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1

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

2

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

3

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

5

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

7

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

10

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to… (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

12

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

13

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

14

Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion...

25

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County,...

26

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Presentation covers...

27

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Controlling electrical costs with energy management  

SciTech Connect

Energy Management Systems have been proven to be extremely effective in reducing electrical energy costs. This particular system is also capable of monitoring natural gas usage and even regulating that usage with the control of valves. Controlling electrical energy usage must be a cooperative effort between the plant where the system is to be installed and the manufacturer of the Energy Management Controller. The latter can be assisted by being advised of which loads are able to be shed and how shedding those loads affect production.

Collins, W.M.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

36

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

39

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

40

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information concerning the quality, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity in the United States.

Dean Fennell

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Cost Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on AddThis.com...

44

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, 1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and 2)enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is

45

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-DP-09-48.pdf Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Screenshot References: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs[1] Abstract "We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer-funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy

46

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Production cost models with regard to liberalised electricity markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book makes a contribution to the formulation and implementation of production cost models for the modelling of liberalized electricity markets by addressing issues associated… (more)

Martinez Diaz, David José

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

50

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration (EIA) has changed the format of the Short-Term Energy Outlook tables for electricity industry overview (Table 7a), electricity generation (Table 7d), electricity...

52

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

53

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer–funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of numbers of people affected DRAFT #12;6 · costs per hour of disruption or outage are used in conjunction with consequences in terms of duration, which is particularly common in electric power outages · costs per dollar for residences. Per Unit of Duration of Outage Duration as an influence in the cost of outages has received a lot

Wang, Hai

57

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

costs, the levelized cost ... 4 These results do not include targeted tax credits such as the production or investment tax credit available for some technologies.

58

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

SciTech Connect

Recently, independent system operators (ISOs) and others have published reports on the costs of transmission congestion. The magnitude of congestion costs cited in these reports has contributed to the national discussion on the current state of U.S. electricity transmission system and whether it provides an adequate platform for competition in wholesale electricity markets. This report reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, (1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and (2) enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is essential to understand who pays, how much, and how do they benefit in evaluating options (both transmission and non-transmission alternatives) to address transmission congestion. To describe the differences among published estimates of congestion costs, we develop and motivate three ways by which transmission congestion costs are calculated in restructured markets. The assessment demonstrates that published transmission congestion costs are not directly comparable because they have been developed to serve different purposes. More importantly, critical information needed to make them more comparable, for example in order to evaluate the impacts of options to relieve congestion, is sometimes not available.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

60

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Fresh Look at Integrating Supply-Side and Demand-Side Resources Speaker(s): Bill Kelly Robert Redlinger Date: January 19, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn The restructuring of the California electricity industry has not proceeded as intended. A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices, power outages, and a political and financial crisis for the State. This crisis will not be solved through increasing electricity supply alone. Energy industry observers agree that 1.) energy efficiency, 2.) distributed on-site generation, and 3.) price

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Forecasting Electric Vehicle Costs with Experience Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April, 5. R 2~1. Dino. "Forecasting the Price Evolution of 1ElectromcProducts," Ioumal of Forecasting, ¥oL4, No I, 1985.costs and a set of forecasting tools that can be refined as

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

63

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

64

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe bene®ts of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

67

Electricity storage: Location, location, location … and cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... nuclear reactors ... Environment. Greenhouse ... providing energy management and load leveling services while taking advantage of differences in the wholesale ...

68

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1, , Wing-Kai Hon2 , Hsiang-Hsuan Liu2 management in smart grid. Consumers send in power requests with a flexible set of timeslots during which arising in "demand response manage- ment" in smart grid [7, 9, 18]. The electrical smart grid is one

Wong, Prudence W.H.

70

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

75

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

76

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major problem associated with energy conservation projects is how to estimate the financial savings associated with a reduction in energy consumption. Although many conservation projects can be implemented in a matter of months, the energy savings may extend over a period of years or decades. The decision to initiate a conservation project often hinges upon the favorable outcome of an "engineering economics" or "present worth" analysis which compares present costs and future incomes. For a conservation project, four sets of data are required for the economic analysis: project cost, rate of return or discount rate, the amount of energy saved, and the future price of energy. Estimating the future price of electricity requires considerable effort since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used to estimate system costs for an electric utility with various mixes of power plants. The electricity costs can then be used to determine the economic value of various conservation projects.

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

February 23, 2012 February 23, 2012 Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S Proposal: Modify the frame of the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," from a census to a sample, and use sampling methods to estimate the sales revenues and customer counts by sector and state for the remaining industry. Use random sampling, if needed, to estimate for changes in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and time-based tariff programs. Proposal: Create a new Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form), for the respondents that have been removed from the Form EIA-861 frame. The form would ask them for contact information and would contain a series of yes/no questions to query their status. In addition, it would collect limited data for use in estimating. Once every five years, the

82

EIA - Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. ... such as investment or production tax credits for specified generation sources, ...

83

Analysis of electricity production costs from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

The economics of the geopressured geothermal resource along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is assessed. Geopressured waters are nearly under twice the normal hydrostatic pressure and believed to be saturated with methane. The costs of generating electricity from this resource are estimated based on the description and conceptual development plans provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Methane content and selling prices are the most important factors affecting the commercial potential of geopressured resources--so it is important that electrical generation be viewed as a by-product of methane production. On the same incremental cost basis, the cost of electricity generated from the geohydraulic energy is potentially competitive with conventional energy sources. This would require development of a small commercial high pressure, hydraulic turbine to extract geohydraulic energy at the wellhead in plants of about 3 MW capacity. Price/quantity relationships are developed for electricity generation from geopressured resources for each of three development plans proposed by USGS. Studies, based on field constructed plants, indicated an optimum power plant size in the range of 20 to 60 MWe, depending on water temperature. However, if standardized thermal conversion power plants could be factory produced in the 6 MWe range competitively with larger field constructed plants, then the optimum plant size might be reduced to single wellhead units.Wellhead units would completely eliminate fluid transmission costs, but would probably incur higher costs for heat rejection, power plant operation, and electrical transmission. The upper cost target for competitive wellhead plants would be on the order of $800/kW in 1975 dollars.

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

85

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

86

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

87

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

88

Will stranded cost recovery distort Pennsylvania`s electricity market?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is ironic indeed that the forecasting errors of Keystone State utilities that have led to today`s claims of stranded costs are now to be remediated in new legislation which, unaccountably, utterly fails to take account of the same problem: utility forecasting errors. On December 3, 1996, the Governor of Pennsylvania signed into law the Electricity Generation Customer Choice and Competition Act (66 Pa. C.S. 2801 et seq.). The Act set in motion an ambitious timetable for restructuring Pennsylvania`s electric utility industry to substantially deregulate its generation component. Customer choice of electricity supplier is to be phased in over a two year period beginning January 1, 1999. As indicated by the appearance of the word {open_quotes}competition{close_quotes} in the official title of the Act, the resulting institutional transformation is expected to foster free market competition in the generation and retail sale of electricity. However, there is already dispute among the Act`s commentators and critics, who are legion, as to whether its strategy for achieving this commendable objective will produce significant cost savings to consumers any time soon. One need look no further than the Act`s transition cost recovery provisions to find cause for skepticism. Section 2808 of the Act empowers the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to impose, for a period of up to nine years from January 1, 1997 (or longer at the Commission`s discretion), a {open_quotes}competitive transition charge{close_quotes} (CTC) upon {open_quotes}every customer accessing the transmission or distribution network.{close_quotes} The CTC is intended to afford Pennsylvania`s regulated electric utilities the opportunity to recover those of their {open_quotes}transition or stranded costs{close_quotes} (collectively {open_quotes}stranded costs{close_quotes}) approved by the Commission.

Caplan, R.L. [Caplan & Luber, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser This analysis was funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy factor trends fails to convey recent improvements in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from wind

90

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

93

Electricity Cost and Firm Performance: Evidence from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the widely acknowledged importance of infrastructure for economic growth, there has been relatively little research on how infrastructure affects the decisions of firms. Using data on Indian manufacturing firms, this paper provides evidence on how electricity prices affect a firm’s industry choice and productivity growth. I construct an instrument for electricity price as the interaction between the price of coal paid by power utilities, which is arguably exogenous to firm characteristics, and the initial share of thermal generation in a state’s total electricity generation capacity. I find that, in response to an exogenous increase in electricity price, firms reduce their electricity consumption and switch to industries with less electricity-intensive production processes. I also find that firm output, machine intensity and labor productivity decline with an increase in electricity price. In addition to these level effects, I show that firm output and productivity growth rates are negatively affected by high electricity prices. These results suggest that electricity constraints faced by firms may limit a country’s growth by leading firms to operate in industries with fewer productivity-enhancing opportunities.

