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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

3

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

Suo, Zhigang

4

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Levelized costs of electricity and direct-use heat from Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOPHIRES (GEOthermal energy for the Production of Heat and Electricity (IR) Economically Simulated) is a software tool that combines reservoir wellbore and power plant models with capital and operating cost correlations and financial levelized cost models to assess the technical and economic performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). It is an upgrade and expansion of the MIT-EGS program used in the 2006 Future of Geothermal Energy study. GEOPHIRES includes updated cost correlations for well drilling and completion resource exploration and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and flash power plants. It also has new power plant efficiency correlations based on AspenPlus and MATLAB simulations. The structure of GEOPHIRES enables feasibility studies of using geothermal resources not only for electricity generation but also for direct-use heating and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. Full documentation on GEOPHIRES is provided in the supplementary material. Using GEOPHIRES the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and the levelized cost of heat (LCOH) have been estimated for 3 cases of resource grade (low- medium- and high-grade resource corresponding to a geothermal gradient of 30 50 and 70?C/km) in combination with 3 levels of technological maturity (today's mid-term and commercially mature technology corresponding to a productivity of 30 50 and 70?kg/s per production well and thermal drawdown rate of 2% 1.5% and 1%). The results for the LCOE range from 4.6 to 57 /kWhe and for the LCOH from 3.5 to 14 $/MMBTU (1.2 to 4.8 /kWhth). The results for the base-case scenario (medium-grade resource and mid-term technology) are 11 /kWhe and 5 $/MMBTU (1.7 /kWhth) respectively. To account for parameter uncertainty a sensitivity analysis has been included. The results for the LCOE and LCOH have been compared with values found in literature for EGS as well as other energy technologies. The key findings suggest that given today's technology maturity electricity and direct-use heat from EGS are not economically competitive under current market conditions with other energy technologies. However with moderate technological improvements electricity from EGS is predicted to become cost-effective with respect to other renewable and non-renewable energy sources for medium- and high-grade geothermal resources. Direct-use heat from EGS is calculated to become cost-effective even for low-grade resources. This emphasizes that EGS for direct-use heat may not be neglected in future EGS development.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Costs of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major reason for the decreased interest in the building of new nuclear power plants in recent years has been the relatively high cost of nuclear power. In this section, we will consider the role of costs in electricity

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologies to Reduce Levelized Cost of Electricity for Hydrothermal Development and EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Geothermal Technologies Program seeks non-prime mover technologies that have the potential to contribute to reducing the levelized cost of electricity from new hydrothermal development to 6/ kWh by 2020 and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) to 6/ kWh by 2030.

8

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT...

9

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Rising Cost of Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... METHODS are being discussed by electrical engineers to meet the rising costs of generating ... of generating electricity. Even before the War this was becoming a serious problem. In some cases it ...

1940-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reviewing electricity generation cost assessments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Studies assessing the electricity generation cost of various power generating technologies are becoming increasingly common and references to such studies can often be heard (more)

Larsson, Simon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

13

Basic Costs in Electricity Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ONE of the principal problems in the management of public electricity supply companies is how to reconcile the ... supply companies is how to reconcile the costs with the charges not only from year to year but also in their irregular secular ...

1941-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION and Anitha Rednam, Comparative Costs of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies Manager Ruben Tavares - Acting Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director

Laughlin, Robert B.

15

Exploring the Basic Principles of Electric Motors and Generators With a Low-Cost Sophomore-Level Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to meet changing curricular needs, an electric motor and generator laboratory experience was designed, implemented, and assessed. The experiment is unusual in its early placement in the curriculum and in that it focuses on modeling electric ... Keywords: Assessment, electric machines, electric motors, laboratory

T. F. Schubert; F. G. Jacobitz; E. M. Kim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

17

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

18

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost-effectiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost, cost and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity..................................................................................................................................... 1 Regional Cost Effectiveness

19

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the topic of the cost of fuel to general electricity for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

20

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION COMMISSION Joel Klein Principal Author Ivin Rhyne Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender DeputyCann Please use the following citation for this report: Klein, Joel. 2009. Comparative Costs of California

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California,The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic ElectricityThe Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Renewable electricity policies, heterogeneity, and cost effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Renewable electricity policies promote investment in renewable electricity generators and have become increasingly common around the world. Because of intermittency and the composition of other generators in the power system, the value of certain renewable particularly wind and solar varies across locations and technologies. This paper investigates the implications of this heterogeneity for the cost effectiveness of renewable electricity policies. A simple model of the power system shows that renewable electricity policies cause different investment mixes. Policies also differ according to their effect on electricity prices, and both factors cause the cost effectiveness to vary across policies. We use a detailed, long-run planning model that accounts for intermittency on an hourly basis to compare the cost effectiveness for a range of policies and alternative parameter assumptions. The differences in cost effectiveness are economically significant, where broader policies, such as an emissions price, outperform renewable electricity policies.

Harrison Fell; Joshua Linn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. leadacid, NaS, Li-ion, and NiCd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

25

Cost Recovery in Congested Electricity Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large scale investments in European electricity networks are foreseen in the next decade. Pricing the network at marginal cost will not be sufficient to pay for ... derives numerically the socially optimal transm...

Guido Pepermans; Bert Willems

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cost estimate of electricity produced by TPV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A crucial parameter for the market penetration of TPV is its electricity production cost. In this work a detailed cost estimate is performed for a Si photocell based TPV system, which was developed for electrically self-powered operation of a domestic heating system. The results are compared to a rough estimate of cost of electricity for a projected GaSb based system. For the calculation of the price of electricity, a lifetime of 20 years, an interest rate of 4.25% per year and maintenance costs of 1% of the investment are presumed. To determine the production cost of TPV systems with a power of 1220 kW, the costs of the TPV components and 100 EUR kW?1el,peak for assembly and miscellaneous were estimated. Alternatively, the system cost for the GaSb system was derived from the cost of the photocells and from the assumption that they account for 35% of the total system cost. The calculation was done for four different TPV scenarios which include a Si based prototype system with existing technology (?sys = 1.0%), leading to 3000 EUR kW?1el,peak, an optimized Si based system using conventional, available technology (?sys = 1.5%), leading to 900 EUR kW?1el,peak, a further improved system with future technology (?sys = 5%), leading to 340 EUR kW?1el,peak and a GaSb based system (?sys = 12.3% with recuperator), leading to 1900 EUR kW?1el,peak. Thus, prices of electricity from 6 to 25 EURcents kWh?1el (including gas of about 3.5 EURcents kWh?1) were calculated and compared with those of fuel cells (31 EURcents kWh?1) and gas engines (23 EURcents kWh?1).

Gnther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean-Claude Mayor; Detlev Grtzmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL COST REDUCTION VIA STEAM TURBINE COGENERATION LYNN B. DI TULLIO, P.E. Project Engineer Ewing Power Systems, Inc. South Deerfield, Mass. ABSTRACT Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used... mature technology. Steam turbines and engines have been used by industry to cogen erate power since before there were electric utilities. While the technology for turbines, generators and controls has continued to develop there is very little about...

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

29

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii Contents Introduction

31

Levelised cost of electricity for organic photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The success of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) as a future energy source is entirely dependent on the cost of the electricity produced by the modules. This study provides the first commercial scale levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) estimates for \\{OPVs\\} by integrating OPV-specific measured and calculated data into the estimates. The impacts of physical and financial variables are also investigated. The study shows that \\{OPVs\\} will become equivalently priced with current conventional solar technologies when efficiencies of 2% and lifetimes of three years are achieved. At efficiencies of 5% and lifetimes of 35 years the LCOE for \\{OPVs\\} will be competitive with that of current coal-based electricity generation.

Cara J. Mulligan; Chhinder Bilen; Xiaojing Zhou; Warwick J. Belcher; Paul C. Dastoor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

period for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are by factors of 1.72, 7.27, and 1 "Conversion" here does1 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview The costs of electrical energy generation can of electric energy out of the power plant. 2.0 Fuels Fuel costs dominate the operating costs necessary

McCalley, James D.

33

Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine efficiency, costs and greenhouse gas emissions of current and future electric cars (EV), including the impact from charging EV on electricity demand and infrastructure for generation and distribution. Uncoordinated charging would increase national peak load by 7% at 30% penetration rate of EV and household peak load by 54%, which may exceed the capacity of existing electricity distribution infrastructure. At 30% penetration of EV, off-peak charging would result in a 20% higher, more stable base load and no additional peak load at the national level and up to 7% higher peak load at the household level. Therefore, if off-peak charging is successfully introduced, electric driving need not require additional generation capacity, even in case of 100% switch to electric vehicles. GHG emissions from electric driving depend most on the fuel type (coal or natural gas) used in the generation of electricity for charging, and range between 0gkm?1 (using renewables) and 155gkm?1 (using electricity from an old coal-based plant). Based on the generation capacity projected for the Netherlands in 2015, electricity for EV charging would largely be generated using natural gas, emitting 3577gCO2eqkm?1. We find that total cost of ownership (TCO) of current EV are uncompetitive with regular cars and series hybrid cars by more than 800year?1. TCO of future wheel motor PHEV may become competitive when batteries cost 400kWh?1, even without tax incentives, as long as one battery pack can last for the lifespan of the vehicle. However, TCO of future battery powered cars is at least 25% higher than of series hybrid or regular cars. This cost gap remains unless cost of batteries drops to 150kWh?1 in the future. Variations in driving cost from charging patterns have negligible influence on TCO. GHG abatement costs using plug-in hybrid cars are currently 4001400tonne?1CO2eq and may come down to ?100 to 300tonne?1. Abatement cost using battery powered cars are currently above 1900tonne?1 and are not projected to drop below 300800tonne?1.

Oscar van Vliet; Anne Sjoerd Brouwer; Takeshi Kuramochi; Machteld van den Broek; Andr Faaij

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

35

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, ``Monthly Power Plant Report.`` These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, Monthly Power Plant Report.'' These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report This report has been discontinued. Cost and quality of fuels for electric plant information can now be found in the detailed...

38

Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Bloom Energy is testing the potential to produce low-cost hydrogen and electricity simultaneously from natural gas.

39

New Continuous-Time Scheduling Formulation for Continuous Plants under Variable Electricity Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Equation 21 is a big-M constraint that is only active if there is a continuous task being executed that belongs to energy cost level e. ... Due to the differences in electricity price among the energy cost levels, assigning production to the cheapest levels will have the biggest impact on the total cost. ... While accurate values are obviously dependent on problem data, particularly on the different cost levels agreed with the electricity provider, and on the scheduling practice at the plant, results have shown potential cost savings around 20%. ...

Pedro M. Castro; Iiro Harjunkoski; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Cost Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of the formula of dynamic discounted costs for determining the replacement cost of electrical energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of the replacement costs of fuel and electrical energy is of great theoretical and practical importance.

D. S. Shchavelev

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, 1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and 2)enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is

43

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach and feasibility study of a low-cost solar thermal electricity generation technology, suitable for distributed: Solar Thermal Collectors, Solar Thermal Electricity, Stirling Engine 1. INTRODUCTION In this paper, we

Sanders, Seth

44

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-DP-09-48.pdf Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Screenshot References: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs[1] Abstract "We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer-funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy

45

Applying electrical utility least-cost approach to transportation planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of the energy and environmental communities believe that parallels exist between electrical utility least-cost planning and transportation planning. In particular, the Washington State Energy Strategy Committee believes that an integrated and comprehensive transportation planning process should be developed to fairly evaluate the costs of both demand-side and supply-side transportation options, establish competition between different travel modes, and select the mix of options designed to meet system goals at the lowest cost to society. Comparisons between travel modes are also required under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). ISTEA calls for the development of procedures to compare demand management against infrastructure investment solutions and requires the consideration of efficiency, socioeconomic and environmental factors in the evaluation process. Several of the techniques and approaches used in energy least-cost planning and utility peak demand management can be incorporated into a least-cost transportation planning methodology. The concepts of avoided plants, expressing avoidable costs in levelized nominal dollars to compare projects with different on-line dates and service lives, the supply curve, and the resource stack can be directly adapted from the energy sector.

McCoy, G.A.; Growdon, K.; Lagerberg, B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Evaluation of Cost Efficiency in Finnish Electricity Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the process of developing an approach to evaluating the cost-efficiency of Finnish electricity distribution companies based on Data Envelopment Analysis...

Pekka J. Korhonen; Mikko J. Syrjnen

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the rising electricity costs and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

48

Levelized Cost of Energy in US | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Levelized Cost of Energy in US Home I'd like to pull a cost comparison for the levelized cost of energy in the US. How do I do this on this site? Does the LCOE interactive table...

49

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of such efforts based substantially on empirical data collected from operating facilities. The combined cycle, alternative technologies, combined cycle, simple cycle, integrated gasification combined cycle, coal cost and simple cycle costs are the result of a comprehensive survey of actual costs from the power plant

50

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

51

Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels.

52

Costs of Electricity Supply and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN an endeavour to foretell the future of electricity supply and distribution in Great Britain, Mr. J. M. Kennedy and Miss D ... . M. Noakes have made an elaborate analysis of the statistical returns issued by the Electricity Commissioners during the last ten years. They explained the conclusions arrived at in a ...

1933-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Grid and the Cost of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... asking whether the advent of the grid is likely to reduce the price of electricity or not. So far as can be seen at present, it will reduce the ... it will reduce the price to numerous consumers. The large stations recently built are generating electricity with far greater economy than the older stations which they replace. The use of ...

