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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

EIA - Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. ... such as investment or production tax credits for specified generation sources, ...

2

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

3

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

costs, the levelized cost ... 4 These results do not include targeted tax credits such as the production or investment tax credit available for some technologies.

4

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

5

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

10

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

11

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

13

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

17

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

18

Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production costing models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DeCesaro, Kevin Lynn United States Department of Energy Introduction Wind and solar power generation are prized for their environmental benefits, their low and stable...

25

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

27

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

28

Transient Control Level Test Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... final determination should be made by direct measurement at ... by the regulation of the generator, must be ... of the timing circuit used to drive the relay ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

30

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

31

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

32

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

33

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

36

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

37

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

38

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration (EIA) has changed the format of the Short-Term Energy Outlook tables for electricity industry overview (Table 7a), electricity generation (Table 7d), electricity...

39

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Costs for Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation (DG) is a broad term that encompasses both mature and emerging onsite power generation technologies with power output as small as 1 kW and as large as 20 MW. While the equipment or purchase cost of a DG system is very important, installation, operation, and maintenance (IOM) costs also are significant and often overlooked. This report reviews IOM costs for both mature and emerging DG technologies. Some equipment cost data is included for reference, but is not the focus of this repo...

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

High level white noise generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blalock, Theron V. (Knoxville, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

42

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

43

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser This analysis was funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy factor trends fails to convey recent improvements in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from wind

44

Integration of Variable Generation and Cost-Causation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable renewable energy generation sources, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, zero fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. Advances in both technologies can reduce capital costs and provide significant control capabilities. However, their variability and uncertainty - which change with weather conditions, time of day, and season - can cause an increase in power system operating costs compared to a fully controllable power plant. Although a number of studies have assessed integration costs, calculating them correctly is challenging because it is difficult to accurately develop a baseline scenario without variable generation that properly accounts for the energy value. It is also difficult to appropriately allocate costs given the complex, nonlinear interactions between resources and loads.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

46

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

50

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

51

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

52

Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The customer-owned backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the customer owned backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

55

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

New low cost IGCC designs for competitive power generation  

SciTech Connect

Design studies of coal based 450 MW new IGCC power plants reveal their ability to compete in today's power generation market. Single train unit designs coupled with significant improvements in IGCC net output and efficiency have brought down the installed costs to the range of 850--1,000 $/kW and net thermal efficiency up to 43--47%. These improvements are shown to result from IGCC design configurations integrating new generation gas turbine combined cycles with High Pressure Texaco Gasification Technology and Elevated Pressure Air Separation Units.

Brdar, D.R.; Depuy, R.A.; Gulko, G.; Jandrisevits, M.; Paolino, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low cost high performance generator technology program. Addendum report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a system weight, efficiency, and size analysis which was performed on the 500 W(e) low cost high performance generator (LCHPG) are presented. The analysis was performed in an attempt to improve system efficiency and specific power over those presented in June 1975, System Design Study Report TES-SNSO-3-25. Heat source volume, configuration, and safety as related to the 500 W(e) LCHPG are also discussed. (RCK)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other than distributed generation. The cost reductionsWind Solar Thermal Photovoltaic Distributed Generation-Base Distributed Generation-Peak D Vintage PLANT TYPE C

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

63

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Low-Cost Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

66

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

68

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of U.S. utilities have experienced gassing in radwaste, with a few encountering the refusal and return of resin shipments from the Barnwell disposal site due to this problem. This report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cost for 1 MW systems with various EP ratios Validated PNNL model using PNNL 1 kW, 1 kWh stack performance data Provided a roadmap for cost effective redox flow battery systems...

70

Modeling of Cost Curves 1.0 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs. Some typical average costs of fuel are given in the following table for coal, petroleum [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion

McCalley, James D.

71

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Title Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects...

73

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

74

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

75

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high levels of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight,...

77

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic analysis indicates that hydrogen could be produced for $3.79 per gge at an electricity cost of $0.05/kWh by the lower-cost PEM electrolyzer developed in this project, assuming high-volume production of large-scale electrolyzer systems.

Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for...

80

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

LBNL-52559 Learning and Cost Reductions for Generating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) incorporates endogenous learning into its cost calculations for power plants. The parameters that affect reductions due to learning for each of 21 power plants types. Technological learning is represented two ways, solar thermal, and photovoltaic plants. The initial TOFs are shown in Table 3. In NEMS, the first plant

82

NREL Sheds Light on Integration Costs of Variable Generation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, lack of fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. However, their variability and uncertainty--which can change with weather and not unique to wind and solar. Key Result Operational changes--such as wind and solar forecasting, larger

83

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on accommodating high levels of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight, waves, tidal forces, and some types of rivers) to generate electricity. Most renewablesfall into this category. Reliably integrating these resources into the bulk power system will require significant changes to traditional methods used for system planning and operation. Ongoing efforts brought together by NERC and its stakeholders

85

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Future Grids Speaker(s): Johan Driesen Date: March 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint...

86

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed intention to install, provides the means for obtaining lower purchased power costs. The functionality of a standby power system and its inherent value in the coming free market purchase of electrical energy are added benefits. Project feasibility, conceptual design, on-site generation facility requirements, interconnection requirements, and operation and maintenance costs will be examined. Installation costs in the range of $350 to $400 per KW and operating costs of approximately $0.06 to $0.07 per kWhr compared to purchased power rates determine the feasibility of an on-site generation system. In some cases avoided demand charges offer an opportunity for savings such that special rates are not needed for a feasible project. Depending on the manufacturer, low capital cost diesel generators are available in 1000 to 2000 KW blocks. Capacity requirements determine the number of engines required. Large capacity installations are somewhat restricted by voltage and current ratings. Some variants for multiple engine generator installations will yield greater reliability or lower costs depending on objectives. Specific requirements for basic building blocks of an on-site generation system will be examined as well as an example of a 5,500 KW installation. IEA provides an alternative to installing and operating an on-site generation system. IEA owns and operates diesel standby generation systems for customers, with responsibility for all maintenance and operation as well as associated costs. This allows customers to focus on core business, not the generation of electrical energy.

Charles, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems. In addition, it describes additional work in progress that will form the basis for the final report. This research was undertaken in response to nuclear power stations experiencing biogas generation from plant systems and low level waste containers.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle and back pressure turbine exhausting to useful process, identifies potential energy savings. Process Power Recovery: Replacing pressure reducing valve with steam turbine produces mechanical or electrical energy in conjunction with process heat. Steam vs. Electric Motor: Comparison of electric motor operating cost with steam turbines to show that cost-savings depend on application. Waste Heat Recovery: The addition of a steam turbine can justify waste heat projects that were previously not feasible on an economic basis.

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

90

Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control  

SciTech Connect

Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented.

Feeley, J.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improving polyhedral code generation for high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-level synthesis (HLS) tools are now capable of generating high-quality RTL codes for a number of programs. Nevertheless, for best performance aggressive program transformations are still required to exploit data reuse and enable communication/computation ... Keywords: high-level synthesis, loop tiling, polyhedral compilation

Wei Zuo; Peng Li; Deming Chen; Louis-Nol Pouchet; Shunan Zhong; Jason Cong

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams November 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $30.6 million in Recovery Act funding for the selection of seven hydropower projects that modernize hydropower infrastructure by increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impacts at existing facilities. The expanded hydro generation projects have estimated incremental costs of less than 4 cents per kWh on average. The selections announced today will deploy innovative technologies such as high-efficiency, fish-friendly turbines, improved water intakes, and

93

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat Pipe Topical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress towards the development of a heat pipe for use in the Low Cost High Performance Thermoelectric Generator Program is reported for the period May 15, 1975 through June 1975. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

96

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houstons innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to todays superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Future Grids Speaker(s): Johan Driesen Date: March 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare In this talk, Johan will discuss the technical barriers met while deploying distributed generation (DG) technology in the grid. These are related to voltage quality, reliability, stability of the grid, but also safety, environmental and economic issues are important. Eventually, the question 'how far can you go ?' is addressed. The range from small-scale local DG such as photovoltaics to large-scale (off-shore) wind farms are dealt with, each with their specific issues. The talk is illustrated with examples from research projects at the KULeuven financied by national and European

100

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

102

The levelized cost of energy for distributed PV : a parametric study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maturation of distributed solar PV as an energy source requires that the technology no longer compete on module efficiency and manufacturing cost ($/Wp) alone. Solar PV must yield sufficient energy (kWh) at a competitive cost (c/kWh) to justify its system investment and ongoing maintenance costs. These metrics vary as a function of system design and interactions between parameters, such as efficiency and area-related installation costs. The calculation of levelized cost of energy includes energy production and costs throughout the life of the system. The life of the system and its components, the rate at which performance degrades, and operation and maintenance requirements all affect the cost of energy. Cost of energy is also affected by project financing and incentives. In this paper, the impact of changes in parameters such as efficiency and in assumptions about operating and maintenance costs, degradation rate and system life, system design, and financing will be examined in the context of levelized cost of energy.