Ama Baafra Abeberese

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

100

Capping the electricity cost of cloud-scale data centers with impacts on power markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel electricity cost capping algorithm that not only minimizes the electricity cost of operating cloud-scale data centers, but also enforces a cost budget on the monthly electricity bill. Our solution first explicitly models the impacts of power demands on electricity prices and the power consumption of cooling and networking in the minimization of electricity cost. In the second step, if the electricity cost exceeds a desired monthly budget due to unexpectedly high workloads, our solution guarantees the quality of service for premium customers and trades off the request throughput of ordinary customers. We formulate electricity cost capping as two related constrained optimization problems and propose an efficient algorithm based on mixed integer programming. Simulation results show that our solution outperforms the state-ofthe-art solutions by having lower electricity costs and achieves desired cost capping with maximized request throughput.

Yanwei Zhang; Yefu Wang; Xiaorui Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Does EIA have data on the costs for electricity transmission and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA does not have data on the costs to build or operate electricity transmission lines and distribution networks. However, ...

103

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

106

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the local/electricity distribution level, storage canthat the U.S. electricity distribution system is designed toto the design of electricity distribution systems, larger

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

110

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renew- ables”, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing,” Energy Journal,28(

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borenstein, Severin. “Electricity Rate Structures and thePrice of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate DiscountedReal Price of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate Table 4:

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Lithium-Ion Battery Cost and Advanced Battery Technologies Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batteries are a critical cost factor for plug-in electric vehicles, and the current high cost of lithium ion batteries poses a serious challenge for the competitiveness of Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEVs). Because the market penetration of PEVs will depend heavily on future battery costs, determining the direction of battery costs is very important. This report examines the cost drivers for lithium-ion PEV batteries and also presents an assessment of recent advancements in the growing attempts to ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

116

Electric Vehicle Charging Levels and Requirements Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification Safety standards and certification * Charging definitions * EVSE ( (electric vehicle supp pp y ly eq quip pment) ) examp ples * Installation requirements * Siting...

117

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. 2004. Electricity Transmission in aInterruptions to U.S. Electricity Customers. September. (Cost Models in Electricity Planning and Pricing. ”

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hybrid vehicle potential assessment. Volume 10. Electric and hybrid vehicle cost handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this interim cost handbood is to provide a consistent single-point source of data and procedures for estimating the costs of electric and hybrid vehicles. These costs include manufacturing, acquisition (purchase price), operating, and life cycle. Each suggested Cost Estimating Relation (CER) presented herein is a result of the compilation of currently existing cost estimates and cost relationships. No independent cost analysis was performed for this handbook, nor was any analysis performed to rework existing cost data for consistency in all primary assumptions. The cost data is presented in terms of major component and subassembly costs so that any vehicle (electric, hybrid, or conventional) can be costed. The cost estimating relations presented in this handbook are subjective averages of the several independent estimates for each component.

Heft, R.C.; Heller, S.C.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Costs Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

120

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Competition Work in Electricity. John Wiley and Sons.Report on the New York Electricity Markets. June. Patton,Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjusting for Time-Varying Production SACRAMENTO flat-rateSolar Photovoltaic Electricity Production Severin BorensteinPhotovoltaic Electricity Production Severin Borenstein 1

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) two-way communications which allow customers to monitor their electricity consumption and take steps to better manage their electric bills; 2) a voluntary, pre-payment...

125

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wholesale electricity trade, and enable consumers to seekelectricity markets rely on offer-based, centralized, wholesale tradeas reported in the trade press. These electricity hub prices

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during electricity transmission and distribution increasesand distribution infrastructure if less electricity needselectricity, and also ignores the potential savings in transmission and distribution

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

UK Electricity Consumption at LLSOA level (2007 - 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (DECC) released experimental statistics on domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Lower Layer Super Output Authority level (LLSOA) for...

128

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auto Industry Models to Review Electric Vehicle Costing andElectric Vehicles in the Nation's Energy Future , DE86-003295, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, November (1984). Auto industry

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

131

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

132

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

133

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0191(2007) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007 December 2008 Energy Information Administration

134

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid… (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electric power transmission and distribution systems: costs and their allocation. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Transmission and distribution costs contribute significantly to the total costs of providing electrical service. The costs derived from the transmission and distribution (TandD) system have historically comprised about 2/3 the costs of producing and delivering electricity to residential-commercial customers, and over 1/3 the total costs supplying electricity to large industrial customers. This report: (1) estimates the differences in transmission and distribution equipment required to serve industrial and residential-commercial customers and allocates to the above two customer classes the average costs of installing this equipment; (2) estimates the costs of operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system, and allocates these costs to the customer classes; and (3) calculates the TandD derived average costs for the two customer classes. (GRA)

Baughman, M.L.; Bottaro, D.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

138

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down January 13, 2012 - 1:29pm Addthis Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager The record number of electric-drive vehicles on the floor of Detroit's

139

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called "antiquated" and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability

140

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per kWh produced than baseload coal, nuclear or combined-even. The model includes a baseload technology with high ?annual production cost are: Baseload (coal) Cost = $208247/M

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) have been promoted as the least-cost approach to meeting steadily increasing energy demand. However, it is unclear whether DER deployment can maintain or improve the electric power supply reliability and quality currently available to consumers. This report address two key factors relating to this question: 1) characteristics of existing power supply reliability, and 2) costs resulting from supply interruptions characteristic of the existing power grid. Interruption cost data collected by the University of Saskatchewan was used in conjunction with data generated by the Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of Manufacturers (Census Bureau, 1995), along with industry shares of gross domestic product (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995a) and gross output (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995b) to derive interruption cost estimates for U.S. industries at the 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level, as well as for broader sectors and the U.S. economy. Interruption cost estimates are presented as a function of outage duration (e.g., 20 minutes, 1-hour, 3-hour), and are normalized in terms of dollars per peak kW.

Balducci, P. J.; Roop, J. M.; Schienbein, L. A.; DeSteese, J. G.; Weimar, M. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM Interconnection, LLC).2002. PJM Interconnection State of the Market Report 2001.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

147

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

148

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

150

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

151

Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-058 Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong? Richard Green Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;Electricity Transmission optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops

California at Berkeley. University of

152

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Cost of Transmission for Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 The Cost of Transmission Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 2009 #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Implications and Future Work #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 3 Motivation

153

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are a form of distributed generation. The current directPV. As a form of distributed generation, solar PV is alsoprovisions for distributed generation. hour when electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling of Cost Curves 1.0 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs. Some typical average costs of fuel are given in the following table for coal, petroleum [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion

McCalley, James D.

157

Figure 80. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gas combined cycle Wind Nuclear Coal Capital O&M Fuel Transmission 2040.00 2020.00 1.35 5.88 5.98 6.61 1.71 6.98 7.73 8.32 0.20 1.31 1.16 0.68 0.20 1.31 1.16 0.68 6 ...

158

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cost for 1 MW systems with various EP ratios Validated PNNL model using PNNL 1 kW, 1 kWh stack performance data Provided a roadmap for cost effective redox flow battery systems...

160

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by low price caps, the di?erence between solar PV powersolar PV power using hourly wholesale electricity prices and5. Real-time Prices for Valuing the Power from Solar PVs As

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Title Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects...

167

Introduction to the OR Forum Article: “Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions” by Ramteen Sioshansi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comment on “Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions” by Ramteen Sieshansi. Keywords: energy, environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Edieal J. Pinker

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fiscal interactions and the costs of controlling pollution from electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I quantify the costs of controlling SO{sub 2}, carbon, and NOx emissions from power generation, accounting for interactions between environmental policies and the broader fiscal system. I distinguish a dirty technology (coal) that satisfies baseload demand and a clean technology (gas) that is used at peak period, and I distinguish sectors with and without regulated prices. Estimated emissions control costs are substantially lower than in previous models of fiscal interactions that assume a single, constant-returns technology and competitive pricing. The results are reasonably robust to alternative scenarios, such as full price deregulation, and market power in the deregulated sector.

