National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for levelized wind costs

  1. Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

    2009-10-01

    The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

  2. A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

    2013-10-01

    This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions, and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  4. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  5. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  6. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    2011b). Development in LCOE for Wind Turbines in Denmark.levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analyses are shown in Tablethe levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for onshore wind energy.

  7. This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

  8. 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

  9. Cost of Offshore Wind Energy Charlene Nalubega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    water as well as on land based wind farms. The specific offshore wind energy case under consideration, most of the offshore wind farms are in Europe, which started being developed in the early 1990's Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

  10. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    E. (2011). Development in LCOE for Wind Turbines in Denmark.to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations.the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for onshore wind energy

  11. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Looking forward, offshore wind costs are generally expectedachieving the U.S. 20% wind cost and performance trajectoryDissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter (21:

  12. Wind power costs in Portugal Saleiro, Carla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power costs in Portugal Saleiro, Carla Department of Biological Engineering, University, following the European tendency. This analysis sets out to evaluate the total generating cost of wind power and CCGT in Portugal. A life cycle cost analysis was conducted, including investment costs, O&M costs, fuel

  13. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performanceaccess the nation's lowest-cost wind resources can be builtpressure on installed wind project costs while the industry

  14. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  15. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A; Simonot, E. (2011). The Cost of Wind Energy. Spanish Wind5. DRIVERS OF FUTURE WIND ENERGY COST REDUCTIONS A largeput upward pressure on wind energy costs, such as continued

  16. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  17. Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2009-07-01

    Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

  18. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Carbon Trust. (2008). Offshore Wind Power: Big Challenge,Financial Support for Offshore Wind. The UK Department ofCost Reduction Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind

  19. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Carbon Trust. (2008). Offshore Wind Power: Big Challenge,and Financial Support for Offshore Wind. The UK DepartmentCost Reduction Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind

  20. Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production cost models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)] [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

  1. Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

    2014-10-01

    The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

  2. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, projectincreases in the cost of wind turbines. Berkeley Lab hasrising prices wind turbine costs, and therefore wind power

  3. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  4. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Great expectations: The cost of offshore wind in UK waters –Monitoring Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of

  5. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andand costs for rapid wind energy deployment in the US haveinstalled cost for wind projects in the US has increased

  6. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris, France:5) Ceña, A; Simonot, E. (2011). The Cost of Wind Energy.Spanish Wind Energy Association (AEE) contribution to IEA

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  8. Cost-Constrained Selection of Strand Wire and Number in a Litz-Wire Transformer Winding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost-Constrained Selection of Strand Wire and Number in a Litz-Wire Transformer Winding C. R. Design of litz-wire windings subject to cost constraints is analyzed. An approximation of nor- malized winding, in terms of a cost function. At the second level, results that are less general but are more

  9. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    that have influenced wind energy costs in the past and areSources of Future Wind Energy Cost Reductions R&D/Learninghistorical declines, wind energy costs were increasing for

  10. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performanceand Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices. . . . . 14in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction

  11. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Break-Even Turnkey Cost of Residential Wind Systems in theaggregate installed cost of a small wind system that couldand wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions

  12. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01

    Wind Integration Costs ..adequacy costs. Wind generation costs are also significantlyvalue. 3. We add wind integration cost to the levelized cost

  13. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of EnergyWIND ENERGY by as much as 270% when comparing today’s turbines

  14. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bolinger, M. ( 2011). 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report.Cost of Energy From U.S. Wind Power Projects. Presentationand Energy Capture at Low Wind Speed Sites. ” European Wind

  15. DEVELOPMENTS IN LARGE BLADES FOR LOWER COST WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the WindPACT project, the Blade System Design Studies developed innovations in manufacturing, materials capacity is a companion drop in the cost of wind energy (COE). The current cost of wind-produced power. 3). Wind produced power currently i

  16. A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROMof establishing a wind transmission cost adder with respectthat involve wind and divide the cost by the relative share

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  18. County Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fuller (1987), Rao (2003). 11 #12;Model searching for Wind Erosion In NRI, wind erosion WEQCounty Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National Resources Inventory Survey Taps Maiti. · Approx. 3 points/PSU; 800,000 points in 1997 NRI 4 #12;· Data on Urban land, small water etc

  19. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of EnergyCOST OF WIND ENERGY by as much as 270% when comparing today’s turbinescosts observed in most markets from 2004 and 2009 has been largely tied to increases in the price of wind turbines [

  20. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    on U. S . Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance30% wind penetration. Wind transmission costs in the severalof Transmission ($/kW-wind) Unit Cost of Transmission ($/

  1. Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2014-04-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

  2. Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Wiser, R.

    2012-08-01

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions.

  3. Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

  4. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY Eric Lantz & Maureen Hand National RenewableRenewable Energy Laboratory. Further improving our understanding of possible future

  5. Offshore Wind Balance-of-System Cost Modeling (Poster), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameters, can yield a rise in BOS cost, such as the spike near 500 megawatts. Figure 4. Offshore wind fixed substructure BOS costs decrease as turbine rating increases, which is...

  6. New York Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Study Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    New York Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Study Final Report Prepared for: New York State Energy of Delaware Special Initiative on Offshore Wind Stephanie McClellan, Ph.D. Director Deniz Ozkan, Ph Fund and Mertz Gilmore Foundation provided funding to the Special Initiative on Offshore Wind

  7. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Renewable Energy Laboratory IEA Wind Task 26: The Past And Futureand Future Cost of Wind Energy Leading Authors Eric Lantz: National RenewableFuture Questions Eric Lantz Research Analyst Strategic Energy Analysis Center National Renewable

  8. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  9. Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.

    2011-02-01

    This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  11. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

    2012-03-26

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

  12. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  13. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and PerformanceTransmission ($/kW-wind) Unit Cost (Capacity-weighted) Windof Transmission ($/MWh- wind) Unit Cost (Capacity-weighted)

  14. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

  15. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    to Drive Wind Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with SiemensAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

  16. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  17. Offshore Wind Plant Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Maples, B.; Meadows, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.; Elkington, C.; Clayton, J.

    2012-09-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non-turbine costs associated with offshore turbine sizes ranging from 3 MW to 6 MW and offshore wind plant sizes ranging from 100 MW to 1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US offshore wind plants.

  18. IEA Wind Task 26: Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to support the generation and feed-in of renewable energy, and was continued by the EEG - Erneuerbare Energien Gesetz (Renewable Energy Law). Since then, 35 GW of land-based wind...

  19. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    wind energy generation costs, and generation costs cannot beand operating costs of new generation projects, whereas ourof installed generation, with costs recovered through

  20. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

    2006-12-01

    This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

  1. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2009-02-02

    The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and WinDS). The authors and general location of the 40 detailed transmission studies included in our review are illustrated in Figure ES-1. As discussed in the body of the report, these studies vary considerably in scope, authorship, objectives, methodology, and tools. Though we recognize this diversity and are cognizant that comparisons among these studies are therefore somewhat inappropriate, we nonetheless emphasize such simple comparisons in this report. We do so in order to improve our understanding of the range of transmission costs needed to access greater quantities of wind, and to highlight some of the drivers of those costs. In so doing, we gloss over many important details and differences among the studies in our sample. In emphasizing simple comparisons, our analysis focuses primarily on the unit cost of transmission implied by each of the studies. The unit cost of transmission for wind in $/kW terms on a capacity-weighted basis is estimated by simply dividing the total transmission cost in a study by the total amount of incremental generation capacity (wind and non-wind) modeled in that study. In so doing, this metric assumes that within any individual study all incremental generation capacity imposes transmission costs in proportion to its nameplate capacity rating. The limitations to this approach are described in some detail in the body of the report.

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andcost of transmission implied by this study is $207/kW-wind (U.S.lead us to overstate the unit cost of transmission for wind.

  3. Comparison of financing costs for wind turbine and fossil powerplants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper compares the financing costs of wind turbine powerplants with those of fossil powerplants. The goal of this examination is to determine the extent to which these costs differ and what the sources of such differences may be. The discussion is organized in the following fashion. Section 2 introduces basic terminology and concepts from finance, as they apply in the powerplant setting. Section 3 reviews available data from a variety of sources to estimate the magnitude of the variables identified in Section 2. In Section 4 we examine the effect of the production tax credit enacted in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on the financing of wind turbine projects. Conclusions are offered in Section 5. In the past two years there have been only two wind turbine projects that have been financed, so the basis for broad conclusions is limited. Nonetheless, there appears to be a significant advantage in financing costs for conventional projects compared to wind turbines. The two sources of disadvantage to wind power are first, the cost of equity capital is significantly more expensive, and second, the capital structure of wind projects has a much greater fraction of expensive equity than conventional alternatives.

  4. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    5 MW) Innovation for Our Energy Future Conclusions 1. It isthink. Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions Eric LantzPotential Sources of Future Wind Energy Cost Reductions R&D/

  5. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  6. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

  7. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Transmission Cost Incremental Generation as Only BeneficiaryUnit of Incremental Generation Equipment Cost Assumptions2003 Least Cost Resource Plan Wind Generation. Xcel Energy

  8. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    factors: wind power capital costs and natural gas prices.key assumptions – wind capital cost and the duration of PTC47 7.3.2 Wind Capital Cost

  9. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    to RPS generation requirements, wind cost assumptions arethe sudden leap in wind costs over the past several years,especially if higher wind costs persist. However, most, if

  10. 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONe β+-DecayUpgrade P. May, G.J.1 All12011 Cost

  11. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

  12. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Luers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabo, Leif I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto; Hand, M. Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  13. Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production...

  14. Edinburgh Research Explorer Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Onshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Onshore Wind Power Citation. 2015 #12;Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Onshore Wind Power R Camilla Thomson, Gareth P the economics of wind energy is vitally important to ensure a rational discussion about the role of wind power

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    cost performance and effectiveness of nine small wind energyAND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSIONAND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION

  16. Historical Analysis of Marine Sea Level Pressure and Wind Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC WINDS FOR 4 PRODUCTS: Our OI; Da Silva (DS); NCEP-NCAR reanalysis (RA); and FSU subjective pseudo-windstresses lagged autocorrelation for zonal windstress OI DS RA FSU #12;CONCLUSIONS: winds are not that bad! #12;4/30/02 Historical Analysis of Marine Sea Level Pressure and Wind Components: the Good, the Bad

  17. Low-Level Winds in Tornadoes and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    I Low-Level Winds in Tornadoes and Potential Catastrophic Tornado Impacts in Urban Areas --HAROLD E areas by making models of the wind field based on mobile Doppler radar observations. As part of that effort, they have estimated death tolls associated with those modeled wind fields, arriving at estimates

  18. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar

  19. Edinburgh Research Explorer Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Offshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Offshore Wind Power Citation for published version: Thomson, C & Harrison, G 2015, Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Offshore Wind. 2015 #12;Life Cycle Costs and Carbon Emissions of Offshore Wind Power R Camilla Thomson, Gareth P

  20. Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings C. R. Sullivan J. D. Mc the IEEE. #12;Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings Charles R. Sullivan://engineering.dartmouth.edu/inductor Abstract--Litz-wire windings for gapped inductors are optimized for minimum cost within a loss constraint

  1. Optimization of a Flyback Transformer Winding Considering Two-Dimensional Field Effects, Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of a Flyback Transformer Winding Considering Two-Dimensional Field Effects, Cost and perhaps miti- gated. And both the cost and the loss in the litz-wire winding are strong functions and cost. In this paper, we address just such a case: a flyback trans- 1Although high-frequency winding

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly the system without the need to reserve flexible capacity for within-hour balancing of wind generation #12;3 5

  3. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solarranges  [26]   Improved  wind  farm  power  quality  and  

  4. Understanding Wind Power Costs: The Value of a Comprehensive Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2013-05-01

    The evolution and maturity of the wind industry have often been assessed by considering changes in key metrics including capital costs, capacity factor, turbine pricing, and in some cases electricity sales data. However, wind turbines and plants represent a complex system optimization problem and each of these metrics, in isolation, fails to tell the complete story of technological progress and industry advancement. By contrast, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) provides a more comprehensive and nuanced perspective on industry trends. LCOE can be used to analyze the effect of individual changes (by holding other variables constant) or to understand the complex interactions that might occur for example between turbine costs and productivity. Moreover, LCOE offers a reflection of the total production costs and required revenue for wind plants. This presentation provides examples of how a narrow focus on individual industry metrics can provide inaccurate representations of industry trends while also demonstrating how LCOE captures the array of critical industry variables to provide a greater level of insight.