Goodrich, Alan C. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Comparison of costs for alternative mixed low-level waste treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Total life cycle costs (TLCCs), including disposal costs, of thermal, nonthermal and enhanced nonthermal systems were evaluated to guide future research and development programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) consisting of RCRA hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In these studies, nonthermal systems are defined as those systems that process waste at temperatures less than 350 C. Preconceptual designs and costs were developed for thirty systems with a capacity (2,927 lbs/hr) to treat the DOE MLLW stored inventor y(approximately 236 million pounds) in 20 years in a single, centralized facility. A limited comparison of the studies` results is presented in this paper. Sensitivity of treatment costs with respect to treatment capacity, number of treatment facilities, and system availability were also determined. The major cost element is operations and maintenance (O and M), which is 50 to 60% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. Energy costs constitute a small fraction (< 1%) of the TLCCs. Equipment cost is only 3 to 5% of the treatment cost. Evaluation of subsystem costs demonstrate that receiving and preparation is the highest cost subsystem at about 25 to 30% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. These studies found no cost incentives to use nonthermal or hybrid (combined nonthermal treatment with stabilization by vitrification) systems in place of thermal systems. However, there may be other incentives including fewer air emissions and less local objection to a treatment facility. Building multiple treatment facilities to treat the same total mass of waste as a single facility would increase the total treatment cost significantly, and improved system availability decreases unit treatment costs by 17% to 30%.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Harvego, L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Biagi, C. [Morrison Knudsen (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

110

Cost Effectiveness of On-Site Chlorine Generation for Chlorine Truck Attack Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chlorine tank truck attack could cause thousands of fatalities. As a means of preventing chlorine truck attacks, I consider the on-site generation of chlorine or hypochlorite at all U.S. facilities currently receiving chlorine by truck. I develop and ... Keywords: applications, cost-effectiveness, public policy, risk analysis, terrorism, uncertainty

Anthony M. Barrett

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

FUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during many months of the year). * Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating wouldFUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY AND MOTOR VEHICLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEMS UCD-ITS-RP-04-21 April 2004 by Timothy Lipman University of California

Kammen, Daniel M.

112

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

113

Apples and oranges: don't compare levelized cost of renewables: Joskow  

SciTech Connect

MIT Prof. Paul Joskow points out that the levelized metric is inappropriate for comparing intermittent generating technologies like wind and solar with dispatchable generating technologies like nuclear, gas combined cycle, and coal. The levelized comparison fails to take into account differences in the production profiles of intermittent and dispatchable generating technologies and the associated large variations in the market value of the electricity they supply. When the electricity is produced by an intermittent generating technology, the level of output and the value of the electricity at the times when the output is produced are key variables that should be taken into account.

NONE

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission were ignored. on the characteristics, constraints, and operating costs of generators, the availability

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Computing confidence intervals on solution costs for stochastic grid generation expansion problems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of core operations and planning problems for the national electrical grid are naturally formulated and solved as stochastic programming problems, which minimize expected costs subject to a range of uncertain outcomes relating to, for example, uncertain demands or generator output. A critical decision issue relating to such stochastic programs is: How many scenarios are required to ensure a specific error bound on the solution cost? Scenarios are the key mechanism used to sample from the uncertainty space, and the number of scenarios drives computational difficultly. We explore this question in the context of a long-term grid generation expansion problem, using a bounding procedure introduced by Mak, Morton, and Wood. We discuss experimental results using problem formulations independently minimizing expected cost and down-side risk. Our results indicate that we can use a surprisingly small number of scenarios to yield tight error bounds in the case of expected cost minimization, which has key practical implications. In contrast, error bounds in the case of risk minimization are significantly larger, suggesting more research is required in this area in order to achieve rigorous solutions for decision makers.

Woodruff, David L..; Watson, Jean-Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 2. Design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The systems studies directed towards up-rating the performance of an RTG using selenide thermoelectrics and a heat source with improved safety are reported. The resulting generator design, designated LCHPG, exhibits conversion efficiency of greater than 10 percent, a specific power of 3 W/lb., and a cost of $6,000/W(e). In the course of system analyses, the significant development activities required to achieve this performance by the 1980 time period are identified.

Not Available

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cascading Failure Risk Variation with Generator Dispatch and System Load Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry reliability rules increasingly require utilities to study and mitigate cascading failure risk in their system. Motivated by this, this paper describes how cascading failure risk, in terms of expected blackout size, varies with power system load level and pre-contingency dispatch. We used Monte Carlo sampling of random branch outages to model contingencies, and a model of cascading failure to estimate blackout sizes. The risk associated with different blackout sizes is separately estimated in order to separate small, medium, and large blackout risk. Results from N-1 secure models of the IEEE RTS case and a 2383 bus case indicate that blackout risk does not always increase with load level, particularly for large blackout risk. The results also show that risk is highly dependent on the method used for generator dispatch. Minimum cost methods of dispatch can result in larger long distance power transfers, which can increase cascading failure risk.

Rezaei, Pooya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Evaluation of Steam Generator Level Measurement Model for OPR1000 Using RETRAN-3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator level measurement is important factor for plant transient analyses using best estimate thermal hydraulic computer codes since the value of steam generator level is used for steam generator level control system and plant protection system. Because steam generator is in the saturation condition which includes steam and liquid together and is the place that heat exchange occurs from primary side to secondary side, computer codes are hard to calculate steam generator level realistically without appropriate level measurement model. In this paper, we prepare the steam generator models using RETRAN-3D that include geometry models, full range feedwater control system and five types of steam generator level measurement model. Five types of steam generator level measurement model consist of level measurement model using elevation difference in downcomer, 1D level measurement model using fluid mass, 1D level measurement model using fluid volume, 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass, and 2D level measurement model using power and fluid volume. And we perform the evaluation of the capability of each steam generator level measurement model by simulating the real plant transient condition, the title is 'Reactor Trip by The Failure of The Deaerator Level Control Card of Ulchin Unit 3'. The comparison results between real plant data and RETRAN-3D analyses for each steam generator level measurement model show that 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass or fluid volume has more realistic prediction capability compared with other level measurement models. (authors)

Doo Yong Lee; Soon Joon Hong; Byung Chul Lee [FNC Technology Co., SNU Research Park Innovation Center 516, San4-2, Bongchun-7 dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heok Soon Lim [KHNP Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Munji-dong 103-16, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

127

Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cost-effectiveness of recommended nurse staffing levels for short-stay skilled nursing facility patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anonymous: Employer Costs for Employee Compensation--BioMed Central Open Access Cost-effectiveness of recommendeddiagnoses. However, the cost-effectiveness of increasing

Ganz, David A; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versus out-of-state renewable energy project development andbarriers to renewable energy in many states, but these costsPV technology or renewable energy generated in-state. For an

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

SVM-Based Multiclass Cost-sensitive Classification with Reject Option for Fault Diagnosis of Steam Turbine Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam turbine generator faults not only damage the generator itself, but also cause outages and loss of profits, for this reason, many researchers work on the fault diagnosis. But misdiagnosing may also lead to serious losses. In order to improve ... Keywords: SVM, multiclass, cost-sensitive, fault diagnosis, reject option

Chao Zou; En-hui Zheng; Hong-wei Xu; Le Chen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Observations of Low-Level Baroclinity Generated by Anvil Shadows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-level cooling beneath the cirrus anvil canopies of supercell thunderstorms is documented in two Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment cases and in the 17 May 1981 Arcadia, Oklahoma, supercell. Surface temperature ...

Paul M. Markowski; Erik N. Rasmussen; Jerry M. Straka; David C. Dowell

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Emission Cuts Realities Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

140

Does Competition Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3 One exception is Hiebert (2002), who uses stochastic frontier production functions to estimate generation plant efficiency over 1988-1997. One set of independent variables he includes is indicators for regulatory orders or legislative enactment... to customers. Joskow (1974) and Hendricks (1975) demonstrate that frictions in cost-of-service regulation, particularly those arising from regulatory lag (time between price- resetting hearings), may provide some incentives at the margin for cost...

Markiewicz, Karl; Rose, Nancy L; Wolfram, Catherine

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are artificially low and that these fake costs are used to 'sell'...

143

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Investigations of Temperature Effects on NOAA's Next Generation Water Level Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collects tide and water-level data by using an acoustic tide gauge in its Next Generation Water Level Measurement System (NGWLMS). The elevation of the water is calculated from the round-trip ...

David L. Portep; H. H. Shih

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

Tolbert, Leon M.

146

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

147

Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

Sonnet, Maria Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Potentially Low Cost Solution to Extend Use of Early Generation Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of image analysis. (Platforms: PC; Cost: Varies) MicroVisionII MicroVision II can be used for for visualising point-

Tonna, Joseph E; Balanoff, Amy M; Lewin, Matthew R; Saandari, Namjilmaa; Wintermark, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Enabling Thin Silicon Technologies for Next Generation Low-cost c ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... from fossil fuels to renewable sources has spurred companies to reduce the cost of their solar photovoltaics (PV) systems.