Parry, I.W.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

170

Hotel dual-cogeneration plant saving 33% on electricity costs  

SciTech Connect

Hotel Del Coronado in California has two cogeneration systems in operation, one gas turbine based, the other an advanced solar photovoltaic installation which cuts its electric bill by $400,000 per year. In order to make the new installation as unobstrusive as possible, the gas turbine and waste heat boiler units were placed underground. The sunlight-to-electricity efficiency of the photovoltaic cogeneration system is about 8% and the thermal conversion efficiency about 50%. That makes for an overall 58% cogeneration efficiency. The design uses silicon solar cells specially designed for concentrator application.

Stambler, I.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

172

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix to develop its 7700 Amonix to develop its 7700 system, which drastically reduces the requirement for costly solar cells by using Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times onto small, highly efficient photovoltaic cells. This reduces the cell area so that expensive solar cell materials can be replaced with inexpensive plastic lenses. Amonix Inc. (Torrance, CA), founded in 1989, develops and

173

Electric Cable Reel Rubber-Tired Gantry Cranes: Costs and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Port equipment manufacturers have responded to the increased focus on air quality control by creating a variety of cleaner equipment and making more electric equipment available to ports. Included in this equipment is the rubber-tired gantry (RTG) crane, which was historically available only with a diesel engine. Electric cable reel RTG cranes, relatively new to the U.S. market, may reduce port crane operating costs due to their lower energy costs, higher energy efficiencies, and longer equipment life. E...

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Diagnostics-while drilling: Reducing the cost of geothermal-produced electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to estimate the potential impact of proposed new Diagnostics-While-Drilling technology on the cost of electricity (COE) produced with geothermal energy. A cost model that predicts the COE was developed and exercised over the range of conditions found for geothermal plants in flashed-steam, binary, and enhanced-reservoir (e.g., Hot Dry Rock) applications. The calculations were repeated assuming that DWD technology is available to reduce well costs and improve well productivity. The results indicate that DWD technology would reduce the geothermal COE by 2--31%, depending on well depth, well productivity, and the type of geothermal reservoir. For instance, for a typical 50-MW, flashed-steam geothermal power plant employing 3-MW wells, 6,000-ft deep, the model predicts an electricity cost of 4.9 cents/kwh. With the DWD technology envisioned, the electricity cost could be reduced by nearly 20%, to less than 4 cents/kwh. Such a reduction in the cost of electricity would give geothermal power a competitive edge over other types of power at many locations across the US and around the world. It is thus believed that DWD technology could significantly expand the role of geothermal energy in providing efficient, environment-friendly electric generating capacity.

PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,DAVID A.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Addthis Description Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs. Speakers Carlos Alvarez, LeAnn Oliver, Steve Kronheim, Jorge Gonzalez, Kathleen Woods-Richardson Duration 2:05 Topic Commercial Heating & Cooling Energy Sources Innovation Energy Economy Energy Sector Jobs Credit Energy Department Video Thank you for coming to celebrate a milestone in Miami-Dade. We are going to be turning biogas into energy. In Miami-Dade County, we've been a leader in the whole sustainability effort. I met with our sustainability

180

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines for monitoring and tracking of utilities are provided. These recommendations, methods, and guidelines are the result of on-site work for schools and hospitals . Recently completed energy usage survey and observations of several hospitals in Texas are included. Opportunities exist for schools, hospitals, and other buildings t o achieve significant dollar savings by good utility management. Understanding utility rate structures is essential for minimizing energy costs. The authors' data is for Texas schools and hospitals, but the principles presented apply to other geographic areas.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

189

Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

191

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

194

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Develop nickel--zinc battery suitable for electric vehicle propulsion. Task A: design and cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-month design and cost study for the use of nickel--zinc batteries in electric vehicles is presented. Battery configuration is analyzed, and expected performance is set forth. Current development problems concern component materials and capacity decline on cycling, electrolyte maintenance, and thermal characteristics. The manufacturing process is outlined, and estimates are made for cost, materials requirements, capital needs, etc. 61 figures, 24 tables. (RWR)

None

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Incremental cost of electricity used as backup for passive heated homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of passive technologies on a north-central US utility has been studied. A method of utility cost and fuel use analysis, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to compute the long run incremental costs and incremental fuel use required for supplementary electricity to houses with Trombe walls or with direct gain features. For comparison, a reference house with no passive features and a house with an energy conservation design were also analyzed. The results show that the total long run incremental cost to the utility of providing supplementary power to the passive houses costs no more than the cost to supply electricity to heat the reference house or the conservation house. An analysis of the annual homeowner costs for the various types of heating systems suggests that the Trombe wall technology is not promising for use in this climate. The passive technologies, as modelled in this study reduced the requirements for conventional energy by about 10% (7 to 10 kilojoules/year). For all of the house types studied, the use of electricity for heating, instead of oil or gas, reduced the overall (utility plus residential) use of oil or gas by only about 30 to 40% even out through the 1990's.

Martorella, J; Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

SciTech Connect

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-peak hours for delivery at times of peak usage. These pumped hydro sys

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas, 2009­04­11). Plug-in vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric

Michalek, Jeremy J.

207

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Industrial Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA E-mail: mmazumd be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails variable because it depends upon two uncertain quantities, demand and the availability of the generating

Mazumdar, Mainak

209

Cost and design study for electric vehicle lead--acid batteries  

SciTech Connect

A design and cost study for electric-vehicle lead--acid batteries is presented; a research and development program leading to demonstration and testing of 20- to 30-kWh batteries is proposed. Both flat pasted and tubular positive electrodes are included. Detailed testing programs are set forth. 110 figures, 8 tables (RWR)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Perception of price when price information is costly: evidence from electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic theory predicts that a well-informed consumer facing multiple prices responds to marginal price rather than to average price because he equates benefits with costs at the margin. The marginal price postulate, however, may not be true if information regarding marginal price is costly. Residential consumption of electricity is an example of a good for which it is costly to determine marginal price since the price changes with quantity purchased according to a declining-block schedule. If the cost of determining marginal price exceeds its expected benefits, the consumer will base his consumption on simpler information rather than on marginal price. The most obvious candidate is the monthly bill. Since electricity expenditures are greater than they would be if priced at marginal price, perceived price is anticipated to be higher than marginal price. The model includes a price perception variable that depends on the complexity of the rate structure as measured by the ratio of average to marginal price. Pooled annual data from 1960 to 1980 on the seven Ohio electric utilities are used for estimation. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the residential consumer responds to average price. Further, the expected increase in consumer's surplus, if marginal price were correctly perceived, is calculated at the sample mean and found to be negligible compared to any possible cost of determining marginal price.

Shin, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.

Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

Ehsani, Mark

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

216

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

217

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparative costs of flexible package cells and rigid cells for lithium-ionhybrid electric vehicle batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We conducted a design study to compare the manufacturing costs at a level of 100,000 hybrid vehicle batteries per year for flexible package (Flex) cells and for rigid aluminum container (Rigid) cells. Initially, the Rigid cells were considered to have welded closures and to be deep-drawn containers of about the same shape as the Flex cells. As the study progressed, the method of fabricating and sealing the Rigid cells was expanded to include lower cost options including double seaming and other mechanically fastened closures with polymer sealants. Both types of batteries were designed with positive electrodes containing Li(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} and graphite negative electrodes. The use of a different combination of lithium-ion electrodes would have little effect on the difference in costs for the two types of cells. We found that 20-Ah cells could be designed with excellent performance and heat rejection capabilities for either type of cell. Many parts in the design of the Flex cells are identical or nearly identical to those of the Rigid Cell, so for these features there would be no difference in the cost of manufacturing the two types of batteries. We judged the performance, size and weight of the batteries to be sufficiently similar that the batteries would have the same value for their application. Some of the design features of the Flex cells were markedly different than those of the deep-drawn and welded Rigid cells and would result in significant cost savings. Fabrication and processing steps for which the Flex cells appear to have a cost advantage over these Rigid cells are (1) container fabrication and sealing, (2) terminal fabrication and sealing, and (3) intercell connections. The costs of providing cooling channels adjacent to the cells and for module and battery hardware appear to favor Rigid cell batteries slightly. Overall, Flex cell batteries appear to have an advantage of about $1.20-$3.70 per cell for a 25-kW Battery of 20 cells or about $24 to $74 per battery. Container experts assisted with this study, including a paid consultant and personnel at container manufacturing companies. Some of the companies are considering entering the business of manufacturing containers for hybrid vehicle battery manufacturers. For this reason they provided valuable guidance on overall approaches to reducing the costs of the cell containers. They have retained the description of some specific designs and procedures for future possible work with battery manufacturers, with whom they are now in contact. Through the guidance of these experts, we determined that a new type of container could be manufactured that would have the best features of performance and low cost of both the Rigid and Flex containers. For instance, the aluminum layer in a tri-layer sheet can be sufficiently thick to form a rigid container that can be fabricated in two halves, much like a Flex container, and mechanically joined at the edges for strength. In addition to the mechanical joint, this container can be sealed at the edges, much like a Flex container, by means of an inner polymer liner that can be heat-sealed or ultrasonically welded. The terminals can be flat strips of metal sealed into the top of the container as part of the edge sealing of the container, as for the Flex cell. Ridges can be stamped into one side of the container to provide cooling channels and the exterior layer of the container stock can be coated with a thin, electrically insulating, polymer layer. We expect this type of container will provide excellent sealing and durability and be less expensive than either the Flex or the Rigid container, which the study initially considered. A major cost for the original Rigid container is the welding required for sealing the container. However, the welding of the current collector tabs to the terminal piece may be even more complex and costly than welding the container. It is important, therefore, to develop an inexpensive procedure for attachment of the foils to the terminal pieces. A lower-cost procedure, such as

Nelson, P. A.; Jansen, A. N.

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

PRISM 2.0: Regional Energy and Economic Model Development and Initial Application: Phase 2: Electric Sector CO2 Reduction Options to 2050: Dimensions of Technology, Energy Costs, and Environmental Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted an analysis of electric sector CO2 reduction options to 2050 across a range of scenarios covering dimensions of technology costs and availability, energy costs, and CO2 constraints.  Using its U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) model, EPRI calculated the impact of changes in generation portfolio, generation capacity, expenditures, and electricity prices on power sector costs. This analysis estimates different levels of ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Photovoltaics for municipal planners. Cost-effective municipal applications of photovoltaics for electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce quantify the benefits of controlled charging of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Costs are determined expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c

McGaughey, Alan

222

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black, Marija Ilic, IEEE Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black This survey contains a sample of the available technologies for implementing residential electricity services understanding of the potential for implementation of residential services. The estimation of the costs

Ilic, Marija D.

223

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric restructuring, currently proposed in California and being reviewed elsewhere, can produce many opportunities for large companies to reduce their electricity costs. As the electricity market changes, electric utilities and other potential suppliers are likely to develop a portfolio of options and creative pricing to attract customers in a competitive market. In attempting to be "energy neutral," i.e., to be indifferent to energy costs in one state or utility service area versus another, many companies are looking at a corporate approach to energy procurement, similar to the procurement of other products. Industrial customers may be looking for regional or even national energy suppliers for their facilities. Electric utilities, in an attempt to be competitive and retain customers, will likely work to be this regional or national energy supplier. The expectation will be that these suppliers can offer competitive pricing and a portfolio of options from which to choose. These options may resemble those that have developed in the natural gas market as a result of restructuring in the fuels industry.

Lowe, E. T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and business consumers are described in Yu et al. (2007). Energy loss (EL) is measured in GWh and valued at average industrial electricity price. The price of Opex and Totex is by convention set to 1. The weather data were obtained from the UK... www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality Performance? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies EPRG Working Paper 0827 Cambridge Working Paper...

Yu, William; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

227

Development of Low Cost Carbonaceous Materials for Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report on the US DOE CARAT program describes innovative R & D conducted by Superior Graphite Co., Chicago, IL, USA in cooperation with researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and defines the proper type of carbon and a cost effective method for its production, as well as establishes a US based manufacturer for the application of anodes of the Lithium-Ion, Lithium polymer batteries of the Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicles. The three materials each representing a separate class of graphitic carbon, have been developed and released for field trials. They include natural purified flake graphite, purified vein graphite and a graphitized synthetic carbon. Screening of the available on the market materials, which will help fully utilize the graphite, has been carried out.

Barsukov, Igor V.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Apples and oranges: don't compare levelized cost of renewables: Joskow  

SciTech Connect

MIT Prof. Paul Joskow points out that the levelized metric is inappropriate for comparing intermittent generating technologies like wind and solar with dispatchable generating technologies like nuclear, gas combined cycle, and coal. The levelized comparison fails to take into account differences in the production profiles of intermittent and dispatchable generating technologies and the associated large variations in the market value of the electricity they supply. When the electricity is produced by an intermittent generating technology, the level of output and the value of the electricity at the times when the output is produced are key variables that should be taken into account.

NONE

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

The levelized cost of energy for distributed PV : a parametric study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maturation of distributed solar PV as an energy source requires that the technology no longer compete on module efficiency and manufacturing cost ($/Wp) alone. Solar PV must yield sufficient energy (kWh) at a competitive cost (c/kWh) to justify its system investment and ongoing maintenance costs. These metrics vary as a function of system design and interactions between parameters, such as efficiency and area-related installation costs. The calculation of levelized cost of energy includes energy production and costs throughout the life of the system. The life of the system and its components, the rate at which performance degrades, and operation and maintenance requirements all affect the cost of energy. Cost of energy is also affected by project financing and incentives. In this paper, the impact of changes in parameters such as efficiency and in assumptions about operating and maintenance costs, degradation rate and system life, system design, and financing will be examined in the context of levelized cost of energy.

Goodrich, Alan C. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

232

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Total Cost of Ownership Model for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has grown dramatically in the past three years, but the central question concerning PEV acceptance in the marketplace still remains: When compared to a hybrid or conventional vehicle, is a PEV worth the additional up-front cost to consumers? Given the incomplete understanding of changes in driving patterns due to vehicle purchases, the baseline analysis described in this report does not model customer adaptation, nor does it attempt to address non-tangible ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Unneeded electric plant's cost draws manufacturer shutdown threat  

SciTech Connect

If the Big Rivers Electric Corp. succeeds in raising its rates to cover the cost of surplus capacity resulting from new constrcution, an aluminum smelter threatens to stop manufacturing, which would raise rates even higher for the remaining consumers. Efforts to sell power out of state and to generate financial assistance from the Rural Electrification Administration are underway. The comment period for rate intervenors ends in mid November.

Efron, S.

1984-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparison of costs for alternative mixed low-level waste treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Total life cycle costs (TLCCs), including disposal costs, of thermal, nonthermal and enhanced nonthermal systems were evaluated to guide future research and development programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) consisting of RCRA hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In these studies, nonthermal systems are defined as those systems that process waste at temperatures less than 350 C. Preconceptual designs and costs were developed for thirty systems with a capacity (2,927 lbs/hr) to treat the DOE MLLW stored inventor y(approximately 236 million pounds) in 20 years in a single, centralized facility. A limited comparison of the studies` results is presented in this paper. Sensitivity of treatment costs with respect to treatment capacity, number of treatment facilities, and system availability were also determined. The major cost element is operations and maintenance (O and M), which is 50 to 60% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. Energy costs constitute a small fraction (< 1%) of the TLCCs. Equipment cost is only 3 to 5% of the treatment cost. Evaluation of subsystem costs demonstrate that receiving and preparation is the highest cost subsystem at about 25 to 30% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. These studies found no cost incentives to use nonthermal or hybrid (combined nonthermal treatment with stabilization by vitrification) systems in place of thermal systems. However, there may be other incentives including fewer air emissions and less local objection to a treatment facility. Building multiple treatment facilities to treat the same total mass of waste as a single facility would increase the total treatment cost significantly, and improved system availability decreases unit treatment costs by 17% to 30%.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Harvego, L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Biagi, C. [Morrison Knudsen (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Std Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW AverageStd Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW Average3-2. Logged Outage Cost per Annual kWh Figure 3-3. Logged

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

paper “CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants. ” We thank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that is, the critical value in the charge for CO2 emissions that would justify investment in CCS capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level (generation) is organized competitively in some U.S. jurisdictions, while in others a regulated utility provides integrated generation and distribution services. For either market structure, we find that emissions charges in the range of $25-$30 per tonne of CO2 would be the break-even value for adopting CCS capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants are substantially higher, near $60 per tonne. Our break-even estimates serve as a basis for projecting the change in electricity prices once carbon emissions become costly. CCS capabilities effectively put an upper bound on the rise in electricity prices. We estimate this bound to be near 30 % at the retail level for both coal and natural gas plants. In contrast to the competitive power supply scenario, however, these price increases materialize only gradually for a regulated utility. The delay in price adjustments reflects that for regulated

Stefan Reichelstein; Erica Plambeck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

U.S. coal stockpile levels at electric power plants approach five ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total coal stockpile levels at U.S. electric power plants were 139 million tons in August 2011—the lowest total level for August since 2006.