  5. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    been located on land; offshore wind capacity surpassed 1 G Woffshore, and deep offshore wind potential. Even assumingthe potential for offshore wind. As such, the size of the

  6. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris, France:Bolinger, M. (2011). 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report.Økonomi (The Economy of Wind Power). EUDP 33033-0196.

  7. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Økonomi (The Economy of Wind Power). EUDP 33033-0196.to the Chapter on Wind Power in Energy TechnologyAgency (DEA). (1999). Wind Power in Denmark: Technologies,

  8. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Wind Energy: Modeling the Competition Between Gas Turbineson Global Wind Turbine Markets and Strategies 2008- Energyand energy input prices, and an overall demand for wind turbines

  9. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    2000. "The Potential of Wind Energy to Reduce Carbon Dioxide0804.1126v2. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). 2008. "Brussels, Belgium: Global Wind Energy Council. Greenblatt,

  10. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris, France:EWEA. (2011). Pure Power – Wind Energy Targets for 2020 andBelgium: European Wind Energy Association (19) Electric

  11. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Opportunities in Wind Energy Technology. ” 50th AIAA/ASME/in its European Wind Energy Technology Platform (TP Wind) tothe Chapter on Wind Power in Energy Technology Perspectives

  12. Ris-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for Large-scale Off-shore Wind Farms Peter contains a preliminary investigation of site specific design of off- shore wind turbines for a large off using a design tool for wind turbines that involve numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations

  13. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Wind Energy Policy in the EU: Lessons from Denmark, GermanyWind Energy Association Although European countries such as Germany,

  14. Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro.

    To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

  15. SMART Wind Consortium Virtual Meeting on Installation: Reducing Electrical and Foundation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 90-minute SMART Wind Consortium virtual meeting is intended to foster dialogue on actions to improve safety and efficiency and to reduce installation costs for distributed wind turbines. Gary...

  16. Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issaeva, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

  17. Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-02-01

    This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

  18. IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy; Work Package 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, P.; Lensink, S.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The lifetime cost of wind energy is comprised of a number of components including the investment cost, operation and maintenance costs, financing costs, and annual energy production. Accurate representation of these cost streams is critical in estimating a wind plant's cost of energy. Some of these cost streams will vary over the life of a given project. From the outset of project development, investors in wind energy have relatively certain knowledge of the plant's lifetime cost of wind energy. This is because a wind energy project's installed costs and mean wind speed are known early on, and wind generation generally has low variable operation and maintenance costs, zero fuel cost, and no carbon emissions cost. Despite these inherent characteristics, there are wide variations in the cost of wind energy internationally, which is the focus of this report. Using a multinational case-study approach, this work seeks to understand the sources of wind energy cost differences among seven countries under International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 26 - Cost of Wind Energy. The participating countries in this study include Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Due to data availability, onshore wind energy is the primary focus of this study, though a small sample of reported offshore cost data is also included.

  19. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of Global Wind Power." Journal of Geophysical2008. "The Economics of Wind Power with Energy Storage."Economics of Large-Scale Wind Power in a Carbon Constrained

  20. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    the Chapter on Wind Power in Energy Technology Perspectives21) IEA. (2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris,WIND ENERGY R&D/Learning  Area   Potential  Changes     (For  more  detail  on  technology  

  1. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    2000. "The Potential of Wind Energy to Reduce Carbon Dioxide2008: arXiv:0804.1126v2. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC).2008. "Global Wind 2007 Report." Brussels, Belgium: Global

  2. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    and Aerodynamic Analysis. ” Wind Energy (10:5); pp. 395–413.2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris, France:in Spain. Spanish Wind Energy Association (AEE) contribution

  3. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and HydropowerSpeed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” Energy

  4. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Speed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” EnergyThe Economics of Wind Energy. ” Renewable and Sustainable

  5. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar Energyoffshore wind in UK waters – Understanding the past and projecting the future. London, UK: UK Energy

  6. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Energy Technology Industry: A n International Comparison of Windthe Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program, Office of EnergyEnergy Capacity Generation Technology Large Hydropower Small Hydropower Wind

  7. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  8. Edinburgh Research Explorer Life cycle costs and carbon emissions of wind power: Executive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Life cycle costs and carbon emissions of wind power: Executive Summary of wind power: Executive Summary. ClimateXChange. Link: Link to publication record in Edinburgh Research of wind power Executive Summary R Camilla Thomson, Gareth P Harrison, University of Edinburgh, 2015

  9. Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fossil fuel resources especially oil and natural gas, alternatives to electricity production basedOperational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter to the variability and unpredictability of wind power production. For large amounts of wind power production

  10. Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ' desire a shift away from carbon intensive electricity generation. Wind power is increasingly becomingEconomics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O

  11. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamic research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions. Research at the NWTC is crucial to understanding how wind turbines function in large, multiple-row wind plants. These conditions impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural components that ultimately effect the useful lifetime of wind turbines. This work also is essential for understanding and maximizing turbine and wind plant energy production. Both turbine lifetime and wind plant energy production are key determinants of the cost of wind-generated electricity.

  12. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    interactions between capital cost and performance as well asthat applies recent capital cost and performance data fromthe interdependence of capital costs and performance and to

  13. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Energy Laboratory. Danish Energy Agency (DEA). (1999). Wind2009) and the Danish Energy Agency (DEA) (1999), illustratedata is from the Danish Energy Agency wind turbine

  14. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study that summarizes the Wind Tower Systems and its Space Frame tower. Describes their new wind tower design and explains how DOE funding made this possible.

  15. Minimizing Wind Power Producer's Balancing Costs Using Electrochemical Energy Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miettinen, J.; Tikka, V.; Lassila, J.; Partanen, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines how electrochemical energy storage can be used to decrease the balancing costs of a wind power producer in the Nordic market. Because electrochemical energy storage is developing in both technological and financial terms, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for the most important variables in the wind-storage hybrid system. The system was studied from a wind power producer's point of view. The main result is that there are no technical limitations to using storage for reducing the balancing costs. However, in terms of economic feasibility, installing hybrid wind-storage systems such as the one studied in this paper faces challenges in both the short and long terms.

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    as a Because this wind private cost with which to evaluateAllow 1 percent of wind machine costs for O&M: The averagein turn will make wind machines cost effective for investors

  17. Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost-benefit analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost carried out a social cost-benefit analysis (CBA) for erecting and operating wind farms on the North Sea 2004, in which they requested a breakdown of the costs and benefits of 6,000 MW of offshore wind energy

  18. How Does Wind Affect Coal? Cycling, Emissions, and Costs (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Milligan, M.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes in general fashion what the emissions and economic impacts of wind power generation on fossil power plants looks like and also offers some mitigation ideas.

  19. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    GW, predominantly from hydropower plants (Table 2). This isIf one excludes large hydropower, however, this figure dropsGeneration Technology Large Hydropower Small Hydropower Wind

  20. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Presentation to EIA Energy Outlook, Modeling, and Data2006. "Global Wind Energy Outlook 2006." Amsterdam, TheA Sustainable World Energy Outlook." Amsterdam, The

  1. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Energy Technology Strategy: Addressing Climate Change."Climate Problem for the Next 50 Years with Current Technologies."technology solutions - including wind - in combating global climate

  2. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    but turbine pricing and capital costs have not returned towhen both performance and capital cost trends suggestedin capacity factor and capital cost GE’s reported median

  3. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D Program: Impact of Selected Energy Technology Investments Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy R&D Program: Impact of Selected Energy Technology...

  4. A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Solar Capacity Factor Capacity Energy TC = c c ( P w + P c +cost weighted by energy or capacity has far less importancerelative share of capacity and energy from the modeled wind

  5. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    information on wind power purchase prices, capital costs,prices and/or negotiated power purchase agreements as muchLab collection of power purchase agreements. To reduce the

  6. Cost of Wind Energy in the United States: Trends from 2007 to 2012 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of recent technology trends observed in the United States including project size, turbine size, rotor diameter, hub height, annual average wind speed, and annual energy production. It also highlights area where system analysis is required to fully understand how these technology trends relate to the cost of wind energy.

  7. The U.S. wind production tax credit - evaluating its impact on wind deployment and assessing the cost of its renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Patrick C. (Patrick Charles)

    2013-01-01

    The desirability, viability, and cost effectiveness of policies designed to incentivize growth of the wind energy industry are subject to widespread debate within the U.S. government, wind industry groups, and the general ...

  8. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    define model demand as German demand net of CHP, run off river hydro, expected wind generation and international power exchange. Hourly wind forecasts and realisations are provided by ISET e.V. Generation plant data are taken from EWI’s plant data base... one model region and endogenously determine international power exchange. In addition, the model is directly applicable to many other empirical questions, such as the effect of CO2emission costs on plant dispatch and costs or competitive bench...

  9. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and WaterWind

  10. Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    (cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

  11. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Energy Watch Group (21) IEA. (2009). Technology Roadmap –AEE) contribution to IEA Task 26 (6) Wiser, R. ; Yang, Z. ;in Denmark. Presentation to IEA Wind Task 26 (12) European

  12. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  13. Integration Costs: Are They Unique to Wind and Solar Energy? Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Hodge, B.; Kirby, B.; Clark, C.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past several years, there has been considerable interest in assessing wind integration costs. This is understandable because wind energy does increase the variability and uncertainty that must be managed on a power system. However, there are other sources of variability and uncertainty that also must be managed in the power system. This paper describes some of these sources and shows that even the introduction of base-load generation can cause additional ramping and cycling. The paper concludes by demonstrating that integration costs are not unique to wind and solar, and should perhaps instead be assessed by power plant and load performance instead of technology type.

  14. Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

  15. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The variable O&M cost of wind and solar is assumed to bethe relative levelized cost of wind and solar supply. OneJ. Swider and C. Weber. The costs of wind’s intermittency in

  16. ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Wenzhong Gao

    2012-09-30

    The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

  17. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Wiser, R. ; Lantz,Economics of Wind Energy. ” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyGolden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Carbon

  18. Alternative wind power modeling methods using chronological and load duration curve production cost models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M R

    1996-04-01

    As an intermittent resource, capturing the temporal variation in windpower is an important issue in the context of utility production cost modeling. Many of the production cost models use a method that creates a cumulative probability distribution that is outside the time domain. The purpose of this report is to examine two production cost models that represent the two major model types: chronological and load duration cure models. This report is part of the ongoing research undertaken by the Wind Technology Division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in utility modeling and wind system integration.

  19. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    and Turbine Costs. ” WINDPOWER 2008. Houston, Texas, JuneProject Performance. ” WINDPOWER 2010. Dallas, Texas, May

  20. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Generation Technologies. NREL/SR-6A20- 48595. Work performedDesign Study Report. (2005) NREL/SR-500-35524. Golden, CO:for Cost of Energy Reduction. NREL/TP-500-41036. Golden, CO:

  1. Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

    2013-09-01

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

  2. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pietermen, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Notable is that current wind costs are in the $1600-2000/kWin place. As a result, the wind cost assumptions employed inespecially if higher wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price

  4. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking of distributed wind state policy and economic environments summarized in the attached report, based on the Policy Tool's default COE results, highlights favorable market opportunities for distributed wind growth as well as market conditions ripe for improvement. Best practices for distributed wind state policies are identified through an evaluation of their effect on improving the bottom line of project investments. The case studies and state rankings were based on incentives, power curves, and turbine pricing as of 2010, and may not match the current results from the Policy Tool. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets. In providing a simple and easy-to-use policy comparison tool that estimates financial performance, the Policy Tool and guidebook are expected to enhance market expansion by the small wind industry by increasing and refining the understanding of distributed wind costs, policy best practices, and key market opportunities in all 50 states. This comprehensive overview and customized software to quickly calculate and compare policy scenarios represent a fundamental step in allowing policymakers to see how their decisions impact the bottom line for distributed wind consumers, while estimating the relative advantages of different options available in their policy toolboxes. Interested stakeholders have suggested numerous ways to enhance and expand the initial effort to develop an even more user-friendly Policy Tool and guidebook, including the enhancement and expansion of the current tool, and conducting further analysis. The report and the project's Guidebook include further details on possible next steps. NREL Report No. BK-5500-53127; DOE/GO-102011-3453.