151

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Comparative analysis of energy costing methodologies. Appendix: report on levelized busbar-costing workshop held at MITRE/Metrek, June 29-30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings of a workshop on levelized busbar costing methodologies which was held at MITRE/Metrek on June 29 and 30, 1978 are described. Particular emphasis was placed on consideration of geothermal energy sources. The objective of the workshop was to determine whether a consensus could be developed regarding the most appropriate methodologies and assumptions for levelized energy costing. The workshop was attended by representatives from energy resource, utility and engineering design companies, and by representatives of the Division of Geothermal Energy and R and D contractors for this Division. It was found that year-by-year calculations in current dollars were generally preferred, using either Discounted Cash Flow or Revenue Requirements methods. No consensus emerged on choice of discount rate or financial parameters such as debt/equity ratio, and tax credit carry forward/carry back provisions. It was felt that engineering aspects deserve close attention.

Leigh, J.G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Internal Tide Generation over Topography: Experiments with a Free-Surface z-Level Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, z-level, primitive-equation ocean circulation model (DieCAST) is modified to include a free-surface and partial cells. The updating of free-surface elevation is implicit in time so that the extra computational cost is minimal ...

Youyu Lu; Daniel G. Wright; David Brickman

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New-generation CRT-controller ICS cut display costs, increase capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The newest VLSI CRT-controller chips, by condensing into one 40-pin dip the capabilities of hundreds of TTL devices, are dramatically lowering the cost of advanced raster-scanned CRT displays. The author considers these CRT controllers, and their applications, including graphics terminals.

Cushman, R.H.

1982-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation-peak, biomass, and advanced combustion turbineCombustion gas turbine, gas combined- cycle, conventional coal Biomass,Biomass plants change from Revolutionary to Evolutionary vintage, while the Advanced Combustion

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prospect of revolutionary new scenarios. In particular, the performance of the small power technologies (the reciprocating engine, gas turbine, and fuel cells) has improved remarkably over the last decade. This has aroused the interest of operators... include Stirling (1997) who provides some interesting arguments to support his thesis. However, we will try to demonstrate that such scepticism is perhaps exaggerated and that external cost methodologies can be very useful despite the considerable...

Gulli, Francesco

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Scalable Methodology for Cost Estimation in a Transformational High-Level Design Space Exploration Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective of the methodology presented in this paper is to perform design space exploration on a high level of abstraction by applying high-level transformations. To realize a design loop which is close and settled on upper design levels, a high-level estimation step is integrated. In this paper, several estimation methodologies fixed on different states of the high-level synthesis process are examined with respect to their aptitude on controlling the transformational design space exploration process.

Gerlach

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Liquid low-level waste generation projections for ORNL in 1993  

SciTech Connect

Liquid low-level waste (LLLW) is generated by various programs and projects throughout Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These wastes are collected in underground collection tanks, bottles, and trucks; they are then neutralized with sodium hydroxide and treated for volume reduction at the ORNL evaporator facility. This report presents historical and projected data concerning the volume and characterization of LLLW, prior to and after evaporation. Storage space for projected waste generation is also discussed.

DePaoli, S.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Alternatives generation and analysis for the phase 1 high-level waste pretreatment process selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of enhanced sludge washing and sludge washing without caustic leaching during the preparation of the Phase 1 high-level waste feeds. The pretreatment processing alternatives are evaluated against their ability to satisfy contractual, cost minimization, and other criteria. The information contained in this report is consistent with, and supplemental to, the Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan (Kirkbride et al. 1997).

Manuel, A.F.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix F GENERATION COST AND PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions reductions of 50% to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050; the other establishes a tightening target of biofuels, and analysis is provided of the implications of these proposals for land use and agriculture. Simulations using the MIT Integrated System Model show that the 50% to 80% targets are consistent with global

173

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

174

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne ...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

177

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

Siskind, B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

Siskind, B.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Phase 1 High Level Waste Feed Tanks Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent revision of the US. Department of Energy privatization contract for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) at Hanford necessitates the investigation of alternative waste feed sources to meet contractual feed requirements. This analysis identifies wastes to be considered as HLW feeds and develops and conducts alternative analyses to comply with established criteria. A total of 12,426 cases involving 72 waste streams are evaluated and ranked in three cost-based alternative models. Additional programmatic criteria are assessed against leading alternative options to yield an optimum blended waste feed stream.

CRAWFORD, T.W.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrogen generation rates in Savannah River Site high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste (HLW) is stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as alkaline, high-nitrate slurries in underground carbon steel tanks. Hydrogen is continuously generated in the waste tanks as a result of the radiolysis of water. Hydrogen generation rates have recently been measured in several waste tanks containing different types of waste. The measured rates ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 cubic feet per million Btu of decay heat. The measured rates are consistent with laboratory data which show that the hydrogen generation rate depends on the nitrate concentration and the decay heat content of the waste. Sampling at different locations indicated that the hydrogen is uniformly distributed radially within the tank.

Hobbs, D.T.; Norris, P.W.; Pucko, S.A.; Bibler, N.E.; Walker, D.D.; d'Entremont, P.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Electrochemical engines for power generation and load-leveling at sites for underground coal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of fuel generation by underground processing of coal with commercial consumption of the fuel at the mine site offers highly efficient utilization of energy. Commercial versions of Li/I/sub 2/ electrochemical engines to be used in one way of integration are postulated, described and evaluated on the basis of laboratory and theoretical studies. These engines are shown to be valuable for electric power generation and storage in connection with underground coal conversion (UCC) in arid land such as Northwestern New Mexico. Such engines, combined with UCC, could convert roughly 26 percent of the energy as pyrolysis hydrocarbons. The engines also provide load leveling so that peak power generators would be unnecessary.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Microsoft Word - 20110321_LTI_PPM_Tetra Tech_Cost Effective Wireless Application in Power Generation Markets.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11/1483 11/1483 Cost-Effective Wireless Application in the Power Generation Market 21 March, 2011 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or

186

Horizontal Steam Generator Thermal-Hydraulics at Various Steady-State Power Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional computer simulation and analyses of the horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics of the WWER 1000 nuclear power plant have been performed for 50% and 75% partial loads, 100% nominal load and 110% over-load. Presented results show water and steam mass flow rate vectors, steam void fraction spatial distribution, recirculation zones, swell level position, water mass inventory on the shell side, and other important thermal-hydraulic parameters. The simulations have been performed with the computer code 3D ANA, based on the 'two-fluid' model approach. Steam-water interface transport processes, as well as tube bundle flow resistance, energy transfer, and steam generation within tube bundles are modelled with {sup c}losure laws{sup .} Applied approach implies non-equilibrium thermal and flow conditions. The model is solved by the control volume procedure, which has been extended in order to take into account the 3D flow of liquid and gas phase. The methodology is validated by comparing numerical and experimental results of real steam generator operational conditions at various power levels of the WWER Novovoronezh, Unit 5. One-dimensional model of the horizontal steam generator has been built with the RELAP 5 standard code on the basis of the multidimensional two-phase flow structure obtained with the 3D ANA code. RELAP 5 and 3D ANA code results are compared, showing acceptable agreement. (authors)

Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Stosic, Zoran V.; Kiera, Michael; Stoll, Uwe [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electric and Magnetic Field Exposure Levels (0 to 3000 Hz) near Residential Photovoltaic Energy Generation Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic field levels associated with two residential photovoltaic energy generation facilities were characterized in this study. This measurement evaluation included static (direct current [DC]) magnetic fields and power-frequency alternating current (AC) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 Hz).The major source of DC and AC magnetic fields associated with a residential solar facility is the power inverter that converts DC to AC electricity. In close proximity to one ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Steam generation in line-focus solar collectors: a comparative assessment of thermal performance, operating stability, and cost issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and system benefits of using direct steam (in situ) generation in line-focus collectors are assessed. The major emphasis of the analysis is a detailed thermal performance comparison of in situ systems (which utilize unfired boilers). The analysis model developed for this study is discussed in detail. An analysis of potential flow stability problems is also provided along with a cursory cost analysis and an assessment of freeze protection, safety, and control issues. Results indicated a significant thermal performance advantage over the more conventional oil and flash systems and the flow stability does not appear to be a significant problem. In particular, at steam temperatures of 220/sup 0/C (430/sup 0/F) under the chosen set of assumptions, annual delivered energy predictions indicate that the in situ system can deliver 15% more energy than an oil system and 12% more energy than a flash system, with all of the systems using the same collector field. Further, the in situ system may result in a 10% capital cost reduction. Other advantages include improvement in simpler control when compared with flash systems, and fluid handling and safety enhancement when compared with oil systems.