1932-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Fresh Look at Integrating Supply-Side and Demand-Side Resources Speaker(s): Bill Kelly Robert Redlinger Date: January 19, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn The restructuring of the California electricity industry has not proceeded as intended. A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices, power outages, and a political and financial crisis for the State. This crisis will not be solved through increasing electricity supply alone. Energy industry observers agree that 1.) energy efficiency, 2.) distributed on-site generation, and 3.) price

55

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

57

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

58

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

60

Assessing the impact of changes in the electricity price structure on dairy farm energy costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to provide information on the changes in electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms, through the simulation of various electricity tariffs that may exist in the future and how these tariffs interact with changes in farm management (i.e. shifting the milking operation to an earlier or later time of the day). A previously developed model capable of simulating electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms (MECD) was used to simulate five different electricity tariffs (Flat, Day&Night, Time of Use Tariff 1 (TOU1), TOU2 and Real Time Pricing (RTP)) on three representative Irish dairy farms: a small farm (SF), a medium farm (MF) and a large farm (LF). The Flat tariff consisted of one electricity price for all time periods, the Day&Night tariff consisted of two electricity prices, a high rate from 09:00 to 00:00h and a low rate thereafter. The TOU tariff structure was similar to that of the Day&Night tariff except that a peak price band was introduced between 17:00 and 19:00h. The RTP tariff varied dynamically according to the electricity demand on the national grid. The model used in these simulations was a mechanistic mathematical representation of the electricity consumption that simulated farm equipment under the following headings; milk cooling system, water heating system, milking machine system, lighting systems, water pump systems and the winter housing facilities. The effect of milking start time was simulated to determine the effect on electricity consumption and costs at farm level. The earliest AM milking start time and the latest PM milking start time resulted in the lowest energy consumption. The difference between the lowest and highest electricity consumption within a farm was 7% for SF, 5% for MF and 5% for LF. This difference was accounted for by the variation in the milk cooling system coefficient of performance. The greatest scope to reduce total annual electricity costs by adjusting milking start times was on TOU2 (39%, 34% and 33% of total annual electricity costs on the SF, MF and LF) and the least scope for reductions using this method was on the Flat tariff (7%, 5% and 7% of total annual electricity costs). The potential for reduction of annual electricity consumption and related costs per litre of milk produced by adjusting milking times was higher for the LF than the SF or MF across all electricity tariffs. It is anticipated that these results and the use of the MECD will help support the decision-making process at farm level around increasing energy efficiency and electricity cost forecasts in future electricity pricing tariff structures.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; L. Shalloo; P.W.G. Groot Koerkamp; I.J.M. De Boer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Using Electricity Market Analytics to Reduce Cost and Environmental Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, energy consumption has become a major issue in terms of cost, infrastructure requirements and emissions. In deregulated markets electricity prices, renewable energy contribution and emissions can vary substantially from hour to hour. ... Keywords: Cloud Computation Pricing, Demand Response, Electricity Market Analytics, Emissions Reduction, Renewable Energy Facilitation

Conor Kelly; Antonio Ruzzelli; Eleni Mangina

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TERRORIST ATTACKS Zimmerman, R. CREATE REPORT Under FEMA Grant EMW-2004-GR-0112 May 31, 2005 Center for Risk and Economic #12;2 Abstract The major economic effects of electric power outages are usually associated with three

Wang, Hai

63

Costing for National Electricity Interventions to Increase Access to Energy, Health Services, and Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing for National Electricity Interventions to Increase Access to Energy, Health Services ..................................................................................................... 6 2 Earth Institute Electricity Planning and Investment Costing Model........................................................................... 21 4.1 Total costs of electricity distribution scale-up............................

Modi, Vijay

64

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

65

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

66

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

67

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses of the manufacturing cost of the key unique components of electric vehicles: batteries, fuel cells,

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

February 23, 2012 February 23, 2012 Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S Proposal: Modify the frame of the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," from a census to a sample, and use sampling methods to estimate the sales revenues and customer counts by sector and state for the remaining industry. Use random sampling, if needed, to estimate for changes in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and time-based tariff programs. Proposal: Create a new Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form), for the respondents that have been removed from the Form EIA-861 frame. The form would ask them for contact information and would contain a series of yes/no questions to query their status. In addition, it would collect limited data for use in estimating. Once every five years, the

69

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

70

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

71

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

72

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

73

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

74

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts in 1984 to electric utility plants is presented, with some data provided for each year from 1979 through 1984. Data were collected on Forms FERC-423 and EIA-759. Fuels are coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. Data are reported by company and plant, by type of plant, and by State and Census Region, with US totals. This report contains information on fossil fuel receipts to electric utility plants with a combined steam capacity of 50 megawatts or larger. Previous reports contained data on all electric plants with a combined capacity of 25 megawatts or larger. All historical data in this publication have been revised to reflect the new reporting threshold. Peaking unit data are no longer collected. A glossary of terms, technical notes, and references are also provided. 7 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regulation and Measuring Cost-Efficiency with Panel Data Models: Application to Electricity Distribution Utilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance of panel data models in measuring cost-efficiency of electricity distribution utilities. Different cost frontier models are applied to a sample...

Mehdi Farsi; Massimo Filippini

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Predicting electricity consumption and cost for South African mines / S.S. (Stephen) Cox.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Electricity costs in South Africa have risen steeply; there are a number of factors that have contributed to this increase. The increased costs have a (more)

Cox, Samuel Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The policy implications of the different interpretations of the cost-effectiveness of renewable electricity support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cost-effectiveness of support for renewable electricity is a main criterion to assess the success of policy instruments, together with effectiveness. The costs of support are also a source of significant concern for governments all over the world. However, significant confusion exists in the literature on the cost-effectiveness of public support for renewable electricity. While some authors define the concept of cost-effectiveness as that which complies with the equimarginality principle, many others, including documents from relevant organisations (European Commission, International Energy Agency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) define it as the lowest costs of support, generally equating it with the minimisation of consumer costs. The aim of this paper is to clarify the differences between both approaches and their policy implications regarding the choice of instruments and design elements. It is shown that they partly overlap and that their policy implications clearly differ, leading to very different policy prescriptions. While the former favours technology neutral instruments and design elements, the minimisation of consumer costs approach favours instruments and design elements which adjust support levels to the costs of the technologies.

Pablo del Ro; Emilio Cerd

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines...

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

At What Cost? A comparative evaluation of the social costs of selected electricity generation alternatives in Ontario.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the private and external costs of electricity generated in Ontario by natural gas, wind, refurbished nuclear and new nuclear power. The purpose (more)

Icyk, Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

85

Transparent Cost Database for Generation at Regional Level? ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

however. I was wondering if such data was available at regional (e.g. Electricity markets or states) level. Thank you Naci Submitted by Ndilekli on 28 January, 2014 - 14:19...

86

Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric Drive Vehicles Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric Drive Vehicles 2010 DOE Vehicle...

87

US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries April 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Advanced...

88

Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds electricity-related costs as well as transient cooling effects. Our evaluation studies the ability) load migration enables sav- ings in many scenarios, and (3) all electricity-related costs must

90

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

91

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement-down General equilibrium Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Electricity generation is a significant contributor

92

The impact of ownership unbundling on cost efficiency: Empirical evidence from the New Zealand electricity distribution sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several countries around the world have introduced reforms to the electric power sector. One important element of these reforms is the introduction of an unbundling process, i.e., the separation of the competitive activities of supply and production from the monopole activity of transmission and distribution of electricity. There are several forms of unbundling: functional, legal and ownership. New Zealand, for instance, adopted an ownership unbundling in 1998. As discussed in the literature, ownership unbundling produces benefits and costs. One of the benefits may be an improvement in the level of the productive efficiency of the companies due to the use of the inputs in just one activity and a greater level of transparency for the regulator. This paper analyzes the cost efficiency of 28 electricity distribution companies in New Zealand for the period between 1996 and 2011. Using a stochastic frontier panel data model, a total cost function and a variable cost function are estimated in order to evaluate the impact of ownership unbundling on the level of cost efficiency. The results indicate that ownership separation of electricity generation and retail operations from the distribution network has a positive effect on the cost efficiency of distribution companies in New Zealand. The estimated effect of ownership separation suggests a positive average one-off shift in the level of cost efficiency by 0.242 in the short-run and 0.144 in the long-run.

Massimo Filippini; Heike Wetzel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The costs of generating electricity and the competitiveness of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an analysis on the costs of generating electricity from nuclear and fossil sources (coal and natural gas) based on the most recent technical data available in literature. The aim is to discuss the competitiveness of nuclear power in a liberalized market context by considering the impact on the generating costs of the main factors affecting the viability of the nuclear option. Particular attention will be devoted to study the variability of the generating costs regarding the level of risk perceived by investors through a sensitivity analysis of the generating costs with respect to the cost of capital and the debt fraction of initial investment. The impact of environment policies is also considered by including a tax on carbon emissions. The analysis reveals that nuclear power could have ample potentiality also in a competitive market, particularly if the level of risk perceived by the investors keeps standing low. For low values of the cost of capital, nuclear power seems to be the most viable solution. Uncertainty about environmental policies and unpredictability of carbon emissions costs might offer further margins of competitiveness.

Carlo Mari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

JET: Electricity cost-aware dynamic workload management in geographically distributed datacenters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ever-increasing operational cost of geographically distributed datacenters has become a critical issue for cloud service providers. To cut the electricity cost of geographically distributed datacenters, several workload management schemes have been proposed. These include Electricity price-aware InteR-datacenter load balancing (EIR), which reduces the electricity cost of active servers by dispatching the workload to datacenters with lower electricity prices, and Cooling-aware IntrA-datacenter load balancing (CIA), which decreases the power consumption of a datacenter by consolidating the workload on servers with high cooling efficiency. However, these existing schemes could incur some undesired results. For example, EIR may result in high electricity cost of cooling systems due to random workload distribution in datacenters. CIA could lead to high electricity cost of active servers since it does not consider the variation of electricity prices. In this paper, we propose a joint inter- and intra-datacenter workload management scheme, Joint ElectriciTy price-aware and cooling efficiency-aware load balancing (JET), to cut the electricity cost of geographically distributed datacenters. JET uses a short processing time to calculate the optimal workload distribution, which trades off the electricity cost of active servers and cooling systems by alternately selecting the electricity prices or the efficiency of a cooling system as the dominating factor to the electricity cost of geographically distributed datacenters. Extensive evaluations show that JET outperforms the existing schemes and achieves substantial reduction in the electricity cost of geographically distributed datacenters.

Zehua Guo; Zhemin Duan; Yang Xu; H. Jonathan Chao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renew- ables, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing, Energy Journal,28(

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

99

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

100

Optimization of Electricity and Server Maintenance Costs in Hybrid Cooling Data Centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electricity cost of data centers dominated by server power and cooling power is growing rapidly. To tackle this problem, inlet air with moderate temperature and server consolidation are widely adopted. However, the benefit of these two methods is ... Keywords: Data centers, electricity cost, server maintenance cost, joint optimization

Shaoming Chen; Yue Hu; Lu Peng

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Concurrent Optimization of Consumer's Electrical Energy Bill and Producer's Power Generation Cost under a Dynamic Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concurrent Optimization of Consumer's Electrical Energy Bill and Producer's Power Generation Cost lower cost. I. INTRODUCTION There is no substitute for the status of electrical energy, which. Availability of affordable and sustainable electrical energy has been the key to prosperity and continued socio

Pedram, Massoud

102

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

Liang, Weifa

103

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modest. When these electricity cost impacts are combinedcould reduce consumer electricity costs by 5.2% (-0.4 /kWh)base-case direct RPS electricity cost impacts (which do not

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Costs Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

105

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

106

Addressing the Level of Florida's Electricity Prices Theodore Kury1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing the Level of Florida's Electricity Prices Theodore Kury1 Public of electricity prices by state changes over time due to a number of factors: · Investment decisions ratepayers; · Electric utilities also buy on the spot market and prices can fluctuate quickly when

Jawitz, James W.

107

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Minimum Cost Path Problem for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 4, 2014 ... Abstract: We introduce a practically important and theoretically challenging problem: finding the minimum cost path for plug-in hybrid electric...

Okan Arslan

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

The development of a system to optimise production costs around complex electricity tariffs / R. Maneschijn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising South African electricity prices and reduced sales following the 2008 economic recession have led cement manufacturers to seek ways to reduce production costs. Prior (more)

Maneschijn, Raynard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to perform demand side management (DSM) [1], which aims at matching the consum- ers' electricity demand between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps upDistributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue

Pedram, Massoud

112

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

113

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down January 13, 2012 - 1:29pm Addthis Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager The record number of electric-drive vehicles on the floor of Detroit's

114

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called "antiquated" and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability

115

Multiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost-effective Evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The optimal shape design of a shielded reactor, based on the optimization of both cost and performanceMultiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost optimization of a device in electrical engineering, the exhaustive sampling of Pareto optimal front implies

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

116

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

118

Analytical model for solar PV and CSP electricity costs: Present LCOE values and their future evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we first make a review of the past annual production of electricity and the cumulative installed capacity for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. This together with the annual costs of PV modules and CSP systems allows us the determination of the experience curves and the corresponding learning rates. Then, we go over a rigorous exposition of the methodology employed for the calculation of the value of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for PV and CSP. Based on this knowledge, we proceed to establish a mathematical model which yields closed-form analytical expressions for the present value of the LCOE, as well as its future evolution (20102050) based on the International Energy Agency roadmaps for the cumulative installed capacity. Next, we explain in detail how specific values are assigned to the twelve independent variables which enter the LCOE formula: solar resource, discount and learning rates, initial cost and lifetime of the system, operational and maintenance costs, etc. With all this background, and making use of a simple computer simulation program, we can generate the following: sensitivity analysis curves, graphs on the evolution of the LCOE in the period 20102050, and calculations of the years at which grid parities will be reached. These representations prove to be very useful in energy planning policies, like tariff-in schemes, tax exemptions, etc., and in making investment decisions, since they allow, for a given location, to directly compare the costs of PV vs CSP power generation technologies for the period 20102050. Among solar technologies, PV seems always more appropriate for areas located in middle to high latitudes of the Earth, while CSP systems, preferably with thermal storage incorporated, yield their best performance in arid areas located at relatively low latitudes.

J. Hernndez-Moro; J.M. Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS Galenthe incremental cost of renewables portfolio standards (RPS)Washington DC have adopted renewables portfolio standards (

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Charges, Costs and Market Power: the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this paper, entitled Pricing Structures in the Deregulated UK Electricity Market. We are particularly for electricity, one of the basic utilities, on the date when the final price constraints were removed from1 Charges, Costs and Market Power: the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market Evens Salies

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cutting Down Electricity Cost in Internet Data Centers by Using Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cutting Down Electricity Cost in Internet Data Centers by Using Energy Storage Yuanxiong Guo, Zongrui Ding, Yuguang Fang, Dapeng Wu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Email: {guoyuanxiong@, dingzr@, fang@ece., wu@ece.}ufl.edu Abstract--Electricity

Latchman, Haniph A.

122

Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-058 Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong? Richard Green Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;Electricity Transmission optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops

California at Berkeley. University of

123

Elections at what cost? The impact of electricity subsidies on groundwater extraction and agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity may better achieve the objective of social welfare maximization as compared to a private firmElections at what cost? The impact of electricity subsidies on groundwater extraction and agricultural production DRAFT Reena Badiani Katrina K. Jessoe January 23, 2011 Abstract In India, electric

Silver, Whendee

124

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

126

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and environmental benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle...

127

Parametric estimating for early electric substation construction cost.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Developing accurate construction estimates is critical for electric utilities to make reliable financial plans for their future. Parametric estimating is just one of several techniques (more)

Wall, Darden Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

129

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

was no competitive in Mexico, at present this situation is changing, due to different factors. One of them is the high price of fossile fuel in Mexico mainly natural gas. Other...

130

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Case study from the Small Business Innovation Research Program that explains how Amonix developed a cost-effective system that uses plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight onto highly efficient photovoltaic cells.