  5. Low-Cost 63% Efficient 2.5-kW UHF Power Amplifier for a Wind Profiler Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    Low-Cost 63% Efficient 2.5-kW UHF Power Amplifier for a Wind Profiler Radar Brad Lindseth1,2 , Tom describes a low-cost 449-MHz 2.5-kW peak pulse amplifier for use in a wind profiling radar. New high- powerW cost upwards of US$30,000 [2,3]. The goal of this work is to develop a low-cost UHF power amplifier

  6. Dynamically Adjustable Wind Turbine Blades: Adaptive Turbine Blades, Blown Wing Technology for Low-Cost Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-02

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Caitin is developing wind turbines with a control system that delivers compressed air from special slots located in the surface of its blades. The compressed air dynamically adjusts the aerodynamic performance of the blades, and can essentially be used to control lift, drag, and ultimately power. This control system has been shown to exhibit high levels of control in combination with an exceptionally fast response rate. The deployment of such a control system in modern wind turbines would lead to better management of the load on the system during peak usage, allowing larger blades to be deployed with a resulting increase in energy production.

  7. An enumerative technique for modeling wind power variations in production costing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R.; Graham, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    Production cost, generation expansion, and reliability models are used extensively by utilities in the planning process. Most models do not provide adequate means for representing the full range of potential variation in wind power plants. In order to properly account for expected variation in wind-generated electricity with these models, the authors describe an enumerated probabilistic approach that is performed outside the production cost model, compare it with a reduced enumerated approach, and present some selected utility results. The technique can be applied to any model, and can considerably reduce the number of model runs as compared to the full enumerated approach. They use both a load duration curve model and a chronological model to measure wind plant capacity credit, and also present some other selected results.

  8. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Association (2002). The U.S. Small Wind Turbine Industryof Grid-Connected Small Wind Turbines in the Domesticto Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems. 2002 Conference

  9. Wind-Driven Snow Buildup Using a Level Set Approach Tommy Hinks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind-Driven Snow Buildup Using a Level Set Approach Tommy Hinks University College Dublin Dr Ken Our Method #12;Problem Description Physically plausible Wind Particles Accumulation- Shape (granular) - Location (wind) Criteria Simulation Components Surfaces Transportation Buildup #12;Related Work Height

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  11. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  12. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction prices,increases in the cost of wind turbines over the last severaland components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  13. Small Wind Guidebook/What Do Wind Systems Cost | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveiraSmall WindInformationSmall

  14. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    2006. Transmission and Wind Energy: Capturing the Prevailingand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologiesand Renewable Energy Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program

  15. A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS Galenthe incremental cost of renewables portfolio standards (RPS)Washington DC have adopted renewables portfolio standards (

  16. Advancing Wind Integration Study Methodologies: Implications of Higher Levels of Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Wan, Y. H.

    2010-07-01

    The authors report on the evolution of techniques to better model high penetrations (generally, 20% or more energy penetration) of wind energy.

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributed generation data used within this calculator. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database...

  18. Wind Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Personal Income January 10, 2013 - 2:21pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of...

  19. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    would stimulate wind technology cost reductions on theprojections of renewable technology costs, fossil fuel priceavailability. Renewable technology cost: Reflects changes to

  20. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    L ABORATORY Building a Market for Small Wind: The Break-Evenemployer. BUILDING A MARKET FOR SMALL WIND: T HE B REAK -E

  1. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Western Wind, and Midwest Wind Energy. Table 4. Merger andHorizon) Noble Power CPV Wind Catamount Western Wind EnergyCoastal Wind Energy LLC Tierra Energy, LLC Renewable

  2. Modeling the reliability and maintenance costs of wind turbines using Weibull analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vachon, W.A. [W.A. Vachon & Associates, Inc., Manchester, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A general description is provided of the basic mathematics and use of Weibull statistical models for modeling component failures and maintenance costs as a function of time. The applicability of the model to wind turbine components and subsystems is discussed with illustrative examples of typical component reliabilities drawn from actual field experiences. Example results indicate the dominant role of key subsystems based on a combination of their failure frequency and repair/replacement costs. The value of the model is discussed as a means of defining (1) maintenance practices, (2) areas in which to focus product improvements, (3) spare parts inventory, and (4) long-term trends in maintenance costs as an important element in project cash flow projections used by developers, investors, and lenders. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to conduct studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of...

  4. Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Saiqi

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

  5. Wind-Driven Snow Buildup Using a Level Set Approach Tommy Hinks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind-Driven Snow Buildup Using a Level Set Approach Tommy Hinks1 and Ken Museth2 1University are achieved by tracing snow-carrying particles in a dynamic wind-field and on the surfaces of objects. Local of the scene complexity. Such techniques could be used to generate snow-covered scenes for movies as well

  6. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    of the U.S. DOE’s Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program. Weand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies ProgramManager Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies Energy

  7. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    National Laboratories Wind Energy Technology Department P.O.Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies Energy EfficiencyOF ENERGY WIND AND HYDROPOWER TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM http://

  8. Afghanistan Wind Power Density at 50-m Above Ground Level GIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Density at 50-m Above Ground Level GIS Data This dataset was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Agency for International...

  9. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Wind Energy Association WindPower 2002 Conference, 3-5 JunePRESENTED AT GLOBAL WINDPOWER 2004 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS W IND EModel, prepared by Bergey Windpower Co. for the National

  10. Construction of low-cost, Mod-0A wood-composite wind-turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lark, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    The construction of two sixty-foot, low-cost, wood composite blades for service on 200 kW Mod-0A wind turbines is described. The blades were constructed of epoxy resin-bonded Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge sections, and paper honeycomb-cored, birch plywood faced panels for the afterbody sections. The blades were joined to the wind turbine hub by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs embedded into the root end of the blades. The blades were installed on the 200 kW Mod-0A wind turbine facility at Kahuku, Hawaii. The blades have completed nearly 8000 hours of operation over an 18 month period at an average power of 150 kW prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The blades were replaced because of a corrosion failure of the steel shank on one stud. Inspections at NASA-Lewis showed that the wood composite structure remains in excellent condition.

  11. Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

    2008-02-01

    This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

  12. Fabrication of low-cost Mod-0A wood-composite wind-turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lark, R.F.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1983-02-01

    A contract was awarded to Gougeon Brothers, Inc., by NASA Lewis Research Center, under Department of Energy sponsorship, for the development and fabrication of two 60-foot, low-cost wood composite blades for service on a 200-kW Mod-0A wind turbine machine. The contractural effort consisted of blade design and analysis and fabrication phases. This report provides a brief summary of the design and analysis phase, and an indepth review of the blade fabrication phase. The wood composite blades were fabricated by using epoxy resin-bonded laminates of Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge spar sections and honeycomb-cored birch plywood panels for the blade trailing edge or afterbody sections. The blade was joined to the wind turbine hub assembly by epoxy resin-bonded steel load takeoff studs. The wood composite blades were installed in the newest Mod-0A wind turbine test facility at Kukuku, Hawaii called Makini Huila (wind wheel) by the Hawaiians. The wood composite blades have successfully completed high power (average of 150 kW) operations for an 18-month period (nearly 8000 h) prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The original set of blades were taken out of service because of the failure of the shank on one stud. An inspection of the blades at NASA Lewis showed that the shank failure was caused by a high stress concentration at a corrosion pit on the shank fillet radius which resulted in fatigue stresses in excess of the endurance limit. The remainder of the blade, including the embedded portion of the fractured stud, and the entire wood structure was found to be in excellent condition. All of the remaining studs, with the exception of four studs that showed an onset of corrosion, were also in excellent condition. The failed stud, as well as four of the corroded studs were successfully replaced with new studs. The blade is currently in a service-ready condition.

  13. Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow intertidal basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow, and wind direction on water depth, fetch, and the resulting wave-generated shear stresses. We identify four. Wiberg (2009), Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses

  14. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  15. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    basis. Text Box 1. Offshore Wind Development Activities Inis some interest in offshore wind in several parts of theGeorgia TOTAL Proposed Offshore Wind Capacity 735 MW 650 MW

  16. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    to Support the Development of Wind Powered Generation inExtraeuropean Options for an Energy Supply with Wind Power,”Conference on Wind Power for the 21 st Century, Kassel,

  17. A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    179c/179c9e0086c0.pdf National Wind CoordinatingTransmission Planning and Wind Energy. Issue Brief. August.and Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program

  18. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    pdf/0554(2008).pdf European Wind Energy Association (EWEA).Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the European PowerPrepared by the European Wind Energy Association. http://

  19. Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department Sandia National Laboratories Thursday, April 8th 3 Y WIND ENERGY SEMINAR SERIES Wind energy is a growing electricity source around the world, providing. The rapid expansion of wind is largely due to its relative similarity in levelized cost of energy to fossil

  20. Wind Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy Costs by IncreasingWhole AlgaeServicesMuch as

  1. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    line cost and substation costs. The resulting broad range inthe cost of all associated equipment such as substations,

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Wind Energy Project. New England Electricity Scenario Analysis: Exploring the economic, reliability, and environmental impacts

  3. Level of Repair Analysis and Minimum Cost Homomorphisms of Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutin, Gregory

    of Lillian Barros Abstract. Level of Repair Analysis (LORA) is a prescribed procedure for defence logistics, LORA seeks to determine an optimal provision of repair and maintenance facilities to minimize overall on bipartite graphs is polynomial time solvable. Keywords: Computational Logistics; Level of Repair Analysis

  4. A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C Integration Costs" Extended Abstract A fast growth of the installation of wind turbines has been experienced in several European countries. The introduction of substantial amounts of wind power in a liberalized

  5. A LOW COST WAFER-LEVEL MEMS PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY Pejman Monajemi, Paul J. Joseph*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    A LOW COST WAFER-LEVEL MEMS PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY Pejman Monajemi, Paul J. Joseph* , Paul A. Kohl-cost low-temperature packaging technique for wafer-level encapsulation of MEMS devices fabricated on any arbitrary substrate. The packaging process presented here does not involve wafer bonding and can be applied

  6. Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  7. levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data book Homefuelleasing Home Alevine'slevelized cost of

  8. Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

  9. The study of pedestrian level wind at MacGregor dormitory building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wannaphahoon, Teerawut (Teerawut Lim)

    2011-01-01

    This study uses the Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel at MIT to study a 100:1 scaled model of the MacGregor dormitory building. The purposes are to quantify and analyze the effect of the presence of the building on pedestrian-level ...

  10. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2008-05-01

    This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

  11. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    all in-state wind is used in-state, New Mexico could meetWind Power Rankings: The Top 20 States Cumulative Capacity (end of 2006, MW) Texas California Iowa Minnesota Washington Oklahoma New Mexico

  12. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    NREL/CP-500-35969. Global WindPower Conference. Chicago,Transmission Projects. ” Windpower 2007 Conference. Los

  13. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    building transmission to meet peak wind conditions during peak transmission usage periods, and the magnitude of curtailment may be small

  14. Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2008-02-09

    This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

  15. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3A: Low Levels of Synchronous Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Nicholas W.; Leonardi, Bruno; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara

    2015-11-17

    The stability of the North American electric power grids under conditions of high penetrations of wind and solar is a significant concern and possible impediment to reaching renewable energy goals. The 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration considered in this study results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system. This includes different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior from wind and solar generation. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, is one of the largest regional solar and wind integration studies to date. In multiple phases, it has explored different aspects of the question: Can we integrate large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West? The work reported here focused on the impact of low levels of synchronous generation on the transient stability performance in one part of the region in which wind generation has displaced synchronous thermal generation under highly stressed, weak system conditions. It is essentially an extension of WWSIS-3. Transient stability, the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism among all elements following disturbances, is a major constraint on operations in many grids, including the western U.S. and Texas systems. These constraints primarily concern the performance of the large-scale bulk power system. But grid-wide stability concerns with high penetrations of wind and solar are still not thoroughly understood. This work focuses on 'traditional' fundamental frequency stability issues, such as maintaining synchronism, frequency, and voltage. The objectives of this study are to better understand the implications of low levels of synchronous generation and a weak grid on overall system performance by: 1) Investigating the Western Interconnection under conditions of both high renewable generation (e.g., wind and solar) and low synchronous generation (e.g., significant coal power plant decommitment or retirement); and 2) Analyzing both the large-scale stability of the Western Interconnection and regional stability issues driven by more geographically dispersed renewable generation interacting with a transmission grid that evolved with large, central station plants at key nodes. As noted above, the work reported here is an extension of the research performed in WWSIS-3.