Murphy, L.M.; May, E.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Busbar Cost Data 47 Windanalysis. energy (wind, in particular), as well as the costwind capital cost estimates from EPRI/DOE Renewable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Deep levels generated by thermal oxidation in p-type 4H-SiC  

SciTech Connect

Thermal oxidation is an effective method to reduce deep levels, especially the Z{sub 1/2}-center (E{sub C}-0.67 eV), which strongly suppresses carrier lifetimes in n-type 4H-SiC epilayers. The oxidation, however, simultaneously generates other deep levels, HK0 (E{sub V}+0.79 eV) and HK2 (E{sub V}+0.98 eV) centers, within the lower half of the bandgap of SiC, where the HK0 center is a dominant deep level with a concentration of about 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} after oxidation. By comparing deep levels observed in three sets of p-type 4H-SiC: oxidized, electron-irradiated, and C{sup +}- or Si{sup +}-implanted samples, we find that the HK0 and HK2 centers are complexes including carbon interstitials such as the di-carbon interstitial or di-carbon antisite. Other defects observed in p-type 4H-SiC after electron irradiation or after C{sup +}/Si{sup +} implantation are also studied.

Kawahara, Koutarou; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

197

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated gasification combined cycle plants, and measuresrate of a new combined-cycle natural gas generator.displaces natural gas combined- cycle generation, and RPS

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbonof renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty,energy, including the fossil fuel hedge value of renewable

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 19, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 151 Production Cost Analysis of Dispersed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) resources to meet forecasted load growth, particularly the application of photovoltaic (PV) generation. II, called area , has self-sufficiency in generation capacity to meet its current and forecasted load for area to meet its forecasted load effectively. This re- quires the installation of additional generation

Gross, George

204

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

206

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, while hydro, landfill gas, and solar eachSolar Hydro West Landfill Gas Biomass Co-Fire Biomass W indRPS generation, while hydro, landfill gas, and solar each

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the waste. The difference in the two models has led to the questions of how different are the results predicted by the two models and which model predicts the more conservative (larger) G values. More conservative G values would predict higher H{sub 2} generation rates that would require higher ventilation rates in the SRS tanks. This report compares predictions based on the two models at various nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS HLW tanks for both beta/gamma and for alpha radiation. It also compares predicted G values with those determined by actually measuring the H{sub 2} production from four SRS HLW tanks (Tanks 32H, 35H, 39H, and 42H). Lastly, the H{sub 2} generation rates predicted by the two models are compared for the 47 active SRS high level waste tanks using the most recent tank nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads for each tank. The predictions of the models for total H{sub 2} generation rates from the 47 active SRS waste were, for the most part, similar. For example, the predictions for both models applied to 25 tanks agreed within {+-}10% of each other. For the remaining 22 tanks, the SRS prediction was more conservative for 9 tanks (maximum 29% higher) and the Hanford prediction was more conservative for 13 tanks (maximum 19% higher). When comparing G values predicted by the equations presuming only alpha radiation or only beta/gamma was present the results were somewhat different. The results of predictions for alpha radiation, at the 47 current nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS tanks indicated that all the SRS predictions were higher (up to 30%) than the Hanford predictions and thus more conservative. For beta/gamma radiation the predictions for both models agreed to {+-}10% for 18 of the combinations, the Hanford model predicted higher values (11 up to 17%) for 25 of the concentrations considered, and the SRS model predicted higher G values for the remaining two combinations (12 and 17%). For the four SRS tanks, where we compared measured G values to those predicted by the two differen

Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

An 800-2400 MC Signal Generator with Automaticallv-Leveled Output Power J f  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ence with microwave signal generators development of new technological advances 1Arthur Fong and W. D. Myers The-hp- Direct-Reading UHF Signal

See Also

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electric and Magnetic Field Exposure Levels (0 to 3 GHz) in Occupational Environments near Photovoltaic Energy Generation Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic field levels associated with photovoltaic energy generation facilities were measured and characterized in this study. This evaluation included the measurement of static (direct current [DC]) magnetic fields, power-frequency alternating current (AC) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 Hz), and radio-frequency (RF) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 MHz) at two electric utility solar generation facilities.The major sources of DC magnetic fields within a ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Management Strategies for Treatment and Disposal of Utility-Generated Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some states or regional compacts may be unable to establish LLRW disposal facilities by the January 1, 1993, deadline. The possible strategies described in this report should help nuclear utilities prepare for this possibility by identifying safe and cost-effective waste disposal options.

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public benefits, or renewable energy costs in evaluating theof the benefits and costs of renewable energy, it providesof the benefits and costs of renewable energy, the findings

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

222

The cost of geothermal energy in the western US region:a portfolio-based approach a mean-variance portfolio optimization of the regions' generating mix to 2013.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy planning represents an investment-decision problem. Investors commonly evaluate such problems using portfolio theory to manage risk and maximize portfolio performance under a variety of unpredictable economic outcomes. Energy planners need to similarly abandon their reliance on traditional, ''least-cost'' stand-alone technology cost estimates and instead evaluate conventional and renewable energy sources on the basis of their portfolio cost--their cost contribution relative to their risk contribution to a mix of generating assets. This report describes essential portfolio-theory ideas and discusses their application in the Western US region. The memo illustrates how electricity-generating mixes can benefit from additional shares of geothermal and other renewables. Compared to fossil-dominated mixes, efficient portfolios reduce generating cost while including greater renewables shares in the mix. This enhances energy security. Though counter-intuitive, the idea that adding more costly geothermal can actually reduce portfolio-generating cost is consistent with basic finance theory. An important implication is that in dynamic and uncertain environments, the relative value of generating technologies must be determined not by evaluating alternative resources, but by evaluating alternative resource portfolios. The optimal results for the Western US Region indicate that compared to the EIA target mixes, there exist generating mixes with larger geothermal shares at equal-or-lower expected cost and risk.

Beurskens, Luuk (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherland); Jansen, Jaap C. (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands); Awerbuch, Shimon Ph.D. (.University of Sussex, Brighton, UK); Drennen, Thomas E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

224

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

WILLIS, W.L.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (N O), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third partys use or the results of such use, of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights. The views expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1307, Revision 13, is not a substitute for NRC regulations, and compliance is not required. The approaches and/or methods described in this NUREG are provided for information only. Publication of this report does not necessarily A requirement placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is that licensees must annually adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is revised periodically, explains the formula that is acceptable to the NRC for determining the minimum decommissioning fund requirements for nuclear power plants. The sources of information used in the formula are identified, and the values developed for the estimation of radioactive waste burial/disposition costs, by site and by year, are given. Licensees may use the formula, coefficients, and burial/disposition adjustment factors from this report in their cost analyses,

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices, the period of PTC extension, and the potential impact of future carbon regulations.natural gas and wholesale electric prices, the period of PTC extension, and the potential impact of future carbon regulations.regulations, may make renewable generation less economic than when renewable energy is presumed to compete with natural gas;

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Greenhouse effect and sea level rise: a challenge for this generation  

SciTech Connect

These papers elaborate on how to deal with a catastrophic result of the ''greenhouse effect'' -- a global warming that could raise the sea level several feet by the end of the century. Topics of discussion include: physical impact of sea level rise, coastal geomorphic responses, climate sensitivity to increasing greenhouse gases and control of erosion. Inundation and salinity intrusion is reviewed, as well as economic analysis and planning for coastal disasters. There is a section which reviews implications for hazardous waste sites and siting in coastal floorplains.

Barth, M.C.; Titus, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Generation and Propagation of Sea Level Variability Along the Pacific Coast of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case history analysis, cross spectra and multiple regression analysis have been used in a study of low-pass filtered sea level records from the Pacific mainland coast of Mexico in 1971 and 197375. During the summer-fall season (MayOctober), sea ...

David B. Enfield; J. S. Allen

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

High-Level Specification and Automatic Generation of IP Interface Monitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A central problem in functional verification is to check that a circuit block is producing correct outputs while enforcing that the environment is providing legal inputs. To attack this problem, several researchers have proposed monitor-based methodologies, which offer many benefits. This paper presents a novel, high-level specification style for these monitors, along with a linear-size, linear-time translation algorithm into monitor circuits. The specification style naturally fits the complex, but well-specified interfaces used between IP blocks in systems-on-chip. To demonstrate the advantage of our specification style, we have specified monitors for various versions of the Sonics OCP protocol as well as the AMBA AHB protocol, and have developed a prototype tool that automatically translates specifications into Verilog or VHDL monitor circuits.

Marcio T. Oliveira; Alan J. Hu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal investments in power generation under centralizedwith significant wind power generation. IEEE Transactions onmodeling of a regional power generation system - integrating

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Assumptions Wind power is often found to be the least-cost renewable energycost studies. The capacity value of renewable energy (wind,wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price Forecasts The difference between renewable energy

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Porter. The cost of transmission for wind energy in theDA forecast error cost per unit of wind energy are somewhatcosts actually slightly decrease with increasing penetration per unit of wind energy.

