Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

SciTech Connect

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

3

A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling  

SciTech Connect

This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy From U.S. WindA; Simonot, E. (2011). The Cost of Wind Energy. Spanish WindUtility Construction Costs: Sources and Impacts. Prepared by

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

Papalambros, Panos

6

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization Genevieve Saur, Todd Ramsden Prepared under...

8

Sandia National Laboratories: reduce wind energy costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wind energy costs DOE Completes Construction of State-of-the-Art Wind Plant Performance Facility On April 17, 2013, in Energy, Events, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

9

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

10

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivered Wind Energy Costs Have Declined Substantially BNEFTable ES-1. Potential Sources of Future Wind Energy Costvii Table 1. Potential Sources of Future Wind Energy Cost

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Life cycle cost analysis of wind power considering stochastic uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a long-term cost analysis of wind power and compares its competitiveness to non-renewable generating technologies. The analysis considers several important attributes related to wind intermittency that are sometimes ignored in traditional generation planning or LCOE (levelized cost of energy) studies, including the need for more nameplate capacity due to intermittency, hourly fluctuations in wind outputs and cost for reserves. The competitiveness of wind power is assessed by evaluating four scenarios: 1) adding natural gas generating capacity to the power grid; 2) adding coal generating capacity to the power grid; 3) adding wind capacity to the power grid; and, 4) adding wind capacity and energy storage to the power grid where an energy storage device is used to cover wind intermittency. A case study in the state of Michigan is presented to demonstrate the use of the proposed methodology, in which a time horizon from 2010 to 2040 is considered. The results show that wind energy will still be more expensive than natural gas power plants in the next three decades, but will be cheaper than coal capacities if wind intermittency is mitigated. Furthermore, if the costs of carbon emissions and environmental externalities are considered, wind generation will be a competitive option for grid capacity expansion.

Chiao-Ting Li; Huei Peng; Jing Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Wind Energy Cost of Wind Energy Review S. Tegen, E. Lantz, M. Hand, B. Maples, A. Smith, and P. Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-56266 March 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review S. Tegen, E. Lantz, M. Hand, B. Maples, A. Smith, and P. Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WE11.1201 Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-56266 March 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

17

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Turbine Design Cost Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model L. Fingersh, M. Hand, and A. Laxson Technical Report NREL/TP-500-40566 December 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model L. Fingersh, M. Hand, and A. Laxson Prepared under Task No. WER6.0703 Technical Report NREL/TP-500-40566 December 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

18

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Wind Energy Cost of Wind Energy Review S. Tegen, M. Hand, B. Maples, E. Lantz P. Schwabe, and A. Smith Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-52920 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review S. Tegen, M. Hand, B. Maples, E. Lantz P. Schwabe, and A. Smith Prepared under Task No. WE11.1201 Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-52920 April 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

19

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Small Wind Guidebook/What Do Wind Systems Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Do Wind Systems Cost What Do Wind Systems Cost < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Do Wind Systems Cost?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

23

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Knowing that reducing the overall cost of wind energy begins on the factory floor, the Wind Program supports R&D efforts and funding opportunities that integrate new designs, materials, and advanced techniques into the manufacturing process, making wind a more affordable source of renewable energy for communities nationwide.

24

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

25

Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

Saur, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but related metric for wind power plant performance, annualwind contracts are among the cheapest deals available, when the cost of building power plants

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 1, Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 1, Final Report Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Dataset, Technical report Website: nrelpubs.nrel.gov/Webtop/ws/nich/www/public/Record?rpp=25&upp=0&m=2&w= Country: Denmark, United States, Spain, Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America, Northern Europe, Western Europe

28

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Tower Systems to develop the Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly optimized design of five custom-shaped legs and interlaced steel struts. With this design, Space Frame towers can support turbines at greater heights, yet weigh and cost less than traditional steel tube towers. Wind Tower Systems LLC (now

32

Will 10 MW Wind Turbines Bring Down the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Offshore Wind Farms?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Larger wind turbines are believed to be advantageous from an investment and installation perspective, since costs for installation and inner cabling are dependent mainly on the number of wind turbines and not their size. Analogously, scaling up the turbines may also be argued to be advantageous from an operation and maintenance (O&M) perspective. For a given total power production of the wind farm, larger wind turbines give a smaller number of individual machines that needs to be maintained and could therefore give smaller O&M costs. However, the O&M costs are directly dependent on how failure rates, spare part costs, and time needed by technicians to perform each maintenance task and will develop for larger wind turbines. A simulation study is carried out with a discrete-event simulation model for the operational phase of an offshore wind farm, comparing the O&M costs of a wind farm consisting of 5 MW turbines with a wind farm consisting of 10 MW turbines. Simulation results confirm that O&M costs decrease when replacing two 5 MW turbines by one 10 MW turbine, if the total production capacity and all other parameters are kept equal. However, whether larger wind turbines can contribute to a reduction of cost of energy from an O&M perspective is first and foremost dependent on how the failure rates and maintenance durations for such wind turbines will develop compared to 5 MW wind turbines. Based on the results of this analysis, it is concluded that higher failure rates and maintenance durations rapidly are counterbalancing the benefits of larger wind turbines.

Matthias Hofmann; Iver Bakken Sperstad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

SciTech Connect

This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

35

Cost of Wind Energy: Comparing Distant Wind Resources to Local Resources in the Midwestern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A general expression of the total savings from reducing the capital costs of developing a wind site with capacity factor CF+?CF, relative to the capital costs of developing the local site with capacity factor CF, is given by eq 1 (see Supporting Information section 1.1 for derivation) where Z is the annual generation requirement (kWh/year), 8670 is the number of hours in a year, WUC is the installed wind capital cost estimate ($/kW), LQCM is the cost multiplier for low quality wind requiring higher hub height (see Section 3.4), CF is the unconstrained capacity factor, ?CF is the increase in unconstrained CF at distant wind site relative to local site, TL is the transmission loss, as a percentage of total wind energy injected into the grid, TC is the transmission constraint, as a percentage of the total wind energy injected into the grid that cannot be delivered because of inadequate transmission capacity, lw is the local wind, and dw is the distant wind. ... Class 1, 2, and 3 turbines are designed for high, medium, and low speed winds, respectively (16). ... From Table 1, the impact of distance on the transmission capacity of high voltage alternating current (HVAC) lines is clear (see Supporting Information section 8). ...

David C. Hoppock; Dalia Patiño-Echeverri

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Decision of the Wind Power Projects Based on Cost-Efficient Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To start from the investment characteristics of wind power projects, account for wind power projects in the life-cycle costs and project income, decision analysis and application of cost-effectiveness of wind pow...

Gao Hong; Gao Wu; Lu Guo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Life-cycle cost analysis of floating offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this article is to put forward a methodology in order to evaluate the Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) of a Floating Offshore Wind Farm (FOWF). In this paper CBS is evaluated linked to Life-Cycle Cost System (LCS) and taking into account each of the phases of the FOWF life cycle. In this sense, six phases will be defined: definition, design, manufacturing, installation, exploitation and dismantling. Each and every one of these costs can be subdivided into different sub-costs in order to obtain the key variables that run the life-cycle cost. In addition, three different floating platforms will be considered: semisubmersible, Tensioned Leg Platform (TLP) and spar. Several types of results will be analysed according to each type of floating platform considered: the percentage of the costs, the value of the cost of each phase of the life-cycle and the value of the total cost in each point of the coast. The results obtained allow us to become conscious of what the most important costs are and minimize them, which is one of the most important contributions nowadays. It will be useful to improve the competitiveness of floating wind farms in the future.

Castro-Santos Laura; Diaz-Casas Vicente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid… (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of Pedestrian-Level Wind in Los Angeles Bruce R. White  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of Pedestrian-Level Wind in Los Angeles Bruce R. White University-level winds within the South Coast Air Basin, a 6,000-square mile area that includes Orange County, most of Los Angeles and Riverside Counties. Working with the city of Los Angeles officials guidelines for wind

White, Bruce

42

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

43

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Larger Turbines and the Future Cost of Wind Energy (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The move to larger turbines has been observed in the United States and around the world. Turbine scaling increases energy capture while reducing general project infrastructure costs and landscape impacts, each of which of can reduce the cost of wind energy. However, scaling in the absence of innovation, can increase turbine costs. The ability of turbine designers and manufacturers to continue to scale turbines, while simultaneously reducing costs, is an important factor in long-term viability of the industry. This research seeks to better understand how technology innovation can allow the continued development of larger turbines on taller towers while also achieving lower cost of energy. Modeling incremental technology improvements identified over the past decade demonstrates that cost reductions on the order of 10%, and capacity factor improvements on the order of 5% (for sites with annual mean wind speed of 7.25 m/s at 50m), are achievable for turbines up to 3.5 MW. However, to achieve a 10% cost reduction and a 10% capacity factor improvement for turbines up to 5 MW, additional technology innovations must be developed and implemented.

Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production...

48

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

49

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O cost of energy (LCOE) [1]. The costs required to keep wind turbines working in extreme temperatures

McCalley, James D.

50

Using ADCP Background Sound Levels to Estimate Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that ambient sound is generated by wind through the process of wave breaking and bubble injection. The resulting sound levels are highly correlated with wind speed and, even though the physical process is not fully understood, ...

Len Zedel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

52

Colorado Wind Resource at 50 Meters Above Ground Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource at 50 Meters Above Ground Level Wind Resource at 50 Meters Above Ground Level Metadata also available as Metadata: Identification_Information Data_Quality_Information Spatial_Data_Organization_Information Spatial_Reference_Information Entity_and_Attribute_Information Distribution_Information Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: AWS TrueWind/NREL Publication_Date: December 2003 Title: Colorado Wind Resource at 50 Meters Above Ground Level Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data Online_Linkage: Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Colorado,

53

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Økonomi (The Economy of Wind Power). EUDP 33033-0196.to the Chapter on Wind Power in Energy TechnologyAgency (DEA). (1999). Wind Power in Denmark: Technologies,

Wiser, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Levelized Cost of Energy in US | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Levelized Cost of Energy in US Home I'd like to pull a cost comparison for the levelized cost of energy in the US. How do I do this on this site? Does the LCOE interactive table...

55

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy." Energy, 32: 1381-1402. Husum WindEnergy (Husum).2008. "WindEnergy Study 2008: Assessment of the Wind EnergyMesse on behalf of Husum WindEnergy. International Energy

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ris-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for Large-scale Off-shore Wind Farms Peter contains a preliminary investigation of site specific design of off- shore wind turbines for a large off using a design tool for wind turbines that involve numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations

57

Offshore Wind Farms – the Impact on Wind Farm Planning and Cost of Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates of planning and construction of new wind farms. Offshore wind farms typically offer the benefits

Jacob Ladeburg; Sanja Lutzeyer

58

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power Denver Post Staff Writer Colorado wind power Page 1 of 3http://eeredev.nrel.gov/greenpower/option.html #12;In a related announcement

59

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of incremental wind development. At the extreme, still otherextreme assumption, the implied unit cost of transmission for windon wind power in their analysis. On one extreme, a number of

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Keeping America Competitive: Bringing Down the Cost of Small Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keeping America Competitive: Bringing Down the Cost of Small Wind Keeping America Competitive: Bringing Down the Cost of Small Wind Turbines Keeping America Competitive: Bringing Down the Cost of Small Wind Turbines January 23, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Bison standing in front of a 10 kW wind turbine manufactured by Bergey Windpower Company. | Photo by Northwest Seed, NREL. Bison standing in front of a 10 kW wind turbine manufactured by Bergey Windpower Company. | Photo by Northwest Seed, NREL. Mark Higgins Operations Supervisor, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office How can I participate? Interested in a small wind turbine for your home? Here's information to guide you. How do we stay competitive in the global wind energy market? A key component is continued leadership in manufacturing small wind turbines - those rated at 100 kilowatts or less.

62

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls 'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power Denver Post Staff Writer Colorado residents could choose between coal plants and windmills for their home electricity source under a plan by Public Service Company of Colorado, the state's largest utility. If enough people want "green energy," PSC will erect small wind plants in eastern Colorado within two years, company president Wayne Brunetti pledged yesterday. The hitch is that the renewable energy could cost up to 40 percent more, he said. The company may offer several pricing levels that would include a portion of renewable energy. The idea will be submitted to the state Public Utilities Commission in 90 days. Green pricing is PSC's first major commitment to promoting renewable energy since

63

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Global Wind Power." Journal of Geophysical2008. "The Economics of Wind Power with Energy Storage."Economics of Large-Scale Wind Power in a Carbon Constrained

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Minimization of Transportation, Installation and Maintenance Operations Costs for Offshore Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although it is a sustainable source and there is abundant potential for energy, cost of energy generated from offshore wind is still high compared to… (more)

Faiz, Tasnim Ibn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the US DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, on held January 17, 2013.

66

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and HydropowerSpeed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” Energy

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” EnergyThe Economics of Wind Energy. ” Renewable and Sustainable

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration,wind resource in which projects are located, as well as development, transmission, integration,

Wiser, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

New Wind Energy Technologies Are Cost-Effective in Federal Applications--Technology Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind energy systems are producing Wind energy systems are producing electricity in some areas of the United States for 5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) or less. As the demand for advanced wind systems increases, wind turbines can be manufactured on a larger scale. This demand, coupled with improvements in the technology, will further reduce the cost of wind- generated electricity. Today, using wind systems to generate electricity can be a cost-effective option for many Federal facilities. This is especially true for facilities that have access to good wind resources and rela- tively high utility costs, and those that depend on diesel power generation. Applications for wind systems are similar to those for solar systems: * Remote communications equipment * Ranger stations * Military installations * Visitor centers and other facilities in

70

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

71

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

72

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind power owners standardized and known payment streams (Mendonca 2007). In other markets in Europe,

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

74

Dispersal of measured sound power levels for wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard IEC 61400?11 provides guidance in the measurement analysis and reporting of acoustic emissions(sound power levels) from wind turbine generator systems. The application of this standard aims to provide accurate results that can be replicated by others. We did several measurement operations according to this standard on various wind farms fitted with many turbine manufacturers on different ground types. Important differences have been noticed with equal working conditions between the most and the less noisy wind turbine on a single farm. We will present these results compared to the manufacturers' guaranteed values and initiate explanations (like the difficulties to link the wind speed at 10m above ground with the wind speed received at hub height; or the influence of wind incidence on blades).

René Gamba; Sébastien Garrigues

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of wind turbine noise levels and impact studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measured A?weighted sound levels at 125?ft distance for individual wind turbines with 20? to 120?kW power ratings are typically in the range 65–75 dB at moderate to high power output conditions (20–30?mph wind speeds). Tonelike sounds in the 300? to 1000?Hz frequency range often are clearly audible. Cyclical fluctuations of 10 dB in low?frequency noise levels are propagated by some downwind?type turbines. The random aerodynamic rotor noisesounds like a roar the gear box noisesounds like a whine and the low?frequency noise fluctuations sound like “thump?thump” or “whoosh?whoosh.” All of these wind turbinenoises are propagated from existing wind farms to residential areas and are judged intrusive and annoying. Measurements and predictions of wind turbinenoise submitted with applications for wind farm development have often contained errors which understated the noise levels by 3–10 dB. These errors were due to noisemeasurements at minimal wind speeds and turbine power and faulty modeling procedures. Simple analytical expressions have been developed which quickly and accurately predict the noise levels for large turbine arrays.