  16. Considerations of the effects of high winds on a low-level radioactive interim storage pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    On Wednesday, March 27, 1991, the St. Louis area experienced high winds that damaged a synthetic cover of a low-level radioactive waste storage pile at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) in Hazelwood, Missouri. Winds in the St. Louis area at the time of the incident were reported to be 35 mi/h with gusts up to 50 mi/h. Tornado warnings were in effect at the time. The purpose of this summary is to analyze the effects of uplift forces on a synthetic pile cover because of high winds. Consideration is given to anchoring the synthetic cover, type and placement of ballast on the pile, and the type of synthetic membranes best suited to this application. Discussion also includes the emergency procedures used in responding to the incident.

  17. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, projectincreases in the cost of wind turbines over the last severalO&M costs given the dramatic changes in wind turbine

  19. System level design enhancements for cost effective renewable power generation by reverse electrodialysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Adam Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the future competitiveness of reverse electrodialysis (RED) with other energy technologies show that the projected levelized cost of electricity realized through current stack designs is prohibitively high. ...

  20. Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

  1. Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

    2008-06-01

    In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Grid. 2006. Trans mission and Wind Energy: Capturing theour sample. 20% Wind Energy: Wind Deployment System (WinDS)and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies

  3. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Certificates of Need for Transmission Lines to Support theand Preference in Transmission Service. ” Washington, D.C. :Integrating Wind into Transmission Planning: The Rocky

  4. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore »of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  5. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  6. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    17 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by Projectperformance, and operations and maintenance expenses.Capacity Factor Operations and maintenance (O&M) costs are

  7. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    additional transmission costs to new electricity generators,additional transmission costs to new electricity generators,Electricity Coordinating Council / California - 13 transmission

  8. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  9. New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities' Carbon Emissions and Fuel Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2), a follow-up to the initial WWSIS released in May 2010, which examined the viability, benefits, and challenges of integrating as much as 33% wind and solar power into the electricity grid of the western United States.

  10. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  11. Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-12

    This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage.

  12. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  13. Estimating costs of low-level radioactive waste disposal alternatives for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, National Low-Level Waste Management Program. It presents planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for four sizes of in-state low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities. These PLCC estimates include preoperational and operational expenditures, all support facilities, materials, labor, closure costs, and long-term institutional care and monitoring costs. It is intended that this report bc used as a broad decision making tool for evaluating one of the several complex factors that must be examined when deciding between various LLRW management options -- relative costs. Because the underlying assumptions of these analyses will change as the Board decides how it will manage Massachusett`s waste and the specific characteristics any disposal facility will have, the results of this study are not absolute and should only be used to compare the relative costs of the options presented. The disposal technology selected for this analysis is aboveground earth-mounded vaults. These vaults are reinforced concrete structures where low-level waste is emplaced and later covered with a multi-layered earthen cap. The ``base case`` PLCC estimate was derived from a preliminary feasibility design developed for the Illinois Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. This PLCC report describes facility operations and details the procedure used to develop the base case PLCC estimate for each facility component and size. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the base case PLCC estimate by varying several factors to determine their influences upon the unit disposal costs. The report presents the results of the sensitivity analyses for the five most significant cost factors.

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    in electricity sector generation costs. In addition, the5/MWh change in levelized generation costs. We find that thethe cost and potential of renewable generation technologies

  15. Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, John E.

    We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

  16. Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise Masahiro Sugiyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise by Masahiro Sugiyama Bachelor of Science in Earth Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Technology and Policy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology February 2007 ©2007 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. All rights

  17. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2007-05-01

    This report--the first in what is envisioned to be an ongoing annual series--attempts to fill this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2006.

  18. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    49 Figure 5. Installed Wind Project Costs Over Time Capacitynot represent the true cost of wind generation (which wouldinstalled project costs on wind power prices. Specifically,

  19. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    specific focus on the cost of wind turbines deployed onshoremovements inflating the cost of wind turbines imported intothe USD-denominated cost of wind turbines imported into the

  20. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedused to estimate wind integration costs and the ability toColorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study. Denver,

  1. Low-cost household paint abatement to reduce children's blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, T.; Kanarek, M.S.; Schultz, B.D.; Murphy, A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of low-cost abatement on children's blood lead levels. Blood lead was analyzed before and after abatement in 37 homes of children under 7 years old with initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL. Ninety-five percent of homes were built before 1950. Abatement methods used were wet-scraping and repainting deteriorated surfaces and wrapping window wells with aluminum or vinyl. A control group was retrospectively selected. Control children were under 7 years old, had initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL and a follow-up level at least 28 days afterward, and did not have abatements performed in their homes between blood lead levels. After abatement, statistically significant declines occurred in the intervention children's blood lead levels. The mean decline was 22%, 1 to 6 months after treatment. After adjustment for seasonality and child's age, the mean decline was 6.0 {micro}g/dL, or 18%. The control children's blood levels did not decline significantly. There was a mean decline of 0.25 {micro}g/dL, or 0.39%. After adjustment for seasonality and age, the mean decline for control children was 1.6 {micro}g/dL, or 1.8%. Low-cost abatement and education are effective short-term interim controls.

  2. Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrow, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

  3. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Lantz

    2012-09-21

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized in the fact sheet.

  4. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  5. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

  6. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet). Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    development potential from wind power installations has beendevelopment potential of wind power projects, however,is whether new investment in wind power projects stimulates

  7. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Lab staff. Wind Project Operations and Maintenance CostsWind project operations and maintenance costs come primarilyEnergy Laboratory operations and maintenance publicly owned

  8. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Energy Use and Costs | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClioCommunity WindInformation Community

  9. POPCYCLE: a computer code for calculating nuclear and fossil plant levelized life-cycle power costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardie, R.W.

    1982-02-01

    POPCYCLE, a computer code designed to calculate levelized life-cycle power costs for nuclear and fossil electrical generating plants is described. Included are (1) derivations of the equations and a discussion of the methodology used by POPCYCLE, (2) a description of the input required by the code, (3) a listing of the input for a sample case, and (4) the output for a sample case.

  10. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Bolinger, M. , 2009. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report .3] U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). 2008. 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy ' s Contribution to U. S .

  11. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    3] U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). 2008. 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy ' s Contribution to U. S .Trans mission and Wind Energy: Capturing the Prevailing

  12. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet). Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM The Impact of Wind Developmentmay be required. WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM Methods TheNREL). The U.S. DOE (Wind & Water Power Program) funded

  13. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    upward pressure on wind turbine costs, and ultimately, windProject Costs From Current Wind Turbine Orders Higherwhen the cost of manufacturing wind turbines has increased

  14. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrent, Noah J.; Kusnick, Joshua F.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-04-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

  15. Impact of WRF Physics and Grid Resolution on Low-level Wind Prediction: Towards the Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Future Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Glascoe, L; Lundquist, J; Wharton, S

    2010-02-24

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used in short-range simulations to explore the sensitivity of model physics and horizontal grid resolution. We choose five events with the clear-sky conditions to study the impact of different planetary boundary layer (PBL), surface and soil-layer physics on low-level wind forecast for two wind farms; one in California (CA) and the other in Texas (TX). Short-range simulations are validated with field measurements. Results indicate that the forecast error of the CA case decreases with increasing grid resolution due to the improved representation of valley winds. Besides, the model physics configuration has a significant impact on the forecast error at this location. In contrast, the forecast error of the TX case exhibits little dependence on grid resolution and is relatively independent of physics configuration. Therefore, the occurrence frequency of lowest root mean square errors (RMSEs) at this location is used to determine an optimal model configuration for subsequent decade-scale regional climate model (RCM) simulations. In this study, we perform two sets of 20-year RCM simulations using the data from the NCAR Global Climate Model (GCM) simulations; one set models the present climate and the other simulates the future climate. These RCM simulations will be used to assess the impact of climate change on future wind energy.

  16. Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

  17. Cost-minimized combinations of wind power, solar power and electrochemical storage, powering the grid up to 99.9% of the time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Cost-minimized combinations of wind power, solar power and electrochemical storage, powering the grid up to 99.9% of the time Cory Budischak a,b,*, DeAnna Sewell c , Heather Thomson c , Leon Mach d, Newark, DE 19713, USA c Center for Carbon-Free Power Integration, School of Marine Science and Policy

  18. Enhancing Low-Cost Ozone Spectrometers to Measure Mesospheric Winds and Tides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, O B

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based spectrometers have been developed to measure the concentration, velocity, and temperature of ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) using low-cost satellite television electronics to observe the 11.072 GHz spectral line of ozone. A two-channel spectrometer has been engineered to yield various performance improvements, including a doubling of the signal-to-noise ratio, improved data processing efficiency, and lower power consumption at 15 W. Following 2009 and 2012 observations of the seasonal and diurnal variations in ozone concentration near the mesopause, the ozone line was observed at an altitude near 95 km and latitude of 38 degrees north using three single-channel spectrometers located at the MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA), Chelmsford High School (Chelmsford, MA), and Union College (Schenectady, NY) pointed south at 8 degrees. Observations from 2009 through 2014 are used to derive the nightly-averaged seasonal variation in meridional velocity, as well as the seasonally...

  19. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    balancing areas, the use of wind forecasts, and intra-hourchallenges and costs. Wind forecasts are most accurate andare the cost of day-ahead wind forecast error; the remaining

  1. A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN, L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    - 1 - A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN.B.Steven@herts.ac.uk wonshim@duck.snut.ac.kr vintan@cs.sibiu.ro ABSTRACT During the 1990s Two-level Adaptive Branch Predictors processors. However, while two-level adaptive predictors achieve very high prediction rates, they tend

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Design and operation of power syste m s with large a mounts of windWind Energy: AEP 765 kV Overlay American Electric Power (AEP) developed a conceptual design

  3. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    a brief discussion on Small Wind Turbines is provided onO&M costs. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Small WindTurbines Small wind turbines can provide power directly to

  4. Integrating a significant amount of wind power generation into bulk power grid is a primary task for building a cost-effective renewable portfolio and a sustainable energy infrastructure. The uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMara, Ronald F.

    Integrating a significant amount of wind power generation into bulk power grid is a primary task. This talk will be focused on modeling the spatial correlation of wind power from farm level to grid level and spatial correlation of wind farm power generation have posed new challenges to power system operations

  5. On the response of polar cap dynamics to its solar wind and magnetotail drivers at high levels of geomagnetic activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Ye

    2012-01-01

    nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functionits controlling factors in solar wind and magnetotail, J.on its controlling factors in solar wind and magnetotail, J.

  6. On the response of polar cap dynamics to its solar wind and magnetotail drivers at high levels of geomagnetic activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Ye

    2012-01-01

    of polar cap potential by intense solar wind electricelectric potential as a function of solar wind parameters bypolar cap potential increases linearly with the solar wind

  7. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

  8. Impact of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind on Transmission-Level System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a new renewable integration study that aims to assess the potential for adding distributed wind to the current power system with minimal or no upgrades to the distribution or transmission electricity systems. It investigates the impacts of integrating large amounts of utility-scale distributed wind power on bulk system operations by performing a case study on the power system of the Independent System Operator-New England (ISO-NE).