131

Time Domain Partitioning of Electricity Production Cost Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production cost models are often used for planning by simulating power system operations over long time horizons. The simulation of a day-ahead energy market can take several weeks to compute. Tractability improvements are often made through model simplifications, such as: reductions in transmission modeling detail, relaxation of commitment variable integrality, reductions in cost modeling detail, etc. One common simplification is to partition the simulation horizon so that weekly or monthly horizons can be simulated in parallel. However, horizon partitions are often executed with overlap periods of arbitrary and sometimes zero length. We calculate the time domain persistence of historical unit commitment decisions to inform time domain partitioning of production cost models. The results are implemented using PLEXOS production cost modeling software in an HPC environment to improve the computation time of simulations while maintaining solution integrity.

Barrows, C.; Hummon, M.; Jones, W.; Hale, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Comparing Stranded Cost Arguments in Telecommunications and Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the prospect of competition has gained salience with regard to the electricity industry in the United States, a number...ex post fees in the competitive environment to provide utility stockholders with revenue...

Timothy J. Brennan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of electricity changes over time depending on the demand. It is important to large scale electricity consumers in manufacturing and service industries

137

Fact #791: August 5, 2013 Comparative Costs to Drive an Electric...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

costs about three times less to drive an electric vehicle than a conventional gasoline-powered vehicle. The Department of Energy has created a new term, called the eGallon, to...

138

Modelling start-up costs of multiple technologies in electricity markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the dispatch problem in providing electric power with minimal costs using different technologies. Initially, we describe this problem in terms of a linear program. This enables us to take...

Ludwig Kuntz; Felix Msgens

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Economics, Competition, and Costs in the Resructuring of U.S. Electricity Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many of the problems facing U.S. electricity markets stem from blatant disregard for the ... inefficient retail prices; anemic incentives to minimize costs; and lack of consumer choice and experience, occasionall...

John C. Hilke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Economies of scope in electricity supply and the costs of vertical separation for different unbundling scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by the movement towards vertical unbundling in Europe this study measures the economies of scope for the U.S. electricity industry based on a multi-stage cost function. The paper analyzes three unbundli...

Roland Meyer

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed Internet Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed a major part of their running costs. Modern electric power grid provides a feasible way to dynamically and efficiently manage the electricity cost of distributed IDCs based on the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP

Rahman, A.K.M. Ashikur

143

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ownership Unbuilding in Electricity Markets - A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of the German TSO'S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OWNERSHIP UNBUNDLING IN ELECTRICITY MARKETS - A SOCIAL COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF THE GERMAN TSOS Gert Brunekreeft1 Jacobs University Bremen Campus Ring 1 D-28759 Bremen Germany Email: g.brunekreeft@jacobs-university.de Version 2, August 11... , 2008 Abstract: This paper presents a social cost benefit analysis of ownership unbundling (as compared to legal und functional unbundling) of the electricity transmission system operators in Germany. The study relies on the Residual Supply Index...

Brunekreeft, Gert

145

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise Masahiro Sugiyama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise by Masahiro Sugiyama Bachelor of Science in Earth To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change, the thesis generalizes the sea-level rise cost function originally proposed by Fankhauser, and applies

146

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

147

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system setting is giving signal to customers the time variant cost of supplying electricity. Since the costs demand. In general, the generation cost is higher during system peak period, and vice versa. In Hong Kong

148

Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Amonix to develop its 7700 Amonix to develop its 7700 system, which drastically reduces the requirement for costly solar cells by using Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times onto small, highly efficient photovoltaic cells. This reduces the cell area so that expensive solar cell materials can be replaced with inexpensive plastic lenses. Amonix Inc. (Torrance, CA), founded in 1989, develops and

150

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium (3.5% U-235) in a light water reactor has an energy content of 960MWhr/kg [2], or multiplying by 3.41 MBTU/MWhr, we get 3274MBTU/kg. The total cost of bringing uranium to the fuel rods of a nuclear power plant, considering mining, transportation, conversion1 , enrichment, and fabrication, has been estimated

McCalley, James D.

151

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electric Urban Delivery Trucks: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost-Effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering current and projected U.S. regional electricity generation mixes, for the baseline case, the energy use and GHG emissions ratios of electric to diesel trucks range from 48 to 82% and 25 to 89%, respectively. ... The relationship between electric and ICE passenger car manufacturing energy use and GHG emissions is used to infer electric truck data from diesel truck manufacturing data. ... van Vliet, O.; Brouwer, A. S.; Kuramochi, T.; van den Broek, M.; Faaij, A.Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars J. Power Sources 2011, 196 ( 4) 2298 2310 ...

Dong-Yeon Lee; Valerie M. Thomas; Marilyn A. Brown

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Addthis Description Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs. Speakers Carlos Alvarez, LeAnn Oliver, Steve Kronheim, Jorge Gonzalez, Kathleen Woods-Richardson Duration 2:05 Topic Commercial Heating & Cooling Energy Sources Innovation Energy Economy Energy Sector Jobs Credit Energy Department Video Thank you for coming to celebrate a milestone in Miami-Dade. We are going to be turning biogas into energy. In Miami-Dade County, we've been a leader in the whole sustainability effort. I met with our sustainability

155

Cost comparison of major low-carbon electricity generation options: An Australian case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper compares the costs of significant deployment of key dispatchable low-emission electricity supply options in the Australian National Electricity Market. These include pulverised coal-fired power plants with carbon capture and storage, concentrating solar thermal with storage, biomass, enhanced geothermal systems and nuclear technologies. Our analysis draws upon published estimates of the potential underlying Australian energy resources for each technology, their technical performance and estimated costs. We identify appropriate locations for deployment subject to resource availability and the existing transmission network. The analysis includes estimates of the potential costs of new transmission lines and of augmenting the existing grid to integrate the different options at significant scale. We highlight the cost uncertainties associated with all technologies and the very high uncertainties for some, particularly when considering their potential exploration, appraisal and development costs. The ranking of technology costs show that biomass generation has likely both lower cost and lower cost uncertainties while enhanced geothermal systems have both higher mean cost and higher uncertainties. For the other technologies there is a trade-off between the expected costs and uncertainties.

Wanwan Hou; Guy Allinson; Iain MacGill; Peter Neal; Minh Ho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Strategies for compensating for higher costs of geothermal electricity with environmental benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After very high growth in the 1980s, geothermal electricity production has slowed in the mid- and late-1990s. While Japanese, Indonesian and Philippine geothermal growth has remained high as a consequence of supportive government policies, geothermal electricity production has been flat or reduced in much of Europe and North America. Low prices for coal and natural gas, combined with deregulation, means that in much of the world electricity from new fuel-burning electricity plants can be provided at half the cost of new geothermal electricity. Cost-cutting must be pursued, but is unlikely to close the price gap by itself. Geothermal production is widely perceived as being environmentally clean, but this is not unambiguously true, and requires reinjection to be fully realized. Strategies for monetizing the environmental advantages of geothermal, including the carbon tax, are discussed.

Hugh Murphy; Hiroaki Niitsuma

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

160

Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

162

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-peak hours for delivery at times of peak usage. These pumped hydro sys

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Optimization of production scheduling with time-dependent and machine-dependent electricity cost for industrial energy efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many industrialized countries, manufacturing industries pay stratified electricity charges depending on the time of day ... may demand that industries pay real-time hourly electricity costs so as to use energy...

Joon-Yung Moon; Kitae Shin; Jinwoo Park

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modelling of electricity cost risks and opportunities in the gold mining industry / Lodewyk Francois van der Zee.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon tax, increased reactive power charges, tariff increases and the Energy Conservation Scheme (ECS) are some of the worrying electricity cost risks faced by large (more)

Van der Zee, Lodewyk Francois

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied...

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design and costs estimation of electrical substations based on three-dimensional building blocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substations design is a fundamental engineering component in power network construction. The benefits obtained for having adequate tools and design systems are related mainly to cost savings, reduction of construction problems and faster throughput of ... Keywords: 3D environments, CAD tools, building blocks, electrical substations design

Eduardo Islas Prez; Jessica Bahena Rada; Jesus Romero Lima; Mirna Molina Marn

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Scheduling workloads in a network of datacentres to reduce electricity cost and carbon footprint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper quantifies the extent to which the scheduling of workloads among a network of datacenters can reduce both electricity cost and carbon footprint. Based upon empirical data from California, Alberta and Ontario, it develops an optimization model that quantifies the savings in relation to the price of carbon on carbon markets and in carbon taxes. Combining the electricity cost with the carbon footprint using the price of carbon, results indicate a simultaneous saving of both 8.09% of electricity cost and 11.25% of carbon footprint, when jobs are scheduled in the current time-period. When jobs can be scheduled in future time-periods, a simultaneous saving of both 51.44% of electricity cost and 13.14% of carbon footprint was obtained. These results are shown to be robust with respect to variations in the price of carbon in taxes and markets in the European Emissions Trading System, Australia, British Columbia, California, and Japan, apart from exceptional periods when the carbon price was very low. The paper shows how a cloud operator can demonstrate that these savings are additional to business as usual so as to sell carbon credits on a carbon market, and indicates the standards available for certifying and auditing those emissions reductions.

Trung Le; David Wright

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Charges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by competitive forces in unregulated residential energy markets. We assess the competitiveness of the market: Energy: Pricing, Market Power Acknowledgements: We are grateful for financial support from the EconomicCharges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market by Evens Salies

Feigon, Brooke

173

Costs and effects of electric-utility DSM programs: 1989--1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All US electric utilities are required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a comprehensive view of utility DSM-program costs and effects (energy savings and load reductions) for 1989, 1990, 1991, and 1992 as well as projections for 1993 and 1997.

Hirst, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

177

Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

Ehsani, Mark

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cost-Effective Design of a Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the battery cycle efficiency and state of health, characteristics of the supercapacitor bank, and dynamics energy storage system comprised of Li-ion batteries only. 1. INTRODUCTION Electric vehicles (EVs) have highly dependent on the intrinsic characteristics of Li-ion batteries. The cycle efficiency degradation

Pedram, Massoud

179

Study of design parameters for minimizing the cost of electricity of tokamak fusion power reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the design parameters on the cost of electricity (COE) is studied through a parameter survey in order to minimize the COE. Three kinds of operating modes are considered; first stability (FS), second stability (SS) and reversed shear (RS). The COE is calculated by a coupled physics-engineering-cost computer system code. Deuterium-tritium type, 1000 MW(e) at electric bus bar, steady state tokamak reactors with aspect ratios A from 3 to 4.5 are assumed. Several criteria are used for the parameter survey; for example, (a) the thermal to electrical conversion efficiency is assumed to be 34.5% using water as a coolant; (b) the average neutron wall load must not exceed 5 MW/m2 for plasma major radius Rp > 5 m; (c) a 2 MeV neutral beam injector (NBI) is applied. It is found that the RS operating mode most minimizes the COE among the three operating modes by reducing the cost of the current drive and the coils and structures. The cost-minimized RS reactor can attain high fbs, high ?N and low q95 at the same time, which results in a short Rp of 5.1 m, a low Bmax of the maximum magnetic toroidal field (TF) of the TF coils of 13 T and a low A of 3.0. It can be concluded that this cost-minimized RS reactor is the most cost-minimized within the frameworks of this study. This cost-minimized RS reactor has two advantages: one is that a Bmax = 13 T TF coil can be made by use of ITER coil technology and the other is that the same cooling technology as that of ITER (water cooling) can be used.

K. Tokimatsu; K. Okano; T. Yoshida; K. Yamaji; M. Katsurai

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Strategic electricity sector assessment methodology under sustainability conditions: a Swiss case study on the costs of CO2 emissions reductions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growing concerns about social and environmental sustainability have led to increased interest in planning for the electricity utility sector because of its large resource requirements and production of emissions. A number of conflicting trends combine to make the electricity sector a major concern, even though a clear definition of how to measure progress toward sustainability is lacking. These trends include imminent competition in the electricity industry, global climate change, expected long-term growth in population and pressure to balance living standards (including per capital energy consumption). In order to approach this global problem on a regional level, a project has been established to develop planning methods for electrical power systems related to sustainability called SESAMS (Strategic Electricity Sector Assessment Methodology under Sustainability Conditions), under the Alliance for Global Sustainability formed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (ETHZ and EPFL), and the University of Tokyo (UT). SESAMS 97 has brought together multi-attribute, multi-scenario electricity system planning, life-cycle assessment, and multi-criteria decision analysis to create an integrated methodology that has been demonstrated using a case study based on the Swiss electricity system. This case study has simulated system dispatch of the Swiss electricity system for 1296 scenarios over a study period from 1996 to 2025. The results for these scenarios include a wide range of direct and indirect sustainability measures, with conclusions that have focused primarily on cost and CO2 emissions. The pairwise scenario trade-off analysis facilitates searching the strategy option space by identifying the best and most robust options. Decision-makers benefit by being able to focus trade-off discussions on the dominant set of best choices for each trade-off pair, rather than covering the entire decision space.

W. Schenler; Adrian V. Gheorghe; Warren Stephen Connors; Stefan Hirschberg; Pierre-Andre Haldi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

Marzeion, Ben

183

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Eucalyptus plantations for electricity generation: the cost of carbon dioxide abatement in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short-rotation plantations are expected to play an important role in the transition towards renewable energy, in particular in many developing countries. At present, developing countries do not have any carbon dioxide (CO2 ) abatement targets under the Kyoto Protocol, but CO2 mitigating projects might nevertheless be carried out through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The purpose of this paper is to analyse: i) the economics of eucalyptus production in the east and northeast of Thailand and ii) the cost of substituting eucalyptus wood for fossil fuels for electricity production. The productivity of eucalyptus plantations is estimated at 7??11 dry ton/hectare(ha)/year over a rotation period of 3 to 5 years. The levelised cost of eucalyptus wood delivered to the factory gate is estimated at 13??18 USD/fresh ton (1.2??1.7 USD/GJ). If eucalyptus wood is used for electricity generation, the cost of electricity generation would be 6.2 US cents/kWh, and consequently the cost of substituting a wood-fired plant for a coal-fired plant and a gas-fired plant would be 107 and 196 USD/ton-C, respectively. The extent to which eucalyptus plantations could offer economically attractive options for electricity generation and CO2 abatement depends, among other things, on the cost of reducing CO2 emissions in the Annex 1 countries and CO2 mitigation options in developing countries. In addition, it depends on the economics of eucalyptus production as seen by farmers. There are also several other factors that affect an increased establishment of eucalyptus plantations in Thailand. The potential land-use change impact as well as the social and environmental impact associated with establishing mono-culture eucalyptus plantations as a CO2 abatement strategy are, however, not analysed in this paper and should be further investigated.