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flat block of power, generation from natural gas fired CCGTsnatural gas plants. Even at high penetration adding power from a flat block does not displace any generation

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas firing in the steam generator of a CSP plant norCycle Steam Nuclear Hydro None Table 14: Incumbent generator

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Asset Management: Thermal Power Plant Cy- cling Costs.to invest in thermal power plants under increasing windthe dispatch of thermal power plants. De Jonghe et al. (

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of pressurized water reactor steam-generator water-level control, designed for use within physically distributed testing environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hardware-in-the-loop model was developed to represent digital sensing and control of steam generator water-level. The model was created with an intention to serve as (more)

Brink, Michael Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation NREL, Ren Anderson Building America Technical Update Meeting July 25 th , 2012 Issue 5 - How Much Insulation is Too Much? How do we define the cost-effective limit for improvements in enclosure efficiency? Key Factors to Consider: -Cost of savings vs. cost of grid-supplied energy -Cost of efficiency savings vs. cost of savings from renewable generation. -Savings from envelope improvements vs. other efficiency options Context * It is widely believed that code-specified insulation levels also represent cost-effective limits. * However, the cost-effective insulation levels exceed IECC values in many climates. * The homeowner-driven value of modest increases in enclosure performance can create economies of scale that will reduce

249

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molten salt storage for parabolic trough solar power plants.Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems inoften based on solar trough or parabolic dish technology) to

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be reflected in energy market prices because the costs areVG. The DA market prices for energy and ancillary services (of the year the market price for energy is based on the

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Capital  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Costs Capital Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent capital cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The estimates are shown in dollars per installed kilowatt of generating capacity or thermal energy capacity for thermal technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology capital cost estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information

252

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests and was spiked with the required amount of noble metals immediately prior to performing the test. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. SME cycles were also performed during six of the tests.

Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere.

Abotsi, G.M.K. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States); Bostick, D.T.; Beck, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (Generation Sold at Low Prices PV Penetration (% AnnualTES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

errors, and monthly hydro power generation budget arepower, coal power, large hydro power, natural outside ofand maintence Pumped hydro storage Power purchase agreement

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE). 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energysbased on California in 2030. Increasing amounts of wind,hourly load profile in 2030. Thermal generation parameters

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions leads to more baseload capacity being replaced bymanner than strictly baseload (Brown, 1996; Grande et al. ,amount of inflexible baseload generation would increase and

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are applied for wind and solar (PV and CSP 0 ); a reasonablethe limits of solar photovoltaics (PV) in traditionalincreasing solar generation: additional PV and CSP 0 are

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Generated at the Department of Energys Idaho Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site August 2011 DOE/EA-1793 Draft Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site August 2011 v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide replacement capability for disposal of remote-handled low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site beginning in October 2017. Historically, INL has disposed of this LLW onsite. However, the existing disposal area located within the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex will undergo

262

Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Generated at the Department of Energys Idaho Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT CAPABILITY FOR THE DISOPOSAL OF REMOTE-HANDLED LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATED AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S IDAHO SITE Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding ofNo Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Operations conducted in support ofIdaho National Laboratory (INL) and Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) missions on the Idaho site generate low-level radioactive waste (LL W). DOE classifies some of the LL W generated at the INL as remote-handled LL W because its potential radiation dose is high enough to require additional protection of workers using distance and shielding. Remote-handled wastes are those with radiation levels exceeding 200 millirem

263

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative Island approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this islands used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an islands cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Cost and Performance Data Technology Cost and Performance Data Dataset Summary Description This data indicates the range of recent cost estimates for renewable energy and other technologies. The estimates are shown in dollars per installed kilowatts of generating capacity. This data provides a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. All costs are in 2006 dollars per installed kilowatts in the United States. Source NREL Date Released August 06th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 06th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords analysis Department of Energy DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data (xls, 107.5 KiB) text/csv icon Capacity Factor (csv, 1.8 KiB)

266

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

267

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

268

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

270

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RPS generation, while hydro, landfill gas, and solar eachGeothermal Solar Hydro Landfill Gas Biomass Co-Fire Biomass

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case of wind electricity in spain. Energy Policy, 36:3345wind power in a carbon constrained world. Energy Policy, 34:wind power generation capacity in liberalized electricity markets. Energy Policy,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.1.2 Storage and Hydro Resource Dispatch . . . 3.1.323 Monthly hydro generation budget and min-flow . . . . .4.3 Hydropower and Pumped Hydro Storage . . 4.4 Thermal

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hour t ? T e t : energy in pumped hydro storage reservoirNuclear Exist_Hydro Exist_Storage Note: Energy for existingcurtail non-hydro generation. Energy Prospects West, June

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Optimal Siting and Sizing of Solar Photovoltaic Distributed Generation to Minimize Loss, Present Value of Future Asset Upgrades and Peak Demand Costs on a Real Distribution Feeder.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in power distribution systems presents technical and economic benefits as well as integration challenges to utility engineers. Governments (more)

Mukerji, Meghana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and /kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Costs Operations and Maintenance Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent operations and maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology operations and maintenance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation.

278

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

282

Disposal Cost Savings Considerations in Curie Reduction Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, the Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, announced a new fee structure for the disposal of radioactive wastes based on waste density, dose rate, and activity (curies). This report provides a detailed discussion of the current Barnwell Disposal Fee Structure along with its cost impact on various types of wastes generated. The report also evaluates various curie reduction options, their practical application, and their cost savings potential to help LLW ...

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

286

Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Generated at the Department of Energys Idaho Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

93 93 Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site Final December 2011 Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1955 Fremont Avenue Idaho Falls, ID 83415 December 21, 2011 Dear Citizen: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site and determined that a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is appropriate. The draft EA was made available for an 81-day public review and comment period on September 1,2011. DOE considered all comments made

287

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

especially when compared to coal prices, making gas pricesEvaluation of coal as the marginal price setter. With highthat coal-fired generation will set wholesale market prices

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

292

Primer: The DOE Wind Energy Program's Approach to Calculating Cost of Energy: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report details the methodology used by DOE to calculate levelized cost of wind energy and demonstrates the variation in COE estimates due to different financing assumptions independent of wind generation technology.

George, K.; Schweizer, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Particle Generation by Laser Ablation in Support of Chemical Analysis of High Level Mixed Waste from Plutonium Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has considerable potential to increase the safety and speed of analysis required for the remediation of high level wastes from cold war plutonium production operations. In some sample types, notably the sodium nitrate-based wastes at Hanford and elsewhere, chemical analysis using typical laser conditions depends strongly on the details of sample history composition in a complex fashion, rendering the results of analysis uncertain. Conversely, waste glass materials appear to be better behaved and require different strategies to optimize analysis.

J. Thomas Dickinson; Michael L. Alexander

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation. [Includes external environmental and societal costs and methods of evaluating them  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

296

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity dierences at the rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of rms with dierent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing rms. We nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across rm productivity. The evidence we nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Farias; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations, may make renewable generation less economic than when renewable energy is presumed to compete with natural gas;natural gas and/or wholesale electric prices that have not been modeled in many of the studies; The potential for future carbon regulations,

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Investigation of the viability and cost effectiveness of solid fuel gasifiers close coupled to internal combustion engines for 200 kWe power generation. Technical progress report No. 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability and cost effectiveness of a 200 kWe engine generator unit fueled by a direct coupled, solid fuel gasifier were studied. Recent literature describing gasifier technology was obtained and personal visits were made to test facility sites and engine manufacturing plants to discuss the subject with researchers and engineers. Two prototype units were inspected, one of which was in partial operation. This report presents a brief discussion of fuel and gasifier technology, gas treatment (clean up) for engine use, engine use technology, other uses for gasifiers, the viability of close coupled units, and an estimate of cost effectiveness. Present small experimental gasifier systems perform as expected and have served to demonstrate the technology. Typically they operate with fuel species which are present and collected on the site of a processing plant. Certain needed development efforts are discussed. Also, fuel must be available at low cost and even then electric power produced in this way is unlikely to be competitive economically where utility poles are available. (LTN)

Mingle, J. G.; Junge, D. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Tri-Generation Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Michael E. Goldsby † , Timothy J. Sa † , Victor Diakov* *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov † Sandia National Laboratories DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: December 1, 2010 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models - Incorporate tri-generation systems into the MSM and * develop a methodology for MSM users to analyze

302

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

303

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

305

Ab initio wavenumber accurate spectroscopy : {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN vibrational levels on automatically generated IMLS potential energy surfaces.  