  9. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01

    supply curve for wind using cost and performance assumptionspressure on installed wind project costs while the industryon U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance

  10. Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2012-01-01

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

  11. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter, vol.A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.they can impact wind turbine costs but fall mostly outside

  12. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) ofEnergy and the Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program OfficeRenewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of

  13. Comparison of SRP high-level waste disposal costs for borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonell, W R

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation of costs for the immobilization and repository disposal of SRP high-level wastes indicates that the borosilicate glass waste form is less costly than the crystalline ceramic waste form. The wastes were assumed immobilized as glass with 28% waste loading in 10,300 reference 24-in.-diameter canisters or as crystalline ceramic with 65% waste loading in either 3400 24-in.-diameter canisters or 5900 18-in.-diameter canisters. After an interim period of onsite storage, the canisters would be transported to the federal repository for burial. Total costs in undiscounted 1981 dollars of the waste disposal operations, excluding salt processing for which costs are not yet well defined, were about $2500 million for the borosilicate glass form in reference 24-in.-diameter canisters, compared to about $2900 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 24-in.-diameter canisters and about $3100 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 18-in.-diameter canisters. No large differences in salt processing costs for the borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic forms are expected. Discounting to present values, because of a projected 2-year delay in startup of the DWPF for the crystalline ceramic form, preserved the overall cost advantage of the borosilicate glass form. The waste immobilization operations for the glass form were much less costly than for the crystalline ceramic form. The waste disposal operations, in contrast, were less costly for the crystalline ceramic form, due to fewer canisters requiring disposal; however, this advantage was not sufficient to offset the higher development and processing costs of the crystalline ceramic form. Changes in proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations to permit lower cost repository packages for defense high-level wastes would decrease the waste disposal costs of the more numerous borosilicate glass forms relative to the crystalline ceramic forms.

  14. Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnet, Maria Claudia

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis- of Wind Turbines (Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis- of Wind Turbines (the mechanical energy of the wind turbine in a chemical form

  16. Evaluation of Production Cost Savings from Consolidation of Balancing Authorities in the US Western Interconnection under High Wind and Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2014-12-24

    This paper introduces a comprehensive analysis to quantify the potential savings in production cost due to consolidation of 32 US western interconnection Balancing Authorities (BAs). Three simulation scenarios are developed: current Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) BAs structure, full copper-sheet consolidation, and full consolidation with transmission congestion considered. The study uses WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) model that was developed for the year 2020. The model assumes 8% wind and 3% solar energy penetration as percentage of total WECC demand in 2020. Sensitivity analyses are carried out to assess the impact of transmission hurdle rates between WECC BAs on potential benefits. The study shows savings that ranges from $400 Million (2.4% of total one year production cost) to $600 Million (3.2%) per year in thermal units production cost due to consolidation can be achieved. The copper sheet consolidation scenario shows an extra savings of $240 Million (1.4%) per year.

  17. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    price is constant Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost WindOhio was modified and offshore wind development in Texas was

  18. A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar TechnologiesRPS costs, per unit of renewable energy generation, rangedFlores-Espino National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

  19. Randomized min-max optimization: the exact risk of multiple cost levels Algo Car`e, Simone Garatti, Marco C. Campi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garatti, Simone

    . Our goal is to evaluate the risks associated to the various costs, where the risk associated to a cost. This evaluation characterizes completely the risks associated to the costs, and represents a full-fledged resultRandomized min-max optimization: the exact risk of multiple cost levels Algo Car`e, Simone Garatti

  20. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    explain historical and forecast future wind cost and pricinglong-term forecast of future wind costs or competitiveness,example. Similarly, forecasts of deep wind cost reductions

  1. Drivers for the Value of Demand Response under Increased Levels of Wind and Solar Power; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Elaine

    2015-07-30

    Demand response may be a valuable flexible resource for low-carbon electric power grids. However, there are as many types of possible demand response as there are ways to use electricity, making demand response difficult to study at scale in realistic settings. This talk reviews our state of knowledge regarding the potential value of demand response in several example systems as a function of increasing levels of wind and solar power, sometimes drawing on the analogy between demand response and storage. Overall, we find demand response to be promising, but its potential value is very system dependent. Furthermore, demand response, like storage, can easily saturate ancillary service markets.

  2. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    to RPS generation requirements, wind cost assumptions arethe sudden leap in wind costs over the past two years, theespecially if higher wind costs persist. However, most, if

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    September 1980), Technology ment of Wind Energy ConversionSeptember 1980), Technology ment of Wind Energy Conversionwind energy for producing electricity. Wind and other renewable technologies

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMSEFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMSFor Evaluating Small Wind Energy Systems Introduction This

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents an analysis of the technical performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) funded during FY 1979 by the U.S. Department of Energy. Chapter 1 gives an analytic framework with which to evaluate the systems. Chapter 2 consists of a review of each of the nine projects, including project technical overviews, estimates of energy savings, and results of economic analysis. Chapter 3 summarizes technical, economic, and institutional barriers that are likely to inhibit widespread dissemination of SWECS technology.

  6. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    of wind power capacity in that state) because generatorsgenerators to provide the needed flexibility to integrate wind power.wind power forecasts by system operators can significantly reduce integration challenges and costs. Intra-hour transmission scheduling and generator

  7. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Daghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Millstein, Dev; Hansen, Dana; Porter, Kevin; Widiss, Rebecca; Buckley, Michael; Oteri, Frank; Smith, Aaron; Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-08-06

    Wind power capacity additions in the United States rebounded in 2014, and continued growth through 2016 is anticipated. Recent and projected near-term growth is supported by the industry’s primary federal incentive—the production tax credit (PTC)—which is available for projects that began construction by the end of 2014. Wind additions are also being driven by recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technologies, which have resulted in the lowest power sales prices ever seen in the U.S. wind sector. Growing corporate demand for wind energy and state-level policies play important roles as well. Expectations for continued technological advancements and cost reductions may further boost future growth. At the same time, the prospects for growth beyond 2016 are uncertain. The PTC has expired, and its renewal remains in question. Continued low natural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and limited near-term demand from state renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have also put a damper on growth expectations. These trends, in combination with increasingly global supply chains, have limited the growth of domestic manufacturing of wind equipment. What they mean for wind power additions through the end of the decade and beyond will be dictated in part by future natural gas prices, fossil plant retirements, and policy decisions.

  8. Technology Overview Fundamentals of Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, S.

    2005-05-01

    A presentation that describes the technology, costs and trends, and future development of wind energy technologies.

  9. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    projections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel priceboth renewable technology costs and avoided fuel costs. Theof future renewable technology cost and performance would

  10. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    AWEA). 2010. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,levels. Small Wind Turbines Small wind turbines can providebelow summarizes sales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and

  11. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    AWEA). 2010. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,a brief discussion on Small Wind Turbines is provided onat 2008 and 2009 levels. Small Wind Turbines Small wind

  12. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    learning, and costs of primary solar and wind power sourceslearning, and costs of primary solar and wind power sourcesenergy-to-electricity costs of solar, wind, and biomass

  13. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  14. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

  15. An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowell, I.

    2011-01-01

    USA. AWEA (2007). Wind Power Outlook 2007. American WindAnnual report on U.S. wind power installa- tion, costs, andAnnual report on U.S. wind power installa- tion, costs, and

  16. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to differing weather conditions. Regional LCOE vary by up to 29%, and LCOE-optimal mixes

  17. Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and NREL recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study, as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized here.

  18. Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackley, J.

    2010-01-01

    through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused...

  19. Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  20. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and INL’s rights and responsibilities in regards to access to the wind farm once constructed. An expression of interest is expected to go out soon to developers. However, with the potential of 2 years of study remaining for Site 6, the expectation of obtaining meaningful interest from developers should be questioned.

  1. Aero-Structural Design Investigations for Biplane Wind Turbine Blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth-Johnson, Perry

    2014-01-01

    costs. However, offshore wind farms need to overcomethe U.S. , several offshore wind farms have been proposed (

  2. WindWaveFloat Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alla Weinstein, Dominique Roddier, Kevin Banister

    2012-03-30

    Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.

  3. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  4. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    but eventually the cost of wind power must be competitiveand contribution to cost of large wind turbine (REpowerabout 75% of the cost of a modern wind farm, with the rest

  5. DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Figure 7. Installed Wind Project Costs Over Time Figure 8.on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performanceof a decline in wind project O&M costs in recent years.

  6. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    of variability of wind generation and costs related toLaxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India are

  7. A Review of Wind Project Financing Structures in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performancecapital to finance wind project costs. Roughly $28 billion (90-95% of the total costs of a wind project qualify for 5-

  8. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    installed wind project costs in the U.S. fell by 14.4% onperiod, reported wind project costs in the U.S. actuallyto the average cost of wind turbines in the US through 2008.

  9. Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

  10. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  11. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Porter, Kevin; Buckley, Michael; Fink, Sari; Oteri, Frank; Tegen, Suzanne

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry is facing uncertain times. With 2011 capacity additions having risen from 2010 levels and with a further sizable increase expected in 2012, there are – on the surface – grounds for optimism. Key factors driving growth in 2011 included continued state and federal incentives for wind energy, recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technology, and the need to meet an end-of-year construction start deadline in order to qualify for the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. At the same time, the currently-slated expiration of key federal tax incentives for wind energy at the end of 2012 – in concert with continued low natural gas prices and modest electricity demand growth – threatens to dramatically slow new builds in 2013.

  12. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performancecontinued to put upward pressure on wind turbine costs,wind project costs, and wind power prices in 2007. Since

  13. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter, vol.A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.driven down wind energy costs (for a brief survey of the

  14. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  15. Scoping and Framing Social Opposition to U.S. Wind Projects (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Flowers, L.

    2010-05-01

    Historical barriers to wind power include cost and reliability. However, rapid growth has increased the footprint of wind power in the United States, and some parts of the country have begun to observe conflicts between local communities and wind energy development. Thus, while questions of economic viability and the ability of grid operators to effectively manage wind energy have become less significant, community acceptance issues have emerged as a barrier to wind and associated transmission projects. Increasing community acceptance is likely to be a growing challenge as the wind industry seeks electricity sector penetration levels approaching 20%.

  16. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    resource types and generation costs are estimated externallystudy reports cost and renewable generation results for thestudy reports cost and renewable generation results for the

  17. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

  18. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.wind tower structures and costs vary substantially as the depth of water in which these turbines

  19. Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

    2013-01-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

  20. Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    W.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis-and I. Mracovcic, "Commerical Wind Energy Conversion SystemW.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis-

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    C.G. , and Hargreaves, W.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics forLarge Arrays Statis- of Wind Turbines (Great Lakes andNo. PF-98655 N under DOE Federal Wind Contract No. DE-AC04-

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    W.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis-land-use related permits. Wind Energy Report (May 1981) p.2.R. Cappelli, B. Dawley, I. Wind Energy Conversion System

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Annual Charac- Power Estimates for Wind Turbine Generators,Economy, Power Estimates for Wind Turbine Generators,wind speed, enough power is available to increase torque sufficiently to overcome internal losses in the generator

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    W.R. (May 1977), Wind Energy tics for Large Arrays Statis-of the Current Status of Wind Energy Innovative Systems1980), Technology ment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems,

  6. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbon Regulationtechnology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty, andtechnology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty, and

  7. Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    ATMS 310 Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at two levels. It is not really a wind at all, just a measure of the shear of the geostrophic wind. But there are good reasons for considering the geostrophic wind; mainly, it provides a convenient way of connecting

  8. Cost savings associated with landfilling wastes containing very low levels of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, C.J. [Argonne National Lab., Germantown, MD (United States); Shaddoan, W.T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Paducah, KY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has operated captive landfills (both residential and construction/demolition debris) in accordance with the Commonwealth of Kentucky regulations since the early 1980s. Typical waste streams allowed in these landfills include nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste (such as paper, plastic, cardboard, cafeteria waste, clothing, wood, asbestos, fly ash, metals, and construction debris). In July 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new requirements for the disposal of sanitary wastes in a {open_quotes}contained landfill.{close_quotes} These requirements were promulgated in the 401 Kentucky Administrative Record Chapters 47 and 48 that became effective 30 June 1995. The requirements for a new contained landfill include a synthetic liner made of high-density polyethylene in addition to the traditional 1-meter (3-foot) clay liner and a leachate collection system. A new landfill at Paducah would accept waste streams similar to those that have been accepted in the past. The permit for the previously existing landfills did not include radioactivity limits; instead, these levels were administratively controlled. Typically, if radioactivity was detected above background levels, the waste was classified as low-level waste (LLW), which would be sent off-site for disposal.