Wathanyu Amatayakul; Christian Azar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 15, 2005, EPA issued the Clean Air Mercury Rule, requiring phased-in reductions of mercury emissions from electric power generators. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL and industry partners, is conducting evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. DOE/NETL targets for total mercury removal are {ge}55% (lignite), {ge}65% (subbituminous), and {ge}80% (bituminous). Based on work done to date at various scales, meeting the removal targets appears feasible. However, work needs to progress to more thoroughly document and test these promising technologies at full scale. This is the final site report for tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Station, one of three sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The other two sites in the program are MidAmerican's Council Bluff Station and Entergy's Independence Station. MidAmerican's Louisa Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Es7mates-funded by EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Office, and the Na*onal Electricity Delivery. Download report: hSp://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14os*/61042.pdf or hSp://emp.lbl.gov/publica*ons/survey-state-level-cost-and-benefit

189

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

190

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

191

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Cost of Storage How to Calculate the Levelized Cost of Stored Energy (LCOE) and Applications to Renewable Energy Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides a new framework for the calculation of levelized cost of stored energy. The framework is based on the relations for photovoltaics amended by new parameters. Main outcomes are the high importance of the C rate and the less dominant role of the roundtrip efficiency. The framework allows for comparisons between different storage technologies. The newly developed framework model is applied to derive the LCOE for a PV and storage combined power plant. The derived model enables quick comparison of combined PV and storage power plants with other forms of energy generation, for example diesel generation. This could prove helpful in the current discussion about diesel substitution in off-grid applications. In general, the combined levelized cost of energy lies between the LCOE of PV and LCOE of storage.

Ilja Pawel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction improves the metabolic energy cost of level walking at customary speeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The metabolic energy cost of walking is altered by pathological changes ... anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency alters the energy requirement for level walking through its effect ... study, it is hypothes...

Mehmet Colak; Irfan Ayan; Ugur Dal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Health and environmental impacts of China's current and future electricity supply, with associated external costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarises the results of the assessment of health and environmental impacts, and the corresponding external costs within the China Energy Technology Program (CETP). China faces an enormous challenge, as it needs to meet the growing demand for energy in general and electricity in particular. Coal is, and will most probably remain for a long time, the dominant energy carrier in China, and its continued use causes enormous damage to public health and the environment. Such damage backfires on the rate of economic growth. As demonstrated in the present work, the total (internal plus external) costs of environment-friendly electricity supply strategies are significantly lower than those of the seemingly cheaper, but ''dirty'' and nonsustainable, strategies based on traditional coal technologies. As demonstrated by the detailed analyses carried out for the Shandong province, cost-efficient reduction of health and environmental damages, and of the corresponding external costs, can be achieved by implementation of scrubbers and other ''clean-coal'' technologies, together with fuel diversification and promotion of efficiency.

Stefan Hirschberg; Thomas Heck; Urs Gantner; Yongqi Lu; Joseph V. Spadaro; Alfred Trukenmuller; Yihong Zhao

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wave energy using GIS based analysis: The case study of Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this paper is to establish an economic modelling of wave energy through a Geographical Information System (GIS). Furthermore, this method has been tested for the particular case of the Portuguese coast. It determines the best sea areas to install wave energy converters in this region, using spatial analysis of the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). Several economic parameters, as capital or O&M costs, have been considered. In addition, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by varying the discount rate in three different scenarios. Several types of physical restrictions have been taken into account: bathymetry, submarine electrical cables, seabed geology, environmental conditions, protected areas in terms of heritage, navigation areas, seismic fault lines, etc. Spatial operations have been carried out to complete the procedure, using Model Builder of GIS software. Results indicate the most suitable areas in economic terms in Portugal to install wave energy devices.

Laura Castro-Santos; Geuffer Prado Garcia; Ana Estanqueiro; Paulo A.P.S. Justino

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermoecological cost of electricity production in the natural gas pressure reduction process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a novel concept for thermodynamic evaluation of a selected energy system. The presented method has been developed by integration of the Thermo-Economic Analysis with the theory of Thermo-Ecological Cost. It can be applied as a thermodynamic evaluation method of rational resources management within any production system. It takes into account both the interrelation of irreversibility within the analyzed system and its influence on the global effects related to the depletion of non-renewable natural resources. The proposed method has been applied to evaluate the production of electricity in the process of natural gas transmission at pressure reduction stations. The expansion system is based on an existing plant integrated with a CHP module, characterized by a performance ratio of 89.5% and exergy efficiency of 49.2%. Within the paper, this expansion plant is supplied with natural gas transported from a natural deposit through a case-study transmission system with 4 compressor stations. The TEC (thermoecological cost) method was applied in conjunction with thermoeconomic analysis. As a result, TEC of the electricity generated in the expanders was determined at 2.42kJ/kJ, TEC of electricity from the CHP module is 1.77, and the TEC of medium-pressure natural gas distributed to consumers is 1.022.

Wojciech J. Kostowski; Sergio Usn; Wojciech Stanek; Pawe? Bargiel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Framework for Multi-Level Reliability Evaluation of Electrical Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Framework for Multi-Level Reliability Evaluation of Electrical Energy Systems Alejandro D. Dom@illinois.edu Abstract--This paper proposes a framework for multi-level reliability evaluation of electrical energy intended function or in which degraded performance is not allowed. Electrical energy systems are highly

Liberzon, Daniel

199

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5718 5718 Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Kristina Hamachi LaCommare and Joseph H. Eto Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California 94720 Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2004 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMP/EMP-pubs.html This work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, Energy Storage Program and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76F00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

200

Integrating High Levels of Renewables into the Lanai Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind turbine * Run-of-river hydropower * Biomass power * Generator: diesel, gasoline, biogas, alternative and custom fuels, co- fired * Electric utility grid * Microturbine * Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 The objective is to develop the entire vehicle thermal management system for two electric drive vehicles (HEVs, PHEVs). Limited battery power and low engine efficiency at...

202

Determining Levels of Productivity and Efficiency in the Electricity Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A few major themes run fairly consistently through the history of productivity and efficiency analysis of the electricity industry: environmental controls, economies of scale, and private versus government.

Abbott, Malcolm

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparative life-cycle cost analysis for low-level mixed waste remediation alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to develop a generic, life-cycle cost model for evaluating low-level, mixed waste remediation alternatives, and (2) to apply the model specifically, to estimate remediation costs for a site similar to the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, OH. Life-cycle costs for vitrification, cementation, and dry removal process technologies are estimated. Since vitrification is in a conceptual phase, computer simulation is used to help characterize the support infrastructure of a large scale vitrification plant. Cost estimating relationships obtained from the simulation data, previous cost estimates, available process data, engineering judgment, and expert opinion all provide input to an Excel based spreadsheet for generating cash flow streams. Crystal Ball, an Excel add-on, was used for discounting cash flows for net present value analysis. The resulting LCC data was then analyzed using multi-attribute decision analysis techniques with cost and remediation time as criteria. The analytical framework presented allows alternatives to be evaluated in the context of budgetary, social, and political considerations. In general, the longer the remediation takes, the lower the net present value of the process. This is true because of the time value of money and large percentage of the costs attributed to storage or disposal.

Jackson, J.A.; White, T.P.; Kloeber, J.M.; Toland, R.J.; Cain, J.P.; Buitrago, D.Y.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Simulation and analysis of a solar assisted heat pump system with two different storage types for high levels of PV electricity self-consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The incentives for PV-systems in Europe is being gradually lowered or ended. This makes a higher level of self-consumption interesting for owners of PV-systems. Sweden has an incentive of 35% of the investment cost for PV-systems. Unfortunately not all consumers can get this incentive. Therefore a high level of self-consumption will be necessary if the PV-systems are to be profitable in Sweden. A reference system with two different energy storage technologies is investigated in this paper. One system with 48kWh of batteries and one system with a hot water storage tank where the electricity is stored as heat. The research questions in this paper are: Which storage system gives the highest level of PV electricity self-consumption? Are the storage systems profitable with the assumptions made in this paper? What are the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) for the reference system with different storage system? The system with batteries has a self-consumption of 89% of the annual PV-electricity output and the system with a hot water storage tank has 88%. The system with batteries has a levelized cost of electricity two times higher than the system with a hot water storage tank.

Richard Thygesen; Bjrn Karlsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Preconstruction schedules, costs, and permit requirements for electric power generating resources in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Generation Programs Branch, Office of Energy Resources, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The principal objective of the report is to assemble in one document preconstruction cost, schedule, and permit information for twelve specific generating resources. The report is one of many documents that provide background information for BPA's Resource Program, which is designed to identify the type and amount of new resources that BPA may have to add over the next twenty years to maintain an adequate and reliable electric power supply in the Pacific Northwest. A predecessor to this report is a 1982 report prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Northwest Power Planning Council (the Council''). The 1982 report had a similar, but not identical, content and format. 306 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Smith, S.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Watts, R.L.; Weakley, S.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Under Various Thermal Conditions Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature Rise and...

210

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

211

Impact of Cost and Reliability on Energy-Saving for Industrial Electrical Drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total electricity consumption of the world today is about 12,000 TWh (terawatthour) per annum and 80% is dedicated to electrical drives. Thus, energy saving is dominant in electrical drives where each per ...

Laszlo Szentirmai; Tivadar Szarka

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cost-effectiveness of recommended nurse staffing levels for short-stay skilled nursing facility patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anonymous: Employer Costs for Employee Compensation--BioMed Central Open Access Cost-effectiveness of recommendeddiagnoses. However, the cost-effectiveness of increasing

Ganz, David A; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reducing Pumping Related Electricity Costs - A Case Study of Three Water Utility Companies in Zambia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Electric pumps are extensively used in many industrial and commercial applications worldwide and account for about twenty percent of the worlds electrical energy demand. (more)

Siyingwa, Bennet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

218

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the commercial building electricity costs distributed energydegradation costs electricity sales fixed electricity costsvariable electricity costs (energy and demand charges) EV

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 34. Regional electricity cost duration curves in 2010especially focus on electricity costs and grid compositionrelatively higher electricity costs. If electricity demand

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electricity consumption and human development level: A comparative analysis based on panel data for 50 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a representative of modern energy, the level of electricity consumption can be regarded as an appraisal criterion of a countrys development level. This study analyses the causality between electricity consumption and human development and assesses the changing trend of electricity consumption. The models in this study are established using panel data from 19902009 for 50 countries divided into four groups according to income. For human development indicators, per-capita GDP, consumption expenditure, urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and the adult literacy rate were selected. The results show that long-run bidirectional causality exists between electricity consumption and five indicators. Additionally, the higher the income of a country, the greater is its electricity consumption and the higher is its level of human development. Further, the variables of four income-groupings vary considerably. Specifically, as income increases, the contribution of electricity consumption to GDP and consumption expenditure increases, but the urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and adult literacy rate present a weakening trend. This mainly because that the latter indicators in high-income countries are increasing to converge. To improve human development, electricity should be incorporated into the basic public services construction to enhance the availability of electricity for low-income residents.

Shuwen Niu; Yanqin Jia; Wendie Wang; Renfei He; Lili Hu; Yan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity...

Ragsdale, K.

224

Optimal Supply Functions in Electricity Markets with Option Contracts and Non-smooth Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the optimal supply function for a generator who sells electricity into a wholesale electricity spot market and whose profit function is ... generator owns several generation units wit...

Edward J. Anderson; Huifu Xu

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electricity Cost as a Driver of Competitiveness in Northern Europe: The Case of Estonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Estonian electricity market will be fully opened in 2013. ... domestically available oil shale as main fuel for electricity generation and expansion of regional power pools, ... is widely believed that Estoni...

Marko Viiding; Kalev Kallemets; Peeter Pikk

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are neededCost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b

Michalek, Jeremy J.

227

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

228

Strategic electricity sector assessment methodology under sustainability conditions: a Swiss case study on CO2 emissions, competition and stranded costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Designing and implementing a sustainable energy sector will be a key element of defining and creating a sustainable society. In the electricity industry, the question of strategic planning for sustainability seems to conflict with the shorter time horizons associated with market forces as deregulation replaces vertical integration. In order to address such questions, a project called SESAMS (Strategic Electricity Sector Assessment Methodology under Sustainability) has been established to develop electricity sector planning methods related to sustainability. This effort is part of the Alliance for Global Sustainability (AGS) formed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (ETHZ and EPFL), and the University of Tokyo (UT). The initial phase of SESAMS in 1997 created a methodology integrating multi-scenario simulation, life-cycle analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis. This 1998 case study has expanded the methodology to study the transitional effects of deregulation associated with the issues of stranded cost. This analysis has studied the inclusion of different classes of stranded assets, different recovery periods, and recovery of costs on a fixed vs. variable (per kWh) basis. On a societal basis, stranded costs are a zero-sum transfer payment, but the ownership patterns of stranded assets mean that compensation for stranded assets will produce relative winners and losers. These winners and losers shift according to the stranded cost and other options present in different scenarios. The results of the stranded cost analysis are integrated with updated multi-criteria trade-off analysis and life-cycle analysis results, based on expanded system boundaries.

W. Schenler; Adrian V. Gheorghe; Warren Stephen Connors; Stefan Hirschberg; Pierre-Andre Haldi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= the efficiency of the propane space heater (BTU-delivered/the efficiency of the heater, and the cost of propane. The

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

CO2 mitigation costs for new renewable energy capacity in the Mexican electricity sector using renewable energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide mitigation costs for the Mexican power sector are calculated in order to compare the business as usual (BAU) scenario, based on natural gas capacity growth, to a transition scenario where electricity generation growth using natural gas after 2007 is replaced by renewable energies (solar, wind, hydro and biomass). The mitigation costs are obtained using the following parameters: natural gas price, discount rate and technological progress. The latter is expressed in terms of the anticipated decrease in capital costs, as reported in electricity generation technological literature. Our results show that when technological progress is considered, CO2 mitigation costs decrease rapidly from 14 $/tCO2 (in this paper $ express 1997 US dollars and t means metric tons) to zero when the price of natural gas nears 2.68 $/GJ, (for some readers, it can be useful to know that 1.0 US$1997/GJ is 1.19 US$2001/MMBTU) which is almost the same as the 2002 price. This means that for middle natural gas prices a no regrets situation can be achieved. Our results also show that for prices higher than 2.80 $/GJ, the incorporation of the technological progress parameter transforms the transition scenario into a no regrets scenario for all the discount rate values considered in this study.

Jorge Islas; Fabio Manzini; Manuel Mart??nez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Minimum Cost Path Problem for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling grid-connected hybrid electric vehicles using advisor, in: Applications and Advances, 2001. The Sixteenth Annual Battery Con- ference on, IEEE. pp.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Multiservice Home Network Based on Hybrid Electrical and Optical Multiplexing on a Low Cost Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a new home network delivering various signals (Ethernet, Television, Radio over Fibre) on a unique infrastructure. This architecture, combining electrical and wavelength...