Samuel R. Lane

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in each of the wind energy markets around the globe. Alsoin each of the wind energy markets around the globe. Alsoprice of wind energy in wholesale markets. 13 3.1 Historical

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2)Where Et is the wind technical potential (kWh/year), A is the area of each grid cell (km(2)), ?1 is the availability factor, ?2 is the array efficiency, ? is average installed power density (MW km–2), and ((A?)/(1.5)) represents the number of turbines (1.5 MW GE turbine) in a given grid cell. ... If wind is to play a large role, lower quality wind resources would need to be used, and a bias against the highest speed winds can be less important. ... EEA. Europe’s Onshore and Offshore Wind Energy Potential. ...

Yuyu Zhou; Patrick Luckow; Steven J. Smith; Leon Clarke

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

79

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. ( 2011). 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report. DOE/GO-Ashwill, T. (2008). Technology Improvement Opportunities forWind Power in Denmark: Technologies, Policies, and Results.

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Case study that summarizes the Wind Tower Systems and its Space Frame tower. Describes their new wind tower design and explains how DOE funding made this possible.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Laboratory. Danish Energy Agency (DEA). (1999). Wind2009) and the Danish Energy Agency (DEA) (1999), illustratedata is from the Danish Energy Agency wind turbine

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

New Wind Energy Technologies Are Cost-Effective in Federal Applications--Technology Focus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy systems are producing energy systems are producing electricity in some areas of the United States for 5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) or less. As the demand for advanced wind systems increases, wind turbines can be manufactured on a larger scale. This demand, coupled with improvements in the technology, will further reduce the cost of wind- generated electricity. Today, using wind systems to generate electricity can be a cost-effective option for many Federal facilities. This is especially true for facilities that have access to good wind resources and rela- tively high utility costs, and those that depend on diesel power generation. Applications for wind systems are similar to those for solar systems: * Remote communications equipment * Ranger stations * Military installations * Visitor centers and other facilities in

83

Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Minimizing Wind Power Producer's Balancing Costs Using Electrochemical Energy Storage: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines how electrochemical energy storage can be used to decrease the balancing costs of a wind power producer in the Nordic market. Because electrochemical energy storage is developing in both technological and financial terms, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for the most important variables in the wind-storage hybrid system. The system was studied from a wind power producer's point of view. The main result is that there are no technical limitations to using storage for reducing the balancing costs. However, in terms of economic feasibility, installing hybrid wind-storage systems such as the one studied in this paper faces challenges in both the short and long terms.

Miettinen, J.; Tikka, V.; Lassila, J.; Partanen, J.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind resource class areas could also include limited transmission availability, environmental and wildlife

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

How Does Wind Affect Coal? Cycling, Emissions, and Costs (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes in general fashion what the emissions and economic impacts of wind power generation on fossil power plants looks like and also offers some mitigation ideas.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Milligan, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GW, predominantly from hydropower plants (Table 2). This isIf one excludes large hydropower, however, this figure dropsGeneration Technology Large Hydropower Small Hydropower Wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another.the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another.costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

91

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

93

Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost Effective Use of Wind Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho Power Company (IPC) has developed a Renewables Integration Tool (RIT) that enables grid operators to use wind energy more cost-effectively to serve electricity customers in Idaho and Oregon. The case study on this project is now available.

94

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this type of plant. Scenario A is a cost-balanced approach, where the dollars of grid energy that you purchase equals the amount of wind that you sell back to the grid on a...

95

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

97

A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.  

SciTech Connect

In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

100

Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost-benefit analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost 2004, in which they requested a breakdown of the costs and benefits of 6,000 MW of offshore wind energy sensitivity analyses were carried out: 1. 6,000 MW offshore wind energy, ready in 2020 2. Equivalent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs  

SciTech Connect

In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

103

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Turbine Costs. ” WINDPOWER 2008. Houston, Texas, JuneProject Performance. ” WINDPOWER 2010. Dallas, Texas, May

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluating capital and operating cost efficiency of offshore wind farms: A DEA approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An actual growth rate greater than 30% indicates that offshore wind is a reasonable alternative to other energy sources. The industry today is faced with the challenge of becoming competitive and thus significantly reduce the cost of electricity from offshore wind. This situation implies that the evaluation of costs incurred during development, installation and operation is one of the most pressing issues in this industry at the moment. Unfortunately, actual cost analyses suffer from less resilient input data and the application of simple methodologies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elevate the discussion, providing stakeholders with a sophisticated methodology and representative benchmark figures. The use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) allowed for plants to be modelled as entities and costs to be related to the main specifics, such as distance to shore and water depth, ensuring the necessary comparability. Moreover, a particularly reliable database was established using cost data from annual reports. Offshore wind capacity of 3.6 GW was benchmarked regarding capital and operating cost efficiency, best-practice cost frontiers were determined, and the effects of learning-by-doing and economies of scale were investigated, ensuring that this article is of significant interest for the offshore wind industry.

Nikolaus Ederer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation Pathway LM Glasfiber Blades WindPACT BaselineBlade Data Mass (kg) LM Glasfiber Blades Rotor Radius (m)Innovation Pathway LM Glasfiber Blades TPI Innovative Blade

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation Pathway LM Glasfiber Blades WindPACT BaselineBlade Data Mass (kg) LM Glasfiber Blades Rotor Radius (m)Blade Innovation Pathway LM Glasfiber Blades TPI Innovative

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PLANT U off-shore wind power plants. The MMC consists of a large number of simple voltage sourced converter offshore wind power plants (WPP) because they offer higher energy yield due to a superior wind profile

Chaudhary, Sanjay

109

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost city probably overstates the value of wind energy.wind energy conversion system in the South Bronx in New York City.

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sensitivity Analysis Plant Sensitivity Analysis Abstract NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Tool Sensitivity Analysis and Results Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado Introduction OFFSHORE WINDPOWER 2012, Virginia Beach, October 911, 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PO-5000-56411

111

An enumerative technique for modeling wind power variations in production costing  

SciTech Connect

Production cost, generation expansion, and reliability models are used extensively by utilities in the planning process. Most models do not provide adequate means for representing the full range of potential variation in wind power plants. In order to properly account for expected variation in wind-generated electricity with these models, the authors describe an enumerated probabilistic approach that is performed outside the production cost model, compare it with a reduced enumerated approach, and present some selected utility results. The technique can be applied to any model, and can considerably reduce the number of model runs as compared to the full enumerated approach. They use both a load duration curve model and a chronological model to measure wind plant capacity credit, and also present some other selected results.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Graham, M.S. [Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter Christoph Weber, Chair of Energy Management, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany Rüdiger Barth & Heike Brand, Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy, University of Stuttgart, Germany Abstract

113

EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant – and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Learn more.

114

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Gary Jordan and Sundar Venkataraman GE Energy Schenectady, New York NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-54864 June 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Gary Jordan and Sundar Venkataraman GE Energy Schenectady, New York NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. KLFT-1-11349-01

116

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Towards greener horizontal-axis wind turbines: analysis of carbon emissions, energy and costs at the early design stage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the development of a quantitative analysis system as a platform for rapidly estimate energy, costs and carbon emission to facilitate the comparison of different wind turbine concept designs. This system aimed specifically at wind turbine manufacturing processes due to the fact that a large proportion of the environmental, costs and energy impacts would occur at this stage. The proposed method supports an initial assessment of multiple design concepts which allows the selection and development of a “greener” wind turbine. The developed system enables concept design of commercial wind turbine towers of hub heights between 44 and 135 m. The method supports an accurate estimation in regards to the dimension, energy consumed, maximum power output, costs and carbon emission in the early design phases of a wind turbine. As a result of the development, the proposed approach could potentially be used to minimise the carbon footprints of major engineering projects such as wind farms.

Raymond Aso; Wai Ming Cheung

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. Transmission and Wind Energy: Capturing the Prevailingand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologiesand Renewable Energy Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal... the start of the station has to be decided several hours before delivering output. At the earlier time there is still uncertainty about the future demand, possible failures of power stations and predictions for wind-output. We represent the uncertainty...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

Operating the Irish Power System with Increased Levels of Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating the Irish Power System with Increased Levels of Wind Power Aidan Tuohy, Student Member-- This paper summarises some of the main impacts of large amounts of wind power installed in the island of Ireland. Using results from various studies performed on this system, it is shown that wind power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Toward mitigating wind-uncertainty costs in power system operation: A demand response exchange market framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The intermittent nature of the wind generation poses an obstacle to high penetration of wind energy in electric power systems. Demand response (DR) increases the flexibility of the power system by allowing very fast upward/downward changes in the demand. This potential can be interpreted as the ability to provide fast upward/downward reserves, facilitating the utilization of the wind power in the power system. Demand response exchange (DRX) market is a separate market in which DR is treated as a virtual resource to be exchanged between DR buyers and sellers. The major advantage of the DRX market in comparison to other DR proposals is that it allocates benefits and payments across all participants, fairly. However, there are still obstacles to its integration into the existing power markets. This paper proposes a short-term framework for DRX market that considers the interactions between the DRX market and energy/reserve markets. The proposed framework is aimed at reducing the operational costs incurred by the uncertainty of the wind power and providing a fair mechanism for valuation of the DR as a virtual resource. A stochastic programming model is used to clear the DRX market considering the wind power production scenarios. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed DRX market framework, it is implemented on a simple and a realistic case study.

Javad Saebi; Mohammad Hossein Javidi; Majid Oloomi Buygi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sound power level measurement of Sheng, a Chinese wind instrument  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sheng is one of the Chinese traditional wind instruments. But its sound power level has never been carefully measured. In this paper the sound powermeasurements of Sheng were performed for the first time in a reverberation chamber according to ISO standard and Chinese national standard. Two qualified musicians performed on their own instruments in the center of the reverberation chamber. The radiated sound energy and the dynamic ranges of the Sheng were investigated by four channel acoustic measuring equipments. Typical sound power values were obtained through averaging and the results were reported in this paper. It was showed that the mean forte sound power level can reach up to 98dB with a dynamic range of 22.5dB when music scale was performed. The method discussed here is valuable for the sound powermeasurements of other musical instruments. The measurement of the sound power radiated by national musical instruments lays foundations for the investigation into the acoustics of national music halls.

Yue Zhe Zhao; Shuo Xian Wu; Jian Zhen Qiu; Li Ling Wu; Hong Huang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advancing Wind Integration Study Methodologies: Implications of Higher Levels of Wind  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the evolution of techniques to better model high penetrations (generally, 20% or more energy penetration) of wind energy.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Wan, Y. H.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS Galenthe incremental cost of renewables portfolio standards (RPS)Washington DC have adopted renewables portfolio standards (

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning (Xcel). 2006. Wind Integration Study Report OfTransmission Vision for Wind Integration. White Paper.Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group), Lynn Coles (

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the U.S. DOE’s Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program. Weand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies ProgramManager Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies Energy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy....

128

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

129

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Association WindPower 2002 Conference, 3-5 JunePRESENTED AT GLOBAL WINDPOWER 2004 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS W IND EModel, prepared by Bergey Windpower Co. for the National

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids with high levels of wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Day-ahead load and wind power forecasts provide useful information for operational decision making, but they are imperfect and forecast errors must be offset with operational reserves and balancing of (real time) energy. Procurement of these reserves is of great operational and financial importance in integrating large-scale wind power. We present a probabilistic method to determine net load forecast uncertainty for day-ahead wind and load forecasts. Our analysis uses data from two different electric grids in the US with similar levels of installed wind capacity but with large differences in wind and load forecast accuracy, due to geographic characteristics. We demonstrate that the day-ahead capacity requirements can be computed based on forecasts of wind and load. For 95% day-ahead reliability, this required capacity ranges from 2100 to 5700 MW for ERCOT, and 1900 to 4500 MW for MISO (with 10 GW of installed wind capacity), depending on the wind and load forecast values. We also show that for each MW of additional wind power capacity for ERCOT, 0.16–0.30 MW of dispatchable capacity will be used to compensate for wind uncertainty based on day-ahead forecasts. For MISO (with its more accurate forecasts), the requirement is 0.07–0.13 MW of dispatchable capacity for each MW of additional wind capacity.

Brandon Mauch; Jay Apt; Pedro M S Carvalho; Paulina Jaramillo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4ƒBalance-of-Station Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29950 1 * NREL/SR-500-29950 D.A. Shafer, K.R. Strawmyer, R.M. Conley, J.H. Guidinger, D.C. Wilkie, and T.F. Zellman With assistance from D.W. Bernadett Commonwealth Associates, Inc. Jackson, Michigan WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4- Balance-of-Station Cost 21 March 2000-15 March 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 July 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29950 WindPACT Turbine Desing Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4- Balance-of-Station Cost 21 March 2000-15 March 2001 D.A. Shafer, K.R. Strawmyer, R.M. Conley, J.H. Guidinger, D.C. Wilkie, and T.F. Zellman

132

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Measurements of the source level of ambient noise due to wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the source level of wind?generated ambient noise in the deep ocean are presented for the frequency band 10–350 Hz. The data were obtained using a vertical line array deployed in the deep sound channel at various sites in the Northeast Pacific. The array response was steered vertically upward to measure the local sea surface noise and eliminate distant shipping noise. The beamforming was carried out in the frequency domain using a Kaiser?Bessel window to reduce sidelobe levels. The beam power levels obtained were referenced to a source level at the sea surface using a simple propagation model. The estimated wind noise levels N were fitted to the wind speed v at a specific frequency using a model of the form N = A + 20 n log v. The data indicate two we!l?defined regions with a weak wind?speed dependence at low wind speeds before wave breaking occurs and a stronger dependence at higher wind speeds. The values of n for wind speeds > 10 kn were in the range from 1.1–1.8. The source levels are compared with other measurements reported in the literature.

N. Ross Chapman; James W. Cornish

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise Masahiro Sugiyama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise by Masahiro Sugiyama Bachelor of Science in Earth To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change, the thesis generalizes the sea-level rise cost function originally proposed by Fankhauser, and applies

136

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

SciTech Connect

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Improved Tropical Cyclone Flight-Level Wind Estimates Using Routine Infrared Satellite Reconnaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new and improved method to estimate the tropical cyclone flight-level winds using globally and routinely available tropical cyclone (TC) information and infrared (IR) satellite imagery is presented. The developmental data set is comprised of ...

John A. Knaff; Scott P. Longmore; Robert T. DeMaria; Debra A. Molenar

139

A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the full capacity of the wind power plant at all times. Theto wind projects than to conventional power plants. Thecoal plants) can be leveraged to efficiently move wind power

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Costs for Integrating Wind into the Future ERCOT System with Related Costs for Savings in CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply from wind increased by more than 200% between 2006 and 2009 (Texas now has the largest installed capacity for wind of all of the states in the U.S., reflecting in large measure the incentives introduced by the PUC in 2005 to fund connections of new systems in CREZ to the existing grid). ... The contribution from wind is particularly important in winter when demand is at a seasonal minimum (impacting thus differentially the shape of the residual coal-gas curve to the right of the demand curve in Figure 2b). ... Banunarayanan, V.; Miller, N.; Chahal, A.; Zandt, D. V.; Freeman, L.; Walling, M.; Martinez, J.; Walling, R. A.Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary Services Requirements; GE Energy: Fairfield, Connecticut, March 28, 2008, 2008; p 254. ...