243

Today's electrical transmission system delivers high levels of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electricity demand that reliability be maintained as we transition to clean electricity generation- ated and delivered to electric loads. Clean Energy Transmission and Reliability Energy Storage Smart a smarter, mod- ern grid. Through the Distrib- uted Energy Communication & Control (DECC) facility, re

244

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5718 5718 Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Kristina Hamachi LaCommare and Joseph H. Eto Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California 94720 Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2004 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMP/EMP-pubs.html This work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, Energy Storage Program and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76F00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

245

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Total Cost of Ownership for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Fall 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic growth over the last three years in the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has resulted in many unanswered questions concerning total cost of ownership (TCO). In June 2013, EPRI released a public study that presented a new way of analyzing driving data for the purpose of calculating TCO for PEV ownership (EPRI report 3002001728). That study—which focused on the 2013 Chevrolet Volt and 2013 Nissan LEAF—used a full year’s worth of driving data to calculate the TCO of ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Workshop Proceedings,J. Oros, President, Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, Inc. ,Hydride Batteries for Electric Vehicles,” presented at the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Determining Levels of Productivity and Efficiency in the Electricity Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few major themes run fairly consistently through the history of productivity and efficiency analysis of the electricity industry: environmental controls, economies of scale, and private versus government.

Abbott, Malcolm

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BPA, Southern Company, Duke Energy, Southern California1999) Niagara Mohawk (1985) Duke Energy Company (1992, 1997)Gas and Electric, and Duke Energy) the same customer classes

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Berkeley CA. Electric Power Research Institute.Spectrum, 30 (6), 40. Electric Power Research Institute.Applications. Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cost-effective applications of photovoltaics for electric utilities: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost targets for the large-scale entry of photovoltaic (PV) systems keep moving, subject to the vagaries of global oil prices and the economic health of the world. Over the last four decades since a practical PV device was announced, costs have come down by a factor of 20 or more and this downward trend is expected to continue, albeit at a slower pace. Simultaneously, conversion efficiencies have nearly tripled. There are many applications today for which PV is cost-effective. In recognition of this, utility interest in PV is increasing and this is manifested by projects such as PVUSA and Central and South West`s renewable resource development effort. While no major technical barriers for the entry of PV systems have been uncovered, several key issues such as power quality, system reliability, ramp rates, spinning reserve requirements, and misoperation of protection schemes will have to be dealt with as the penetration of this technology increases. PV is still in the evolutionary phase and is expected to grow for several decades to come. Fueled by environmental considerations, interest in PV is showing a healthy rise both in the minds of the public and in the planning realms of the electric power community. In recognition of this, the Energy Development Subcommittee of the IEEE Energy Development and Power Generation Committee organized a Panel Session on photovoltaics applications at the 1993 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri. Summaries of the four presentations are assembled here for the benefit of the readers of this Review.

Bigger, J.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Emission Cuts Realities – Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a „Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

Nelson, P. A.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

262

Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cost-effectiveness of recommended nurse staffing levels for short-stay skilled nursing facility patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anonymous: Employer Costs for Employee Compensation--BioMed Central Open Access Cost-effectiveness of recommendeddiagnoses. However, the cost-effectiveness of increasing

Ganz, David A; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

±metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several di€erent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy ± and hence battery cost ± required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and bene®ts in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371±404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Pilot Evaluation of Electricity-Reliability and Power-in the Economic Value of Electricity Reliability to the U.S.of the economic value of electricity reliability, the U.S.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

272

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electric and Magnetic Field Exposure Levels (0 to 3000 Hz) near Residential Photovoltaic Energy Generation Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic field levels associated with two residential photovoltaic energy generation facilities were characterized in this study. This measurement evaluation included static (direct current [DC]) magnetic fields and power-frequency alternating current (AC) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 Hz).The major source of DC and AC magnetic fields associated with a residential solar facility is the power inverter that converts DC to AC electricity. In close proximity to one ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessing the viability of level III electric vehicle rapid-charging stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an analysis of the feasibility of electric vehicle rapid-charging stations at power levels above 300 kW. Electric vehicle rapid-charging (reaching above 80% state-of-charge in less than 15 minutes) has been ...

Gogoana, Radu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (N O), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and ¢/kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the product of the cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with theper kg (rather than the cost per kWh) as a function of the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

product of an assumed cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with thethis battery has a low cost per kWh, and relatively few kWh

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the data centers' energy consumptions, energy prices, and peak power prices, it becomes clear that we can two components: (1) the cost of energy consumed (energy price: $ per KWh), and (2) the cost. Unfortunately, these works did not consider energy prices, peak power costs, or any cooling issues

Bianchini, Ricardo

283

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Framework for Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of Investments in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric vehicles151including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery-only vehicles151are desirable alternatives to vehicles powered by internal combustion engines because they produce considerably less or no direct emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants that are attributed to the transportation sector. However, they use electricity to charge their batteries, the generation of which consumes fossil fuels (in some cases, coal), which increases the emission of th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology… (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

291

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

293

Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

Sonnet, Maria Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Electricity transmission pricing : how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

297

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparative analysis of energy costing methodologies. Appendix: report on levelized busbar-costing workshop held at MITRE/Metrek, June 29-30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings of a workshop on levelized busbar costing methodologies which was held at MITRE/Metrek on June 29 and 30, 1978 are described. Particular emphasis was placed on consideration of geothermal energy sources. The objective of the workshop was to determine whether a consensus could be developed regarding the most appropriate methodologies and assumptions for levelized energy costing. The workshop was attended by representatives from energy resource, utility and engineering design companies, and by representatives of the Division of Geothermal Energy and R and D contractors for this Division. It was found that year-by-year calculations in current dollars were generally preferred, using either Discounted Cash Flow or Revenue Requirements methods. No consensus emerged on choice of discount rate or financial parameters such as debt/equity ratio, and tax credit carry forward/carry back provisions. It was felt that engineering aspects deserve close attention.

Leigh, J.G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the customer-level demand for electricity by industrial and commercial customers purchasing electricity according to the half-hourly energy prices from the England and Wales (E&W) electricity market. These customers also face the possibility of a demand charge on its electricity consumption during the three half-hour periods that are coincident with E&W system peaks. Although energy charges are largely known by 4 PM the day prior to consumption, a fraction of the energy charge and the identity of the half-hour periods when demand charges occur are only known with certainty ex post of consumption. Four years of data from a Regional Electricity Company (REC) in the United Kingdom is used to quantify the half-hourly customer-level demands under this real-time pricing program. The econometric model developed and estimated here quantifies the extent of intertemporal substitution in electricity consumption across pricing periods within the day due to changes ...

Robert H. Patrick; Frank A. Wolak

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing,...