SciTech Connect

We report here calculated J = 0 vibrational frequencies for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN with root-mean-square error relative to available measurements of 2.0 cm{sup -1} and 3.2 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These results are obtained with DVR calculations with a dense grid on ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). The ab initio electronic structure calculations employed are Davidson-corrected MRCI calculations with double-, triple-, and quadruple-{zeta} basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. In the {sup 1}CH{sub 2} case, Full CI tests of the Davidson correction at small basis set levels lead to a scaling of the correction with the bend angle that can be profitably applied at the CBS limit. Core-valence corrections are added derived from CCSD(T) calculations with and without frozen cores. Relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer corrections are available for HCN and were applied. CBS limit CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations with the same basis sets were also tried for HCN. The CCSD(T) results are noticeably less accurate than the MRCI results while the CASPT2 results are much poorer. The PESs were generated automatically using the local interpolative moving least-squares method (L-IMLS). A general triatomic code is described where the L-IMLS method is interfaced with several common electronic structure packages. All PESs were computed with this code running in parallel on eight processors. The L-IMLS method provides global and local fitting error measures important in automatically growing the PES from initial ab initio seed points. The reliability of this approach was tested for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} by comparing DVR-calculated vibrational levels on an L-IMLS ab initio surface with levels generated by an explicit ab initio calculation at each DVR grid point. For all levels ({approx}200) below 20000 cm{sup -1}, the mean unsigned difference between the levels of these two calculations was 0.1 cm{sup -1}, consistent with the L-IMLS estimated mean unsigned fitting error of 0.3 cm{sup -1}. All L-IMLS PESs used in this work have comparable mean unsigned fitting errors, implying that fitting errors have a negligible role in the final errors of the computed vibrational levels with experiment. Less than 500 ab initio calculations of the energy and gradients are required to achieve this level of accuracy.

Dawes, R.; Wagner, A. F.; Thompson, D. L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Missouri at Columbia

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Reducing the Costs of Manufacturing Flow...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and power generation. * Design and material cost reductions are a means to reducing battery costs. * Is it possible to accelerate the knowledge building that comes from...

307

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

308

Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

King, Robert Dean (Schenectady, NY); DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson (Malvern, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigurePrice to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigureP e Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

313

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Argonne CNM Highlight: Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Photovoltaic electricity is a rapidly growing renewable energy source and will ultimately assume a major role in global energy production. The cost of solar-generated electricity is typically compared with electricity produced by traditional sources with a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculation. Generally, LCOE is treated as a definite number, and the assumptions lying beneath that result are rarely reported or even understood. We shed light on some of the key assumptions and offer a new approach to calculating LCOE for photovoltaics based on input parameter distributions feeding a Monte Carlo simulation. In this framework, the influence of assumptions and confidence intervals becomes clear.

315

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

February 23, 2012 February 23, 2012 Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S Proposal: Modify the frame of the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," from a census to a sample, and use sampling methods to estimate the sales revenues and customer counts by sector and state for the remaining industry. Use random sampling, if needed, to estimate for changes in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and time-based tariff programs. Proposal: Create a new Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form), for the respondents that have been removed from the Form EIA-861 frame. The form would ask them for contact information and would contain a series of yes/no questions to query their status. In addition, it would collect limited data for use in estimating. Once every five years, the

320

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil benchmarks moved higher in November, showing their first month-over-month increase since August, while U.S. crude oil prices moved higher during the first week of December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $110.98 per barrel on December 5, an increase of $5.07 per barrel since its close on November 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.77 per barrel compared to November 1, settling at $97.38 per barrel on December 5. A combination of better-than-expected economic data and a continuation of supply outages buoyed international crude oil prices in November. Recent manufacturing data for the United States and China were above expectations, supporting demand for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Office of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis 1 Office of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis 1 October 2012 Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility Summary * Correlations among changes in the prices of commodities, and between the prices of commodities and other asset classes, generally increased from 2007 until 2012. One reason often cited for the increase in the correlation of commodity and asset price movements has been increasing economic growth in emerging market economies. * When correlations of crude oil prices with prices of multiple commodities decline, it usually implies that a supply side issue is affecting the crude oil market. When the correlation of crude oil price movements with the price movements for a specific

322

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets 1 May 11, 2012 ADDENDUM Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Additional Information on Jones Act Vessels' Potential Role in Northeast Refinery Closures The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent report exploring the potential impacts of reductions in refinery activity in the Northeast on petroleum product markets in that region pointed out that, if Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery shuts down, waterborne movements from the Gulf Coast could be an important route for alternative supplies to help replace lost volumes in the short term, particularly for ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD). Because this route would involve

323

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: The front month futures price for Brent, the world waterborne crude benchmark, increased by $5.72 per barrel to settle at $115.26 per barrel on September 5 (Figure 1). Front month futures prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil also increased over the same time period but by a lesser amount, to settle at $108.37 per barrel on September 5. The primary drivers of higher crude oil prices over the past five weeks included an uptick in unplanned crude oil production outages and increased tensions in the Middle East. Continued disputes between local governments in the eastern oil producing regions of Libya and the central government in Tripoli combined with worker strikes at

324

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Host and Presentor Contact Information Hosts: Mindi Farber-DeAnda Team Lead, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Mindi.Farber-DeAnda@eia.gov 202-586-6419 Vishakh Mantri, Ph.D, P.E. Chemical Engineer, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team Vishakh.Mantri@eia.gov 202-586-4815 Presenters: Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator, Energy Information Administration Howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov 202-586-6351 Modeling of Biofuels in the AEO, Michael Cole Operations Research Analyst, Energy Information Administration, Liquid Fuels Market Team

325

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 1 3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Front month futures prices for the Brent and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil benchmarks fell in September. The Brent contract settled at $109.00 per barrel on October 3, a decline of $6.68 per barrel since September 3, and WTI settled at $103.31 per barrel on October 3, falling by $5.23 per barrel over the same period (Figure 1). These changes marked the first month-over-month declines in crude oil prices since May 2013. The return of some Libyan production and declining refinery runs during September helped put downward pressure on crude oil prices. This is a regular monthly companion to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook

326

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

highest since March of 2012. Although there was no single major disruption in oil production over the last month, lower exports from South Sudan, Iraq, and Libya and a...

327

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

About the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1 April 30, 2012 About the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code...

328

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Preciado (james.preciado@eia.gov) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2013 2 Crude oils of both medium and light API gravity on the U.S....

329

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

330

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions. The model uses generation dispatch algorithms, efficiency levels, and capacity factorsemissions factors for fuel and electricity. Table A-3.3.2 Energy Savings, Costs, and Carbon Dioxide

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PRISM 2.0: Regional Energy and Economic Model Development and Initial Application: Phase 2: Electric Sector CO2 Reduction Options to 2050: Dimensions of Technology, Energy Costs, and Environmental Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted an analysis of electric sector CO2 reduction options to 2050 across a range of scenarios covering dimensions of technology costs and availability, energy costs, and CO2 constraints. Using its U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) model, EPRI calculated the impact of changes in generation portfolio, generation capacity, expenditures, and electricity prices on power sector costs. This analysis estimates different levels of ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Correlating Cycle Duty with Cost at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report is part of the ongoing EPRI Cycling Impacts Program to develop a range of analysis and simulation-capable planning tools. The objectives are to better determine cycling impacts (including incremental costs), reliability impact, component level effects, and impacts and other elements needed to better plan and manage operational and financial aspects of power generation. This report documents early efforts to establish strong correlations between the cycle duty of a produc...

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

Bill Major

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

343

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)Wind Energy Program is currently funding additional efforts to better understand the drivers for O&M costs and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solving the Unit Commitment Problem in Power Generation by Primal and Dual Methods \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deals with the fuel cost optimal scheduling of on/off decisions and output levels for generating unitsSolving the Unit Commitment Problem in Power Generation by Primal and Dual Methods \\Lambda D and results of test runs are reported. 1 Introduction The unit commitment problem in electricity production

Römisch, Werner

348

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of ...

349

CMI Working PaperDid English Generators Play Cournot? Capacity withholding in the Electricity Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which should be generating will raise energy prices but make the pattern of generation less efficient. This pattern improved significantly after privatisation. Withholding capacity that was not expected to generate would raise the Capacity Payments based on spare capacity. On a multi-year basis, these did not usually exceed competitive levels, the cost of keeping stations open. The evidence for large-scale capacity withholding is weak. Keywords: JEL:

Richard Green; Richard Green

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

Willigan, Rhonda

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, New York, 1981. MIL-HDBK-881, Handbook Work BreakdownWBS level-3 cost elements [MIL- HDBK-881, 1998]. In general,

Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

System cost model user`s manual, version 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The System Cost Model (SCM) was developed by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies in Idaho Falls, Idaho and MK-Environmental Services in San Francisco, California to support the Baseline Environmental Management Report sensitivity analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SCM serves the needs of the entire DOE complex for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. The model can be used to evaluate total complex costs based on various configuration options or to evaluate site-specific options. The site-specific cost estimates are based on generic assumptions such as waste loads and densities, treatment processing schemes, existing facilities capacities and functions, storage and disposal requirements, schedules, and cost factors. The SCM allows customization of the data for detailed site-specific estimates. There are approximately forty TSD module designs that have been further customized to account for design differences for nonalpha, alpha, remote-handled, and transuranic wastes. The SCM generates cost profiles based on the model default parameters or customized user-defined input and also generates costs for transporting waste from generators to TSD sites.