Xi Lu; Michael B. McElroy; Nora A. Sluzas

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Infrasonic?Noise Power Level and Wind?Velocity Correlation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of infrasonic?noise power and analyses of wind?velocity data were made. Correlation was found between infrasonic?noise power levels at a particular location and wind?velocity measurements taken at a distance of approximately 11 miles away. This information is useful for studying infrasonic?signal data improving the signal?to?noise ratio in physical measurements of infrasonic signals and for the selection of sites for infrasonic stations.

Howard S. Bowman

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Wind- versus Eddy-Forced Regional Sea Level Trends and Variability in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional sea level trend and variability in the Pacific Ocean have often been considered to be induced by low-frequency surface wind changes. In this study, we demonstrate that significant sea level trend and variability can also be generated by ...

Bo Qiu; Shuiming Chen; Lixin Wu; Shinichiro Kida

143

Energy Department Announces Funding to Access Higher Quality Wind Resources and Lower Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $2 million to help efficiently harness wind energy using taller towers. These projects will help strengthen U.S. wind turbine component manufacturing, reduce...

144

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Withoutstrategy by allowing wind power to be dispatched down orwind generation in Wyoming, for instance, will initially provide power to

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL/CP-500-35969. Global WindPower Conference. Chicago,Transmission Projects. ” Windpower 2007 Conference. Los

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: The Effects of Wind and Solar Power…Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind and Solar Power- Wind and Solar Power- Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions Results From the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine. Changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding variable renewable generation such as wind and solar power affects the operation of conventional power plants, and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) was initiated to determine the wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts of cycling and to simulate grid operations to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar power on

147

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

148

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied...

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Transparent Cost Database for Generation at Regional Level? ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

however. I was wondering if such data was available at regional (e.g. Electricity markets or states) level. Thank you Naci Submitted by Ndilekli on 28 January, 2014 - 14:19...

152

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Arizona Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study.an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind Powered

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grid. 2006. Trans mission and Wind Energy: Capturing theour sample. 20% Wind Energy: Wind Deployment System (WinDS)and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

155

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

Marzeion, Ben

157

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities' Carbon Emissions and Fuel Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2), a follow-up to the initial WWSIS released in May 2010, which examined the viability, benefits, and challenges of integrating as much as 33% wind and solar power into the electricity grid of the western United States.

160

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

Robichaud, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

163

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Cost of Storage – How to Calculate the Levelized Cost of Stored Energy (LCOE) and Applications to Renewable Energy Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides a new framework for the calculation of levelized cost of stored energy. The framework is based on the relations for photovoltaics amended by new parameters. Main outcomes are the high importance of the C rate and the less dominant role of the roundtrip efficiency. The framework allows for comparisons between different storage technologies. The newly developed framework model is applied to derive the LCOE for a PV and storage combined power plant. The derived model enables quick comparison of combined PV and storage power plants with other forms of energy generation, for example diesel generation. This could prove helpful in the current discussion about diesel substitution in off-grid applications. In general, the combined levelized cost of energy lies between the LCOE of PV and LCOE of storage.

Ilja Pawel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Balancing Performance, Noise, Cost, and Aesthetics in the Southwest Windpower "Storm" Wind Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of an 1800-watt innovative small wind turbine and discusses the importance of idiosyncratic aerodynamic and aeroacoustic airfoil characteristics for clean airfoils at low Reynolds numbers.

Migliore, P.; Green, J.; Calley, D.; Lonjaret, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003-2006 Date Study Xcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacitybeen a considerable 2004 Xcel-MNDOC na na amount of analysisconcerns about whether the 2006 Xcel-PSCo na electrical grid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

Suo, Zhigang

168

Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction improves the metabolic energy cost of level walking at customary speeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The metabolic energy cost of walking is altered by pathological changes ... anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency alters the energy requirement for level walking through its effect ... study, it is hypothes...

Mehmet Colak; Irfan Ayan; Ugur Dal…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost ($/MWh) Regulation Load Following Unit Commitment Gas31 Regulation and load-following impacts are generally found

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development of a low-cost bi-axial intensity-based optical fibre accelerometer for wind turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A bi-axial optical fibre accelerometer was developed for wind turbine monitoring. The sensor was fabricated from intensity-modulated optical fibre, which is low-cost, lightweight and simple in design. The bi-axial acceleration was measured by light intensity coupling between a cantilever fibre and two receiving fibres. Numerical simulation was performed to obtain the light coupling characteristics and the results were used to design the sensor parameters. A prototype was fabricated and the calibration scheme validated experimentally. The performance of the prototype was tested in terms of frequency response and linearity.

Yao Ge; Kevin S. Kuang; Ser Tong Quek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards  

SciTech Connect

Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Low-Cost System for Measuring Horizontal Winds from Single-Engine Aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation and accuracy of a low-rate (~1 Hz) horizontal wind measurement system is described for a fixed-wing aircraft without modification to the airframe. The system is based on a global positioning system (GPS) compass that provides ...

Stephen A. Conley; Ian C. Faloona; Donald H. Lenschow; Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind turbine prices in the United States have declined, on average, by nearly one-third since 2008, after doubling from 2002 through 2008. Over this entire period, the average nameplate capacity rating, hub height, and rotor swept area of turbines installed in the United States have increased significantly, while other design improvements have also boosted turbine energy production. In combination, these various trends have had a significant-and sometimes surprising-impact on the levelized cost of energy delivered by wind projects. This webinar will feature three related presentations that explore these

176

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEC). 2008. Form 10-K: Xcel Energy Inc. http://www.sec.gov/cost of transmission proposed in Xcel Energy 2001). SouthernApril. http://www.ftloutreach.com Xcel Energy Transmission

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

How Do High Levels of Wind and Solar Impact the Grid? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a brief introduction to the scope of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), inputs and scenario development, and the key findings of the study.

Lew, D.; Piwko, D.; Miller, N.; Jordan, G.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparative life-cycle cost analysis for low-level mixed waste remediation alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to develop a generic, life-cycle cost model for evaluating low-level, mixed waste remediation alternatives, and (2) to apply the model specifically, to estimate remediation costs for a site similar to the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, OH. Life-cycle costs for vitrification, cementation, and dry removal process technologies are estimated. Since vitrification is in a conceptual phase, computer simulation is used to help characterize the support infrastructure of a large scale vitrification plant. Cost estimating relationships obtained from the simulation data, previous cost estimates, available process data, engineering judgment, and expert opinion all provide input to an Excel based spreadsheet for generating cash flow streams. Crystal Ball, an Excel add-on, was used for discounting cash flows for net present value analysis. The resulting LCC data was then analyzed using multi-attribute decision analysis techniques with cost and remediation time as criteria. The analytical framework presented allows alternatives to be evaluated in the context of budgetary, social, and political considerations. In general, the longer the remediation takes, the lower the net present value of the process. This is true because of the time value of money and large percentage of the costs attributed to storage or disposal.

Jackson, J.A.; White, T.P.; Kloeber, J.M.; Toland, R.J.; Cain, J.P.; Buitrago, D.Y.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

180

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Costs of Solar and Wind Power Variability for Reducing CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our research differs from earlier solar PV studies because we use real power output data from operational utility-scale plants to calculate the variability and cost of variability. ... In addition, the ISO utilizes up and down regulation equivalent to the minimum and maximum deviation from qh, respectively (lower right graph). ... (9) The Docket states that ISOs may use the same rate they charge utilities for load variability in Schedule 3. FERC envisions that individual transmission utilities can apply to charge different rates as long as they “demonstrate that the per-unit cost of regulation reserve capacity is somehow different when such capacity is utilized to address system variability associated with generator resources”. ...

Colleen Lueken; Gilbert E. Cohen; Jay Apt

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

500 and 230 kV 765 kV and 800 kV HVDC 500 and 230 kV 500 kVmi) 138 and 345 kV 345 kV 345 kV 345 kV and HVDC 345kV and HVDC 345 kV 345 kV Note: Total transmission cost is

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

LBNL/NREL Analysis Predicts Record Low LCOE for Wind Energy in 2012-2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A recent analysis conducted by the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) suggests that lower capital costs and continued increases in wind turbine productivity will drive down the levelized cost of wind energy for U.S. wind projects constructed in 2012 – 2013.

185

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet). Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development potential from wind power installations has beendevelopment potential of wind power projects, however,is whether new investment in wind power projects stimulates

Brown, Jason P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

Myrent, Noah J. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Kusnick, Joshua F. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Barrett, Natalie C. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Adams, Douglas E. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Griffith, Daniel Todd

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

COST EFFECTIVE SIMULATION OF THE HYBRID SOLAR/WIND AND DIESEL ENERGY SYSTEM IN RURAL AREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the optimization of a hybrid energy system model. Currently in Sarawak people living in the rural areas still depend on diesel generators to generate electricity. This increases the demand for fossil fuel creates noise pollution and toxic gas is emitted to the environment. Hence hybrid energy systems were introduced to replace this conventional energy system as well as improving the living standard in the villages. In this paper several hybrid energy system configurations were investigated in order to find out the most cost effective hybrid system through Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewability (Homer) software. Homer simulates optimizes and analyzes the sensitivity variables for each of the system configurations.

Ee. Y. Sim; Nader Barsoum

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Levelized costs of electricity and direct-use heat from Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOPHIRES (GEOthermal energy for the Production of Heat and Electricity (“IR”) Economically Simulated) is a software tool that combines reservoir wellbore and power plant models with capital and operating cost correlations and financial levelized cost models to assess the technical and economic performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). It is an upgrade and expansion of the “MIT-EGS” program used in the 2006 “Future of Geothermal Energy” study. GEOPHIRES includes updated cost correlations for well drilling and completion resource exploration and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and flash power plants. It also has new power plant efficiency correlations based on AspenPlus and MATLAB simulations. The structure of GEOPHIRES enables feasibility studies of using geothermal resources not only for electricity generation but also for direct-use heating and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. Full documentation on GEOPHIRES is provided in the supplementary material. Using GEOPHIRES the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and the levelized cost of heat (LCOH) have been estimated for 3 cases of resource grade (low- medium- and high-grade resource corresponding to a geothermal gradient of 30 50 and 70?°C/km) in combination with 3 levels of technological maturity (today's mid-term and commercially mature technology corresponding to a productivity of 30 50 and 70?kg/s per production well and thermal drawdown rate of 2% 1.5% and 1%). The results for the LCOE range from 4.6 to 57 ¢/kWhe and for the LCOH from 3.5 to 14 $/MMBTU (1.2 to 4.8 ¢/kWhth). The results for the base-case scenario (medium-grade resource and mid-term technology) are 11 ¢/kWhe and 5 $/MMBTU (1.7 ¢/kWhth) respectively. To account for parameter uncertainty a sensitivity analysis has been included. The results for the LCOE and LCOH have been compared with values found in literature for EGS as well as other energy technologies. The key findings suggest that given today's technology maturity electricity and direct-use heat from EGS are not economically competitive under current market conditions with other energy technologies. However with moderate technological improvements electricity from EGS is predicted to become cost-effective with respect to other renewable and non-renewable energy sources for medium- and high-grade geothermal resources. Direct-use heat from EGS is calculated to become cost-effective even for low-grade resources. This emphasizes that EGS for direct-use heat may not be neglected in future EGS development.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wind energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbines—low level noise sources interfering with restoration? Eja Pedersen and Kerstin Persson Waye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece George Caralis, Yiannis Perivolaris, Konstantinos Rados and Arthouros Zervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake A Jimenez, A Crespo, E Migoya and J Garcia How to improve the estimation of

Jakob Mann; Jens Nørkær Sørensen; Poul-Erik Morthorst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

connection costs associated with renewable energy in Europeand costs for renewables electricity grid connection: Examples in Europe. Renewable Energyrenewable energy zones (CREZs), for instance, estimated the cost

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cost-effectiveness of recommended nurse staffing levels for short-stay skilled nursing facility patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anonymous: Employer Costs for Employee Compensation--BioMed Central Open Access Cost-effectiveness of recommendeddiagnoses. However, the cost-effectiveness of increasing

Ganz, David A; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Investigation of Wind Turbine Rotor Concepts for Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current plans in offshore wind energy developments call for further reduction of cost of energy. In order to contribute to this goal, several wind turbine rotor concepts have been investigated. Assuming the future offshore wind turbines will operate only in the offshore wind farms, the rotor concepts are not only evaluated for their stand-alone performances and their potential in reducing the loads, but also for their performance in an offshore wind farm. In order to do that, the 10MW reference wind turbine designed in Innwind.EU project is chosen as baseline. Several rotor parameters have been modified and their influences are investigated for offshore wind turbine design purposes. This investigation is carried out as a conceptual parametrical study. All concepts are evaluated numerically with BOT (Blade optimisation tool) software in wind turbine level and with Farmflow software in wind farm level for two wind farm layouts. At the end, all these concepts are compared with each other in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

Özlem Ceyhan; Francesco Grasso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modelling and control of a variable speed wind turbine driving doubly fed induction generator using three-level PWM converter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this researcher is to develop a complete wind central model driven doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) which feeds an AC power grid. For that, two-pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage converters are connected back to back between the rotor terminals of DFIG and the utility grid via a common DC link, in there, our contribution will appear in the utilisation of three levels voltage inverters in order to ameliorate the energy quality. The simulation was carried out on a 2 MW wind-turbine driven DFIG system and the developed unified model validity and the proposed control strategies feasibility are all confirmed by the simulated results.

Fairouz Kendouli; Khoudir Abed; Khalil Nabti; Hocine Benalla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

197

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplementalThe value of compressed air energy storage with wind inresources and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Energy

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Offshore Wind Accelerator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Accelerator Place: United Kingdom Sector: Wind energy Product: Research and development initiative aimed at cutting the cost of offshore wind energy. References:...

199

Simulation of Offshore Wind Turbine Link to the Electric Grid through a Four-Level Converter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is on the modulation of offshore wind energy conversion systems with full-power converter and permanent magnet synchronous generator with an AC link. The drive train considered in this paper is a th...

Mafalda Seixas; Rui Melício…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Impact of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind on Transmission-Level System Operations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new renewable integration study that aims to assess the potential for adding distributed wind to the current power system with minimal or no upgrades to the distribution or transmission electricity systems. It investigates the impacts of integrating large amounts of utility-scale distributed wind power on bulk system operations by performing a case study on the power system of the Independent System Operator-New England (ISO-NE).

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years. #12;Reading on ESRP 285 Website #12;The Competition: Gas-Fired Generation from a Combined CycleESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind (CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;Bottom

Ford, Andrew

202

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

203

NREL: Wind Research - Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wind turbine research addresses performance and reliability issues that large wind turbines experience throughout their lifespan and reduces system costs through innovative...