302

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy  

SciTech Connect

During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Planning electricity transmission to accommodate renewables: Using two-stage programming to evaluate flexibility and the cost of disregarding uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 uncertainty, ECIU), and the value of being able to  postpone  decisions  until  some  uncertainty  is  resolved  (the  expected  cost  of  ignoring  optionality,  ECIO).  These  indices  quantify,  in  different  ways,  the  benefits  of  considering    Thirdly, concern about climate...  the total generation capacity at each bus or  in each zone. This capacity  is often  taken  to  be  a  function  of  uncertain  electricity  demand,  or  simply  presumed  to  have  an  exogenous probability distribution. Other risks that have been considered by some of these  models  are...

van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Increase Your Boiler Pressure to Decrease Your Electric Bill: The True Cost of CHP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of small scale steam turbine generator projects are installed as an afterthought to overall plant design. As a plant manager or process engineer, the primary concern is providing the process with the thermal load it needs at the lowest $ per Btu. The viability of installing a steam turbine generator set comes after the plant is in operation and pressure reducing valves (PRV's) have been installed, providing the opportunity has been proven to be sufficient for onsite power generation. This methodology produces reliable systems that operate with whatever steam conditions were present. What if users could take a step back to the initial design of the steam boiler? Plant engineers can proactively analyze the impact of folding a steam turbine generator set into the overall plant design at the pre-construction phase, significantly decreasing total energy costs and reducing the net $ per Btu. This paper analyzes the costs and benefits of integrating a steam turbine generator set into the initial boiler plant design, with marginal fuel increase and equipment cost yet providing the added benefit of clean, low cost and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

308

Charges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 July 2010 For Immediate Release: UC Berkeley Study Touts Economic Benefits of a Feed-In Tariff examining the economic benefits of a comprehensive Feed-In Tariff (FIT). The analysis shows that enacting price, long-term contract for a utility to buy electricity produced by renewable energy generators

Feigon, Brooke

309

Analysis of FERC's Final EIS for Electricity Open Access & Recovery of Stranded Costs  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Reviews the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for its electricity transmission system open access prepared in April 1996 and uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to analyze the open access rule (Orders 888 and 889).

Robert T. Eynon

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Reducing Electricity and Network Cost for Online Service Providers in Geographically Located Internet Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online service providers(OSPs) have Internet data centers (IDCs) in multiple geographical locations in order to satisfy global user demand. Increased data centers consume a large amount of energy, and at the same time cause increased heat dissipation, ... Keywords: Internet data centers, green computing, electricity market, load dispatching, energy proportional

Xinying Zheng; Yu Cai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

R-parity violating two-loop level rainbowlike contribution to the fermion electric dipole moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the two-loop level R-parity violating supersymmetric contribution to the electric and chromoelectric dipole moments of the fermion with neutrino and gaugino in the intermediate state. It is found that this contribution can be sufficiently enhanced with large tan {\\beta} and that it can have comparable size with the currently known R-parity violating Barr-Zee type process in the TeV scale supersymmetry breaking. We also give new limits on the R-parity violating couplings from the experimental data of the electric dipole moments of the neutron and the electron.

Nodoka Yamanaka

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tarrifs on PHEV Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&M Project 2A: R&M Project 2A: Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Tim Mount, Eilyan Bitar and Ray Zimmerman Cornell University Alberto Lamadrid Lehigh University CERTS Review, Cornell, August 6 th - 7 th , 2013 An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage (Mount) PART II: Ramping* (Lamadrid) PART III: Robust Optimization* (Bitar) *(Note: This is a new part of the project that began on 3/30/13) 2 OUTLINE OF THE PRESENTATION An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage Wooyoung Jeon Hao Lu Jung Youn Mo 3 An NSF I/UCRC Context of the Research: An Integrated Multi-Scale Framework 4 SuperOPF  Costs PEV charger capacities  Commuting Patterns  Nodal Capabilities

313

Energy accounting - Tracking electric use and cost with a spreadsheet program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One definition of Energy Accounting is a formal method of recording and analyzing energy use and costs. Records of monthly energy use and cost are organized into managerial reports. Would you manage a business or organization without using a financial accounting system. You could not make sound decisions or expenditures or budgets and you could not tell if the business was healthy or operating at a loss. The same principles apply to energy management. Without an energy accounting system, a manager cannot make informed decisions on operations, projects, or even identify patterns in energy use that may affect the facility or business. Yet many businesses and property managers have no method for Energy Accounting in their operations. Energy accounting is a key element in a successful energy management program. The conservation staff at Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) have developed an easy to use PC spreadsheet program that is available to Energy Managers to use in starting an energy accounting system.

Weisner, R.; Codina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III that we sub- sume supply technologies in different groups. To be more precise, we distinguish 16 supply technology groups (nuclear, three lignite, four hard coal, two combined cycle gas turbine, three open cycle gas turbine, two oil... shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

320

Electric and Magnetic Field Exposure Levels (0 to 3 GHz) in Occupational Environments near Photovoltaic Energy Generation Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic field levels associated with photovoltaic energy generation facilities were measured and characterized in this study. This evaluation included the measurement of static (direct current [DC]) magnetic fields, power-frequency alternating current (AC) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 Hz), and radio-frequency (RF) electric and magnetic fields (up to 3,000 MHz) at two electric utility solar generation facilities.The major sources of DC magnetic fields within a ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retail and residential electricity rates by Electricityand Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical Residentialresidential electricity consumption data and retail rates

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Scalable Methodology for Cost Estimation in a Transformational High-Level Design Space Exploration Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective of the methodology presented in this paper is to perform design space exploration on a high level of abstraction by applying high-level transformations. To realize a design loop which is close and settled on upper design levels, a high-level estimation step is integrated. In this paper, several estimation methodologies fixed on different states of the high-level synthesis process are examined with respect to their aptitude on controlling the transformational design space exploration process.

Gerlach

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of the electricity industry’s evolution. To aidsome aspects of electricity industry restructuring throughbegan restructuring the U.S. electricity industry in 1996 by

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Parametric analysis of the electric utility market for advanced load-leveling batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This task examines the market for batteries in utility load-leveling service as a function of the Battery System Cost characteristics in order to give DOE a method of assessing the results of various program alternatives. The sensitivity of the benefits (barrels of oil saved) that might be derived to the timing of the market (i.e. when it begins) is also investigated. (The real cost of fuel is to be assumed to increase 2.4% per year.) How large is the total market for a new technology; how is the relative effectiveness of Battery Storage Systems related to the cost of fuel, the capital cost of the battery, and the perception of the credits associated with batery systems; and how do these vary with time required answers in order to estimate how the market for battery systems might develop. Most of the answers were obtained by studying the data developed by MITRE/METREK for a market assessment of battery systems using lead/acid batteries. MITRE's market analysis considered a large variety of variables; since the resources and time available for the present task were limited, it was not possible to either duplicate or confirm their work in detail. The initial results of this study depend on the assumptions used by MITRE. However, where these assumptions were incomplete, the results are adjusted. The supplementary information was obtained from studies performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. and by PSE and G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix F GENERATION COST AND PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions reductions of 50% to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050; the other establishes a tightening target of biofuels, and analysis is provided of the implications of these proposals for land use and agriculture. Simulations using the MIT Integrated System Model show that the 50% to 80% targets are consistent with global

326

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

327

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Technology and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment for Battery Electric Vehicles, Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of affordable advanced battery technology is a crucial challenge to the growth of the electric-drive vehicle (EDV) market. This study assesses the state of advanced battery technology for EDVs, which include battery electric vehicles (BEVs), power assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEV 0s -- hybrids without electric driving range), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and fuel cell vehicles. The first part of this study presents assessments of current battery performance and cycle life ca...

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle System Research and Development Project: Hybrid Vehicle Potential Assessment. Volume VI. Cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the cost analysis is to determine the economic feasibility of a variety of hybrid vehicles with respect to conventional vehicles specifically designed for the same duty cycle defined by the mission analysis. Several different hybrid configurations including parallel, parallel-flywheel, and series vehicles were evaluated. The ramifications of incorporating examples of advanced batteries, these being the advanced lead-acid, nickel-zinc, and sodium sulfur were also investigated. Vehicles were specifically designed with these batteries and for the driving cycles specified by the mission. Simulated operation on the missions yielded the energy consumption (petroleum and/or electricity) over the driving cycles. It was concluded that: in the event that gasoline prices reach $2.50 to $3.00/gal, hybrid vehicles in many applications will become economically competitive with conventional vehicles without subsidization; in some commercial applications hybrid vehicles could be economically competitive, when the gasoline price ranges from $1.20 to $1.50/gal. The cost per kWh per cycle of the advanced batteries is much more important economically than the specific energy; the series hybrid vehicles were found to be more expensive in comparison to the parallel or parallel-flywheel hybrids when designed as passenger vehicles; and hybrid vehicles designed for private use could become economically competitive and displace up to 50% of the fuel normally used on that mission if subsidies of $500 to $2000 were supplied to the owner/operator. (LCL)

Hardy, K.S.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

331

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

332

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

333

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

334

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

335

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

336

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne ...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 Typical Residential Electricity Bill Impacts Projected byResidential Monthly Electricity Bill Impacts by Individualthey influence consumer electricity bills. We focus here on