  9. Wind Program Accomplishments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Over the last three decades the Wind Program has led the nation's efforts to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of wind technologies on land and offshore....

  10. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  11. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Bioenergy Power Systems Wind Power Wind Power Main Page Outreach Programs Image Gallery FAQs Links Software Hydro Power INL Home Wind Power Introduction The Wind Power...

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    wind and solar systems with conventional power grids. Technical & Institutional Issues for SWECS Technical Issues Design &

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    electricity demand growth; existing state policies that are insufficient to support future wind power capacity additions at the levels 2011 Wind Technologies Market

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    impacts We converted other cost metrics to ¢/kWh retail ratePower System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective onA. Bibliography of RPS Cost Studies Studies listed in

  15. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  16. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2011-06-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends in the U.S. wind power market in 2010. The report analyzes trends in wind power capacity, industry, manufacturing, turbines, installed project costs, project performance, and wind power prices. It also describes trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers, and discusses financing issues.

  18. Wind Turbine Selection: A case-study for Brfell, Iceland Samuel Perkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    , Reykjavík University, Iceland Margrét Arnardóttir, Co-Supervisor Project Manager (Wind Power), Landsvirkjun. The model identified an optimum wind turbine design for Búrfell which decreases the Levelized Cost of Energy by 10.4% when compared to the existing E-44 turbines. The power curve of the optimum turbine design

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Installation costs, including well drilling and the diggingplastic pipe drilling & installing pipe Total costs to beproject costs: Tower Foundation (including drilling,

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Installation costs, including well drilling and the diggingproject costs: Tower Foundation (including drilling,plastic pipe drilling & installing pipe Total costs to be

  1. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  2. Parametric design of floating wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy, Christopher (Christopher Henry)

    2007-01-01

    As the price of energy increases and wind turbine technology matures, it is evident that cost effective designs for floating wind turbines are needed. The next frontier for wind power is the ocean, yet development in near ...

  3. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Carbon Trust. 2008. Offshore wind power: big challenge, bigGreat Expectations: The cost of offshore wind in UK waters –Bruce Valpy. 2011. Offshore Wind: Forecasts of future costs

  4. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Great Expectations: The cost of offshore wind in UK waters –Bruce Valpy. 2011. Offshore Wind: Forecasts of future costsCarbon Trust. 2008. Offshore wind power: big challenge, big

  5. Wind and tidal response of a semi-enclosed bay, Bahía Concepción, Baja California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponte, Aurélien L. S.

    2009-01-01

    Observed response to diurnal winds . . . . . 4.1Thermal wind balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .level response to wind . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Current

  6. Value of Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.

    2011-04-01

    This study, building on the extensive models developed for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), uses these WECC models to evaluate the operating cost impacts of improved day-ahead wind forecasts.

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    horizontal wind electric machines, and other Wind Pumpingmachine is an 8-10 KVA recently designed, bUilt, and mark- eted by Jacobs Wind Electricmachine delivers about 1095 Kwh of en- ergy during the six month farming period. Assuming an electric

  8. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01

    to lower the cost of offshore wind power, and incrementallyinstalled offshore. From 2018 to 2030, roughly 16 GW of wind

  9. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    or clean energy policies, unless RPS-specific costs areCost Impacts of a Vermont Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard Economics of a Washington Energy Portfolio Standard: Effects on Ratepayers The Washington Clean Energy

  10. Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shreekant

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

  11. Automatic contour-based road network design for optimized wind farm micrositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, H; Wang, J; Lin, Q; Gong, Q

    2015-01-01

    and R. Li, “Study on wind power generation cost in Zhejiang:Analysis of wind farm construction cost,” East China Invest.RE_ Technologies_Cost_Analysis-WIND_POWER.pdf [6] G.

  12. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    installed wind project costs in the U.S. fell by 14.4% onperiod, reported wind project costs in the U.S. actuallyto the average cost of wind turbines in the US through 2008.

  13. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    movements inflating the cost of wind turbines imported intoto the average cost of wind turbines in the US through 2008.specific focus on the cost of wind turbines deployed onshore

  14. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    upward pressure on wind turbine costs, wind project costs,Wind Turbine Transaction Prices Over Time With turbines accounting for as much as 75%-80% of total project costs,

  15. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    demand in future years. Technology cost and performanceAssumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technology

  16. Automatic contour-based road network design for optimized wind farm micrositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, H; Wang, J; Lin, Q; Gong, Q

    2015-01-01

    in Zhejiang: Analysis of wind farm construction cost,” Eastroute slection on wind farm construction,” in Proc. 2010planning of the wind farm construction. A well-chosen road

  17. Automatic contour-based road network design for optimized wind farm micrositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, H; Wang, J; Lin, Q; Gong, Q

    2015-01-01

    R. Guanche, “Offshore wind farm layout opti- mization usingin Zhejiang: Analysis of wind farm construction cost,” EastPayan, “Optimization of wind farm turbines layout using an

  18. Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

    2002-02-26

    In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

  19. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    technologies. The ownership cost of wind, before incentives,other hand, wind electricity, with an ownership cost of 6.9to wind electricity, about 60% of the ownership cost is

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Farm Wind Electricity Project The New Hampshire Ski Resortpurchasers of electricity of the New Hampshire Publicelectricity tash will receive for selling power back to New Hampshire

  1. Cost-minimized combinations of wind power, solar power and electrochemical storage, powering the grid up to 99.9% of the time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    wind, and photovoltaics) with electrochemical storage (batteries and fuel cells), incorporated if we optimize the mix of generation and storage technologies. Ó 2012 Published by Elsevier B

  2. Impact of Balancing Areas Size, Obligation Sharing, and Ramping Capability on Wind Integration: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines wind integration costs as a function of balancing area size to determine if the larger system size helps mitigate wind integration cost increases.

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

  4. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    wholesale electricity price projections as a model output.in natural gas prices projections over the past severalprojections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price

  5. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    detailed wholesale electricity price projections as a modelelectricity bills, and renewable energy certificate (REC) prices. Developing a consistent set of metrics for comparing cost projections

  6. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    and Germany’s 25,813 MW. Several countries are beginning to achieve relatively high levels of wind energy

  7. Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

    1983-01-01

    Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  9. Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    of reducing the cost of producing wind power: for example, the site selection, site layout design, predictiveDesign of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song Intelligent Accepted 24 August 2009 Available online 22 September 2009 Keywords: Wind farm Wind turbine Layout design

  10. Offshore Wind Farm Model Development - Upcoming Release of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Large-eddy simulation of wind farms with parameterization of wind turbines is emerging as a powerful tool for improving the performance and lowering the maintenance cost of...

  11. Next-Generation Wind Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity...

  12. NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in European Seas A. M installation, operation and maintenance costs associated with offshore wind parks. Successful offshore wind. Keywords Wind energy Á Offshore Á Resources assessment Á European seas Á Wind mapping Á Wind climatology Á

  14. Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Wind Energy, LLC

    2006-05-01

    This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

  15. Revealing the Hidden Value that the Federal Investment Tax Credit and Treasury Cash Grant Provide To Community Wind Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    third of the installed cost of a wind project, and thereforeto 95% of the total costs of a wind project qualify for 5-depending on the wind project’s capital cost and capacity

  16. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01

    was  directly  tied  to  wind  turbine  cost.  Goldwind’s countries where  the cost of wind power technology had bringing  down  the  cost  of  wind?powered  electricity.  

  17. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    and forecast future wind cost and pricing trends (see,long-term forecast of future wind costs or competitiveness,To put the material on wind cost and pricing trends in

  18. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01

    that  transport  costs  for  wind  turbines,  composed  of was  directly  tied  to  wind  turbine  cost.  Goldwind’s production of wind turbines could reduce the cost of the 

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    oil drilling likely be important sources retortion of divergence between private and social It is unlikely that environmen- cost

  20. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  1. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson

    2011-01-10

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    crop irrigation. The system consists of a windmill, pump,irrigation conduits Total gross costs From gross costs I must net out those costs associated an electric with using pumppump water from an eXisting well into a pond. The pond water is used for irrigation

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

  4. Remote sensing for wind power potential: a prospector's handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, J.E.; Maule, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.; Rosenfeld, C.L.; Woolley, S.G.; McClenahan, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Remote sensing can aid in identifying and locating indicators of wind power potential from the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments (i.e.: wind-deformed trees, white caps, and areas of thermal flux). It is not considered as a tool for determining wind power potential. A wide variety of remotely sensed evidence is described in terms of the scale at which evidence of wind power can be identified, and the appropriate remote sensors for finding such evidence. Remote sensing can be used for regional area prospecting using small-scale imagery. The information from such small-scale imagery is most often qualitative, and if it is transitory, examination of a number of images to verify presistence of the feature may be required. However, this evidence will allow rapid screening of a large area. Medium-scale imagery provides a better picture of the evidence obtained from small-scale imagery. At this level it is best to use existing imagery. Criteria relating to land use, accessibility, and proximity of candidate sites to nearby transmission lines can also be effectively evaluated from medium-scale imagery. Large-scale imagery provides the most quantitative evidence of the strength of wind. Wind-deformed trees can be identified at a large number of sites using only a few hours in locally chartered aircraft. A handheld 35mm camera can adequately document any evidence of wind. Three case studies that employ remote sensing prospecting techniques are described. Based on remotely sensed evidence, the wind power potential in three geographically and climatically diverse areas of the United States is estimated, and the estimates are compared to actual wind data in those regions. In addition, the cost of each survey is discussed. The results indicate that remote sensing for wind power potential is a quick, cost effective, and fairly reliable method for screening large areas for wind power potential.

  5. Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  6. James TokishiJames Tokishi General term for any use of the wind to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    on environment #12;Offshore wind farms Stronger, steadier winds Wind Energizer Increases output of HAWT units common Wind farms Private turbines PumpingPumping Wind turbine powers water pump for drainage Levees Well Large startup costs, low maintenance costs Profitable wind farms exist, e.g. UK Low impact

  7. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  8. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    G. Sinden, A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC SpecialM. Hand, and A. Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and2009). Analysis of Impacts of Wind Integration in the Tamil

  9. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Bloomberg NEF”). 2011c. Wind Turbine Price Index, Issue V.Hand, A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scalingof a Multi-MegaWatt Wind Turbine. ” Renewable Energy, vol.

  10. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    of the cost of a modern wind farm, with the rest going toclose to the site of the wind farm. Other parts are smallerexcluded from China’s major wind farm projects (Kirkegaard

  11. DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    the Growth of the U.S. Wind Industry The U.S. Department ofAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andkey trends in the U.S. wind industry, in many cases using

  12. Modeling the National Potential for Offshore Wind: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

    2007-06-01

    The Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was created to assess the potential penetration of offshore wind in the United States under different technology development, cost, and policy scenarios.

  13. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    contribution to cost of large wind turbine (REpower MM92)Wind turbine manufacturing and transportation account for about 75% of the costcost of many key components. Tearing apart a multi-million dollar wind turbine

  14. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC Special Report onestimate the cost of wind energy and compare it with otherCMA (2006). The Report of Wind Energy Resource Assessment in

  15. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-10-30

    The amount of wind power capacity being installed globally is surging, with the United States the world leader in terms of annual market share for three years running (2005-2007). The rapidly growing market for wind has been a double-edged sword, however, as the resulting supply-demand imbalance in wind turbines, along with the rising cost of materials and weakness in the U.S. dollar, has put upward pressure on wind turbine costs, and ultimately, wind power prices. Two mitigating factors--reductions in the cost of equity provided to wind projects and improvements in project-level capacity factors--have helped to relieve some of the upward pressure on wind power prices over the last few years. Because neither of these two factors can be relied upon to further cushion the blow going forward, policymakers should recognize that continued financial support may be necessary to sustain the wind sector at its current pace of development, at least in the near term. Though this article emphasizes developments in the U.S. market for wind power, those trends are similar to, and hold implications for, the worldwide wind power market.