204

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) ofEnergy and the Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program OfficeRenewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind turbine equipment-related costs are assumed to equal 85% of 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report periods to further avoid “noise”

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , 2009. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report . DOE/GO-Reports.htm Quanta Technology, LLC. 2008. F inal Report onpublications/Quanta_Technology_March_2_2008_Update_to_the_

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind with transmission alternative 7b (500 kV AC line fromkV line CAISO - A4 Central California Clean Energy TransmissionTransmission Line: Transmission Development Facilities Application Volume One MATL New 230 kV

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

Sonnet, Maria Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plume dispersion sensitivity to upper-level wind variations in a Chilean coastal environment  

SciTech Connect

Government and industry leaders in Chile are concerned with the impact of coastal smelter emissions on the air quality of surrounding communities and the inland capitol city of Santiago. The smelter emissions contain large amounts of sulfur and heavy metals. Because several large smelters are located along the coast, an air quality modeling system must be able to handle flow in both a coastal and mountainous environment. Linked seabreeze and mountain-induced slope flows which change in time and space have been best handled using prognostic numerical models. We are using a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model (HOTMAC - Higher-Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulation) linked to a random walk/puff model (RAPTAD - Random Particle Transport and Dispersion) in order to simulate plume transport over hundreds of kilometers. In this paper, we test the sensitivity of plume dispersion to variations in the prescribed wind direction. These tests were motivated by our desire to evaluate the effect of the uncertainties inherent in rawinsonde wind measurements and large-scale weather wind-field forecasts, which are often used as input to meteorological models, as well as to develop a climatology of plume transport direction based on prevailing wind direction.

Michael J. Brown; Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 4: Transmission and Integration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

costs would be generally less than 10% wholesale cost of energy Date Study Wind Capacity Penetration (%) Regulation Cost (MWh) Load Following Cost (MWh) Unit Commit- ment Cost...

211

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the technical performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) funded during FY 1979 by the U.S. Department of Energy. Chapter 1 gives an analytic framework with which to evaluate the systems. Chapter 2 consists of a review of each of the nine projects, including project technical overviews, estimates of energy savings, and results of economic analysis. Chapter 3 summarizes technical, economic, and institutional barriers that are likely to inhibit widespread dissemination of SWECS technology.

Kay, J.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERCOT (Brown 2012). Wind power plants with negative offersThermal Power Plants Under Increasing Wind Energy Supply. ”power plants that, among other benefits, lowers the costs of integrating wind

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Wind Energy Markets, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the global market for wind energy, including a concise look at wind energy development in key markets including installations, government incentives, and market trends. Topics covered include: an overview of wind energy including the history of wind energy production and the current market for wind energy; key business drivers of the wind energy market; barriers to the growth of wind energy; key wind energy trends and recent developments; the economics of wind energy, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; regional and national analyses of major wind energy markets; and, profiles of key wind turbine manufacturers.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

215

Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologies to Reduce Levelized Cost of Electricity for Hydrothermal Development and EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Geothermal Technologies Program seeks non-prime mover technologies that have the potential to contribute to reducing the levelized cost of electricity from new hydrothermal development to 6¢/ kWh by 2020 and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) to 6¢/ kWh by 2030.

217

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEC). 2008. Form 10-K: Xcel Energy Inc. http://www.sec.gov/cost of transmission proposed in Xcel Energy 2001). SouthernApril. http://www.ftloutreach.com Xcel Energy Transmission

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

California and Washington: Utilities Receive Honors for Innovative Wind Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Public Power Wind Award winners' efforts lower energy costs and enable utilities to use wind power more reliably.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

222

Flapping wing applied to wind generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The new conditions at the international level for energy source distributions and the continuous increasing of energy consumption must lead to a new alternative resource with the condition of keeping the environment clean. This paper offers a new approach for a wind generator and is based on the theoretical aerodynamic model. This new model of wind generator helped me to test what influences would be if there will be a bird airfoil instead of a normal wind generator airfoil. The aim is to calculate the efficiency for the new model of wind generator. A representative direction for using the renewable energy is referred to the transformation of wind energy into electrical energy with the help of wind turbines; the development of such systems lead to new solutions based on high efficiency reduced costs and suitable to the implementation conditions.

Alexandra Colidiuc; Stelian Galetuse; Bogdan Suatean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm Simulation Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Researchers at DOE's Argonne National Laboratory are developing a computational simulation tool to conduct studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy. Simulations on a wind-plant-scale require accurate simultaneous resolution of multiple flow scales, from mesoscale weather to turbine-blade scale turbulence, which presents special demands on the computational solver efficiency and requires extreme scalability.

224

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study, Volume I,"M. Schuerger, "Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Empirical Analysis of the Variability of Wind Generation in India: Implications for Grid Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations: A Review of Wind Integration Studies to Date. ”Analysis of Impacts of Wind Integration in the Tamil Nadu2009. “Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind

Phadke, Amol

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102009-2918 October 2009 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on an earlier draft of

227

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

228

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Economics: Past, Present, Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind turbine prices in the United States have declined, on average, by nearly one-third since 2008, after doubling from 2002 through 2008. Over this entire period, the average nameplate capacity rating, hub height, and rotor swept area of turbines installed in the United States have increased significantly, while other design improvements have also boosted turbine energy production. In combination, these various trends have had a significant-and sometimes surprising-impact on the levelized cost of energy delivered by wind projects. This webinar will feature three related presentations that explore these

229

Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power  

SciTech Connect

Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tax SIR Private after-tax SIR IX: Wind Electricity in thetax SIR Private after-tax SIR V: Wind Electricity Generationtax SIR Private after-tax SIR VI: Wind Electricity at the

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis-land-use related permits. Wind Energy Report (May 1981) p.2.R. Cappelli, B. Dawley, I. Wind Energy Conversion System

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

233

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Improvement Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006 J. Cohen and T. Schweizer Princeton Energy Resources International (PERI) Rockville, Maryland A. Laxson, S. Butterfield, S. Schreck, and L. Fingersh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Veers and T. Ashwill Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Technical Report NREL/TP-500-41036 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

234

NREL: Wind Research - WindPACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindPACT WindPACT The Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technology (WindPACT) studies were conducted to assist industry by testing innovative components, such as advanced blades and drivetrains, to lower the cost of energy. Specific goals included: Foster technological advancements to reduce the cost of wind energy Determine probable size ranges of advanced utility-scale turbines over the next decade for U.S. application Evaluate advanced concepts that are necessary to achieve objectives of cost and size for future turbines Identify and solve technological hurdles that may block industry from taking advantage of promising technology Design, fabricate, and test selected advanced components to prove their viability Support wind industry through transfer of technology from

235

U.S. Wind Power Development  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of domestic wind power development which provides an understanding of where the industry stands today, how it got there, and where it is going. The advent of state renewable portfolio standards and the 3-year renewal of the production tax credit have driven wind power to record levels. A key objective of the report is to provide a comprehensive view of what is behind these developments, so that industry participants can take advantage of the opportunity offered by wind power. Topics covered include: overview of U.S. wind power including its history, current status, and future prospects; business drivers of the U.S. wind power market; barriers to the growth of the U.S. wind power market; keys to successful wind power project development; economics of U.S. wind power, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; analysis of key state markets for wind power development; and, profiles of major U.S. wind power project developers.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost Effective Use of Wind Power Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost Effective Use of Wind Power...

237

CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

Firestone, Jeremy

238

Measurement of the underwater noise levels generated from marine piling associated with the installation of offshore wind turbines.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine piling is the most commonly used method for the installation of offshore wind turbines in the shallow coastal waters in the UK and consists of steel mono?piles being driven into the seabed using powerful hydraulic hammers. This is a source of impulsive sound of potentially high level that can travel a considerable distance in the water column and has the potential for impact on marine life. This presentation describes methodologies developed for measurement of marine piling and for the estimation of the energy source level. Measurements are presented for piles of typically 5 m in diameter driven by hammers with typical strike energies of 1000 kJ. Data were recorded as a function of range from the source using vessel?deployed hydrophones and using fixed acoustic buoys that recorded the entire piling sequence including soft start. The methodology of measurement is described along with the method of estimation of the energy source level. Limitations and knowledge gaps are discussed.

Pete D. Theobald; Stephen P. Robinson; Michael A. Ainslie; Christ A. F. de Jong; Paul A. Lepper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Wind Program Accomplishments | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of wind technologies on land and offshore. Wind Accomplishments.pdf More Documents & Publications Securing Clean, Domestic,...

240

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 7.3 Renewable Energy CostResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterizationassumptions affecting renewable energy costs are often not

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential, Energy Citations Database Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants, DOE Information Bridge 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind, ScienceCinema, multimedia Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the

243

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wave energy using GIS based analysis: The case study of Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this paper is to establish an economic modelling of wave energy through a Geographical Information System (GIS). Furthermore, this method has been tested for the particular case of the Portuguese coast. It determines the best sea areas to install wave energy converters in this region, using spatial analysis of the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). Several economic parameters, as capital or O&M costs, have been considered. In addition, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by varying the discount rate in three different scenarios. Several types of physical restrictions have been taken into account: bathymetry, submarine electrical cables, seabed geology, environmental conditions, protected areas in terms of heritage, navigation areas, seismic fault lines, etc. Spatial operations have been carried out to complete the procedure, using Model Builder of GIS software. Results indicate the most suitable areas in economic terms in Portugal to install wave energy devices.

Laura Castro-Santos; Geuffer Prado Garcia; Ana Estanqueiro; Paulo A.P.S. Justino

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Predicting underwater radiated noise levels due to the first offshore wind turbine installation in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noise generated by offshore impact pile driving radiates into the air water and sediment. Predicting noise levels around the support structures at sea is required to estimate the effects of the noise on marine life. Based on high demands developing renewable energy source the United States will begin the first pile driving within one to two years. It is necessary to investigate acoustic impact using our previously verified coupled Finite Element (Commercial FE code Abaqus) and Monterey Miami Parabolic Equation (2D MMPE) models [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131(4) 3392 (2012)]. In the present study we developed a new coupled FE-MMPE model for the identification of zone of injury due to offshore impact pile driving. FE analysis produced acoustic pressure outputs on the surface of the pile which are used as a starting field for a long range 2D MMPE propagation model. It calculates transmission loss for N different azimuthal directions as function of distance from the location of piling with the inputs of corresponding bathymetry and sediment properties. We will present predicted zone of injury by connecting N different distances of equivalent level fishes may get permanent injury due to the first offshore wind farm installation in the United States.

James H. Miller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Predicting underwater radiated noise levels due to the first offshore wind turbine installation in the U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noise generated by offshore impact pile driving radiates into the air water and sediment. Predicting noise levels around the support structures at sea is required to estimate the effects of the noise on marine life. Based on high demands developing renewable energy source the United States will begin the first pile driving within one to two years. It is necessary to investigate acoustic impact using our previously verified coupled Finite Element (Commercial FE code Abaqus) and Monterey Miami Parabolic Equation (2D MMPE) models (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131(4) p. 3392 2012). In the present study we developed a new coupled FE-MMPE model for the identification of zone of injury due to offshore impact pile driving. FE analysis produced acoustic pressure outputs on the surface of the pile which are used as a starting field for a long range 2D MMPE propagation model. It calculates transmission loss for N different azimuthal directions as function of distance from the location of piling with the inputs of corresponding bathymetry and sediment properties. We will present predicted zone of injury by connecting N different distances of equivalent level fishes may get permanent injury due to the first offshore wind farm installation in the U.S..

Huikwan Kim; James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NREL: Wind Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's wind energy research and development projects focus on reducing the cost of wind technology and expanding access to wind energy sites. Our specialized technical expertise, comprehensive design and analysis tools, and unique testing facilities help industry overcome challenges to bringing new wind technology to the marketplace. Some of these success stories are described in NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories. We also work closely with universities and other national laboratories supporting fundamental research in wind technologies, including aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, and material sciences essential in the development of new blade technologies and advanced controls, power electronics, and testing to further refine drivetrain topology.

250

Coastal Ohio Wind Project  

SciTech Connect

The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Reduced Form of Detailed Modeling of Wind Transmission and Intermittency for Use in Other ModelsReduced Form of Detailed Modeling of Wind Transmission and Intermittency for Use in Other Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPPLY CURVE FOR ONE-REGION MODEL SUPPLY CURVE FOR ONE-REGION MODEL Figure 7 is the final supply curve to be used in a one-region model, plotted as the sum of the major drivers (described below). * Wind Capital represents the difference in cost of the wind capacity installed in the one-region model and the WinDS model. The level increases because WinDS requires a greater wind capacity for the same wind generation than the one-region model. This is because:

252

Capacity allocation of a hybrid energy storage system for power system peak shaving at high wind power penetration level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High wind power penetration in power system leads to a significant challenge in balancing power production and consumption due to the intermittence of wind. Introducing energy storage system in wind energy system can help offset the negative effects, and make the wind power controllable. However, the power spectrum density of wind power outputs shows that the fluctuations of wind energy include various components with different frequencies and amplitudes. This implies that the hybrid energy storage system is more suitable for smoothing out the wind power fluctuations effectively rather than the independent energy storage system. In this paper, we proposed a preliminary scheme for capacity allocation of hybrid energy storage system for power system peak shaving by using spectral analysis method. The unbalance power generated from load dispatch plan and wind power outputs is decomposed into four components, which are outer-day, intra-day, short-term and very short-term components, by using Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and spectral decomposition method. The capacity allocation can be quantified according to the information in these components. The simulation results show that the power rating and energy rating of hybrid energy storage system in partial smoothing mode decrease significantly in comparison with those in fully smoothing mode.

Pan Zhao; Jiangfeng Wang; Yiping Dai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

MAPping Foehn Winds in the Austrian Alps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the flow above mountain-top level 3. Study the vertical and cross-gap distribution of wind speed-valley horizontal wind speed ("measured") vertical wind speed (calculated) total wind speed & streamlines -20 -10 0 October 1999 ­ TEACO2 calculated 2D winds down-valley horizontal wind speed ("measured") vertical wind

Gohm, Alexander

254

Parametric design of floating wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price of energy increases and wind turbine technology matures, it is evident that cost effective designs for floating wind turbines are needed. The next frontier for wind power is the ocean, yet development in near ...

Tracy, Christopher (Christopher Henry)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

user. An oil-based avoided cost although by thus providesoil costs as a measure of avoided costs. base If coal costssale, so-called avoided costs. * In fact, the implementation

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 * November 2010 5 * November 2010 Energy transfer improvements from the 10-kW wind turbine tested by NREL. The graph shows successive improvement, including the latest preliminary third generation improvement in the green shaded area. Increased Energy Transfer: NREL continues to improve energy transfer from a 10-kW solar PV array, comparing directly coupling the PV array to the electrolyzer stack with a connection through a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) power electronics package designed at NREL. The experimental testing (above) revealed that direct coupling outperformed power electronics when solar irradiance levels are below 500 W/m 2 while the MPPT power converter delivered more energy to the stacks between 500 and 1,100 W/m 2 . These findings

257

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in improving energy transfer within a wind turbine-based hydrogen production system. Work was performed by the Wind2H2 Project team at the National Wind Technology Center in partnership with Xcel Energy.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

259

NREL: Wind Research - NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs March 22, 2013 Wind energy research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the last decade has earned the lab two patents, one for adaptive pitch control and one for a resonance blade test system that will ultimately help its industry partners increase the efficiency of wind technologies and reduce the cost of wind energy. The most recent patent for adaptive pitch control for variable-speed wind turbines was granted in May 2012. Variable-speed wind turbines use rotor blade pitch control to regulate rotor speed at the high wind speed limit. Although manufacturers and operators have been interested in developing a nominal pitch to improve

260

Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

Multiple

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modest. When these electricity cost impacts are combinedcould reduce consumer electricity costs by 5.2% (-0.4 ¢/kWh)base-case direct RPS electricity cost impacts (which do not

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress. WA: 15% by 2020 MN (Xcel): 825 MW wind by 2007 +policies. In addition to Xcel’s renewable energy mandate,

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

WINDExchange Wind Energy Benefits Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs. Learn more about the pros and cons of wind energy.