Shropshire, D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Definition: Reduced Ancillary Service Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary Service Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary services are necessary to ensure the reliable and efficient operation of the grid. The level of ancillary services required at any point in time is determined by the grid operator and/or energy market rules. Ancillary services, including spinning reserve and frequency regulation, could be reduced if generators could more closely follow load; peak load on the system was reduced; power factor, voltage, and VAR control were improved; or information available to grid operators were improved.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms ancillary service, frequency regulation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in

355

Implications of a New Source Performance Standard for New Fossil Generation: A High-Level Bounding Analysis Based on the US-REGEN Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a bounding analysis of the impact to the electric sector of the proposed New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for new generating units, recently put forward by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.The purpose of the analysis is to look at the coal generation option, under various plausible policy and uncertainty scenarios, and not to create a singular forecast of future outcomes. The primary assumed implication of the proposed ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative methods for achieving given power system reliability levels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This work examines the relative cost-effectiveness of competing electrical generating alternatives in contributing to the overall reliability level of a utility system. Three principal issues raised by Section 209 of the 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) are considered. They are: When there is a need for additional generating capacity, is it cost-effective to: (1) use small unit sizes rather than fewer large units of similar total megawatt capacity, (2) use intermittent and unconventional generating units in place of some conventional units, (3) use generation in decentral rather than central applications.

Yamayee, Z.A.; Boardman, R.W.; Khan, S.U.; Ma, F.S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;BottomESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind by the end of 2010 and at current rates of growth, it could double by 2014 to reach 400 GW 120 GW #12

Ford, Andrew

360

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ECONOMIC FACTORS OF MFP THERMOELECTRIC GENERATORS. Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Mixed Fission Products (MFP) for use as a heat source for thermoelectric generators will become increasingly available in the coming years. The Atomic Energy Conamission sponsored program on solidification of nuclear wastes is now entering the hot-bench scale test phase. During this phase approximately 5000 thermal watts of two year old MFP could be produced monthly. Two different types of hot calcination pilot plants are planned for installation at the Hanford National Laboratories in the 1964 to 1966 time period. Each of these plants should be able to produce 160,000 thermal watts of two year MFP and 16,000 thermal watts of ten year MFP on a monthly basis. During this phase, MFP costs should be less than 15 per ihermal watt for two year MFP and 50 for ten year MFP. This cost includes operation of the plant solely to obtain heat sources and sealing the MFP into fuel containers. A full scale plant for a 15,000 Mw(e) nuclear economy is estimated to produce four to five times as much MFP as either of the pilot plants. Costs will be dependent upon AEC policy in effect at the time the plant is operating. lf the policy indicates that the full cost be paid by the user, the prices will approximate that obtained from the pilot plant operation. A conceptual design has been made for MFP fueled generators at several output power levels up to 1000 watts. These are for use at great underwater depths and contain an integral biological shield. A low cost biological shield of high density concrete or cast iron is considered. Economic studies indicate that, in production quantities, a 10 watt generator will cost one tenth an equivalent Strontium90 generator. Because of the low cost for MFP heat sources, radionuclide generators at the hundred and thousand watt level can be reasonably postulated for the first time. At the kilowatt level costs of per watt year are achievable while to 0 are estimated at the ten watt level. Currently available ocean-going craft can handle the placement of MFP generators up to the hundreds of watts level. Investigation of other available vessels is continuing. (auth)

Barmat, M.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more renewable energy generation at lower costs, and (2) arelative incremental cost of renewable energy is low, and/orin higher costs for regulatory mandates and renewable energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Unprecedented Generation Shifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic recession, which reduced electricity demand, and falling natural gas costs have brought about unprecedented shifts in electric generation. These developments have affected coal-fired generation the most, leading to operational challenges (cycling and shut downs), deterioration of financial performance, and an awareness of the vulnerability of many units to retirement. A third force, though usually affecting natural gas unit operations more than coal, is the build-up of wind generation. This ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

367

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solution 2 What size generator? What fuel or energy source? Does it include storage? Who pays the up-front cost of the generator? Who owns the generator? Who...

368

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

369

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

370

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE). 12Sep2005. "EEREConsumer'sGuide:SizingandRenewableEnergy(EERE),whichmadethefollowinggenerationcosts. Figure16:EEREForecastedCostofPV

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sizing storage and wind generation capacities in remote power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Global adoption of renewable energy is increasing due to growing concern over climate change, increasing costs associated with conventional generation, and decreasing capital investment costs (more)

Gassner, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

373

A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing, renewable energy resources), the costs will varymade in renewable energy projects or costs of renewableenables renewable energy generation to become more cost-

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

and Cost-Effective Climate-Change Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change proposals currently under consideration include both a cap-and-trade program to curb greenhouse gas (GHS) emissions and a nationwide renewable electricity standard (RES). Some proposals permit a portion of the renewable electricity requirement to be satisfied by adopting energy efficiency measures, while others include a separate efficiency requirement. This paper examines how these approaches fit together, the costs associated with substantially expanding the portion of electricity generated by renewable resources, and the potential savings from incorporating energy efficiency into an RES. It is now generally accepted that cost-effective environmental regulation uses market mechanisms, such as a tax or a cap-and-trade program, in order to leave choices about the leastcost ways of achieving policy goals to individual producers and consumers. An RES represents the opposite of a market-oriented approach, because it prescribes technologies regardless of cost, rather than prescribing a goal and allowing the market to choose least-cost technologies. Under a cap-and-trade program, an RES is unnecessary to achieve GHG emissionsreduction goals. Moreover, an RES will reduce the economic efficiency advantages of a capand-trade program and raise the cost of achieving any given level of GHG emissions reduction.

Thomas M. Lenard; Thomas M. Lenard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

378

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

379

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

380

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam generators (SG),steam turbines(T), generators andawith the costs of modern steam turbine generator plants forSteam generators Remote maintenance equipment Turbine plant

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain  

SciTech Connect

Clipper Windpower, in collaboration with United Technologies Research Center, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, developed a low-cost, deflection-compliant, reliable, and serviceable chain drive speed increaser. This chain and sprocket drivetrain design offers significant breakthroughs in the areas of cost and serviceability and addresses the key challenges of current geared and direct-drive systems. The use of gearboxes has proven to be challenging; the large torques and bending loads associated with use in large multi-MW wind applications have generally limited demonstrated lifetime to 8-10 years [1]. The large cost of gearbox replacement and the required use of large, expensive cranes can result in gearbox replacement costs on the order of $1M, representing a significant impact to overall cost of energy (COE). Direct-drive machines eliminate the gearbox, thereby targeting increased reliability and reduced life-cycle cost. However, the slow rotational speeds require very large and costly generators, which also typically have an undesirable dependence on expensive rare-earth magnet materials and large structural penalties for precise air gap control. The cost of rare-earth materials has increased 20X in the last 8 years representing a key risk to ever realizing the promised cost of energy reductions from direct-drive generators. A common challenge to both geared and direct drive architectures is a limited ability to manage input shaft deflections. The proposed Clipper drivetrain is deflection-compliant, insulating later drivetrain stages and generators from off-axis loads. The system is modular, allowing for all key parts to be removed and replaced without the use of a high capacity crane. Finally, the technology modularity allows for scalability and many possible drivetrain topologies. These benefits enable reductions in drivetrain capital cost by 10.0%, levelized replacement and O&M costs by 26.7%, and overall cost of energy by 10.2%. This design was achieved by: (1) performing an extensive optimization study that deter-mined the preliminary cost for all practical chain drive topologies to ensure the most competitive configuration; (2) conducting detailed analysis of chain dynamics, contact stresses, and wear and efficiency characteristics over the chain???????¢????????????????s life to ensure accurate physics-based predictions of chain performance; and (3) developing a final product design, including reliability analysis, chain replacement procedures, and bearing and sprocket analysis. Definition of this final product configuration was used to develop refined cost of energy estimates. Finally, key system risks for the chain drive were defined and a comprehensive risk reduction plan was created for execution in Phase 2.

Anthony Chobot; Debarshi Das; Tyler Mayer; Zach Markey; Tim Martinson; Hayden Reeve; Paul Attridge; Tahany El-Wardany

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

383

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy and Maintenance Cost Savings Review at Several US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Energy and Maintenance Cost Savings Review at Several US ... Weight-Time Curves Generated with the PoDFA / Prefil Footprinter Method.

386

Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lower power prices and high repair costs drive nuclear retirements ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, concerns over the length of the review process and the high costs associated with steam generator repairs led SCE to retire both reactors.

388

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

389

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

PHENIX WBS notes. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Full Economic Costing:-Updated guidance notes for peer reviewers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the level of resources required to undertake the project and not their unit cost. In particular, peer are as follows: 1) Directly Incurred costs: These are costs which are specific to a project and will be charged to the project on the basis of actual costs incurred. They must be supported by an audit record, which

395

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

396

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Generating safe template languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Template languages are widely used within generative programming, because they provide intuitive means to generate software artefacts expressed in a specific object language. However, most template languages perform template instantiation on the level ... Keywords: generative programming, language extension, safe authoring, template language

Florian Heidenreich; Jendrik Johannes; Mirko Seifert; Christian Wende; Marcel Bhme

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring Speaker(s): Catherine Wolfram Date: June 9, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Over the past eleven years, US electric utilities have faced significant changes to their competitive and regulatory environments. The industry restructuring is designed to enhance economic efficiency at all levels of operation, including distribution, transmission, generation and retail services. The gains are likely to be largest in electric generation because generation costs are the largest component of end-use costs and restructuring has a larger impact on generation than on other segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remain more heavily regulated. This paper evaluates changes in

400

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wind Generators and Market Power: Does it matter who owns them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Unions 20 % renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.

Nihat Misir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

403

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

404

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

405

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

406

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

407

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

408

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Historically, the average fuel cost of operating a combined-cycle natural gas generator exceeded that for a coal-fired generator. Until 2010, ...

409

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a put option on natural gas generation, which increasesgeneration (DG) unit that operates on natural gas.While the long-term natural gas generation cost is

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

411

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Comparative study of economic viability of rural electrification using renewable energy resources versus diesel generator option in Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to assess the economic viability of Saudi Arabia's renewable energy resources in electricity production in the rural and remote areas as against the use of diesel generators (DG). The methodology employed is to pick an existing isolated DG electric station for a rural community and assess the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) generated for incremental generation by adding either DG

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

RWP 10-18The Roles of Price Points and Menu Costs in Price Rigidity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macroeconomic models often generate nominal price rigidity via menu costs. This paper provides empirical evidence that treating menu costs as a structural explanation for sticky prices may be spurious. Using supermarket scanner data, I note two empirical facts: (1) price points, embodied in nine-ending prices, account for more than 60 percent of prices; (2) at the conclusion of sales, post-sale prices return to their pre-sale levels nearly 90 percent of the time. I construct a model that nests roles for menu costs and price points and estimate model variants via simulated method of moments. Excluding the two facts yields a statistically and economically significant role for menu costs in generating price rigidity. Incorporating the two facts yields an incentive to set nine-ending prices two orders of magnitude larger than the menu costs in this model. In this setting, the price point model can match the two stylized facts, but menu costs are effectively irrelevant as a source of price rigidity. The choice of a mechanism for price rigidity matters for aggregate dynamics.

Edward S. Knotek Ii; Edward S. Knotek Ii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Roles of Price Points and Menu Costs in Price Rigidity *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macroeconomic models often generate nominal price rigidity via menu costs. This paper provides empirical evidence that treating menu costs as a structural explanation for sticky prices may be spurious. Using supermarket scanner data, I note two empirical facts: (1) price points, embodied in nine-ending prices, account for more than 60 percent of prices; (2) at the conclusion of sales, post-sale prices return to their pre-sale levels nearly 90 percent of the time. I construct a model that nests roles for menu costs and price points and estimate model variants via simulated method of moments. Excluding the two facts yields a statistically and economically significant role for menu costs in generating price rigidity. Incorporating the two facts yields an incentive to set nine-ending prices two orders of magnitude larger than the menu costs in this model. In this setting, the price point model can match the two stylized facts, but menu costs are effectively irrelevant as a source of price rigidity. The choice of a mechanism for price rigidity matters for aggregate dynamics.

Edward S. Knotek Ii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method of grid generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Automatic monitoring helps reduce lighting costs  

SciTech Connect

A Benton, Arkansas utility is using a dimmable ballast system to curb high-intensity-discharge (HID) lighting costs. The system also incorpoates a monitoring control system. This control automatically maintains minimum illumination levels.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

419

Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

El-Khoury, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Parameter inference of cost-sensitive boosting algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several cost-sensitive boosting algorithms have been reported as effective methods in dealing with class imbalance problem. Misclassification costs, which reflect the different level of class identification importance, are integrated into the weight ...

Yanmin Sun; A. K. C. Wong; Yang Wang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reference Design Description and Cost Evaluation for Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed-air energy storage (CAES) is a valuable solution for mitigating the current challenges of renewable-power variability, facilitating higher renewable penetration levels, enhancing grid reliability, and improving the utilization of transmission and generation assets. However, capital costs play a critical role in evaluating the overall CAES value proposition, at least relative to direct-market revenues (energy and ancillary services). Although the first U.S. CAES plant in Alabama was built at co...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of todays changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costsfor example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budgets (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfallsall recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

424

Design and Performance Aspects of Steam Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packaged steam generators are widely used in process and power plants. They are also used as standby boilers in cogeneration/combined cycle plants. The general feeling among consultants, plant engineers and end users is that packaged steam generators are "standard" or "off-the-shelf items", that there exists a model number for a given steam capacity and one has to live with whatever performance is offered by the boiler vendor. Unfortunately, boiler suppliers also encourage specifying of steam generators based on standard, pre-packaged designs. A "standard" boiler has several limitations such as pre-determined furnace dimensions, tube length, surface area, tube spacings etc, which may or may not be the optimum choice for a given steam demand, particularly when today's emission levels have to be met. Also, operating costs, which form a significant portion of overall costs, are ignored by consultants when evaluating various designs for possible purchase. This paper highlights the importance of custom designing packaged steam generators and the resulting benefits from boiler performance viewpoint.

Ganapathy, V.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

427

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

Frank Macri

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. Distributed Power Generation, Marcel Dekker. pp.180-This greatly influences power generation costs and reducesand Ogden, 2000) total power generation is estimated at 5.3

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs (2009). The cost per square foot was determined fromcost for basement levels is given at $36.40 per square foot

Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

For appliances, choosing the most cost-effective option depends on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumers in the market for new appliances have a wide range of choices that likely vary by cost, options, and efficiency level. If energy cost effectiveness is a ...

432

Heliostat manufacturing cost analysis. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has two primary objectives. The first is to provide a detailed cost evaluation of the second generation of DOE heliostats, from which repowering heliostat designs are likely to be derived. A second objective is to provide an analytical foundation for the evaluation of futue heliostat designs. The approach taken for this study was to produce a cost estimate for the production of the McDonnell Douglas prototype design by generating estimates of the materials, labor, overhead, and facilities costs for two different production scenarios, 25,000 heliostats per year and 250,000 heliostats per year. The primary conclusion of this study is that the second generation of heliostat designs should cost approximately $100/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 25,000 units/year. This price falls to approximately $80/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 250,000 units/year. A second conclusion is that cost reduction begins at relatively low production volumes and that many production benefits can be obtained at production rates of 5,000 to 15,000 units/year. A third conclusion is that the SAMICS model and the SAMIS III program can be useful tools in heliostat manufacturing, costing, and economic studies.

Drumheller, K; Schulte, S C; Dilbeck, R A; Long, L W

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Practical Application of Second Law Costing Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key to proper allocation of fuel and feedstock costs to the products from a plant or from any one of its components is the commodity called exergy - the central concept of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, commonly named available energy or availability. The methods for composing exergy cost flow diagrams will be explained. The results will be shown for several plants - electric-power, co-generation, coal-gasification, and others. The application of such results will be shown for cost-accounting, for plant operation economics, for maintenance decisions, and for design decisions - at both the preliminary and detailed design states.

Wepfer, W. J.; Gaggioli, R. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Determining the Cost of Producing Ethanol from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mature corn-to-ethanol industry has many similarities to the emerging lignocellulose-to-ethanol industry. It is certainly possible that some of the early practitioners of this new technology will be the current corn ethanol producers. In order to begin to explore synergies between the two industries, a joint project between two agencies responsible for aiding these technologies in the Federal government was established. This joint project of the USDA-ARS and DOE/NREL looked at the two processes on a similar process design and engineering basis, and will eventually explore ways to combine them. This report describes the comparison of the processes, each producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol. This paper attempts to compare the two processes as mature technologies, which requires assuming that the technology improvements needed to make the lignocellulosic process commercializable are achieved, and enough plants have been built to make the design well-understood. Ass umptions about yield and design improvements possible from continued research were made for the emerging lignocellulose process. In order to compare the lignocellulose-to-ethanol process costs with the commercial corn-to-ethanol costs, it was assumed that the lignocellulose plant was an Nth generation plant, built after the industry had been sufficiently established to eliminate first-of-a-kind costs. This places the lignocellulose plant costs on a similar level with the current, established corn ethanol industry, whose costs are well known. The resulting costs of producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol from each process were determined. The figure below shows the production cost breakdown for each process. The largest cost contributor in the corn starch process is the feedstock; for the lignocellulosic process it is the capital cost, which is represented by depreciation cost on an annual basis.

McAloon, A.; Taylor, F.; Yee, W.; Ibsen, K.; Wooley, R.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

438

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy Evolution of Texture in...

440

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized generation costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

442

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

444

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given companys cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

446

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

447

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

452

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and...

453

Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site DG installed by a microgrid in the presence of stochastic electricity and fuel prices. We proceed (natural gas generating cost) exceeds the natural gas generating cost (electricity price) by a significant fraction of energy conversion from primary fuels to electricity takes place closer to loads, i

454

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urinals Vary water cost, frequency of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION This calculator assumes that early replacement of a urinal or toilet will take place with...

456

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing,...

457

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z