Guillory, J; Guignard, Ph; Richard, F; Guillo, L; Pizzinat, A

234

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Although many electricity providers will offer their services in a restructure U.S. electricity market, it is not clear which pow r producers industrial customers wil1 buy from. James Rouse, associate director of energy policy for Praxair, Inc., thinks...

Lowe, E. T.

235

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and technologies expected to be available to meet bulk power generation needs during the period of the power plan PRICES The price forecasts for coal, fuel oil and natural gas are described in Appendix B. COAL-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over

236

The cost of balancing a parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant in the Spanish electricity spot markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study presents a new dispatch model (SCSP) for a CSP plant based on a dynamic programing algorithm. The purpose is to investigate the cost of balancing a CSP plant in the Spanish electricity market. Results are presented for a parabolic plant in the Spanish market for years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using solar availability data at the Plataforma Solar, Andalucia, Spain. The variation of balancing cost with solar multiple (SM) and number of storage hours (Nh) is analysed and results for two different optimisation cases presented. The first uses day-ahead forecasts for both solar availability and market prices. The second uses day-ahead solar availability and within-day market price forecasts. Both cases are settled in the balancing market. Key results include that the balancing cost decreases with increased SM and Nh and that balancing costs can be 2.2% to 9.5% of the plants gross income. For all SM and Nh, balancing costs are a function of season, being lower in summer than winter driven by increased load-factor in summer. During the year Quarter 3 has a lower balancing cost than Quarter 2 due to a closer match between forecast and actual solar availability. Optimising against within-day prices costs more than with day-ahead prices resulting from more balancing energy traded at a less favourable price than day-ahead. It is envisaged that the numbers presented in this study will provide an aid to policy makers when constructing tariffs to support future CSP development.

S.W. Channon; P.C. Eames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

Sonnet, Maria Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The social cost of carbon: implications for modernizing our electricity system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US government must use an official estimate of the social cost of carbon (SCC) to estimate carbon emission reduction benefits for proposed environmental standards expected to reduce CO2 emissions. The SCC i...

Laurie T. Johnson; Starla Yeh; Chris Hope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Towards Large Area Industrial Cost Competitive Coating for Thin Film Solar Electricity Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thin film PV market faces a struggling situation due to the need of reducing strongly prices, which can be done by increasing efficiency and reducing fabrication costs. Improvement of...

Bermudez, Veronica

240

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electricity transmission pricing : how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nodal pricing of electricity: how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a 13-node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorpor...

Richard Green

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method of calculating the cost of water and electrical power for nuclear desalination system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of determining the economic factors of double-purpose systems is set out; this provides separate and fairly strict determinations of the expenses involved in the production of electrical power and fre...

Yu. I. Koryakin; A. A. Loginov; V. A. Chernyaev; I. I. Zakharov

1965-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Marginal Cost Pricing: An Efficient Tool to Ensure Electricity Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The constant adaptation between electricity supply and demand can be achieved in two ways : On the supply side, through the construction of additional facilities, and on the demand side, by implementing tariffs, ...

B. Lescoeur; J. B. Galland; E. Husson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

246

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

248

Consumer cost effectiveness of CO2 mitigation policies in restructured electricity markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the cost of carbon dioxide mitigation to consumers in restructured USA markets under two policy instruments, a carbon price and a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). To estimate the effect of policies on market clearing prices, we constructed hourly economic dispatch models of the generators in PJM and in ERCOT. We find that the cost effectiveness of policies for consumers is strongly dependent on the price of natural gas and on the characteristics of the generators in the dispatch stack. If gas prices are low (~$4/MMBTU), a technology-agnostic, rational consumer seeking to minimize costs would prefer a carbon price over an RPS in both regions. Expensive gas (~$7/MMBTU) requires a high carbon price to induce fuel switching and this leads to wealth transfers from consumers to low carbon producers. The RPS may be more cost effective for consumers because the added energy supply lowers market clearing prices and reduces CO2 emissions. We find that both policies have consequences in capacity markets and that the RPS can be more cost effective than a carbon price under certain circumstances: continued excess supply of capacity, retention of nuclear generators, and high natural gas prices.

Jared Moore; Jay Apt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes how Mid-South Metallurgical implemented several recommendations resulting from a plant-wide energy assessment from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at Tennessee Technological University. This included installing new furnace insulation, implementing an electrical demand system, installing energy efficient equipment on its natural gas furnace burner tubes, and upgrading its lighting. Through these upgrades, the commercial heat treating business cut its overall energy use by 22%, reduced its peak demand by 21%, and decreased its total energy costs by 18%.

250

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Learn more.

252

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF COST EFFECTIVE SURFACE MOUNTED WATER TURBINES FOR RURAL ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model and design of hydro dynamically balanced rotor. Small-scale hydro power is the key source of serving the ever increasing demand of power requirements in the shortest time are driving forces for small/low head hydro power generation. This project intends to design and develop cost effective design

Sóbester, András

253

A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel School Bus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel analysis of a V2G-capable electric school bus compared to a traditional diesel school bus. Applied Energy (rmccorma@udel.edu) 1 Center for Carbon-Free Power Integration, University of Delaware ISE Lab, Newark, DE

Firestone, Jeremy

254

AN ENERGY COST OPTIMIZATION METHOD FOR A LARGE SCALE HYBRID CENTRAL COOLING PLANT WITH MULTIPLE ENERGY SOURCES UNDER A COMPLEX ELECTRICITY COST STRUCTURE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The cooling energy cost could be a significant portion of the total energy cost for a large organization or building complex during summer. A hybrid (more)

Guo, Yin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tarrifs on PHEV Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R&M Project 2A: R&M Project 2A: Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Tim Mount, Eilyan Bitar and Ray Zimmerman Cornell University Alberto Lamadrid Lehigh University CERTS Review, Cornell, August 6 th - 7 th , 2013 An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage (Mount) PART II: Ramping* (Lamadrid) PART III: Robust Optimization* (Bitar) *(Note: This is a new part of the project that began on 3/30/13) 2 OUTLINE OF THE PRESENTATION An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage Wooyoung Jeon Hao Lu Jung Youn Mo 3 An NSF I/UCRC Context of the Research: An Integrated Multi-Scale Framework 4 SuperOPF  Costs PEV charger capacities  Commuting Patterns  Nodal Capabilities

256

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

257

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal... the start of the station has to be decided several hours before delivering output. At the earlier time there is still uncertainty about the future demand, possible failures of power stations and predictions for wind-output. We represent the uncertainty...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effects on chickens of continuous exposure to low level electromagnetic, electric, and magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subjects Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) EFFECTS ON CHI CKENS OF CONT INUOUS EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVEL ELECTRONAGNETIC, ELECTRIC, AND MAGNETIC 1 IELDS A Thesis by ROBERT SHERWOOD HOWELL Approved... exposure to ionizing radiation. The treated groups appear to have a significantly reduced growth rate and a slightly increased feed conversion ratio. The spleen weight in the 260 MHz {calculated average input power density of 0. 029 mW/cm ) group...

Howell, Robert Sherwood

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Levelized cost-benefit analysis of proposed diagnostics for the Ammunition Transfer Arm of the US Army`s Future Armored Resupply Vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (PM-AFAS/FARV) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be applied to the resupply vehicle for the Advanced Field Artillery System. The Engineering Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has proposed adding diagnostics/prognostics systems to four components of the Ammunition Transfer Arm of this vehicle, and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on the diagnostics/prognostics to show the potential savings that may be gained by incorporating these systems onto the vehicle. Possible savings could be in the form of reduced downtime, less unexpected or unnecessary maintenance, fewer regular maintenance checks. and/or tower collateral damage or loss. The diagnostics/prognostics systems are used to (1) help determine component problems, (2) determine the condition of the components, and (3) estimate the remaining life of the monitored components. The four components on the arm that are targeted for diagnostics/prognostics are (1) the electromechanical brakes, (2) the linear actuators, (3) the wheel/roller bearings, and (4) the conveyor drive system. These would be monitored using electrical signature analysis, vibration analysis, or a combination of both. Annual failure rates for the four components were obtained along with specifications for vehicle costs, crews, number of missions, etc. Accident scenarios based on component failures were postulated, and event trees for these scenarios were constructed to estimate the annual loss of the resupply vehicle, crew, arm. or mission aborts. A levelized cost-benefit analysis was then performed to examine the costs of such failures, both with and without some level of failure reduction due to the diagnostics/prognostics systems. Any savings resulting from using diagnostics/prognostics were calculated.

Wilkinson, V.K.; Young, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

264

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

265

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

266

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

267

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

268

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

269

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

270

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach To Auxiliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger; Kanchan Angal; Steve Brewer; Steve Kraihanzel; Lenny Schrank; Jason Wolf

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Making Fischer?Tropsch Fuels and Electricity from Coal and Biomass: Performance and Cost Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We employ a unified analytical framework to systematically analyze 16 separate process designs, simulating for each detailed mass/energy balances using Aspen Plus software, and calculating their full lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ... In the plant designs with electricity as a major coproduct, designated as once-through (OT) configurations (Figure 1b), the syngas passes only once through the synthesis reactor, and all of the unconverted syngas plus light gases from FTL refining are compressed and supplied to the power island where a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle (GTCC) provides the power needed to operate the plant, as well as a substantial amount of export power (up to 37% of the total plant output of fuel (LHV) and powersee Table 3). ... (27) The gasifier is followed by a tar cracking unit, modeled as an ATR with a syngas exit temperature of 882 C that converts into syngas the heavy hydrocarbons that form at typical biomass gasification temperatures and that would otherwise condense and cause operating difficulties downstream. ...

Guangjian Liu; Eric D. Larson; Robert H. Williams; Thomas G. Kreutz; Xiangbo Guo

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1562102Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1562102 The Importance of Marginal Cost Electricity Pricing to the Success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ssrn.com/abstract=1562102 GSPP10-002 The Importance of Marginal Cost Electricity Pricing to the Success of Greenhouse: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1562102 1 The Importance of Marginal Cost Electricity Pricing of GHG emissions: the pricing of offpeak electricity. There may be many opportunities to reduce

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

274

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal electric vehicle (EV) policies in the United States currently include vehicle purchase subsidies linked to EV battery capacity and subsidies for installing charging stations. We assess the cost-effectiveness of increased battery capacity vs. nondomestic charging infrastructure installation for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks, and \\{SUVs\\} in the US. We find across a wide range of scenarios that the least-cost solution is for more drivers to switch to low-capacity plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (short electric range with gasoline backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are needed per vehicle, nondomestic charging infrastructure installation is substantially more expensive than increased battery capacity per gallon saved, and both approaches have higher costs than US oil premium estimates. Cost effectiveness of all subsidies are lower under a binding fuel economy standard. Comparison of results to the structure of current federal subsidies shows that policy is not aligned with fuel savings potential, and we discuss issues and alternatives.

Scott B. Peterson; Jeremy J. Michalek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 7.3 Renewable Energy CostResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterizationassumptions affecting renewable energy costs are often not

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the indirect cycle designs has investigated the effects of various parameters to increase electric production at full power. For the direct-contact reactor, major issues related to the direct-contact heat transfer rate and entrainment and carryover of liquid lead-bismuth to the turbine have been identified and analyzed. An economic analysis approach was also developed to determine the cost of electricity production in the lead-bismuth reactor. The approach will be formulated into a model and applied to develop scientific cost estimates for the different reactor designs and thus aid in the selection of the most economic option. In the area of lead-bismuth coolant activation, the radiological hazard was evaluated with particular emphasis on the direct-contact reactor. In this system, the lack of a physical barrier between the primary and secondary coolant favors the release of the alpha-emitter Po?210 and its transport throughout the plant. Modeling undertaken on the basis of the scarce information available in the literature confirmed the importance of this issue, as well as the need for experimental work to reduce the uncertainties on the basic characteristics of volatile polonium chemical forms.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a Triad That Can Be Assembled/Disassembled by Two Different External Inputs. Toward Molecular-Level Electrical Extension Cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toward Molecular-Level Electrical Extension Cables ... We have designed, synthesized, and investigated a self-assembling supramolecular system which mimics, at a molecular level, the function performed by a macroscopic electrical extension cable. ...

Roberto Ballardini; Vincenzo Balzani; Miguel Clemente-Len; Alberto Credi; Maria Teresa Gandolfi; Elna Ishow; Julie Perkins; J. Fraser Stoddart; Hsian-Rong Tseng; Sabine Wenger

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The effect of electricity consumption from renewable sources on countries? economic growth levels: Evidence from advanced, emerging and developing economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses a sample of 36 countries for the time period 19902011 in order to examine the relationship between countries? electricity consumption from renewable sources and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) levels. Several nonparametric techniques are applied to investigate the effect of electricity consumption from several renewable sources including wind, geothermal, solar, biomass and waste on countries? GDP levels. When investigating the whole sample ignoring countries? economic development status, the results reveal an increasing relationship up to a certain GDP level, which after that point the effect of electricity consumption on GDP stabilises. However when analyzing separately the Emerging Markets and Developing Economies, and, the Advanced-Developed Economies, the results change significantly. For the case of Emerging Market and Developing Economies the relationship appears to be highly nonlinear (an M-shape form) indicating that on those countries the levels of electricity consumption from renewable sources will not result on higher GDP levels. In contrast for the case of the advanced economies the results reveal an increasing nonlinear relationship indicating that higher electricity consumption levels from renewable sources results to higher GDP levels. This finding is mainly attributed to the fact that in the advanced-developed economies more terawatts from renewable sources are generated and consumed compared to the emerging market and developing economies, which traditionally their economies rely on non-renewable sources for power generation and consumption.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electric resistive space heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of heating residential buildings using electricity is compared to the cost employing gas or oil. (AIP)

David Bodansky

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c vehicles (BEVs), create additional electricity demand, resulting in additional air emissions from powerEstimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce

Michalek, Jeremy J.

285

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

286

Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entail higher electricity costs than in the reference case,which yields lower electricity purchase costs for utilitiesand renewable electricity generation costs. This proportion

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

288

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Regional transmission pricing. 4. Retail access. 5.cost. Regional transmission pricing is designed to make each

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electric-drive tractability indicator integrated in hybrid electric vehicle tachometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indicator, system and method of indicating electric drive usability in a hybrid electric vehicle. A tachometer is used that includes a display having an all-electric drive portion and a hybrid drive portion. The all-electric drive portion and the hybrid drive portion share a first boundary which indicates a minimum electric drive usability and a beginning of hybrid drive operation of the vehicle. The indicated level of electric drive usability is derived from at least one of a percent battery discharge, a percent maximum torque provided by the electric drive, and a percent electric drive to hybrid drive operating cost for the hybrid electric vehicle.