264

The impact of Production Tax Credits on the profitable production of electricity from wind in the U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A spatial financial model using wind data derived from assimilated meteorological condition was developed to investigate the profitability and competitiveness of onshore wind power in the contiguous U.S. It considers not only the resulting estimated capacity factors for hypothetical wind farms but also the geographically differentiated costs of local grid connection. The levelized cost of wind-generated electricity for the contiguous U.S. is evaluated assuming subsidy levels from the Production Tax Credit (PTC) varying from 0 to 4 ¢/kWh under three cost scenarios: a reference case, a high cost case, and a low cost case. The analysis indicates that in the reference scenario, current PTC subsidies of 2.1 ¢/kWh are at a critical level in determining the competitiveness of wind-generated electricity compared to conventional power generation in local power market. Results from this study suggest that the potential for profitable wind power with the current PTC subsidy amounts to more than seven times existing demand for electricity in the entire U.S. Understanding the challenges involved in scaling up wind energy requires further study of the external costs associated with improvement of the backbone transmission network and integration into the power grid of the variable electricity generated from wind.

Xi Lu; Jeremy Tchou; Michael B. McElroy; Chris P. Nielsen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sandia National Laboratories: Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProgramsAnalysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 The "20% Wind Energy by...

266

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utilities in California and Washington Receive Honors for Innovative Wind Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Public Power Wind Award winners' efforts lower energy costs and enable utilities to use wind power more reliably.

268

Emerald PUD Wind Power Solicitation, Deadline July 14, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerald PUD Wind Power Solicitation Emerald PUD Wind Power Solicitation June 20, 2003 Background: Emerald is interested in purchasing wind power through a Purchase Power Agreement or through ownership. While our aim is to gain the cost advantage of the PTC or REPI, we are concerned that REPI with its current configuration and funding level may be risky and may not add equivalent value over the life of the project. We are interested in proposals that can begin to deliver wind power now or within the next couple of years. Our thinking is that our wind power would come from part of larger wind project, thus gaining the economies of scale. If a PPA is proposed, we are interested in an ownership option at the end of the contract term, and ask that PPA proposers discuss this option in as much detail

269

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable) costs apply

Boisvert, Jeff

270

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408 ­ off-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable

Boisvert, Jeff

271

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to purchase and install an Enertech 1500 wind an elevationabout $100 annually. The Enertech 1500 that would have beenthan by the utility. Enertech estimates that a similarly

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NREL: Wind Research - Grid Integration of Offshore Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Photograph of a wind turbine in the ocean. Located about 10 kilometers off the coast of Arklow, Ireland, the Arklow Bank offshore wind park consists of seven GE Wind 3.6-MW wind turbines. Much can be learned from the existing land-based integration research for handling the variability and uncertainty of the wind resource. Integration and Transmission One comprehensive grid integration study is the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), in which offshore wind scenarios were analyzed. Nearly 80 GW of offshore wind was studied in the highest penetration scenario. Specific offshore grid distribution and transmission solutions were identified, including cost estimates. With the Atlantic coast likely to lead the way in offshore wind power deployment, EWITS is a benchmark for

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - american large wind Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

installation capacity, growth rate, costs of wind power, small versus large wind turbines, and onshore ver- sus... strategies. Many large wind power generation facilities...

274

Wind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Wind Wind EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost-competitive with traditional sources of energy. EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost-competitive with traditional sources of energy. Image of a wind turbine against a partly cloudy sky. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads national efforts to improve the performance, lower the costs, and accelerate the deployment of wind energy technologies-both on

275

What economic support is needed for Arctic offshore wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind power is increasingly being installed in cold climates and in offshore locations. It is generally recognised that installing wind power to offshore locations is more expensive than onshore. The additional challenges from Arctic conditions with annual sea icing are still poorly known. We reviewed the existing knowledge of offshore wind power costs and developed a calculation model for the economics of offshore wind turbines in Finland, including taxes and sea base rent, to obtain a base case for determining the required tariff support. The model was tested with different production and cost rates to obtain a tariff price, which would make offshore wind power on Finnish territory economically viable for the producer. The main developers of planned offshore projects in Finland were interviewed to obtain a comparison between the created model and industry expectations. The cost of erected turbines was estimated to be 2750 €/kW. With this cost of capacity, it was clear that a higher than the current tariff price (83.5 €/MWh) will be required for offshore developments. Our analysis indicated a price level of about 115 €/MWh to be required. We found that even rather small changes in cost or production rates may lead to excess profits or economic losses and further research and pilot projects are required to define a more reliable tariff level.

Olli Salo; Sanna Syri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nebraska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Wind Resources Nebraska/Wind Resources < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nebraska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

277

Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alabama Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

278

Florida/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Wind Resources Florida/Wind Resources < Florida Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Florida Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

279

Vermont/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Wind Resources Vermont/Wind Resources < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Vermont Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

280

Wisconsin/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin/Wind Resources Wisconsin/Wind Resources < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wisconsin Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Idaho/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Wind Resources Idaho/Wind Resources < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Idaho Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

282

Missouri/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Wind Resources Missouri/Wind Resources < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Missouri Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

283

Iowa/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Wind Resources Iowa/Wind Resources < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Iowa Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

284

Maryland/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Wind Resources Maryland/Wind Resources < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maryland Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

285

Massachusetts/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Wind Resources Massachusetts/Wind Resources < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Massachusetts Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

286

Minnesota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Wind Resources Minnesota/Wind Resources < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Minnesota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

287

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources Pennsylvania/Wind Resources < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Pennsylvania Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

288

Hawaii/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Wind Resources Hawaii/Wind Resources < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Hawaii Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

289

Alaska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alaska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

290

Wyoming/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources Wyoming/Wind Resources < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wyoming Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

291

Nevada/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Wind Resources Nevada/Wind Resources < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nevada Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

292

Kansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Wind Resources Kansas/Wind Resources < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

293

Washington/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Wind Resources Washington/Wind Resources < Washington Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Washington Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

294

Louisiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Wind Resources Louisiana/Wind Resources < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Louisiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

295

Oregon/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Wind Resources Oregon/Wind Resources < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oregon Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

296

Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Wind Resources Kentucky/Wind Resources < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kentucky Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

297

NREL: Wind Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications The NREL wind research program develops publications about its R&D activities in wind energy technologies. Below you'll find links to recently published publications, links to the NREL Avian Literature and Publications Databases, and information about the Technical Library at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The NWTC's quarterly newsletter, @NWTC, contains articles on current wind energy research projects and highlights the latest reports, papers, articles, and events published or sponsored by NREL. Subscribe to @NWTC. Selected Publications Featured Publication Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers Here are some selected NWTC publications: 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

298

Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Innovation Impact, Wind: NREL Collaborative Improves the Reliability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborative Improves the Reliability of Wind Turbine Gearboxes Gearbox failures have a significant impact on the cost of wind farm operations. To help minimize gearbox failures,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from OWITSTRC Wind Curtailment (MWhyear) -90,000 Sourced from OWITSTRC Delivered Energy Capacity Factor (%) 42.29% Sourced from OWITSTRC CAPITAL COST FACTORS Wind Farm &...

302

Wind Program Newsletter: Third Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Extreme-Scale Wind Farm Simulation Capabilities New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities' Carbon Emissions and Fuel Costs Funding Opportunities Request for...

303

Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Golove. 2006. “Accounting for Fuel Price Risk When Comparingof Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbon Regulationtechnology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty, and

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Wind Resources < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Montana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

306

Ohio/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ohio/Wind Resources < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Ohio Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

307

Small Wind Guidebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

308

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effective hydrogen until the cost of electrolysis has fallenElectrolysis Station 3.2 Long Term Costs of Wind Hydrogen Ofhydrogen available to them. Table 3.1: Assumptions for Capital and Energy Costs for Electrolysis

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

much smaller than the electricity costs. Table 3.1 shows thecosts compare to the electricity costs for a kg of hydrogenthese units. The wind electricity costs are consistent with

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Wind derivatives: hedging wind risk:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind derivatives are financial contracts that can be used to hedge or mitigate wind risk. In this thesis, the focus was on pricing these wind… (more)

Hoyer, S.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects (Double-Gatefold Brochure)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

How Does WEF Work? How Does WEF Work? Inputs The user enters data about the project, including: * General assumptions * Capital costs * Operating expenses * Financing assumptions * Tax assumptions * Economic assumptions * Financial constraining assumptions. Extensive help notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net present value * Internal rate of return * Summary and detailed cash flows. As an alternative option, if the user enters a first-year energy payment, the program will calculate the rate of return, coverage ratios, etc. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects The National Renewable Energy Laboratory created

312

Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems July 15, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. What does this mean for me? Small wind electric systems can be one of the most efficient ways of producing electricity for your home. Wind energy is a fast growing market, because it is effective and cost efficient. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power lines extended

313

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

314

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It was initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming (see study area map). WestConnect also includes utilities in California, but these were not included because California had already completed a renewable energy integration study for the state. This study was set up to answer questions that utilities, public utilities commissions, developers, and regional planning organizations had about renewable energy use in the west: (1) Does geographic diversity of renewable energy resource help mitigate variability; (2) How do local resources compare to out-of-state resources; (3) Can balancing area cooperation help mitigate variability; (4) What is the role and value of energy storage; (5) Should reserve requirements be modified; (6) What is the benefit of forecasting; and (7) How can hydropower help with integration of renewables? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and run by NREL with WestConnect as a partner organization. The study follows DOE's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, which did not find any technical barriers to reaching 20% wind energy in the continental United States by 2030. This study and its partner study, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, performed a more in-depth operating impact analysis to see if 20% wind energy was feasible from an operational level. In DOE/NREL's analysis, the 20% wind energy target required 25% wind energy in the western interconnection; therefore, this study considered 20% and 30% wind energy to bracket the DOE analysis. Additionally, since solar is rapidly growing in the west, 5% solar was also considered in this study. The goal of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is to understand the costs and operating impacts due to the variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. This is mainly an operations study, (rather than a transmission study), although different scenarios model different transmission build-outs to deliver power. Using a detailed power system production simulation model, the study identifies operational impacts and challenges of wind energy penetration up to 30% of annual electricity consumption.

Lew, D.; Piwko, R.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection Anca D. Hansen1 controller for a wind farm made-up exclusively of active stall wind turbines with AC grid connection wind farm control involves both the control on wind turbine level as well as the central control

316

Wisconsin Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resources Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Wisconsin Wind Resources WisconsinMap.jpg Retrieved from

317

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the base of the foothills just south of Boulder, Colorado, is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. Built in 1993, the center provides an ideal environment for the development of advanced wind energy technologies. The goal of the research conducted at the center is to help industry reduce the cost of energy so that wind can compete with traditional energy sources, providing a clean, renewable alternative for our nation's energy needs. Research at the NWTC is organized under two main categories, Wind Technology Development and Testing and Operations. Illustration of the National Wind Technology Center's organization chart. Fort Felker is listed as the Center Director, with Mike Robinson, Deputy Center Director; Paul Veers, Chief Engineer, and Laura Davis and Dorothy Haldeman beneath him. The Associate Director position is empty. Beneath them is the Wind Technology Research and Development Group Manager, Mike Robinson; the Testing and Operations Group Manager, Dave Simms; and the Offshore Wind and Ocean Power Systems Acting Supervisor, Fort Felker.

318

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Environmental Surveillance Programs  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum supplements, and to some extent replaces, the preliminary description of environmental radiological surveillance programs for low-level waste burial grounds (LLWBG) used in the parent document, 11 Technology, Safety and Costs of DecolliTlissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground, 11 NUREG/ CR-0570. The Addendum provides additional detail and rationale for the environmental radiological surveillance programs for the two referenced sites and inventories described in NUREG/CR-0570. The rationale and performance criteria herein are expected to be useful in providing guidance for determining the acceptability of environmental surveillance programs for other inventories and other LLWBG sites. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are reference facilities considered in this Addendum, and as described in the parent document (NUREG/CR-0570). The two sites are assumed to have the same capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology, and hydrology of the two reference sites are typical of existing western and eastern sites, altnough a single population distribution was chosen for both. Each reference burial ground occupies about 70 hectares and includes 180 trenches filled with a total of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of radioactive waste. In acldition, there are 10 slit trenches containing about 1.5 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 3} of high beta-gamma activity waste. In this Addendum environmental surveillance programs are described for the several periods in the life of a LLWBG: preoperational (prior to nuclear waste receipt); operational (including interim trench closures); post-operational (after all nuclear waste is received), for both short-term {up to three years) and long-term (up to 100 years) storage and custodial care; and decommissioning (only for the special case of waste removal). The specific environmental monitoring requirements for final site characterization and certification surveys are beyond the scope of this Addendum. Data collection associated with site reconnaissance and preselection is not specifically addressed, but it is recognized that such data may be useful in designing the preoperational program. Predisposal control measures, quality assurance, and record-keeping (other than inventory records) associated with waste disposal operations are also not addressed. The primary intent of routine environmental surveillance at a LLWBG is to help ensure that site activities do not cause significant transport of radioactivity from the site, resulting in an unacceptable health hazard to people. Preoperational environmental surveillance serves to determine for later comparison the background radioactivity levels, either naturally occurring or the result of man's activities (e.g. world-wide fallout or an adjacent nuclear facility), in and around the proposed burial ground site. The operational environmental surveillance program is used to estimate radiological conditions, both onsite and offsite as a possible result of burial ground activities, including trench closure(s). These data help to determine LLWBG compliance with regulatory requirements. During the post-operational period environmental surveillance should normally be an extension of the program carried out during operations, with appropriate deletions (or modifications) to account for the differences between operational and post-operational activities at the site. During the long-term storage and custodial care period, environmental surveillance serves to verify the radionuclide confinement capability of the burial ground and to identify problem situations requiring remedial action. For waste removal (exhumation), the environmental surveillance program is again modified to account for the greatly increased potential for direct radiation and contamination spread. At the time of decommissioning, "environmental surveillance" takes on a new meaning, from that of an ongoing prog

Denham, D. H.; Eddy, P. A.; Hawley, K. A.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

being installed for a 2-MW wind turbine. Knowing that reducing the overall cost of wind energy begins on the factory floor, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program...

320

The right size matters: Investigating the offshore wind turbine market equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although early experiences indicate that the maturity of deployed technology might not be sufficient for operating wind farms in large scale far away from shore, the rapid development of offshore wind energy is in full progress. Driven by the demand of customers and the pressure to keep pace with competitors, offshore wind turbine manufacturers continuously develop larger wind turbines instead of improving the present ones which would ensure reliability in harsh offshore environment. Pursuing the logic of larger turbines generating higher energy yield and therefore achieving higher efficiency, this trend is also supported by governmental subsidies under the expectation to bring down the cost of electricity from offshore wind. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that primarily due to the limited wind resource upscaling offshore wind turbines beyond the size of 10 MW (megawatt) is not reasonable. Applying the planning methodology of an offshore wind project developer to a case study wind farm in the German North Sea and assessing energy yield, lifetime project profitability and levelized cost of electricity substantiate this thesis. This is highly interesting for all stakeholders in the offshore wind industry and questions current subsidy policies supporting projects for developing turbines up to 20 MW.

Nikolaus Ederer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Microsoft Word - wind direction vane1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Wind Direction And Making A Wind Vane Grade Levels: Kindergarten, 1, 2, and 3 Objectives: The students will learn how to construct a wind vane and understand the...

323

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andState of the U.S. Wind Power Market Intro Sidebar: The U.S.Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Small Wind Guidebook/What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need?

325

Small Wind Guidebook/Is There Enough Wind on My Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

There Enough Wind on My Site There Enough Wind on My Site < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

326

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capac- ityas the capacity factor of the wind power plant during the 10Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and Issues," IEEE Power &

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Costing climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Costenergy analyses of such schemes...and tidal power at costs...consider in economic analyses of GHG abatement...pertaining to wind power in Denmark...In a cost analysis of implementing...Cutting coal combustion...large an economic burden...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy in the Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Provi and BP Energy in the Wind - Exploring Basic Electrical Concepts by Modeling Wind Turbines Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, aerodynamics, weather/climatology, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: High School Small groups: 2 students Time: Introductory packet will take 2-3 periods. Scientific investigation will take 2-3 periods. (45-50 minute periods) Summary: Students explore basic electrical concepts. Students are introduced to electrical concepts by using a hand held generator utilizing a multimeter, modeling, and designing a wind turbine in a wind tunnel (modifications are given if a wind tunnel is not available). Students investigate how wind nergy is used as a renewable energy resource. e

329

Global potential for wind-generated electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...individual wind farm involves...individual turbines, costs for...operations and maintenance (O&M...downtime for maintenance accounts...installed turbines reflecting the fact that maintenance is normally...relatively low wind conditions...

Xi Lu; Michael B. McElroy; Juha Kiviluoma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Optimal Siting of Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this study is finding the best location for constructing an offshore wind farm with respect to investment and operation costs and technical limitations. Wind speed, sea depth and distance between shor...

Salman Kheirabadi Shahvali…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy Department Announces Distributed Wind Competitiveness...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

for projects led by Pika Energy, Northern Power Systems, Endurance Wind Power, and Urban Green Energy that will help drive down the cost of small and medium-sized wind energy...

332

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and Lower Cost of Energy U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and...

333

WINDExchange: Where Is Wind Power?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

models that are used by weather forecasters and are even used to estimate the wind energy potential-or how much wind energy could potentially be produced at the state level, if...

334

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigates the impacts of high penetrations of wind and solar power into the Western Interconnection of the United States. WWSIS2 builds on the Phase 1 study but with far greater refinement in the level of data inputs and production simulation. It considers the differences between wind and solar power on systems operations. It considers mitigation options to accommodate wind and solar when full costs of wear-and-tear and full impacts of emissions rates are taken into account. It determines wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts. New data sets were created for WWSIS2, and WWSIS1 data sets were refined to improve realism of plant output and forecasts. Four scenarios were defined for WWSIS2 that examine the differences between wind and solar and penetration level. Transmission was built out to bring resources to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales ranging from seasonal down to 5 minutes.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.-M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

U.S. Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With balance-of-system (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine costs has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from U.S. offshore wind plants.

Maples, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of ownership and environmental savings analyses: solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cellscost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cellsanalysis results favor wind over solar and fuel cells in terms of both ownership cost and

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Airborne Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN, L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" of Sibiu Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K. Seoul, Korea Sibiu-2400, Romania AL10 9AB 139-743 email: G accuracy of between 80 to 95% [1]. More recently, the advent of superscalar processors has given renewed are far more costly on a superscalar processor. This renewed interest in branch prediction led

Vintan, Lucian N.

339

Oklahoma/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oklahoma/Wind Resources < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oklahoma Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

340

Michigan/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Michigan/Wind Resources < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Michigan Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Indiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Indiana/Wind Resources < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Indiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

342

Maine/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Maine/Wind Resources < Maine Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maine Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

343

Mississippi/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mississippi/Wind Resources < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Mississippi Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

344

Tennessee/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Tennessee Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

345

Virginia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Virginia/Wind Resources < Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Virginia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

346

Texas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Texas/Wind Resources < Texas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Texas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

347

Illinois/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Illinois/Wind Resources < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Illinois Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

348

Arizona/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Arizona/Wind Resources < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Arizona Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

349

California/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » California/Wind Resources < California Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> California Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

350

Connecticut/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Connecticut/Wind Resources < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Connecticut Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

351

Georgia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Georgia/Wind Resources < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Georgia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

352

Delaware/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Delaware/Wind Resources < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Delaware Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

353

Colorado/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Colorado/Wind Resources < Colorado Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Colorado Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

354

Arkansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Arkansas/Wind Resources < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Arkansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

355

Utah/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Utah/Wind Resources < Utah Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Utah Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate?

356

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Assessment of Accident Commission.in coal mining accidents or value of nuclear nuclear as theaccident of March 1979 predicts that may exceed the cost of nuclear

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

make direct contact with a utility line. able to connecta single phase or 3-phase utility line. Direct connectioneffective cost. when a utility line could not be extended at

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Flexibility Reserve Reductions from an Energy Imbalance Market with High Levels of Wind Energy in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection (WI) over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Areas (BAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts (GW) of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive load make it attractive to consider ways in which Balancing Area Authorities (BAAs) can pool their variability and response resources, thus taking advantage of geographic and temporal diversity to increase overall operational efficiency. Our analysis considers several alternative forms of an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) that have been proposed in the non-market areas of the WI. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: BAA cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As proposed, the EIM does not consider any form of coordinated unit commitment; however, over time it is possible that BAAs would develop formal or informal coordination plans. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations, both separately and in concert.

King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; S. Beuning

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Wind Energy Update  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Energy Update Wind Powering America January 2012 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Evolution of Commercial Wind Technology NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Small (≤100 kW) Homes Farms Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Midscale (100-1000 kW) Village Power Hybrid Systems Distributed Power Large, Land-based (1-3 MW) Utility-scale wind farms Large Distributed Power Sizes and Applications Large, Offshore (3-7 MW) Utility-scale wind farms, shallow coastal waters No U.S. installations NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Capacity & Cost Trends As of January 2012 (AWEA) 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

360

Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

362

Colorado Public Utility Commission's Xcel Wind Decision  

SciTech Connect

In early 2001 the Colorado Public Utility Commission ordered Xcel Energy to undertake good faith negotiations for a wind plant as part of the utility's integrated resource plan. This paper summarizes the key points of the PUC decision, which addressed the wind plant's projected impact on generation cost and ancillary services. The PUC concluded that the wind plant would cost less than new gas-fired generation under reasonable gas cost projections.

Lehr, R. L. (NRUC/NWCC); Nielsen, J. (Land and Water Fund of the Rockies); Andrews, S.; Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis of wind power ancillary services characteristics with German 250-MW wind data  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, power fluctuations have become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the US, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. This paper analyzes wind power in the context of ancillary services, using data from a German 250 Megawatt Wind project.

Ernst, B.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy, the commission determined that wind energy provided the lowest cost of any new generation resource submitted a reduction in payments by electricity customers of $305 million in one year.2 2 Wind energy requires

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

365

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary Correspondence M. Wächter, ForWind-Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, Carl Von Ossietzky on the operation of wind energy converters (WECs) imposing different risks especially in terms of highly dynamic

Peinke, Joachim

366

Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

367

Modeling of wind farm controllers Poul Srensen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dead band. Two types of wind farms are presented. The first using variable speed wind turbines with doubly fed induction generators and fixed speed wind turbines with active stall control. Keywords: wind the wind turbines have increased in size, the costs have been reduced, and the controllability developed

368

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for...

369

New England Wind Forum: Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Figure 1: Installed Wind Project Costs by Region: 2003 through 2006 Projects Only New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. Click on the graph to view a larger version. New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. View a larger version of the graph. Figure 2: 2006 Project Capacity Factors by Region: 2002 through 2005 Projects Only The chart depicts project capacity factor by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version.

370

wind energy  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Pantex to Become Wind Energy Research Center http:nnsa.energy.govfieldofficesnponpopressreleasespantex-become-wind-energy-research-center

371

WINDExchange: Wind for Schools Pilot Project Results  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

that develops wind farms and sells renewable energy certificates (commonly known as "green tags") Community Energy provided much of the cost of the standard system during the...

372

Optimal design of a hybrid solar–wind-battery system using the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potou is an isolated site, located in the northern coast of Senegal. The populations living in this area have no easy access to electricity supply. The use of renewable energies can contribute to the improvement of the living conditions of these populations. The methodology used in this paper consists in Sizing a hybrid solar–wind-battery system optimized through multi-objective genetic algorithm for this site and the influence of the load profiles on the optimal configuration. The two principal aims are: the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP). To study the load profile influence, three load profiles with the same energy (94 kW h/day) have been used. The achieved results show that the cost of the optimal configuration strongly depends on the load profile. For example, the cost of the optimal configuration decreases by 7% and 5% going from profile 1 to 2 and for those ones going from 1 to 3.

B. Ould Bilal; V. Sambou; P.A. Ndiaye; C.M.F. Kébé; M. Ndongo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources  

SciTech Connect

This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This 2-page fact sheet describes NREL's offshore wind research and development efforts and capabilities. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: (1) Developing offshore design tools and methods; (2) Collaborating with international partners; (3) Testing offshore systems and developing standards; (4) Conducting economic analyses; (5) Characterizing offshore wind resources; and (6) Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers. NREL has developed and maintains a robust, open-source, modular computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool, known as FAST. FAST's state-of-the-art capabilities provide full dynamic system simulation for a range of offshore wind systems. It models the coupled aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, control system, and structural response of offshore wind systems to support the development of innovative wind technologies that are reliable and cost effective. FAST also provides dynamic models of wind turbines on offshore fixed-bottom systems for shallow and transitional depths and floating-platform systems in deep water, thus enabling design innovation and risk reduction and facilitating higher performance designs that will meet DOE's cost of energy, reliability, and deployment objectives.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Large Wind Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Wind Technology Large Wind Technology Large Wind Technology The Wind Program works with industry partners to increase the performance and reliability of large wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity factor (a measure of power plant productivity) from 22% for wind turbines installed before 1998 to 35% for turbines installed between 2004 and 2007. Wind energy costs have been reduced from over 55 cents (current dollars) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 1980 to under six cents/kWh today. To ensure future industry growth, the technology must continue to evolve, building on earlier successes to further improve reliability, increase capacity factors, and reduce costs. This page describes the goal of the

376

Computationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

windings occurs at the level of individual turns, the method could be applied, but its advantages are lessComputationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary Waveforms and Two- or Three-Dimensional Field Geometry C. R. Sullivan From IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics

377

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable resources and avoided costs. Section 7 summarizes,renewable energy and the avoided cost of conventional fuelsdispatch model of utility avoided cost using reference case-

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REL's wind energy research and development efforts at REL's wind energy research and development efforts at the National WInd Technology Center (NWTC) have contributed to numerous successes for the wind industry. In addition to helping its industry partners develop commercially successful wind turbines, NREL has developed award-winning components and modeling software. The Laboratory also engages in deployment activities that help schools, communities, and utilities understand the benefits of wind energy and how it can be successfully integrated into our nation's electrical system to provide for a cleaner, more secure energy future. NREL's successes in wind energy research, development, and deployment have: * Reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies

379

Levelized Cost Calculations | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial PV: 0.83155 Marine Hydrokinetic: 0.83155 Solar Thermal: 0.83155 Compressed Air Energy Storage: 1 Near Field (or Enhanced Hydrothermal): 0.83155 Utility pv: 0.83155...

380

Wind Class Sampling of Satellite SAR Imagery for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is ...

Merete Badger; Jake Badger; Morten Nielsen; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Alfredo Peña

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Es7mates-funded by EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Office, and the Na*onal Electricity Delivery. Download report: hSp://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14os*/61042.pdf or hSp://emp.lbl.gov/publica*ons/survey-state-level-cost-and-benefit

382

Long-Term National Impacts of State-Level Policies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents analysis conducted with the Wind Deployment System Model (WinDS) -- a model of capacity expansion in the U.S. electric sector. With 358 regions covering the United States, detailed transmission system representation, and an explicit treatment of wind intermittency and ancillary services, WinDS is uniquely positioned to evaluate the market impacts of specific state-level policies. This paper provides analysis results regarding the impact of existing state-level policies designed to promote wind-capacity expansion, including state portfolio standards, mandates, and tax credits. The results show the amount of wind deployment due to current state-level incentives as well as examine their lasting impact on the national wind industry. For example, state-level mandates increase industry size and lower costs, which result in wind capacity increases in states without mandates and greater market growth even after the policies expire. Although these policies are enacted by individual states, the cumulative effect must be examined at a national level. Finally, this paper examines the impact on wind-capacity growth by increasing the penalty associated with the state-level renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The results show national and regional wind energy deployment and generation through 2050.

Blair, N.; Short, W.; Denholm, P.; Heimiller, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Long-term, low-level radwaste volume-reduction strategies. Volume 4. Waste disposal costs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 4 establishes pricing levels at new shallow land burial grounds. The following conclusions can be drawn from the analyses described in the preceding chapters: Application of volume reduction techniques by utilities can have a significant impact on the volumes of wastes going to low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Using the relative waste stream volumes in NRC81 and the maximum volume reduction ratios provided by Burns and Roe, Inc., it was calculated that if all utilities use maximum volum

Sutherland, A.A.; Adam, J.A.; Rogers, V.C.; Merrell, G.B.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Model Predictive Control Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines Martin Klauco Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-MSc-2012-65 #12;Summary Wind turbines are the biggest part of the green energy industry. Increasing interest control strategies. Control strategy has a significant impact on the wind turbine operation on many levels

385

System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a few minutes; load-following – tens of minutes to a fewimpacts of wind energy on load-following and unit commitmentCost ($/MWh) Regulation Load Following Unit Commit. trace

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

New York/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Wind Resources New York/Wind Resources < New York Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New York Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

388

West Virginia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Wind Resources West Virginia/Wind Resources < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> West Virginia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

389

North Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Dakota/Wind Resources North Dakota/Wind Resources < North Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> North Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

390

South Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Dakota/Wind Resources South Dakota/Wind Resources < South Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

391

New Jersey/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey/Wind Resources New Jersey/Wind Resources < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Jersey Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

392

Rhode Island/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources Rhode Island/Wind Resources < Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Rhode Island Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

393

South Carolina/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina/Wind Resources South Carolina/Wind Resources < South Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Carolina Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

394

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Policy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards State Renewable Energy Funds Federal Tax Incentives and Grants Net Metering and Interconnection Standards Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Awareness Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Policy in New England Why Incentives and Policy? Federal and state policies play an important role in encouraging wind energy development by leveling the playing field compared to other energy sources. Many of the substantial benefits of wind power as a domestic, zero-emission part of the energy portfolio - sustainability, displacement of pollutant emissions from other power sources, fuel diversity, price stabilization, keeping a substantial portion of energy expenditures in the local economy - are shared by society as a whole and cannot be readily captured by wind generators directly in the price they charge for their output. In addition, while wind power receives some policy support, the level of federal incentives for wind represents less than 1% of the subsidies and tax breaks given to the fossil fuels and nuclear industries (source: "Wind Power An Increasingly Competitive Source of New Generation." Wind Energy Weekly #1130.).