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and availability, and transmission capability).O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

345

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow of electricity, possibly restricting desired trade. (freedom to trade, consumers would want more electricity, andelectricity industry restructuring, short-term wholesale trades

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

347

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Busbar Cost Data 47 Windanalysis. energy (wind, in particular), as well as the costwind capital cost estimates from EPRI/DOE Renewable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Electric Rates in Colorado The Colorado Renewable EnergyEnergy Portfolio Standard on Retail Electric Rates in Colorado.Energy Standard in Amendment 37 on Retail Electric Rates in Colorado.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Pakistan,Nepal and Bangladesh) direct management is all the more Flat-rate electricity tariffs induce farmers to pump more of annual hours of pump operation,electric (flat tariff) and diesel pumpsets Water Policy Briefing 2 #12,there are strong theoretical arguments in favor of the metered electricity tariff. Farmers would learn the real

355

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

356

RESEARCH CALL TO DOE/FEDERAL LABORATORIES Technical Support for Interconnection-Level Electric Infrastructure Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on electricity demand, and comparison of utility resource plans · Water/energy nexus · Technical assistance-year period covered by this research call. Area of Interest 2: New Technologies, Electricity Demand, and Utility Resource Plans a) Western Interconnection Project 1 - New Technologies and Electricity Demand Need

357

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

358

Italian Association of Energy EconomistsYardstick Regulation of Electricity Distribution Utilities Based on the Estimation of an Average Cost Function *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we estimate an average-cost function for a panel of 45 Swiss electricity distribution utilities as a basis for yardstick regulation of the distribution-network access prices. Unlike the existing literature, we separate the electricity sales function of utilities from the network operation function. Several exogenous variables measuring the heterogeneity of the service areas were included in the model specification in order to allow the regulator to set differentiated benchmark prices incorporating this heterogeneity. We can identify different exogenous service area characteristics that affect average cost. These are the load factor, the customer density and the output density of different consumer groups. Moreover, the estimation results indicate the existence of significant economies of scale; i.e. most of the Swiss utilities in our sample are too small to reach minimum efficient scale. However, to give the small utilities incentives to merge the size of the utilities must not be included in the yardstick calculation. 1.

Massimo Filippini; Jörg Wild; Massimo Filippini; Jörg Wild

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies of RTOs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joseph Joseph H. Eto is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he manages the program office for the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions. Douglas R. Hale recently retired from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration, where he served as a senior economist most recently working in the areas of energy price risk management, modeling electricity transmission pricing, and electricity transmission data. Bernard C. Lesieutre is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he conducts public-interest research on the electric power grid and electricity markets. The work described in this article was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This article is based on a longer technical report

360

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2011 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An investigation into the present tariff cost structure and a methodology to determine the tariff increase for Ethekwini electricity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??EThekwini Electricity (EE) purchases its energy on the Megaflex tariff from Eskom which has had considerable changes in content over the years. This has caused… (more)

Ramballee, Ashwin.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Load Leveling Approach to Removing Appliance Features from Home Electricity Usage Profiles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the past twenty years, researchers have developed a class of algorithms that are capable of disaggregating a residential electric load into its set of… (more)

McLaughlin, Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future James McNerney,a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant of the price of coal, coal transportation cost, coal energy density, thermal effi- ciency, plant construction in the United States, going back to the earliest coal-fired power plant in 1882 through 2006, rather than cross

365

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

1991-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electric power monthly, November 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increaseelectricity consumption data and retail rates for each state,state in 2003 Average retail rate in EMM region in 2003 Specific calculation steps to arrive at percentage changes in electricity

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temporally-dependent renewable energy production profiles,renewable energy offsets natural gas-fired electricity production.renewable energy to be more labor-intensive than conventional forms of electricity production (

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

372

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado (UCS), Rhode Island (Tellus), and Texas (UCS), also include some electricityColorado will reach $1.25 per month by 2015, compared to an estimated increase in electricityColorado (PPC) study estimates that residential customers would save $0.46 to $0.67 on their monthly electricity

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

None

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC). 1996. Environmental Impactland-docs/rm95-8p3-000.txt FERC. 1999. Regional Transmissionfileid=9514094&trial=1 FERC. 2004. Staff Report on Cost

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

378

Does Competition Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3 One exception is Hiebert (2002), who uses stochastic frontier production functions to estimate generation plant efficiency over 1988-1997. One set of independent variables he includes is indicators for regulatory orders or legislative enactment... to customers. Joskow (1974) and Hendricks (1975) demonstrate that frictions in cost-of-service regulation, particularly those arising from regulatory lag (time between price- resetting hearings), may provide some incentives at the margin for cost...

Markiewicz, Karl; Rose, Nancy L; Wolfram, Catherine

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbonof renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty,energy, including the fossil fuel hedge value of renewable

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case retail electricity rate increases of no greater thannine studies predict rate increases above 1%, and twothese studies predict rate increases of more than 5%. Though

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

price elasticity of natural gas supply nationally, and thestudy assumes that natural gas supply is inelastic at theheavily on natural gas for their electricity supply are more

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies of RTOs  

SciTech Connect

Definitive assessment of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission policies on regional transmission organizations is not currently possible because of uncertainties in the data and methods used in recent benefit-cost studies as well as lack of investigation of key impacts of the formation of RTOs. (author)

Eto, Joseph H.; Hale, Douglas R.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

389

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final Report Providing the Design for Low-Cost Wireless Current Transducer and Electric Power Sensor Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design and development of a wireless current transducer and electric power sensor prototype. The report includes annotated schematics of the power sensor circuitry and the printed circuit board. The application program used to illustrate the functionality of the wireless sensors is described in this document as well.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Burghard, Brion J.; Reid, Larry D.

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An electrical-level superposed-edge approach to statistical serial link simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brute-force simulation approaches to estimating serial-link bit-error rates (BERs) become computationally intractable for the case when BERs are low and the interconnect electrical response is slow enough to generate intersymbol interference that spans ... Keywords: bit-error rate, circuit simulation, eye diagrams, interconnect, serial link

Michael Tsuk; Daniel Dvorscak; Chin Siong Ong; Jacob White

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versus out-of-state renewable energy project development andbarriers to renewable energy in many states, but these costsPV technology or renewable energy generated in-state. For an

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

396

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

397

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

398

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity sector natural gas demand reductions of 4-5% inin New York’s natural gas demand. These contrasting resultsthat reductions in natural gas demand in Colorado will have

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrating High Levels of Renewables in to the Lanai Electric Grid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy sources on the island of Lanai with a stated goal of reaching 100% renewable energy. NREL and Sandia partnered with Castle & Cooke, Maui Electric Company (MECO), and SRA International to perform the assessment.

Kroposki, B.; Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kandt, A.; Glassmire, J.; Lilienthal, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electric Power Monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

402

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Melting of Aluminum by Electricity: A Review of Operating Practice and Discussion of Cost Factors for Melting Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, about 10 million tons of aluminum ingot and various forms of scrap were melted to produce a variety of products. The majority of the aluminum was melted in oil or natural gas-fired furnaces. However, as old gas-fired furnaces are being replaced or capacity is being increased, consideration is being given to electric-fired furnaces to obtain more energy efficient melting and increased yield of product. The purpose of this report is to acquaint the reader with the various types of commercial elect...

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electric power monthly, January 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

409

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

410

Electric power monthly, April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices, the period of PTC extension, and the potential impact of future carbon regulations.natural gas and wholesale electric prices, the period of PTC extension, and the potential impact of future carbon regulations.regulations, may make renewable generation less economic than when renewable energy is presumed to compete with natural gas;

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Operational, cost, and technical study of large windpower systems integrated with an existing electric utility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed wind energy assessment from the available wind records, and evaluation of the application of wind energy systems to an existing electric utility were performed in an area known as the Texas Panhandle, on the Great Plains. The study area includes parts of Texas, eastern New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle and southern Kansas. The region is shown to have uniformly distributed winds of relatively high velocity, with average wind power density of 0.53 kW/m/sup 2/ at 30 m height at Amarillo, Texas, a representative location. The annual period of calm is extremely low. Three separate compressed air storage systems with good potential were analyzed in detail, and two potential pumped-hydro facilities were identified and given preliminary consideration. Aquifer storage of compressed air is a promising possibility in the region.

Ligon, C.; Kirby, G.; Jordan, D.; Lawrence, J.H.; Wiesner, W.; Kosovec, A.; Swanson, R.K.; Smith, R.T.; Johnson, C.C.; Hodson, H.O.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC HPWH(2) HPWH(3) HPWH Standard 0.62 EF WH unless high natural gas costs (>1.50therm), in which case recommendations consistent with new...

414

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing. ... production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? ...

416

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third party’s use or the results of such use, of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights. The views expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1307, Revision 13, is not a substitute for NRC regulations, and compliance is not required. The approaches and/or methods described in this NUREG are provided for information only. Publication of this report does not necessarily A requirement placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is that licensees must annually adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is revised periodically, explains the formula that is acceptable to the NRC for determining the minimum decommissioning fund requirements for nuclear power plants. The sources of information used in the formula are identified, and the values developed for the estimation of radioactive waste burial/disposition costs, by site and by year, are given. Licensees may use the formula, coefficients, and burial/disposition adjustment factors from this report in their cost analyses,

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Introduction to Electric Systems Expansion Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes (LPG) LG 12.805 per gallon 139.039 Motor Gasoline MG 19.564 per gallon 156.425 Petroleum Coke PC 32 field levels. 5. Cost of energy: The cost of electric energy, which is heavily determined by planning

McCalley, James D.

420

Bringing Electric Cars to Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation choices toward reduced social and envi- Electric Performance, and and Cooperative Development, ronmental costs.

Sperling, Daniel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electric power quarterly, April-June 1983  

SciTech Connect

This document provides electric utilities' plant-level information about the cost, quantity, and quality of fossil fuel receipts, net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks. Data regarding electric utilities' net generation, fuel consumption, and fuel stocks are presented on a plant-by-plant basis. In addition, quantity, cost, and quality of fossil fuel receipts are presented on a plant-by-plant basis.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comparative analysis of energy costing methodologies  

SciTech Connect

The methodologies used for computing levelized busbar costs of electricity from geothermal (hydrothermal) resources used by 16 organizations active in the geothermal area are discussed. The methodologies are compared by (a) comparing the results obtained by using two standard data sets, (b) a theoretical analysis of the mathematical formulation of the embedded models, and (c) an examination of differences in data and assumptions. The objective is to attempt to resolve differences in estimates of geothermal (and conventional) electric power costs, upon which policies may be formulated and research, development and demonstration activities designed and implemented.

El-Sawy, A.H.; Leigh, J.G.; Trehan, R.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typicalinfluence consumer electricity bills. Some benefits thatconsumer’s monthly electricity bill. Figure presents

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James, A cost comparison of fuel-cell and battery electricHowever, battery electric vehicles have lower fuel cost, usebattery-electric vehicles in terms of weight, volume, GHGs and cost,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

430

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

431

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Benchmarking Electricity Liberalisation in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources does the country’s electricity industry use? A country with a high proportion of hydro-electricity may not be exposed to fluctuations in the prices of fossil fuels, but is vulnerable to years with low precipitation. Historically, oil prices have... the summer of 2000. The disadvantages of this measure include the significant effort required to calculate it. Although simple models of the industry can be built and maintained at low cost, and regularly updated with fuel prices and demand levels...

Green, Richard J; Lorenzoni, Arturo; Perez, Yannick; Pollitt, Michael G.

435

Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

King, Robert Dean (Schenectady, NY); DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson (Malvern, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Performance Evaluation of a Cascaded H-Bridge Multi Level Inverter Fed BLDC Motor Drive in an Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automobile industry is moving fast towards Electric Vehicles (EV); however this paradigm shift is currently making its smooth transition through the phase of Hybrid Electric Vehicles. There is an ever-growing need for integration of hybrid energy sources especially for vehicular applications. Different energy sources such as batteries, ultra-capacitors, fuel cells etc. are available. Usage of these varied energy sources alone or together in different combinations in automobiles requires advanced power electronic circuits and control methodologies. An exhaustive literature survey has been carried out to study the power electronic converter, switching modulation strategy to be employed and the particular machine to be used in an EV. Adequate amount of effort has been put into designing the vehicle specifications. Owing to stronger demand for higher performance and torque response in an EV, the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine has been favored over the traditional Induction Machine. The aim of this thesis is to demonstrate the use of a multi level inverter fed Brush Less Direct Current (BLDC) motor in a field oriented control fashion in an EV and make it follow a given drive cycle. The switching operation and control of a multi level inverter for specific power level and desired performance characteristics is investigated. The EV has been designed from scratch taking into consideration the various factors such as mass, coefficients of aerodynamic drag and air friction, tire radius etc. The design parameters are meant to meet the requirements of a commercial car. The various advantages of a multi level inverter fed PMSM have been demonstrated and an exhaustive performance evaluation has been done. The investigation is done by testing the designed system on a standard drive cycle, New York urban driving cycle. This highly transient driving cycle is particularly used because it provides rapidly changing acceleration and deceleration curves. Furthermore, the evaluation of the system under fault conditions is also done. It is demonstrated that the system is stable and has a ride-through capability under different fault conditions. The simulations have been carried out in MATLAB and Simulink, while some preliminary studies involving switching losses of the converter were done in PSIM.

Emani, Sriram S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Eligibility Utility Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Information...

438

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

439

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergyOffice of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical...

440

Electric Power Monthly, June 1990  

SciTech Connect

The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

1990-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Assumptions Wind power is often found to be the least-cost renewable energycost studies. The capacity value of renewable energy (wind,wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price Forecasts The difference between renewable energy

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electric Power Monthly, September 1995: With data for June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric power monthly: April 1996, with data for January 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 64 tabs.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Electric power monthly, May 1995 with data for February 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisiommakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuel, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Portfolio Standard on Retail Electric Rates in Colorado.Energy Standard in Amendment 37 on Retail Electric Rates in Colorado.

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electric power monthly, January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electric power monthly, October 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Electric power monthly, February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

All Electric Houses in Cold Climates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Houses Electric Houses in Cold Climates Duncan Prahl, RA IBACOS BA Tech Update, April 29, 2013 Denver CO All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Caveats About Me: * I'm an Architect * I love math and science, but I'm not going to marry it * My engineering skills are primarily based on osmosis and graphics * "Close enough is good enough" All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Utility Unbundling * True costs becoming "transparent" * Allows for next level of analysis * Cash flow, Total Cost of Ownership All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Martha's Vineyard Community Images courtesy South Mountain Company All Electric Houses in Cold Climates Specifications Building System Specification Below Slab R-20 extruded polystyrene (XPS) foam Foundation Walls R-20 poly iso foam

455

10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1

Kammen, Daniel M.

456

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Capacity Planning submodule  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The NEMS produces integrated forecasts for energy markets in the United States by achieving a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand. Currently, for each year during the period from 1990 through 2010, the NEMS describes energy supply, conversion, consumption, and pricing. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The supply of electricity is a conversion activity since electricity is produced from other energy sources (e.g., fossil, nuclear, and renewable). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. The EMM consists of four main submodules: Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP), Electricity Fuel Dispatching (EFD), Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP), and Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM). The ECP evaluates changes in the mix of generating capacity that are necessary to meet future demands for electricity and comply with environmental regulations. The EFD represents dispatching (i.e., operating) decisions and determines how to allocate available capacity to meet the current demand for electricity. Using investment expenditures from the ECP and operating costs from the EFD, the EFP calculates the price of electricity, accounting for state-level regulations involving the allocation of costs. The LDSM translates annual demands for electricity into distributions that describe hourly, seasonal, and time-of-day variations. These distributions are used by the EFD and the ECP to determine the quantity and types of generating capacity that are required to insure reliable and economical supplies of electricity. The EMM also represents nonutility suppliers and interregional and international transmission and trade. These activities are included in the EFD and the ECP.

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

Short run price elasticity of residential electricity demand within income levels and the implications for CO2 policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the relationship between price and use of electricity in residential homes in order to understand the impact of CO2 policy. A model… (more)

Green, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability, operational limits, ramp rates, and start-up costs Reliability requirements Transmission andavailability, electricity demand, and dispatches power plants based on operating costs and transmission

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas and wholesale electric prices, and the availability of other renewable energy incentives.

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have seen several electricity rate structure changes in thefor more electricity, and those on reduced rates have morerate structure was introduced that increased the cost of electricity

Lai, Judy