Tamai, Goro; Zhou, Jing; Weslati, Feisel

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids with high levels of wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Day-ahead load and wind power forecasts provide useful information for operational decision making, but they are imperfect and forecast errors must be offset with operational reserves and balancing of (real time) energy. Procurement of these reserves is of great operational and financial importance in integrating large-scale wind power. We present a probabilistic method to determine net load forecast uncertainty for day-ahead wind and load forecasts. Our analysis uses data from two different electric grids in the US with similar levels of installed wind capacity but with large differences in wind and load forecast accuracy, due to geographic characteristics. We demonstrate that the day-ahead capacity requirements can be computed based on forecasts of wind and load. For 95% day-ahead reliability, this required capacity ranges from 2100 to 5700MW for ERCOT, and 1900 to 4500MW for MISO (with 10 GW of installed wind capacity), depending on the wind and load forecast values. We also show that for each MW of additional wind power capacity for ERCOT, 0.160.30MW of dispatchable capacity will be used to compensate for wind uncertainty based on day-ahead forecasts. For MISO (with its more accurate forecasts), the requirement is 0.070.13MW of dispatchable capacity for each MW of additional wind capacity.

Brandon Mauch; Jay Apt; Pedro M S Carvalho; Paulina Jaramillo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The economic effect of electricity net-metering with solar PV: Consequences for network cost recovery, cross subsidies and policy objectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Net-metering is commonly known as a practice by which owners of distributed generation (DG) units may offset their electricity consumption from the grid with local generation. The increasing number of prosumers (consumers that both produce and consume electricity) with solar photovoltaic (PV) generation combined with net-metering results in reduced incomes for many network utilities worldwide. Consequently, this pushes utilities to increase charges per kWh in order to recover costs. For non-PV owners, this could result into inequality issues due to the fact that also non-PV owners have to pay higher chargers for their electricity consumed to make up for netted costs of PV-owners. In order to provide insight in those inequality issues caused by net-metering, this study presents the effects on cross-subsidies, cost recovery and policy objectives evolving from different applied netmetering and tariff designs for a residential consumer. Eventually this paper provides recommendations regarding tariffs and metering that will result in more explicit incentives for PV, instead of the current implicit incentives which are present to PV owners due to net-metering.

Cherrelle Eid; Javier Reneses Guilln; Pablo Fras Marn; Rudi Hakvoort

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies of RTOs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Joseph Joseph H. Eto is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he manages the program office for the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions. Douglas R. Hale recently retired from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration, where he served as a senior economist most recently working in the areas of energy price risk management, modeling electricity transmission pricing, and electricity transmission data. Bernard C. Lesieutre is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he conducts public-interest research on the electric power grid and electricity markets. The work described in this article was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This article is based on a longer technical report

293

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable) costs apply

Boisvert, Jeff

294

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408 ­ off-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable

Boisvert, Jeff

295

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh Universitys approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

297

Health costs associated with the mining, transport and combustion of coal in the steam-electric industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... rarely takes into account factors other than the market value of the commodities1,2. The costs of such decisions to society in general are rarely considered. Some of these ... of such decisions to society in general are rarely considered. Some of these costs are environmental: for example, disposal of industrial waste has often been free. Others ...

L. A. Sagan

1974-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs EV battery degradation costs electricity sales fixedand sales, DER capital costs, fuel costs, demand response measures and EV

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Awardee share: 378,732 - Funding for FY10: 627,151 * Barriers - Ground Source Heat Pumps - Reduce levelized cost of electricity (ton) by 30% by 2016 * Partners - Bob...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temporally-dependent renewable energy production profiles,renewable energy offsets natural gas-fired electricity production.renewable energy to be more labor-intensive than conventional forms of electricity production (

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR) by modulating

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

303

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real for optimizing their utility bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

304

Measurement of technical and allocative efficiencies using a CES cost frontier: a benchmarking study of Japanese transmission-distribution electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper estimates the technical and allocative inefficiencies of the transmission-distribution sector of Japanese electric utilities using a panel data during the 19811998 period. A stochastic production f...

Jiro Nemoto; Mika Goto

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Production

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating Costs Purifier Electricity costs (energy + demand)Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

308

Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while liquefaction electricity costs ($/kg) are independent0.10/kg while higher electricity costs ($0.075 vs $0.05/kWh)the cost of electricity and the cost of storage lead to

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Statewide Electrical Energy Cost Savings and Peak Demand Reduction from the IECC Code-Compliant, Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

peaking plant (i.e., capacity savings), the calculated demand savings in MW were then multiplied by the average capital cost of natural gas combined cycle power plant, $1,165 per kW (Kaplan, 2008) using a 15% reserve margin (Faruqui et al. 2007... to the 2001 and 2006 IECC codes. 72?F Heating, 75?F CoolingSpace Temperature Set point (Simulation adjustment3: Heating 72F, Cooling 75F) (b) Heat Pump House: 0.904 360 0.88 kW (Simulation adjustment3: 1.095 kW) HVAC System Type (a) Electric/Gas...

Kim, H; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

312

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Golove. 2006. Accounting for Fuel Price Risk When Comparingof Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbon Regulationtechnology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty, and

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Load control in low voltage level of the electricity grid using CHP appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a Virtual Power Plant to the electricity grid. In this work we focus on different algorithms to control is centrally generated in large power plants and in which distribution means distribution from these power.g.c.bosman@utwente.nl Abstract--The introduction of µCHP (Combined Heat and Power) appliances and other means of distributed

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

314

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source...

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

316

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the costs of renewable energy procurement, the costs of theRE is the total costs of renewable energy procurement, r resThough the total costs of renewable energy procurement (C

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

318

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

319

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Environmental Surveillance Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Addendum supplements, and to some extent replaces, the preliminary description of environmental radiological surveillance programs for low-level waste burial grounds (LLWBG) used in the parent document, 11 Technology, Safety and Costs of DecolliTlissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground, 11 NUREG/ CR-0570. The Addendum provides additional detail and rationale for the environmental radiological surveillance programs for the two referenced sites and inventories described in NUREG/CR-0570. The rationale and performance criteria herein are expected to be useful in providing guidance for determining the acceptability of environmental surveillance programs for other inventories and other LLWBG sites. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are reference facilities considered in this Addendum, and as described in the parent document (NUREG/CR-0570). The two sites are assumed to have the same capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology, and hydrology of the two reference sites are typical of existing western and eastern sites, altnough a single population distribution was chosen for both. Each reference burial ground occupies about 70 hectares and includes 180 trenches filled with a total of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of radioactive waste. In acldition, there are 10 slit trenches containing about 1.5 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 3} of high beta-gamma activity waste. In this Addendum environmental surveillance programs are described for the several periods in the life of a LLWBG: preoperational (prior to nuclear waste receipt); operational (including interim trench closures); post-operational (after all nuclear waste is received), for both short-term {up to three years) and long-term (up to 100 years) storage and custodial care; and decommissioning (only for the special case of waste removal). The specific environmental monitoring requirements for final site characterization and certification surveys are beyond the scope of this Addendum. Data collection associated with site reconnaissance and preselection is not specifically addressed, but it is recognized that such data may be useful in designing the preoperational program. Predisposal control measures, quality assurance, and record-keeping (other than inventory records) associated with waste disposal operations are also not addressed. The primary intent of routine environmental surveillance at a LLWBG is to help ensure that site activities do not cause significant transport of radioactivity from the site, resulting in an unacceptable health hazard to people. Preoperational environmental surveillance serves to determine for later comparison the background radioactivity levels, either naturally occurring or the result of man's activities (e.g. world-wide fallout or an adjacent nuclear facility), in and around the proposed burial ground site. The operational environmental surveillance program is used to estimate radiological conditions, both onsite and offsite as a possible result of burial ground activities, including trench closure(s). These data help to determine LLWBG compliance with regulatory requirements. During the post-operational period environmental surveillance should normally be an extension of the program carried out during operations, with appropriate deletions (or modifications) to account for the differences between operational and post-operational activities at the site. During the long-term storage and custodial care period, environmental surveillance serves to verify the radionuclide confinement capability of the burial ground and to identify problem situations requiring remedial action. For waste removal (exhumation), the environmental surveillance program is again modified to account for the greatly increased potential for direct radiation and contamination spread. At the time of decommissioning, "environmental surveillance" takes on a new meaning, from that of an ongoing prog

Denham, D. H.; Eddy, P. A.; Hawley, K. A.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixer with lower electricity costs Notes Market Information:of conserved energy (electricity) Cost of conserved energy (of conserved energy (electricity) Cost of conserved energy (

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN, L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" of Sibiu Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K. Seoul, Korea Sibiu-2400, Romania AL10 9AB 139-743 email: G accuracy of between 80 to 95% [1]. More recently, the advent of superscalar processors has given renewed are far more costly on a superscalar processor. This renewed interest in branch prediction led

Vintan, Lucian N.

326

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LCC accounts for the electricity costs paid by the consumerProduct Additional Electricity Cost NPV Product Coststhe annual operating cost (electricity bill), and DR is the

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index (1,2, 24) fixed electricity costs, $ macrogrid CO 2the commercial building, $ electricity costs, $ distributedcosts, $ variable electricity costs (energy and demand

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1: Disaggregated electricity costs for commercial customers1: Disaggregated electricity costs for commercial customers9 Figure 4: NYISO 2003 Day Ahead Electricity Costs, by

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A new assessment of RELAP5-3D using a General Electric level swell problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D (version bt) computer program was used to assess a GE level swell experiment. The primary goal of the new assessment models was to faithfully represent the experimental facility and instrumentation. In developing the new models, a non-physical representation of the vessel heads in a previous assessment was found. This distortion resulted in predictions that closely matched the experimental data, but were in error. The new assessment also highlighted an instability in the calculation of interfacial drag. To explore this issue, analyses were performed using three different interfacial drag correlations appropriate for large diameter pipes and/or vessels. The results of this study show that the Kataoka-Ishii correlation, which is currently used in RELAP5-3D, compares most favorably with the experimental data. Additionally, a numerical instability was uncovered with the analysis performed using the Gardner correlation and was traced to the calculation of bubble diameter in the bubbly flow regime.

Aumiller, D.L.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Clarke, W.G.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable resources and avoided costs. Section 7 summarizes,renewable energy and the avoided cost of conventional fuelsdispatch model of utility avoided cost using reference case-

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Levelized Cost Calculations | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial PV: 0.83155 Marine Hydrokinetic: 0.83155 Solar Thermal: 0.83155 Compressed Air Energy Storage: 1 Near Field (or Enhanced Hydrothermal): 0.83155 Utility pv: 0.83155...

333

This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

Papalambros, Panos

334

GC GUIDANCE ON ELECTRIC VEHICLE RECHARGING STATIONS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Several National Laboratory contractors have asked whether appropriated funds may be used to reimburse cost of installing electric vehicle recharging stations and to pay electricity bill costs...

335

Long-term, low-level radwaste volume-reduction strategies. Volume 4. Waste disposal costs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 4 establishes pricing levels at new shallow land burial grounds. The following conclusions can be drawn from the analyses described in the preceding chapters: Application of volume reduction techniques by utilities can have a significant impact on the volumes of wastes going to low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Using the relative waste stream volumes in NRC81 and the maximum volume reduction ratios provided by Burns and Roe, Inc., it was calculated that if all utilities use maximum volum

Sutherland, A.A.; Adam, J.A.; Rogers, V.C.; Merrell, G.B.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

337

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

338

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cost of electricity difference for direct and indirect drive targets for inertial fusion energy using a diode pumped solid state laser driver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed systems analysis code has been used to compare the projected cost of electricity (COE) for inertial fusion energy for direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) target scenarios, based on a diode pumped solid state laser driver with Yb:S-FAP (Yb doped Sr5(PO4)3F) gain media. Previously published target gain curves which resulted in a target gain at the optimal DD operating point that is 30% higher than that for the ID scenario have been used. This gain advantage for DD is offset by a requirement for improved beam smoothing, which was obtained via smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with a 1THz bandwidth at 349nm. Such a large SSD bandwidth has a number of effects on laser performance, including greater risk of optics damage from non-linear effects, lowered harmonic conversion efficiency, altered extraction parameters and higher front-end costs. The non-linear effects, which contribute to optical component damage by amplification of intensity non-uniformities, were parameterized through a constraint on the maximum allowable Bintegral (i.e. the total average phase retardation due to the non-linear indices of all materials traversed by the beam). If we constrain B to be no larger than 1.8rad, which is the presently accepted safe value based on observations in single shot glass laser facilities, the COEs for DD and ID are predicted to be the same within the uncertainties. If technology permits the B limit to be raised, the optimized COE for DD is predicted to decrease relative to that for ID.

C.D. Orth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Impacts of high penetration level of fully electric vehicles charging loads on the thermal ageing of power transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper develops a methodology to determine the impacts of high penetration level of fully electric vehicles (FEVs) charging loads on the thermal ageing of power distribution transformers. The method proposed in this paper is stochastically formulated by modelling the transformer life consumption due to \\{FEVs\\} charging loads as a function of ambient temperature, start time of \\{FEVs\\} charging, initial state-of-charge and charging modes. \\{FEVs\\} loads are modelled using the results from an analytical solution that predicts a cluster of \\{FEVs\\} chargers. A UK generic LV distribution network model and real load demand data are used to simulate FEVs impacts on the thermal ageing of LV power distribution transformers. Results show that the ambient temperature, \\{FEVs\\} penetration level, and start time of charging are the main factors that affect the transformer life expectancy. It was concluded that the smart charging scenario generally shows the best outcome from the loss of life reduction perspective. Meanwhile, public charging which shifts a large percentage of charging load to commercial and industrial areas can significantly alleviate the residential transformer loading thus has little impact on the loss of life of transformers. The proposed method in this paper can be easily applied to the determination of the optimum charging time as a function of existing loads, and ambient temperature.