395

Small Wind Guidebook/Is Wind Energy Practical for Me | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practical for Me Practical for Me < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is Wind Energy Practical for Me?

396

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Where Is Wind Power?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Where Is Wind Power? Where Is Wind Power? Wind Powering America offers maps to help you visualize the wind resource at a local level and to show how much wind power has been installed in the United States. How much wind power is on my land? Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. If you want to know how much wind power is in a particular area, these wind resource maps can give you a visual indication of the average wind speeds to a local level such as a neighborhood. These maps have been developed using the same mathematical models that are used by weather forecasters and are even used to estimate the wind energy potential-or how much wind energy could potentially be produced at the state level, if wind power were developed there.

397

Levelized cost-benefit analysis of proposed diagnostics for the Ammunition Transfer Arm of the US Army`s Future Armored Resupply Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

The US Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (PM-AFAS/FARV) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be applied to the resupply vehicle for the Advanced Field Artillery System. The Engineering Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has proposed adding diagnostics/prognostics systems to four components of the Ammunition Transfer Arm of this vehicle, and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on the diagnostics/prognostics to show the potential savings that may be gained by incorporating these systems onto the vehicle. Possible savings could be in the form of reduced downtime, less unexpected or unnecessary maintenance, fewer regular maintenance checks. and/or tower collateral damage or loss. The diagnostics/prognostics systems are used to (1) help determine component problems, (2) determine the condition of the components, and (3) estimate the remaining life of the monitored components. The four components on the arm that are targeted for diagnostics/prognostics are (1) the electromechanical brakes, (2) the linear actuators, (3) the wheel/roller bearings, and (4) the conveyor drive system. These would be monitored using electrical signature analysis, vibration analysis, or a combination of both. Annual failure rates for the four components were obtained along with specifications for vehicle costs, crews, number of missions, etc. Accident scenarios based on component failures were postulated, and event trees for these scenarios were constructed to estimate the annual loss of the resupply vehicle, crew, arm. or mission aborts. A levelized cost-benefit analysis was then performed to examine the costs of such failures, both with and without some level of failure reduction due to the diagnostics/prognostics systems. Any savings resulting from using diagnostics/prognostics were calculated.

Wilkinson, V.K.; Young, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

399

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of different levels of technology upon expected yields, costs, and returns for major crops in Diamante Departamento, Entre Rios province, Argentina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ass'stance in carrying out and analyzing tnis thesis work, and to Dr. C. R. Harston and Dr. R. L. Ehrich for their cooperation in improving its presenta- tion. IIr. Zames McGrann assisted in the early stages of the fieId work. Dr. Zohn Steele revie...), Di:nants Departs~onto, Entre Hlos ) Jzge'lt inay 1969 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 77 Early land preparation a d e;rly seeding tine:~ thod for corn: osti. -. !ated cost per hectare {level 5), Diaaante Departa-, . . ento, Entre H(os, Argentina~ 1969...

Albarracin, Ernesto Oscar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also concludes that the integration of 20% wind into U.S.and integration costs, Figure 4 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy Department Announces $2.5 Million to Improve Wind Forecasting...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

better forecasts, wind energy plant operators and industry professionals can ensure wind turbines operate closer to maximum capacity, leading to lower energy costs for consumers....

404

U.S. Department of Energy Breaks Ground on State-of-the-Art Wind...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and manufacturers continue to drive down the cost of wind energy by reducing the aerodynamic losses of wind energy plants, enhancing energy capture, and mitigating turbine...

405

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind and Hydropower Technology Analysis Wind and Hydropower Technology Analysis Wind and hydropower analysis supports advanced technologies that convert more of the nation's wind into electricity. Grid Operational Impact Analysis The wind program will address the variable, normally uncontrollable nature of wind power plant output, and the additional needs that its operation imposes on the overall grid. At present, the generation and transmission operational impacts that occur due to wind variability are not well quantified. This research will include efforts to quantify and fairly allocate impacts in both an engineering and cost sense. Methods of analysis are at an early stage of development. Without realistic analysis and cost allocation, utilities tend to overestimate imposed operational costs,

406

New Mexico/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Mexico/Wind Resources < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Mexico Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine?

407

International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization Risoe DTU Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Wind Topics Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type Workshop, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.risoe.dtu.dk/~/medi References International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries[1] Background "The workshop covers the following main themes: Wind energy technologies, their perspectives and applications in developing countries. Reliability of wind turbines, lifetime and strength of wind turbine components. Low cost and natural materials for wind turbines.

408

New England Wind Forum: Motivations for Buying Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Motivations for Buying Wind Power Motivations for Buying Wind Power Voluntary Voluntary purchases are often referred to as "Green Power." Voluntary purchases are made by individuals, businesses, governments, and groups of each (known as aggregations) to express personal preferences or meet personal or institutional commitments. One recent example of a government purchase is a request for proposals, issued in February 2005, to supply the Rhode Island State House with renewable energy for a five-year period. Hedging Hedging is a growing motivation to reduce exposure to volatile and rising energy costs. New England's publicly-owned utilities, as well as Vermont's utilities, can stabilize their fuel cost-driven supply portfolios with wind generation. In competitive markets that dominate the New England landscape, larger electricity customers are beginning to look to longer-term purchases of wind power as a means to protect their energy budgets against the volatile fossil-fuel-driven costs. Examples include:

409

The independency of stellar mass-loss rates on stellar X-ray luminosity and activity level based on solar X-ray flux and solar wind observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......observed at inner parts of the Solar system, in particular at the beginning of the year 2000. This can be due to solar wind energy exchange with pickup ions, CIRs or other temporal variations of the solar wind at that distance, which cannot be......

O. Cohen

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Song of the Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Song of the Wind Song of the Wind Nature Bulletin No. 318-A October 26, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SONG OF THE WIND The wind is simply air in motion. Air has substance like wood or water, it has pressure, it can acquire heat and hold a temperature, and it can travel from place to place.... The air which affects our lives is a layer seven or eight miles thick, called the troposphere, which is next to the earth. This air has pressure (14.7 pounds per square inch at sea level) and when various factors, one of which is temperature, cause changes in this pressure, the air starts moving. We cannot see it. We can hear it. The song of the wind is the most wonderful music on earth, and at times the most terrifying in its angry moments.

411

The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have relied primarily on wind power to meet general RPSpower to leads. One assessment of the costs of transmission for wind

Heeter, Jenny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cost Optimal Energy Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPBD recast requires Member States (MS) to ensure that minimum energy performance requirements of buildings are set with a view to achieving cost optimal levels using a comparative methodology framework...1]. Cost

Jarek Kurnitski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wind Mills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over 5,000 years ago, the ancient Egyptians used wind to sail ships on the Nile River. While the proliferation of water mills was in full swing, windmills appeared to harness more inanimate energy by employing wind

J. S. Rao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wind Farm  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

415

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe...

416

Wind Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For off-shore wind energy, it is not economically profitable to locate wind turbines in waters with depths larger than about 40 m. For this reason, some floating turbine prototypes are being tested, which can be ...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Competitiveness of Wind Power with the Conventional Thermal Power Plants Using Oil and Natural Gas as Fuel in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fossil fuels mainly imported oil and natural gas are major sources of electricity generation in Pakistan. The combustion of fossil fuels in thermal power plants has greater environmental impacts like air pollution and global warming. Additionally, the import of oil is a heavy burden on the poor economy of the country. Pakistan is a country with huge renewable sources; wind energy being the major one. This paper elucidate the cost-competitiveness of wind power with the conventional thermal power plants. In this regard, Levelized estimated cost of a 15MW wind power plant is compared with three types of conventional thermal power plants, namely (i) Oil-fired thermal power plant (ii) Natural gas-fire combine cycle power plant (iii) Diesel oil- fired gas turbine cycle 100MW each. The results show that the cost of wind energy is lowest with Rs. 3/kWh. It is concluded that the wind power is cost-competitive to the conventional thermal power plants in Pakistan. The cost estimation for wind energy is lowest of all others with Rs. 3/kWh.

A. Mengal; M.A. Uqaili; K. Harijan; Abdul Ghafoor Memon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Wind energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is approximately 4.5-6.01 for onshore wind farms. The price for offshore wind farms is estimated to be 50% higher. For comparison...visually intrusive. The visual impact of offshore wind farms quickly diminishes with distance and 10km...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

‘Chinook winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of south-easterly winds, which blow over the...Ocean, from which the winds come, can at this season...freezing-point. The wind well known in the Alps as the foehn is another example of...result is complicated by local details; regions of...

George M. Dawson

1886-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New England Wind Forum: Selling Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Selling Wind Power Selling Wind Power Markets are either well-developed or developing for each of the 'products' produced by wind generators. These include electricity products and generation attributes. Electricity Electricity can be used in two ways: on-site (interconnected behind a retail customer's meter) of for sales of electricity over the electric grid. On-site generation can displace a portion of a customer's purchases of electricity from the grid. In addition, net metering rules are in place at the state level that in some cases allow generation in excess of on-site load to be sold back to the local utility (see state pages for net metering specifics). For sales over the electricity grid, the Independent System Operator of New England (ISO New England) creates and manages a wholesale market for electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services within the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL). Wind generators may sell their electric energy and capacity in spot markets organized by the ISO, or they may contract with wholesale buyers to sell these products for any term to buyers operating in the ISO New England marketplace. Wind generators do not generally produce other marketable ancillary services. The ISO has rules specific to the operation of wind generators reflecting operations, scheduling, calculation of installed capacity credit, and so forth.

422

Low Cost Heliostat Development Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The heliostat field in a central receiver plant makes up roughly one half of the total plant cost. As such, cost reductions for the installed heliostat price greatly impact the overall plant cost and hence the plant’s Levelized Cost of Energy. The general trend in heliostat size over the past decades has been to make them larger. One part of our thesis has been that larger and larger heliostats may drive the LCOE up instead of down due to the very nature of the precise aiming and wind-load requirements for typical heliostats. In other words, it requires more and more structure to precisely aim the sunlight at the receiver as one increases heliostat mirror area and that it becomes counter-productive, cost-wise, at some point.

Kusek, Stephen M.

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets ´Ulfar Linnet Kongens Lyngby 2005 IMM.imm.dtu.dk IMM-THESIS: ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Abstract A large share of the wind energy produced in Scandinavia in a fine, called regulation cost. As wind energy comes from an uncontrollable energy source - the wind

424

Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets â?? Ulfar Linnet Kongens Lyngby 2005 IMM.imm.dtu.dk IMM­THESIS: ISSN 0909­3192 #12; Abstract A large share of the wind energy produced in Scandinavia in a fine, called regulation cost. As wind energy comes from an uncontrollable energy source ­ the wind

425

Judi Danielson Wind Power: From Niche to Mainstream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Judi Danielson Wind Power: From Niche to Mainstream What's Inside (continued on page 11) Winter the same way sails capture the wind to produce lift. In the Northwest, the market for wind power has, was the federal production tax incentive, which lowers the cost of wind power for potential investors

426

Small Wind Guidebook/State Information Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Portal Information Portal < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal

427

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

428

Wind Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry http://energy.gov/eere/articles/two-facilities-one-goal-advancing-america-s-wind-industry wind-industry" class="title-link">Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry

429

Approach to the fatigue analysis of vertical-axis wind-turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

A cursory analysis of the stress history of wind turbine blades indicates that a single stress level at each wind speed does not adequately describe the blade stress history. A statistical description is required. Blade stress data collected from the DOE/ALCOA Low Cost experimental turbines indicate that the Rayleigh probability density function adequately describes the distribution of vibratory stresses at each wind speed. The Rayleigh probability density function allows the distribution of vibratory stresses to be described by the RMS of the stress vs. time signal. With the RMS stress level described for all wind speeds, the complete stress history of the turbine blades is known. Miner's linear cumulative damage rule is used as a basis for summing the fatigue damage over all operating conditions. An analytical expression is derived to predict blade fatigue life.

Veers, P.S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

Wiser, Ryan H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Feasibility analysis of coordinated offshore wind project development in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy is one of the cleanest and most available resources in the world, and advancements in wind technology are making it more cost effective. Though wind power is rapidly developing in many regions, its variable ...

Zhang, Mimi Q

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect

The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reactive Power Compensation Strategy of DGIF Wind Park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, two different wind park reactive power compensation strategies for the DFIG wind park connected to the sub-transmission level are proposed. Except considering DFIG wind turbines as dynamic reacti...

JingJing Zhao; Yang Fu; DongDong Li…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Understanding Trends in Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices O Over the Past Decade Mark Bolinger and Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory October, 2011 The work described in this presentation was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division * Energy Analysis Department Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Water Power Program) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 Motivation 1) Turbine prices in the U.S. have fallen ~20%-30% in recent years, but from elevated levels - prices had previously doubled from 2002 2008 2002-2008 2) This doubling in price contradicts standard "learning curve" theory, and requires an alternate explanation * Traditional learning curves suggest that wind project costs should fall

435

wind speed | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

speed speed Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

436

NREL: Wind Research - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us NREL works with industry in a public-private contracting environment to research, design, and build advanced wind energy technologies. We have an outstanding performance record for working with the wind industry to advance wind turbine science and lower the cost of wind-generated electricity. Companies partner with NREL when they have particular design challenges, when they wish to cost-share development of state-of-the-art wind turbines, and when they want to document their turbine's performance for certification. See projects and NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories for examples of current and past industry partnerships. Flexibility is the key to government-industry collaborations at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), where companies get the support

437

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. lead–acid, NaS, Li-ion, and Ni–Cd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for Clean Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced the selection of three projects that aim to advance the offshore wind industry and lower the cost of offshore wind technologies. Learn more about these technological innovations.

439

Doppler Lidar–Based Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have relied primarily on wind power to meet general RPSreductions. Because wind power does not have fuel costs—itXcel has been able to buy wind power through PPAs at prices

Heeter, Jenny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wind Power Forecasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrospective Reports 2011 Smart Grid Wind Integration Wind Integration Initiatives Wind Power Forecasting Wind Projects Email List Self Supplied Balancing Reserves Dynamic...

442

Assessment and Validation of Oil Sensor Systems for On-line Oil Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbine Gearboxes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The gearbox oil and the wind turbine gearbox condition are correlated. The oil can give the wind turbine operator the necessary information to plan maintenance and avoid costly repairs. Therefore, a test bench that can reproduce the gearbox operating conditions would be necessary to test oil-sensors. This paper presents a first testing approach using a Highly Accelerated Life Test / Highly Accelerated Stress Screening test chamber. It allows assessing the performance of oil properties sensors under extreme ambient temperature and vibration levels, based on measurements from a wind turbine gearbox. Results from a test on an oil properties sensor are presented and discussed.