  16. Flexibility Reserve Reductions from an Energy Imbalance Market with High Levels of Wind Energy in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; S. Beuning

    2011-10-01

    The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection (WI) over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Areas (BAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts (GW) of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive load make it attractive to consider ways in which Balancing Area Authorities (BAAs) can pool their variability and response resources, thus taking advantage of geographic and temporal diversity to increase overall operational efficiency. Our analysis considers several alternative forms of an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) that have been proposed in the non-market areas of the WI. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: BAA cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As proposed, the EIM does not consider any form of coordinated unit commitment; however, over time it is possible that BAAs would develop formal or informal coordination plans. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations, both separately and in concert.

  17. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andState of the U.S. Wind Power Market Intro Sidebar: The U.S.Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

  18. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01

    power at the wind turbine shaft as the cost func- tion asstructure, cost, and land occupation. In wind turbines, thecost. Since the P&O method adds delay, it is not practical for medium- and large-inertia wind turbine

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Energy Policy Research Marginal Cost Pricing Project, FirstEnergy Innovative Systems Projects, Solar Energy ResearchEnergy Innovative Systems Projects, Solar Energy Research

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Risks in Reactor Q. ~. Safety Study: An Commercial Nuclear Powernuclear power are While the costs mostly in the form of incurred risk

  1. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    to generate in this way wind speed fluctuations with similar statistics as observed in nature. Forces wereWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  2. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.-M.; King, J.

    2012-09-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigates the impacts of high penetrations of wind and solar power into the Western Interconnection of the United States. WWSIS2 builds on the Phase 1 study but with far greater refinement in the level of data inputs and production simulation. It considers the differences between wind and solar power on systems operations. It considers mitigation options to accommodate wind and solar when full costs of wear-and-tear and full impacts of emissions rates are taken into account. It determines wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts. New data sets were created for WWSIS2, and WWSIS1 data sets were refined to improve realism of plant output and forecasts. Four scenarios were defined for WWSIS2 that examine the differences between wind and solar and penetration level. Transmission was built out to bring resources to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales ranging from seasonal down to 5 minutes.

  3. U.S. Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.

    2012-10-01

    With balance-of-system (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine costs has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from U.S. offshore wind plants.

  4. Energy Department Announces Distributed Wind Competitiveness...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for projects led by Pika Energy, Northern Power Systems, Endurance Wind Power, and Urban Green Energy that will help drive down the cost of small and medium-sized wind energy...

  5. Automatic contour-based road network design for optimized wind farm micrositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, H; Wang, J; Lin, Q; Gong, Q

    2015-01-01

    and R. Li, “Study on wind power generation cost in Zhejiang:ing renewable energy. A wind power generation station, alsotheir applications to wind power prediction, and wind energy

  6. Wind power development -Status and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of long-term forecasts for the wind power technology in general shows a decrease in production costs of 2 5.1 US-DOE estimate of the development of wind power costs. 22 5.2 Technology based forecast 23 5 to the Macro Task E1 on pro- duction costs for fusion and alternative technologies, part of the pro- gramme

  7. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01

    to reduce the cost of all future floating wind turbines andwind turbine is an important factor in the design of these structures, reducing the cost

  8. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-09-01

    The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

  9. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  10. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    New Jersey “high technology cost” scenario, which exceedsthan-expected solar technology costs would probably causeAvailability Renew able Technology Cost Fossil Fuel Price

  11. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing in the U.S. Department of...

  12. Analysis of wind power ancillary services characteristics with German 250-MW wind data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, B.

    1999-12-09

    With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, power fluctuations have become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the US, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. This paper analyzes wind power in the context of ancillary services, using data from a German 250 Megawatt Wind project.

  13. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Cost Studies en al ty CO2 Reduction Cost in 1st Peak Targetdo not represent the average costs of CO2 abatement over theestimated CO2 reductions. Since these are single-year costs,

  14. Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant...

  15. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  16. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    , wind power has been expanding globally in recent years and it has become a dominant renewable energy the turbulent atmosphere and the wind turbine wake in order to optimize the design of the wind turbine as wellWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary

  17. wind energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Pantex to Become Wind Energy Research Center http:nnsa.energy.govfieldofficesnponpopressreleasespantex-become-wind-energy-research-center

  18. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

  19. Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection Anca D. Hansen1 on the wind farm level. The ability of active stall wind farms with AC grid connection to regulate the power, is therefore directed towards optimising the integration of large wind farms within the electrical power grid

  20. Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This 2-page fact sheet describes NREL's offshore wind research and development efforts and capabilities. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: (1) Developing offshore design tools and methods; (2) Collaborating with international partners; (3) Testing offshore systems and developing standards; (4) Conducting economic analyses; (5) Characterizing offshore wind resources; and (6) Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers. NREL has developed and maintains a robust, open-source, modular computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool, known as FAST. FAST's state-of-the-art capabilities provide full dynamic system simulation for a range of offshore wind systems. It models the coupled aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, control system, and structural response of offshore wind systems to support the development of innovative wind technologies that are reliable and cost effective. FAST also provides dynamic models of wind turbines on offshore fixed-bottom systems for shallow and transitional depths and floating-platform systems in deep water, thus enabling design innovation and risk reduction and facilitating higher performance designs that will meet DOE's cost of energy, reliability, and deployment objectives.

  1. Metabolic cost of generating horizontal forces during human running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kram, Rodger

    . Using a wind tunnel to apply horizontal impeding forces, Pugh (19) showed that the metabolic cost forces. Davies (5) compared the metabolic cost of running with wind resistance vs. wind assistanceMetabolic cost of generating horizontal forces during human running YOUNG-HUI CHANG AND RODGER KRAM

  2. Model Predictive Control Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines Martin Klauco Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-MSc-2012-65 #12;Summary Wind turbines are the biggest part of the green energy industry. Increasing interest control strategies. Control strategy has a significant impact on the wind turbine operation on many levels

  3. Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

  4. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  5. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  6. Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholomy, Obadiah

    2005-01-01

    lowest cost renewable energy source in California [2], windCost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies” August 2003, California Energycosts are consistent with values developed by the California Energy

  7. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

  8. U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2011-12-01

    This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

  9. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

  10. Effects of protein and energy levels during the growing and laying periods on performance and egg production costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santana, Jose

    1968-01-01

    Ih O O I IA I O o 0' V V V V Al F! I nlI 0 o 0 0 a J2 nl 0 C4 H 0 I! I! IA O nl A u nl nl nl W A nl A nl nl I! Cl 4 W W 0 0 V 0 '0 cl nl u u V II nl Sl nl nl In n! nl m M nl g A CI CI nl ~ In 28... of diet to pullets from 8 to 21 weeks of age, combined with an all-mash and a mash plus unground milo free choice feeding system, in a factorial arrangement (3xZx2) had no effect on body weight, level of peak production or egg size during the laying...

  11. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  12. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  13. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    technology costs, fossil fuel price uncertainty, alternativeand performance assumptions. Fossil fuel price uncertainty:able Technology Cost Fossil Fuel Price Uncertainty Alternate

  14. 11march2007 Blowing in the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genton, Marc G.

    in Scotland, the largest in the USA is planned for southern California, and the biggest offshore wind farm in development) can take advantage of stronger ocean breezes. Just over 15 offshore wind farms are currently a planned 1000 MW at a capital cost of £2 bil- lion. Most offshore wind farms are located in water less than

  15. Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

  16. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Gamesa G90-2.0 MW #12;Maximum output at minimum cost per kWh for low wind sites ®® Class IIIA mast and the electrical substation. This innovative modular design based on TCP/IP architecture has

  17. Ris-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    winds in offshore wind resource assessment. Firstly, wind wakes behind two large offshore wind farms farming 3 2.1 Horns Rev and Nysted offshore wind farms 4 3 Synthetic aperture radar 6 3.1 Imaging geometry in offshore wind energy planning as a supplement to on site measurements, which are costly and sparse

  18. New Report Evaluates Impacts of DOE's Wind Powering America Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    which are intended to increase the deployment of utility-scale, community, and small wind systems. These state-level activities include the formation of wind working groups...

  19. Low Cost Heliostat Development Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusek, Stephen M.

    2014-04-21

    The heliostat field in a central receiver plant makes up roughly one half of the total plant cost. As such, cost reductions for the installed heliostat price greatly impact the overall plant cost and hence the plant’s Levelized Cost of Energy. The general trend in heliostat size over the past decades has been to make them larger. One part of our thesis has been that larger and larger heliostats may drive the LCOE up instead of down due to the very nature of the precise aiming and wind-load requirements for typical heliostats. In other words, it requires more and more structure to precisely aim the sunlight at the receiver as one increases heliostat mirror area and that it becomes counter-productive, cost-wise, at some point.

  20. Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  1. Addressing Barriers to Wind Energy by Creating Consensus through Information Dissemination and Outreach: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Perchlik

    2003-02-28

    OAK B188 The sixteen month project to address barriers to the development of VT wind energy was successful. The project built consensus on wind energy siting issues through four stakeholder workshops and engaged Vermonters on wind energy issues with a wind energy information dissemination and outreach campaign. There is still a great need for more outreach and accurate wind energy information dissemination on the local level where informed discussion on the cost and benefits of wind energy projects needs to be held. The stakeholder workshop framework and outreach tools that were created by this project will be helpful tools as state agencies, wind developers, non-profit organizations and concerned citizens (in Vermont and around the country) continue to discuss wind energy projects and the role of wind energy in comprehensive energy plans. Given the success of this project it is recommended that other states replicate this project as a way to help overcome the barriers to win d energy development. This report provides: an overview of the project accomplishments, detailed quarter by quarter descriptions of the project activities, activities spawned by the project, conclusions, and copies of all the documents created during the project as attachments (No.1-8).

  2. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  3. innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms Far off the shores for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective

  4. Due to decrease in fossil fuel levels, the world is shifting focus towards renewable sources of energy. With an annual average growth rate of 25%, wind is one of the foremost source of harnessing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with domains including both onshore and offshore wind farms. Unlike most previous works, where wind farms were. As a single wind turbine is insufficient, multiple turbines are installed forming a wind farm. Generally, wind multiple studies centering the influence of weather on such wind farms, but no substantial research focused

  5. Wind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    towers represent 26% of the total WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) cost #12;Why concrete towerWind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy output? · Energy output is proportional to the cube of wind velocity, 100m towers (versus

  6. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

  7. Feasibility analysis of coordinated offshore wind project development in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Mimi Q

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the cleanest and most available resources in the world, and advancements in wind technology are making it more cost effective. Though wind power is rapidly developing in many regions, its variable ...

  8. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andExpectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market IntroSidebar: The U.S. wind industry experienced unprecedented

  9. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). 2008. “20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.costs of achieving 20% wind energy are projected to be

  10. Automatic contour-based road network design for optimized wind farm micrositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, H; Wang, J; Lin, Q; Gong, Q

    2015-01-01

    and R. Guanche, “Offshore wind farm layout opti- mization1] S. Zhao and R. Li, “Study on wind power generation costin Zhejiang: Analysis of wind farm construction cost,” East

  11. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    clean_energy_policies/increase-wisconsin- rps.html Table 1. State RPS Policies as Modeled by RPS Cost

  12. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    D. (2005), California Wind Resources, CEC publication # CEC-level inversions with surface wind and temperature at PointD. W. Stuart (1986), Mesoscale wind variability near Point

  13. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Wind Energy Educational Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01

    Wind Powering America national technical director Ian Baring-Gould made this presentation about workforce development in the wind energy industry to an audience at the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference in Anaheim. The presentation outlines job projections from the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report and steps to take at all levels of educational institutions to meet those projections.

  14. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  15. Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced the selection of three projects that aim to advance the offshore wind industry and lower the cost of offshore wind technologies. Learn more about these technological innovations.

  16. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropo

  17. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    as the leading market for wind power and requires the use ofeventually the cost of wind power must be competitive withwind turbine (REpower MM92) Tower Rotor blades Gear box Power

  18. America's Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hardware costs are spurring near-record low prices for wind power. In 2011 and 2012 the price of wind under long-term power purchase contracts averaged just 4 cents per kilowatt...