Kejun Qian; Chengke Zhou; Yue Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and natural gas energy savings: Electrical energy savings (gas energy cost savings: Electrical energy cost savings ($/sf) = Electrical energy savings (kBtu/sf) National

Granderson, Jessica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electric Power Quarterly, October-December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ) provides electric utilities' plant-level information about the cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts, net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks. The EPQ contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. In this report, data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electric Power Quarterly, January-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ)'' provides information on electric utilities at the plant level. The information concerns the following: cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts; net generation; fuel consumption; and fuel stocks. The ''EPQ'' contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. In this report, data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

Not Available

1986-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electric Power Quarterly, July-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ) provides electric utilities' plant-level information about the cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts, net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks. The EPQ contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. In this report, data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

348

All Electric Houses in Cold Climates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Houses Electric Houses in Cold Climates Duncan Prahl, RA IBACOS BA Tech Update, April 29, 2013 Denver CO All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Caveats About Me: * I'm an Architect * I love math and science, but I'm not going to marry it * My engineering skills are primarily based on osmosis and graphics * "Close enough is good enough" All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Utility Unbundling * True costs becoming "transparent" * Allows for next level of analysis * Cash flow, Total Cost of Ownership All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Martha's Vineyard Community Images courtesy South Mountain Company All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Specifications Building System Specification Below Slab R-20 extruded polystyrene (XPS) foam Foundation Walls R-20 poly iso foam

349

Effect of different levels of technology upon expected yields, costs, and returns for major crops in Diamante Departamento, Entre Rios province, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ass'stance in carrying out and analyzing tnis thesis work, and to Dr. C. R. Harston and Dr. R. L. Ehrich for their cooperation in improving its presenta- tion. IIr. Zames McGrann assisted in the early stages of the fieId work. Dr. Zohn Steele revie...), Di:nants Departs~onto, Entre Hlos ) Jzge'lt inay 1969 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 77 Early land preparation a d e;rly seeding tine:~ thod for corn: osti. -. !ated cost per hectare {level 5), Diaaante Departa-, . . ento, Entre H(os, Argentina~ 1969...

Albarracin, Ernesto Oscar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

location, price of electricity, and cost of ENERGY STAR andtreatment systems. Electricity costs can compose anywhereBear in mind that electricity costs represent as much as 96

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Watt Does It Cost To Use It?  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students learn how electrical usage is counted and priced. They measure and evaluate energy use and cost of representative household and school electrical items.

352

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology to reduce Electric Motor Maintenance Costs.1998. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Marketof steam turbines or electric motors to run compressors. The

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs, EV battery degradation costs, and sales. min C ?????electricity sales, $ Electricity exchange with EVs D EV m,h

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cost Optimal Energy Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPBD recast requires Member States (MS) to ensure that minimum energy performance requirements of buildings are set with a view to achieving cost optimal levels using a comparative methodology framework...1]. Cost

Jarek Kurnitski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Flexibility and reliability in long-term planning exercises dedicated to the electricity sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexibility and reliability in long-term planning exercises dedicated to the electricity sector of these options. This paper focuses on the electricity sector and on problems of flexibility and reliability are assessed through the level of electrical losses they induced and a related cost. These approaches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Argonne CNM Highlight: Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Photovoltaic electricity is a rapidly growing renewable energy source and will ultimately assume a major role in global energy production. The cost of solar-generated electricity is typically compared with electricity produced by traditional sources with a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculation. Generally, LCOE is treated as a definite number, and the assumptions lying beneath that result are rarely reported or even understood. We shed light on some of the key assumptions and offer a new approach to calculating LCOE for photovoltaics based on input parameter distributions feeding a Monte Carlo simulation. In this framework, the influence of assumptions and confidence intervals becomes clear.

358

Illinois: High-Energy, Concentration-Gradient Cathode Material for Plug-in Hybrids and All-Electric Vehicles Could Reduce Batteries' Cost and Size  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Batteries for electric drive vehicles and renewable energy storage will reduce petroleum usage, improving energy security and reducing harmful emissions.

359

10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum

Kammen, Daniel M.

360

Global Cost Diversity Aware Dispatch Algorithm for Heterogeneous Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ture and draw electricity from the local electricity market. Reducing the electricity costs real-world request workload and real-world electricity prices. We show that our strategies achieve cost, the electric- ity cost of operating these data center has emerged as a serious concern for these data center

Fedorova, Alexandra

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Promoting a level playing field for energy options: electricity alternatives and the case of the Indian Point Energy Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indian Point Energy Center, with two operational nuclear reactors ... the 2,000MW of power provided by Indian Point. This paper assesses the potential for electricity alternatives in the Indian Point service...

Marilyn A. Brown; Benjamin K. Sovacool

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in theis met by wind, solar PV, concentrating solar power with 6schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

achieving low CoE for hydrogen production. Although other WEfor competitive hydrogen production, such advanced targetsElectricity and Hydrogen Fuel Production from Multi-Unit

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels onof Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar EnergyImpact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Use: February 2014 Retail RatesPrices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

366

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: July 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

367

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

368

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

load factor and electricity costs. In a hydrogen economy, HkW h. At these low electricity costs, this translates tothe remaining (non-electricity) costs between $0.70 and $4:

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

In-Use Performance Comparison of Hybrid Electric, CNG, and Diesel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maintenance Costs - The propulsion- related vehicle systems include the exhaust; fuel; engine; electric propulsion; nonlighting electrical (general electrical, charging, cranking,...

370

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

371

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of reliability, resource options, wholesale competition and market power, cost of electricity to consumers, environmental quality, or other? Are these consequences so...

372

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Estimating the costs of nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on this topic is fairly confusing. Some present electricity production using nuclear power as an affordable of costs and draw a distinction between a private cost and a social cost. The private cost is what evaluating the costs it is impossible to establish the cost price, required to compare electricity production

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Multi-Level Grid Interactive Bi-directional AC/DC-DC/AC Converter and a Hybrid Battery/Ultra-capacitor Energy Storage System with Integrated Magnetics for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a bi-directional multi-level power electronic interface for the grid interactions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) as well as a novel bi-directional power electronic converter for the combined operation of battery/ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (ESS). The grid interface converter enables beneficial vehicle-to-grid (V2G) interactions in a high power quality and grid friendly manner; i.e, the grid interface converter ensures that all power delivered to/from grid has unity power factor and almost zero current harmonics. The power electronic converter that provides the combined operation of battery/ultra-capacitor system reduces the size and cost of the conventional ESS hybridization topologies while reducing the stress on the battery, prolonging the battery lifetime, and increasing the overall vehicle performance and efficiency. The combination of hybrid ESS is provided through an integrated magnetic structure that reduces the size and cost of the inductors of the ESS converters. Simulation and experimental results are included as prove of the concept presenting the different operation modes of the proposed converters.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 9.2 /kWh retail electricity cost in 2012 across theof total retail electricity costs. Again, comparabilityprojected increase in electricity costs to meet a 33% RPS in

Heeter, Jenny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

378

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Green Electricity Certificates in Flanders: The Gradual Extension of a Market-Based Mechanism and Doubts Over its Cost-Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the time of its introduction in 2002, the Flemish system to support renewables was a pure market-based green electricity certificate system. Starting in 2004 a string of changes to the system, up till the c...

Ils Moorkens; Yoko Dams; Luc Van Wortswinkel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

An assessment of electric vehicles: technology, infrastructure requirements, greenhouse-gas emissions, petroleum use, material use, lifetime cost, consumer acceptance and policy initiatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and PEVs require a new energy infrastructure to be deployed...because hydrogen is an energy carrier, like electricity, that...number of different primary energy resources. There are...accomplished by thermochemical conversion of hydrocarbon fuels...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionGas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Productioncost data from a variety of sources for electrolysis and natural gas reformation technologies. Capacity and production

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electric Power Quarterly, October-December 1985. [Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ) provides information on electric utilities at the plant level. The information concerns the following: cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts; net generation; fuel consumption; and fuel stocks. The EPQ contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. Data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

Not Available

1986-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electric power quarterly, July-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ) provides information on electric utilities at the plant level. The information concerns the following: cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts; net generation; fuel consumption; and fuel stocks. The EPQ contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. In this report, data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. The EPQ presents a quarterly summary of disturbances and unusual occurrences affecting the electric power industry collected by the Office of International Affairs and Energy Emergencies (IE) on Form IE-417.

Not Available

1987-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves awide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cost Function Estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cost function describes the cost-minimizing combinations of inputs required for production of different levels of output. Empirical cost function studies take both short-run and long-run approaches and can be structurally consistent with microeconomic theory versus more behavioral or real-world data oriented. Studies of health care providers face numerous challenges including the multiproduct nature of the firm, difficulty in controlling for quality of service, and frequent failure of the profit-maximization assumption. Cost function applications in health care are numerous and include such topics as optimal firm size, performance inefficiency measures, and comparisons of production costs with third-party payments.

K. Carey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Will customer choice always lower costs?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since competition may either increase or decrease electricity costs for individual customers, regulators need the authority and tools to determine whether retail competition will result in a lower or higher cost of electric service, and whether anti-competitive conduct can be detected. Today`s regulations of the electric industry generally allows only a single supplier to serve all retail customers within an exclusive service territory. Due to changes in technology, law, and in what might best be called philosophy, many large customers are now being joined by independent power producers, marketers and brokers in arguing that a multitude of suppliers should be allowed to compete to serve retail customers. Thus, a critical issue regulators and legislatures must address is whether or not to allow more than one supplier of electricity at the retail level. The primary economic rationale for permitting exclusive service territories and a single retail provider is the existence of a natural monopoly. The driving force for retail competition, on the other hand, is the perception that a less costly non-utility option is available for a number of customers. Conventional wisdom seems to see natural monopoly and lower-cost options for customers as mutually exclusive alternatives. That is, it is often thought that there can be no less costly alternative for any customer if a natural monopoly exists. Conversely, if there is a cheaper alternative for any customer, many see this as evidence that a natural monopoly no longer exists, and that free entry into the retail market should be allowed.

Corneli, S.B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced in creating the electricity through a full Life Cycle Analysis. As a result, proper comparison of electrified and conventional vehicles must include a complete Well-to-Wheel (WtW) study including the emissions generated through production and use...

Strecker, Bryan Anthony

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

An assessment of electric vehicles: technology, infrastructure requirements, greenhouse-gas emissions, petroleum use, material use, lifetime cost, consumer acceptance and policy initiatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will have peak-power devices such as high-power batteries or...Fuel-cell passenger cars and sport utility...feedstocks (water, electricity...Comparing land, water, and materials...hybrid vehicles: power sources, models...using a motor car. Transport...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Transportation Research - Power Electronics and Electric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decreasing costs. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's power electronics and electric machines research focuses on systems for electric-drive vehicles (EDVs) that...

392

Ppb-level QEPAS NO2 sensor by use of electrical modulation cancellation method with a high power blue LED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel electrical modulation cancellation method (E-MOCAM) is proposed to suppress the background noise in the case of the excitation light source with a poor beam quality. For its practical implementation, an E-MOCAM based on-beam QEPAS NO2 sensor by use of a commercial high-power wide-stripe LED is developed. The E-MOCAM ultimately suppressed the background noise caused by the stray light by three orders of magnitude. A 1? detection limit of 1.3ppb (part per billion by volume) was achieved at 1s integration time in this experiment, which corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA) 4.2נ10?9Wcm?1Hz?1/2. A 9h continuous on-line monitoring of ambient atmospheric NO2 was carried out on the campus of Shanxi University.

Huadan Zheng; Lei Dong; Xukun Yin; Xiaoli Liu; Hongpeng Wu; Lei Zhang; Weiguang Ma; Wangbao Yin; Suotang Jia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy, environmental, health and cost benefits of cogeneration from fossil fuels and nuclear energy using the electrical utility facilities of a province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is investigated for increasing the utilization efficiency of energy resources and reducing environmental emissions, focusing on utility-scale cogeneration and the contributions of nuclear energy. A case study is presented for Ontario using the nuclear and fossil facilities of the main provincial electrical utility. Implementation of utility-based cogeneration in Ontario or a region with a similar energy system and attributes is seen to be able to reduce significantly annual and cumulative uranium and fossil fuel use and related emissions, provide economic benefits for the province and its electrical utility, and substitute nuclear energy for fossil fuels. The reduced emissions of greenhouse gases are significant, and indicate that utility-based cogeneration can contribute notably to efforts to combat climate change. Ontario and other regions with similar energy systems and characteristics would benefit from working with the regional electrical utilities and other relevant parties to implementing cogeneration in a careful and optimal manner. Implementation decisions need to balance the interests of the stakeholders when determining which cogeneration options to adopt and barriers to regional utility-based cogeneration need to be overcome.

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

395

Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Faucets and Showerheads Faucets and Showerheads Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads October 8, 2013 - 2:35pm Addthis Vary utility cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to the default value). Defaults Water Saving Product Faucet Showerhead Faucet Showerhead Flow Rate gpm 2.2 gpm 2.5 gpm Water Cost (including waste water charges) $/1000 gal $4/1000 gal $4/1000 gal Gas Cost $/therm 0.60 $/therm 0.60 $/therm Electricity Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Minutes per Day of Operation minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes Days per Year of Operation days 260 days 365 days Quantity to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit 1 unit Calculate Reset

396

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative Island approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this islands used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an islands cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Toward Cost-Effective Solar Energy Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cost), then the sale price of grid-connected PV electricity...would have to be hooked up to the grid, and they would have to cost as...superconducting global transmission grid, supercapacitors, flywheels, etc., as promoted by Smalley...

Nathan S. Lewis

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

399

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs.  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs Transportation fuel Heat or electricity * Data are from literature, except heating oil is adjusted from 2011 winter average *...

400

Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

policy impacts on system financing, and to perform detailed levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analyses. This shows the path to cost-equalizing as envisioned under the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

402

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

404

Electric Power Quarterly, January-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Quarterly (EPQ), a new series in the EIA statistical publications, provides electric utilities' plant-level information about the cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts, net generation, fuel consumption and fuel stocks. The EPQ contains monthly data and quarterly totals for the reporting quarter. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275). This edition of the EPQ contains monthly data for the first quarter of 1983. In this report, data collected on Form EIA-759 regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented for the first time on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts collected on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423 are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

406

Cost Shifting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cost shifting exists when a provider raises prices for one set of buyers because it has lowered prices for some other buyer. In theory, cost shifting can take place only if providers have unexploited market power. The empirical evidence on the extent of cost shifting is mixed. Taken as a whole, the evidence does not support the claims that cost shifting is a large and pervasive feature of the US health-care markets. At most, one can argue that perhaps one-fifth of Medicare payment reductions have been passed on to private payers. The majority of the rigorous studies, however, have found no evidence of cost shifting.

M.A. Morrisey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

EV Everywhere: Electric Drive Systems Bring Power to Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Find out how the Energy Department's Vehicles Technologies Office is helping reduce the cost of plug-in electric vehicles through research and development of electric drive technologies.

408

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

409

Transmission line capital costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22W and 95kWh/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were...

Fiorino, D. P.