D. Coronado; C. Kupferschmidt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wind Development on the Rosebud  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rosebud Sioux Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation Wind Development on the Rosebud Akicita Cikala 750 Kw turbine Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm, 30Mw North Antelope Highlands Wind Farm, 190Mw Met towers installed in 2003 Met tower installed in 2001 Met tower installed in 1999 Met towers installed in 2009 Akicita Cikala Turbine Neg Micon 750kw Commissioned March 2003 Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm 2003 Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Participants in Development RST Resource Development Office, Ken Haukaas, Coordinator RST Tribal Utilities Commission, Tony Rogers, Director RST Natural Resource Office, Stephanie Middlebrooks, Wildlife Biologist Distribute Generation Inc., Dale Osborn, President, Belvin Pete, Project

444

Wind resource assessment and siting  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of employing wind power as a possible energy source to the New Hampshire power grid. Wind data was obtained from the New Hampshire State Forestry Service, the State Climatologist as well as other miscellaneous sources. Data on power generation and the power grid system was received from the Public Service Company of New Hampshire. Using this information as a data base, siting studies were made which indicated that there was a potential for a wind energy system in New Hampshire. Costs of fossil fuel generated power were compared to estimated wind generated production costs of electric energy fed into the Public Service Company of New Hampshire lines for various potential WECS sites. Based on the data and analysis provided in this study, it appears that WECS can be usefully developed in New Hampshire which would result in significant savings in fuel oil consumption.

Bortz, S.A. (IIT Research Inst., Chicago, IL); Fieldhouse, I.; Budenholzer, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

The improvement in a wind turbine comprises providing a tower with a freely liftable mount and adapting a nacelle which is fitted with a propeller windwheel consisting of a plurality of rotor blades and provided therein with means for conversion of wind energy to be shifted onto said mount attached to the tower. In case of a violent wind storm, the nacelle can be lowered down to the ground to protect the rotor blades from breakage due to the force of the wind. Required maintenance and inspection of the nacelle and replacement of rotor blades can be safely carried out on the ground.

Abe, M.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Small Wind Guidebook/Introduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction Introduction < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across

447

North Carolina/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » North Carolina/Wind Resources < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> North Carolina Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

448

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Rural Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Agricultural & Rural Farm Bill Outreach Articles Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Wind Farms Resources & Tools Native Americans Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Wind Powering America produced Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's Guides to help homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses decide if wind energy will work for them. A Small Wind Guidebook is available for each state and answers these questions. Is wind energy practical for me? What size wind turbine do I need? What are the basic parts of a small wind electric system? What do wind systems cost? Where can I find installation and maintenance support? How much energy will my system generate? Is there enough wind on my site?

449

New Hampshire/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Hampshire/Wind Resources < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Hampshire Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support?

450

Community Solar and Wind Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Solar and Wind Grant Program Community Solar and Wind Grant Program Community Solar and Wind Grant Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate $250,000 Program Info Funding Source Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund Start Date 09/2011 Expiration Date 04/08/2013 State Illinois Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Business Solar Thermal: 30% of project costs Government and Nonprofit Solar Thermal: 40% of project costs Business PV: $1.50/watt or 25% of project costs Government and Nonprofit PV: $2.60/watt or 40% of project costs Business Wind: $1.70/watt or 30% of project costs Government and Nonprofit Wind: $2.60/watt or 40% of project costs

451

Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings for better efficiency turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore turbines build father offshore will be able to capture more wind energy. Currently two types of towers are considered. Cylindrical tubular structures and truss type structures. But truss type structures have less weight and flexibility in design. The construction of the offshore towers to harness the wind energy is also presented. The results will include the calculation of wind and wave forces on the tower and the design details for the tower.

V. J. Kurian; S. P. Narayanan; C. Ganapathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Wind power in electricity markets: key issues and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the large penetration and continuous improvement in the wind power technology, wind farms are asked to operate similar to the conventional power plants. In emerging electricity market, wind power generators are now seen differently and should sustain with/without limited government support. Although cost reductions due to technological improvements bring wind power in competitions to conventional fossil-fuel generation, but until now various incentives are required to overcome wind power's cost disadvantage and these incentives may play a significant role in improving the competitiveness of wind power. However, the use and trade of wind power in the market is complicated because of the lack of guarantees of generation, mainly in the wind farms. This paper discusses several key issues and challenges which can be faced by the wind power in the competitive power market. With suitable market mechanism, wind power can be helpful in mitigating the market abuse up to some extent.

B.S. Rajpurohit; S.N. Singh; Istvan Erlich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Wind Powering America: Wind Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind power-related events. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Wind Events http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/calendar.asp Pennsylvania Wind for Schools Educator Workshop https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1352684 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4068 Wed, 4 Dec 2013 00:00:00 MST 2014 Joint Action Workshop http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 Mon, 21 Oct 2013 00:00:00 MST AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 Mon, 21

454

Community Wind Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Wind Development Handbook Community Wind Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Community Wind Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Windustry Partner: AURI AG Innovations, The Minnesota Project, MC&PC, Clean Energy Resource Teams, Southwest Initiative Foundation Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind, Economic Development Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.auri.org/research/Community%20Wind%20Handbook.pdf Cost: Free References: Community Wind Development Handbook[1] Provides developers practical knowledge of what to expect when developing commercial-scale community wind energy projects in the range of 2 to 50 Megawatts. Overview The Community Wind Development Handbook "is designed to give developers of

455

Wyoming Wind Power Project (generation/wind)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Wyoming Wind Power Project (Foote Creek Rim I and II) Thumbnail image of wind...

456

NWTC Controllable Grid Interface (Fact Sheet), National Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time and costs while providing system engineers with a better understanding of how wind turbines, PV inverters, and energy storage systems react to grid disturbances and provide...

457

Future of Wind Energy Technology in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the status of wind energy in the United States as of 2007, its cost, the potential for growth, offshore development, and potential technology improvements.

Thresher, R.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Optimal investment in wind and solar power in California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wind and solar electricity are increasingly attractive as their costs decline and greater value is given to avoiding greenhouse gas emissions. However, these technologies… (more)

Fripp, Matthias

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Wind power costs in Portugal Saleiro, Carla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originated from hydroelectric power stations. Portugal assumed that the Electricity System Expansion Plan will proceed with the construction of new hydroelectric power plants with an installed power rating of more

460

Technology Roadmapping for wind energy: case of the Pacific Northwest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy has been existent for many centuries and has advanced in both products and technologies. The objective of this study is to identify the future adoption, products, and technologies for Residential and Industrial consumers in a form of a graphical Technology Roadmap. Technology Roadmapping (TRM) is a high level planning tool used for strategy planning, implementation and aligning technologies and products with overall business objectives. The study considered the following aspects as the basis of the roadmap (market drivers): environmental concerns, rising cost and dependency on fossil fuel, business opportunities, government involvement and availability of natural wind resources in the Pacific Northwest (NW). The results of this study show, as implementation and the shift towards renewable energies unfold, specifically wind energy, we will notice a considerable reduction in the fluctuation and high cost of utilities, increased efforts towards the alarming concerns of global warming and environment degradation, evolving technologies, and its products as a dependable alternative energy resource. This paper also highlights the benefits in utilizing wind energy to residential, commercial and industrial consumers within the Pacific NW.

Tugrul U. Daim; Muhammad Amer; Rubyna Brenden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Offshore Wind Power USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

462

offshore wind farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

offshore wind farm, wind farm [‘Wind park’ which one may find on the ... engineers and should not be used. A wind farm consists of a network of wind turbines] ? Windkraftanlage f, Windpark m; Offshore

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

464

Design Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind is characterized by various different parameters. They include the following items: (1) wind speed, such as the mean wind speed and maximum instantaneous wind speed; (2) wind direction such as the azimuth di...

Yozo Fujino; Kichiro Kimura; Hiroshi Tanaka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Small Wind Guidebook/Image Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Library Image Library < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information *Capacity-10 kilowatts *Turbine manufacturer-Bergey Windpower Company

466

Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

467

Forecastability as a Design Criterion in Wind Resource Assessment: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a methodology to include the wind power forecasting ability, or 'forecastability,' of a site as a design criterion in wind resource assessment and wind power plant design stages. The Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) methodology is adopted to maximize the capacity factor of a wind power plant. The 1-hour-ahead persistence wind power forecasting method is used to characterize the forecastability of a potential wind power plant, thereby partially quantifying the integration cost. A trade-off between the maximum capacity factor and the forecastability is investigated.

Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

469

Session: Wind industry project development  

SciTech Connect

This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

WIND ENERGY POLICIES IN TURKEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy is a strategic parameter, which demonstrates the development of a country. In Turkey, energy and energy politics are mainly based on the supply due to the inadequate fossil fuel resources. In the beginning of the 21 st century, due to the increase in the price of fossil fuels and environmental burdens, many countries showed renewed interest in alternative energy resources. Climate change and environmental problems caused by greenhouse gas emissions showed the importance of renewable energy resources and especially wind energy. The major reason for the interest in wind energy technologies out of many renewable energy resources is the bulk availability of this resource without any cost. In Turkey, the major solution to the dependency on foreign energy resources is: domestic production, development, and operation of renewable energy resources. However, in order to make these investments, suitable conditions and strategies must be generated. In order to accelerate the wind energy investments in Turkey: (i) the problems related to the interconnectivity of the wind power systems to the grid must be solved (ii) the guaranteed purchase price of the wind energy must be updated (iii) and the construction/operation of wind power plants must be subsidised by government initiatives. In this study, the politics related to wind energy is extensively reviewed and the possible suggestions/solutions related to the acceleration of wind energy production and investments in Turkey are given.

S?tk? Güner; Irem Firtina; Mehmet Meliko?lu; Ayhan Albostan

471

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves a wide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindResPercMax WindResPercMax Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/WindResPercMax Property Type String Description The maximum % of the installed cost of a residential wind system that the rebate may offset. Use this for (1.) rebates calculated in terms of % of capital cost as well as (2.) rebates structured in terms of $/kW or $/kWh that also have a maximum % of costs that can be offset by the rebate. Ex: (1.) DE's rebate is 50% of the project cost; (2.) WI's residential wind incentive is based on annual expected performance, up to 25% of installed cost. Format: 25% [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/WindResPercMax" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Technology Program (Ohio) + 50% +

473

Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook  

SciTech Connect

This handbook has been written for individuals and groups involved in evaluating wind projects: decision-makers and agency staff at all levels of government, wind developers, interested parties and the public. Its purpose is to help stakeholders make permitting wind facility decisions in a manner which assures necessary environmental protection and responds to public needs.

NWCC Siting Work Group

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above surface  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maps at 10m and 50m above surface maps at 10m and 50m above surface and 0.25 degree resolution for global oceans from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS ASCII data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential of offshore areas. Source NREL Date Released December 31st, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS NASA NREL SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 36.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2004 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

475

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m above  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10m and 50m above 10m and 50m above surface and 0.25 degree resolution for global oceans from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS ASCII data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential of offshore areas. Source NREL Date Released December 31st, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS NASA NREL ocean offshore QuikScat SWERA UNEP wind Data application/msword icon Download Documentation (doc, 53.8 KiB) application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 41 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 01/01/2000 - 12/31/2004

476

Wind pressure distribution on shell structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relates to both cost and safety. This study has revealed that wind pressure criteria for shell structures is not adequately covered by most building codes. Those that do exist are rather vague and sometimes erroneous. One recently published design manual...

Yancey, Kenneth Earl, Jr

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

Lodde, P.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

NREL: News - NREL Study Suggests Cost Gap for Western Renewables...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) indicates that by 2025 wind and solar power electricity generation could become cost-competitive without federal subsidies,...

479

Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

below the logo shows the cost reduction in photovoltaics compared to other energy-conversion technologies. PV is performing better than coal, natural gas, nuclear fusion, wind,...

480

Cost Function Estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cost function describes the cost-minimizing combinations of inputs required for production of different levels of output. Empirical cost function studies take both short-run and long-run approaches and can be structurally consistent with microeconomic theory versus more behavioral or real-world data oriented. Studies of health care providers face numerous challenges including the multiproduct nature of the firm, difficulty in controlling for quality of service, and frequent failure of the profit-maximization assumption. Cost function applications in health care are numerous and include such topics as optimal firm size, performance inefficiency measures, and comparisons of production costs with third-party payments.

K. Carey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized wind costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Wind News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters http://energy.gov/eere/articles/new-report-shows-trend-toward-larger-offshore-wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects" class="title-link">New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters

482

Wind Energy: Large and Small Systems Competing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the wheat in Kansas. Wind power...of mass-production they offer...systems produce electricity or drive-shaft...the specific site. Interference...Based on a production run of 1000...econ-omies of production in the past...could produce electricity at a cost...winds at the site, plus the...

WILLIAM D. METZ

1977-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Build a Durable Market for Wind Power in the United States”crisis on the U.S. wind power market. A sizable literaturethe recent run-up in wind power costs and pricing. Moreover,

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Build a Durable Market for Wind Power in the United States”Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andcrisis on the U.S. wind power market. A sizable literature

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

At What Cost? A comparative evaluation of the social costs of selected electricity generation alternatives in Ontario.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the private and external costs of electricity generated in Ontario by natural gas, wind, refurbished nuclear and new nuclear power. The purpose… (more)

Icyk, Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Microsoft Word - 080530Wind.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jennifer Scoggins, (202) 586-4940 Thursday, May 29, 2008 U.S. Continues to Lead the World in Wind Power Growth DOE Report Shows Rapidly Growing U.S. Wind Power Market WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2007 edition of its Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends, which provides a comprehensive overview of developments in the rapidly evolving U.S. wind power market. Notably, the report finds that U.S. wind power capacity increased by 46 percent in 2007, with $9 billion invested in U.S. wind plants in 2007 alone, making the U.S. the fastest-growing wind power market in the world for the third straight

489

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

492

Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models Stefan Heinz and Harish Gopalan applicable as a low cost alternative. 1 Introduction There is a growing interest in using wind energy suggests the possibility of providing 20% of the electricity in the U.S. by wind energy in 2030

Heinz, Stefan

493

ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in European Seas A. M offshore is generally larger than at geographically nearby onshore sites, which can offset the higher installation, operation and maintenance costs associated with offshore wind parks. Successful offshore wind

Pryor, Sara C.

494

Wind Energy Learning Curves for Reference in Expert Elicitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Learning Curves for Reference in Expert Elicitations Sarah Mangels, Erin Baker. Abstract: This study presents future projections of wind energy capacity and cost based on historical data. The study will be used during wind- energy expert elicitations (formal interviews aimed to quantify

Mountziaris, T. J.

495

Cost of Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

as well as projections for the future. Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P. (March 2013). 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review. National Renewable...

496

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Assessment Wind Resource Assessment A map of the United States is color-coded to indicate the high winds at 80 meters. This map shows the wind resource at 80 meters for both land-based and offshore wind resources in the United States. Correct estimation of the energy available in the wind can make or break the economics of wind plant development. Wind mapping and validation techniques developed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) along with collaborations with U.S. companies have produced high-resolution maps of the United States that provide wind plant developers with accurate estimates of the wind resource potential. State Wind Maps International Wind Resource Maps Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Due to the existence of special use airspace (SUA) (i.e., military airspace

497