  19. Strategies to Mitigate Declines in the Economic Value of Wind and Solar at High Penetration in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This resource evaluates several options to reduce and eliminate the decline in the value of wind and solar PV technology, as a previous study had quantified the decline as penetration levels increased. Researchers found that largest increase in the value of PV at high penetration levels comes from assuming that low-cost bulk power storage is an investment option. Other attractive options, particularly at more modest penetration levels, include real-time pricing and technology diversity.

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  1. Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    These factors make wind power's cost significantly more stable and predictable than the cost of power generated from fossil fuels. Consequently, power purchase agreements for...

  2. Wind Power Forecasting Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Call 2012 Retrospective Reports 2012 Retrospective Reports 2011 Smart Grid Wind Integration Wind Integration Initiatives Wind Power Forecasting Wind Projects Email...

  3. Idaho_Wind_Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Bryans Run Cell Tower Site Wilson Peak Eckert Site Loertscher Boise State's Wind Data Link Wind Power Idaho Wind Data See also: Idaho Energy Resources - Wind, American...

  4. Economical wind protection - underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesling, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    Earth-sheltered buildings inherently posess near-absolute occupant protection from severe winds. They should sustain no structural damage and only minimal facial damage. Assuming that the lower-hazard risk attendant to this type of construction results in reduced insurance-premium rates, the owner accrues economic benefits from the time of construction. Improvements to aboveground buildings, in contrast, may not yield early economic benefits in spite of a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. This, in addition to sensitivity to initial costs, traditionalism in residential construction, and lack of professional input to design, impede the widespread use of underground improvements and the subsequent economic losses from severe winds. Going underground could reverse the trend. 7 references.

  5. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

  6. VOLUME 18, NUMBER 2, 2010 n LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL 47 Wind-Shear System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    VOLUME 18, NUMBER 2, 2010 n LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL 47 Wind-Shear System Cost-Benefit Analysis. » #12;48 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL n VOLUME 18, NUMBER 2, 2010 WIND-SHEAR SYSTEM COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS-shear system cost benefits in order to retrospectively evaluate the expected safety benefits of wind

  7. Computational analysis of shrouded wind turbine configurations using a 3-dimensional RANS solver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    October 2014 Available online Keywords: Wind energy Shrouded wind turbines DAWT CFD Transition model a b presently confronting the widespread adoption of wind energy is cost. Improvements in wind turbineComputational analysis of shrouded wind turbine configurations using a 3-dimensional RANS solver

  8. Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    cost projections · Chemical Engineering (CE) Plant Construction Cost Index ­ Base value = 100 in 1957.0 in 2Q 2001 · Engineering News Record (ENR) · Nelson Refinery (NR) Construction Cost Index Cost Indices available for estimation are based upon the past · These data must be updated using cost indexes . · Cost

  9. South Carolina Opens Nation's Largest Wind Drivetrain Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the facility will help test and validate new turbines, particularly for offshore wind-helping to speed deployment of next generation energy technology, reduce costs for...

  10. Energy Department Announces New Regional Approach to Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Centers. The new WINDExchange initiative and website will serve as a digital portal providing fact-based informational resources about the costs and benefits of wind...

  11. Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Power Plant This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable energy to be transported via hydrogen to a demand center for transportation use....

  12. SMART Wind Consortium Virtual Meeting on Installation: Reducing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to improve safety and efficiency and to reduce installation costs for distributed wind turbines. Gary Harcourt of Great Rock Windpower will discuss the electrician's work and...

  13. Future of Wind Energy Technology in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the status of wind energy in the United States as of 2007, its cost, the potential for growth, offshore development, and potential technology improvements.

  14. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    of the utility companies. In Utah, the Commission is responsible for determining avoided cost rates for qualifying facilities. As will be noted later, the Spanish Fork Wind...

  15. Energy Department Announces Innovative Offshore Wind Energy Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    be installed in water more than 1,000 feet deep, demonstrating an innovative solution for deep water wind turbine projects and lowering costs by simplifying installation and...

  16. Wind and Solar Curtailment: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Speer, B.; Wang, X.; Carlini, E. M.; Estanqueiro, A.; Flynn, D.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Menemenlis, N.; Orths, A.; Pineda, I.; Smith, J. C.; Soder, L.; Sorensen, P.; Altiparmakis, A.; Yoh, Y.

    2013-09-01

    High penetrations of wind and solar generation on power systems are resulting in increasing curtailment. Wind and solar integration studies predict increased curtailment as penetration levels grow. This paper examines experiences with curtailment on bulk power systems internationally. It discusses how much curtailment is occurring, how it is occurring, why it is occurring, and what is being done to reduce curtailment. This summary is produced as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 25 on Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power.

  17. Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building John Seryak Kelly Kissock Project Engineer Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Dayton... Dayton, Ohio ABSTRACT Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical...

  18. Effects of incoming surface wind conditions on the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on a wind turbine model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    . In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine by using a force-moment sensor, a high in the incoming ABL wind with higher turbulence intensity levels. The turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4904375] I. INTRODUCTION Wind energy, as a renewable energy source, has been playing a

  19. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  20. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  1. Steve Kropper WindPole Ventures, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Storage far off. SOLUTION Good data/forecast (like other energy markets) PRODUCT Real time, hub height Endorsements #12;Bad Data Slows Wind 300 MW wind needs backup: ready, idle, expensive No grid level storage now. No construction. No tech risk. Big economic advantage $15k vs $65k. Invenergy, #5 in wind asset. 6 states prepaid

  2. Technical and economic assessments of electrochemical energy storage systems: Topical report on the potential for savings in load-leveling battery and balance of plant costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Binas, G.; Del Monaco, J.L.; Pandya, D.A.; Sharp, T.E.; Consiglio, J.A.

    1985-08-31

    The battery technologies considered in this study are zinc-bromide, lead-acid, zinc-chloride and sodium sulfur. Results of the study are presented in self contained sections in the following order: Balance of Plant, Zinc-Bromide, Lead-Acid, Zinc-chloride, and Sodium-Sulfur. The balance of plant cost estimates are examined first since the results of this section are utilized in the following battery sections to generate cost reductions in the battery plant costs for each of the battery technologies.

  3. Forecastability as a Design Criterion in Wind Resource Assessment: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to include the wind power forecasting ability, or 'forecastability,' of a site as a design criterion in wind resource assessment and wind power plant design stages. The Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) methodology is adopted to maximize the capacity factor of a wind power plant. The 1-hour-ahead persistence wind power forecasting method is used to characterize the forecastability of a potential wind power plant, thereby partially quantifying the integration cost. A trade-off between the maximum capacity factor and the forecastability is investigated.

  4. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  5. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

    2014-07-01

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  6. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  7. Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    compared to other energy-conversion technologies. PV is performing better than coal, natural gas, nuclear fusion, wind, and solar thermal in reducing the cost of energy....

  8. Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-05-01

    The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

  9. Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 Rules and Regulations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 RULES AND REQUIREMENTS Revision 2, 9415 iv This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at www.nrel.gov...

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. What does this mean...

  11. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Build a Durable Market for Wind Power in the United States”crisis on the U.S. wind power market. A sizable literaturethe recent run-up in wind power costs and pricing. Moreover,

  12. Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects. Berkeley,and M. Bolinger. 2012. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report.AWEA). 2012b. AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Fourth Quarter 2012

  13. Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

    2005-11-01

    Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

  14. General Electric Company Oahu Wind Integration Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General Electric Company Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report Delivered to: Richard Rocheleau dependent state in the nation. In 2008 this cost the state approximately $8.4 billion each year, which to integrate 400 MW of wind power located on the islands of Molokai and/or Lanai that could be transmitted

  15. Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office, and Debbie Lew provided their expertise on wind and solar data from NREL and contributed to the TRC state in the nation. In 2008 this cost the state approximately $8.4 billion each year, which

  16. ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    /s). Maximum sound power is first produced by the wind turbine at the design wind speed. The study at or above 4.2 m/s) and 108.4 dBA for the design wind condition (hub height winds at or above 9.7 m average sound levels are in the range of 34 to 56 dBA. · The maximum wind turbine sound level under design

  17. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  18. Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

    1982-08-01

    The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

  19. Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

  20. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  1. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    wind power more cost competitive will require technological advancements, dwindling onshore siting space and larger, more powerful turbines.turbines with siting in deeper waters harnessing faster offshore winds. However, it is likely that costs

  2. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  3. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  4. Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    offshore wind farms are installed in British, Swedish and Danish waters, and present-day costs in 2015, 2030 and 2050 14 3.1 Offshore wind farms under construction and in planning stage 14 3Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for Deployment Jørgen Lemming, Poul Erik

  5. Wind Energy Learning Curves for Reference in Expert Elicitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Wind Energy Learning Curves for Reference in Expert Elicitations Sarah Mangels, Erin Baker. Abstract: This study presents future projections of wind energy capacity and cost based on historical data. The study will be used during wind- energy expert elicitations (formal interviews aimed to quantify

  6. EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES J.F. Mandell D.D. Samborsky and L Composite materials of interest for wind turbine blades use relatively low cost fibers, resins and processes WORDS: Composite Materials, Fiber Waviness, Compressive Strength #12;1. INTRODUCTION Wind turbine blades

  7. innovati nWind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nWind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation For more than 20 years. Tackling Turbine Blade Inefficiencies In 1984, NREL researchers began investigating problems with wind turbine blade designs. Inefficiency was a significant barrier to lowering the cost of wind energy

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY 1 Optimal Maintenance Strategies for Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntaimo, Lewis

    conditions. In-situ sensors installed at wind turbines produce useful information about the physical guidelines that reduces the repair costs and increases the marketability of wind energy generation. #12;IEEEIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY 1 Optimal Maintenance Strategies for Wind Turbine Systems Under

  9. Efficiently finding optimal winding-constrained loops in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernaza, Paul

    Efficiently finding optimal winding- constrained loops in the plane Paul Vernaza, Venkatraman winding- constrained loops in the plane that are optimal with respect to a minimum-cost objective times it winds around each obstacle, enabling us to reduce the problem of finding paths satisfying

  10. Contribution to the Chapter on Wind Power Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution to the Chapter on Wind Power Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 Jørgen Lemming; Poul Power Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 Division: Division Risø-R-1674(EN) January 2008 Abstract turbines, are being implemented across all wind energy countries. The cost of wind-generated electricity

  11. How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, G.

    2007-01-01

    customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers...

  12. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    conventional power plants and wind power. IEEE Transactionsplanning with significant wind power generation. IEEEmix with high level of wind power penetration. Applied

  13. Wind Vision: Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Vision: Impacts Rich Tusing New West Technologies, LLC For EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office July 15, 2015 2 | Wind and Water Power Technologies Office...

  14. Wind Program News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-06

    Stay current on the news about the wind side of the Wind and Water Power Program and important wind energy events around the U.S.

  15. Wind Power Link

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Links These other web sites may provide additional information of interest: American Wind Energy Association Idaho Department of Energy Wind Power Information Utah...

  16. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  17. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  18. Vandenberg_Wind_Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Force and other branches of the Department of Defense for several years doing wind data collection and assessment, wind power feasibility studies, and wind farm design....

  19. Electrical Collection and Transmission Systems for Offshore Wind Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Bowen, A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Wan, Y.

    2007-03-01

    The electrical systems needed for offshore wind farms to collect power from wind turbines--and transmit it to shore--will be a significant cost element of these systems. This paper describes the development of a simplified model of the cost and performance of such systems.

  20. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Zeyer, Timo; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin; Jacobson, Mark Z

    2014-01-01

    Wind and solar PV generation data for the entire contiguous US are calculated, on the basis of 32 years of weather data with temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of 40x40km$^2$, assuming site-suitability-based as well as stochastic wind and solar PV capacity distributions throughout the country. These data are used to investigate a fully renewable electricity system, resting primarily upon wind and solar PV power. We find that the seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar PV comes at around 80% solar PV share, owing to the US summer load peak. By picking this mix, long-term storage requirements can be more than halved compared to a wind only mix. The daily optimal mix lies at about 80% wind share due to the nightly gap in solar PV production. Picking this mix instead of solar only reduces backup energy needs by about 50%. Furthermore, we calculate shifts in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to their differing resour...