414

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

415

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Comparison of Design Criteria, Construction Practices and Cost : Among Bonneville Power Administration, Umatilla Electric Co-op Association, Arizona Public Service Company, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Ontario Hydro.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA is continually challenged to be cost competitive with other public and private utilities. This report summarizes the results of a survey conducted in 1989 by the Office of Engineering to compare design criteria and practices for constructing transmission and substation facilities with those of other utilities. The objective of the study was to evaluate whether BPA's design criteria and practices result in higher cost for power system facilities with respect to other utilities. The study was initiated by the Assistant Administrator for Engineering as part of overall effort to review BPA's reliability criteria, standards, and related design practices. The survey was jointly conducted by BPA's Division of Facilities Engineering and the Division of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. The evaluation was divided into three major parts which addressed the design and construction of transmission lines, buildings, and substation and control facilities. To conduct the survey, detailed questionnaires were developed to cover a broad spectrum of design criteria, costs, and related subjects, such as environment, land, design, procurement, and construction practices. The questionnaires were sent to participating utilities, followed by visits to the utilities by the BPA survey teams. Of the four utilities participating in the survey, three are larger utilities located outside the Pacific Northwest Region. The utilities were selected because they have transmission voltages similar to BPA, voltages up to 500-kV. The fourth is a smaller BPA customer utility from within the Region selected to provide a BPA customer viewpoint, as well as comparative design information for lower voltage facilities. 6 refs., 43 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

reduced the amount of time involved in the annual chemical inventory for a cost savings of 18,282. Other presentations covered SRNS' award-winning employee suggestion...

418

BPA's Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPAsCosts Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

419

Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electric Currents Electric Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of resistivity Electric Power: = = = Also, = . So, = = 2 = 2 Unit of Power(P): Watt (WChapter 18 Electric Currents #12;Electric Current: Flow of electric charge Current is flow of positive charge. In reality it's the electron moves in solids- Electron current. #12;Ohm's Law : Resistance

Yu, Jaehoon

426

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential systems 30 kW or less: $14,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Small commercial systems 30 kW or less: $50,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems 30 kW or less: $2.00 per W-AC Systems larger than 30 kW: $0.06 per kWh for 5 years Provider Moreno Valley Electric Utility Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30 kilowatts (kW) or less can

427

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connection costs associated with renewable energy in Europeand costs for renewables electricity grid connection: Examples in Europe. Renewable Energyrenewable energy zones (CREZs), for instance, estimated the cost

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steel and glass. Pins, glass beads and headers are assembled manually and are put in a carbon tray. Carbon trays are put in furnaces (ovens) which are maintained at a constant temperature between 160Q-2000F and have an exothermic gas environment.... At this time, company registers its peak demand. Company keeps all furnaces on and keep them available for workers in case they will need it for their products. On average, no more than two furnaces will have same temperature and exothermic gas...

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

432

U.S. Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With balance-of-system (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine costs has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from U.S. offshore wind plants.

Maples, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluating the Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Electricity Supplies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to increase the use of electricity to fuel the U.S. transportation needs. The effect of this additional demand on the electric system will depend on the amount and timing of the vehicles' periodic recharging on the grid. We used the ORCED (Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch) model to evaluate the impact of PHEVs on the Virginia-Carolinas (VACAR) electric grid in 2018. An inventory of one million PHEVs was used and charging was begun in early evening and later at night for comparison. Different connection power levels of 1.4 kW, 2 kW, and 6 kW were used. The results include the impact on capacity requirements, fuel types, generation technologies, and emissions. Cost information such as added cost of generation and cost savings versus use of gasoline were calculated. Preliminary results of the expansion of the study to all regions of the country are also presented. The results show distinct differences in fuels and generating technologies when charging times are changed. At low specific power and late in the evening, coal was the major fuel used, while charging more heavily during peak times led to more use of combustion turbines and combined cycle plants.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Powering Electric Cooperatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Network Research Network DOE Electricity Distribution System Workshop Forward Looking Panel September 2012 NRECA's Technical Focus * Over 900 Electric Cooperatives * Serve 42 million Americans in 47 States * Cover >70% of Nation's land mass * Own 42% of all Distribution Line * Totals 2.4 Million Line Miles Not for Profit, Consumer Owned, Consumer Controlled 2 Timely Energy Innovations Identify and Adopt Beneficial Technologies: * Improve Productivity * Enhance Service * Control Cost Choosing the Right Technologies Motivations & Methods Uncovering Smart Grid ROI Technology Investments Hinge on Cost Benefit Accelerate Beneficial Adoption Rate Precision Modular Evaluation Tool * Run cost-benefit analyses on smart grid investments, either

435

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

437

Electric Bike Use in China and Their Impacts on the Environment, Safety, Mobility and Accessibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits! and! costs! of! electric! bikes! are! relative!would! otherwise! use! if! electric! bikes! were! banned. !That! is,! if! an! electric! bike! user! would! otherwise!

Cherry, Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

439

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas...

440

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: September 2011 Resource Use: September 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, is most pronounced in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: August 2011 Resource Use: August 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, predominants in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the Southeast and

442

Converting Solar Radiation to Electric Power in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The generation of electric power for supplying the populations of large cities is effected at an elevated cost, given that this cost does not include solely the price of generating the electric power itself, i...

Antonio Jimenez Gonzalez; Aaron Sanchez-Juarez

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Modernising underground compressed air DSM projects to reduce operating costs / Christiaan Johannes Roux Kriel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Growing demand for electricity forces suppliers to expand their generation capacity. Financing these expansion programmes results in electricity cost increases above inflation rates. By reducing (more)

Kriel, Christiaan Johannes Roux

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Exploration of regional and global costsupply curves of biomass energy from short-rotation crops at abandoned cropland and rest land under four IPCC SRES land-use scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explored the production cost of energy crops at abandoned agricultural land and at rest land at a regional and a global level to the year 2050 using four different land-use scenarios. The estimations were based on grid cell data on the productivity of short-rotation crops on the available land over time and assumptions regarding the capital and the labour input required to reach these productivity levels. It was concluded that large amounts of grown biomass at abandoned agricultural land and rest land, 130270EJyr?1 (about 4070% of the present energy consumption) may be produced at costs below $2GJ?1 by 2050 (present lower limit of cost of coal). Interesting regions because of their low production cost and significant potentials are the Former USSR, Oceania, Eastern and Western Africa and East Asia. Such low costs presume significant land productivity improvements over time and cost reductions due to learning and capital-labour substitution. An assessment of biomass fuel cost, using the primary biomass energy costs, showed that the future costs of biomass liquid fuels may be in the same order of the present diesel production costs, although this may change in the long term. Biomass-derived electricity costs are at present slightly higher than electricity baseload costs and may directly compete with estimated future production costs of fossil fuel electricity with CO2 sequestration. The present world electricity consumption of around 20PWhyr?1 may be generated in 2050 at costs below $45MWh?1 in A1 and B1 and below $55MWh?1 in A2 and B2. At costs of $60MWh?1, about 18 (A2) to 53 (A1)PWhyr?1 can be produced.

Monique Hoogwijk; Andr Faaij; Bert de Vries; Wim Turkenburg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring Speaker(s): Catherine Wolfram Date: June 9, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Over the past eleven years, US electric utilities have faced significant changes to their competitive and regulatory environments. The industry restructuring is designed to enhance economic efficiency at all levels of operation, including distribution, transmission, generation and retail services. The gains are likely to be largest in electric generation because generation costs are the largest component of end-use costs and restructuring has a larger impact on generation than on other segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remain more heavily regulated. This paper evaluates changes in

446

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Stocks Electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in October, though stockpile levels remain well below 2010 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from October 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 12 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was generally flat in October 2011 compared to September of this year. The summer of 2011 saw significant declines in total U.S. stockpile levels, which were replenished in the

447

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Stocks As discussed in this month's feature story, electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in November, though stockpile levels remain below 2010 and 2009 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from November 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 9 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants dropped slightly from last month and remained below levels seen in November of 2010 or 2009. While

448

Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technology development - Evaluation of electric vehicle benefits and challenges 3 HEV Systems Reduce cost, increase energy of energy storage Low-cost power electronics Modeling...

449

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: December 2011 End Use: December 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

450

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2011 End Use: August 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

451

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: November 2011 End Use: November 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

452

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: February 2012 End Use: February 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

453

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2011 End Use: October 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

454

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: March 2012 End Use: March 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

455

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: September 2011 End Use: September 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

456

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2013 End Use: October 2013 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

457

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: January 2012 End Use: January 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

458

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are

459

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are reasonable compared to gasoline, especially if consumers take advantage of

460

Economic analysis of electric energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents a cost analysis of grid-connected electric energy storage. Various battery energy storage technologies are considered in the analysis. Life-cycle cost analysis is (more)

Poonpun, Piyasak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and...

462

Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems July 15, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. What does this mean for me? Small wind electric systems can be one of the most efficient ways of producing electricity for your home. Wind energy is a fast growing market, because it is effective and cost efficient. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power lines extended

463

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2011 Resource Use: October 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Consistent with the retail sales numbers, generation output rose in Texas, as well as the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions and declined or remained

464

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

465

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: March 2012 Resource Use: March 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined across much of the country in March due to unseasonably warm temperatures. The two regions that observed small

466

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: February 2012 Resource Use: February 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in almost all regions in February due to unseasonably warm temperatures. Following the same pattern as January,

467

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: December 2011 Resource Use: December 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions, with the exception of the West and Texas, due to unseasonably warm temperatures in December. Fossil steam

468

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: November 2011 Resource Use: November 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined or remained relatively flat in all regions except for Texas and the Southeast. Both of these regions saw generation

469

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: January 2012 Resource Use: January 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions due to unseasonably warm temperatures in January. Fossil steam generation followed total generation

470

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

471

Stearns Electric Association- Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stearns Electric Association, through a program offered by Rural Utilities Services, offers its members low-interest Energy Resource Conservation (ERC) loans. The complete cost of making approved...

472

Energy Savings in Electric Arc Furnace Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, followed by suggestions on how energy consumption can be reduced. unit cost of electricity in steelmaking is discussed with emphasis on energy management....

Lubbeck, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Buying Clean Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to pay a small premium in exchange for electricity generated from clean, renewable ("green") energy sources. The premium covers the increased costs incurred by the power...

474

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Direct costing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oau 5e reduced. Under the same oonOitions, even ~Me on a bread scale entails not mere1y the conduct of the direct oyeraticns cf yrccessing the materials into finished products, but also the performance of auxiliary functions. these may 'ba power y... purposes have been advanced as folkway le Most of a o03RyaxO' 8 products Grc usual13r sold at prices which oovex' full product costs y plus 861ling a%el administrative expenses, plus normal profit. The inventoi~ valuate. on should be consistent...

Browning, Donald Bullock

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

476

Climate and Environmental Effects of Electric Vehicles versus Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China: A Life-Cycle Analysis at Provincial Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under such circumstances, there will be a battle between coal and NG in many sectors, particularly the on-road transport sector, which is exclusively petroleum-dependent but currently facing a worldwide oil shortage. ... Consumption-based power mixes estimated based on provincial data provided by China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2011(4) (data include amount of electricity produced from coal, NG, hydro and others, and amount of electricity imported from and exported to other provinces), under the following assumptions: (1) Electricity-imported provinces first import electricity from other provinces under the same interprovincial power grid, then from neighboring grids (China has six interprovincial power grids serving six regions, respectively; for details refer to our previous study(13)); (2) the mix of exported electricity is 100% coal considering the marginal effect, except for provinces (e.g., Hubei and Sichuan) where huge hydropower projects (e.g., the Three Gorges project) are built with intent to export hydropower outside the province. ... Chinas oil imports and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have grown rapidly over the past decade. ...

Hong Huo; Qiang Zhang; Fei Liu; Kebin He

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

EV Everywhre Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Battery Status and Cost Reduction Prospects July 26, 2012 David Howell Team Lead, Hybrid & Electric Systems Vehicle Technologies Program U.S....

479

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

NREL: News - NREL Study Suggests Cost Gap for Western Renewables...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) indicates that by 2025 wind and solar power electricity generation could become cost-competitive without federal subsidies,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel-cell vehicles in 2030. This comparative analysis, based on costfuel cell or hydrogen ICE) and all-electric vehicles. According to the analysis, the societal cost

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric...

483

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for...

484

Electric Motor Maintenance & Repair for Long Term Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy costs to operate electric motors can be a significant part of an operating budget. For example, a recent survey of California water departments reveals energy costs for pumping and treating water may be 25% of operating costs. Strategies...

Brithinee, W. P.

485

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

486

EV Project Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max electricity demand across all days Min electricity demand across all days Electricity demand on single calendar day with highest peak Charging Unit Usage Residential Level 2...

487

The impact of Production Tax Credits on the profitable production of electricity from wind in the U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A spatial financial model using wind data derived from assimilated meteorological condition was developed to investigate the profitability and competitiveness of onshore wind power in the contiguous U.S. It considers not only the resulting estimated capacity factors for hypothetical wind farms but also the geographically differentiated costs of local grid connection. The levelized cost of wind-generated electricity for the contiguous U.S. is evaluated assuming subsidy levels from the Production Tax Credit (PTC) varying from 0 to 4/kWh under three cost scenarios: a reference case, a high cost case, and a low cost case. The analysis indicates that in the reference scenario, current PTC subsidies of 2.1/kWh are at a critical level in determining the competitiveness of wind-generated electricity compared to conventional power generation in local power market. Results from this study suggest that the potential for profitable wind power with the current PTC subsidy amounts to more than seven times existing demand for electricity in the entire U.S. Understanding the challenges involved in scaling up wind energy requires further study of the external costs associated with improvement of the backbone transmission network and integration into the power grid of the variable electricity generated from wind.

Xi Lu; Jeremy Tchou; Michael B. McElroy; Chris P. Nielsen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

489

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

490

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Efficiency Matching  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Efficiency Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Efficiency Matching Grant Program Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Efficiency Matching Grant Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Heating & Cooling Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount 50% of cost, up to $100 Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmers Electric Cooperative (FEC) offers a grant program which splits the cost of simple energy efficient improvements to the home. The utility will cover 50% of the cost of eligible improvements made by the participating member. Grants are limited to $100 per year. A variety of measures and

491

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets 1 May 11, 2012 ADDENDUM Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Additional Information on Jones Act Vessels' Potential Role in Northeast Refinery Closures The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent report exploring the potential impacts of reductions in refinery activity in the Northeast on petroleum product markets in that region pointed out that, if Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery shuts down, waterborne movements from the Gulf Coast could be an important route for alternative supplies to help replace lost volumes in the short term, particularly for ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD). Because this route would involve

492

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: The front month futures price for Brent, the world waterborne crude benchmark, increased by $5.72 per barrel to settle at $115.26 per barrel on September 5 (Figure 1). Front month futures prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil also increased over the same time period but by a lesser amount, to settle at $108.37 per barrel on September 5. The primary drivers of higher crude oil prices over the past five weeks included an uptick in unplanned crude oil production outages and increased tensions in the Middle East. Continued disputes between local governments in the eastern oil producing regions of Libya and the central government in Tripoli combined with worker strikes at

493

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Host and Presentor Contact Information Hosts: Mindi Farber-DeAnda Team Lead, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging