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1

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

2

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Host and Presentor Contact Information Hosts: Mindi Farber-DeAnda Team Lead, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Mindi.Farber-DeAnda@eia.gov 202-586-6419 Vishakh Mantri, Ph.D, P.E. Chemical Engineer, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team Vishakh.Mantri@eia.gov 202-586-4815 Presenters: Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator, Energy Information Administration Howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov 202-586-6351 Modeling of Biofuels in the AEO, Michael Cole Operations Research Analyst, Energy Information Administration, Liquid Fuels Market Team

3

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

4

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

5

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

6

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

7

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized generation costs; Model documentation; Capital cost for electricity plants; About the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Retrospective Review for AEO2011;

8

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets 1 May 11, 2012 ADDENDUM Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Additional Information on Jones Act Vessels' Potential Role in Northeast Refinery Closures The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent report exploring the potential impacts of reductions in refinery activity in the Northeast on petroleum product markets in that region pointed out that, if Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery shuts down, waterborne movements from the Gulf Coast could be an important route for alternative supplies to help replace lost volumes in the short term, particularly for ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD). Because this route would involve

9

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: The front month futures price for Brent, the world waterborne crude benchmark, increased by $5.72 per barrel to settle at $115.26 per barrel on September 5 (Figure 1). Front month futures prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil also increased over the same time period but by a lesser amount, to settle at $108.37 per barrel on September 5. The primary drivers of higher crude oil prices over the past five weeks included an uptick in unplanned crude oil production outages and increased tensions in the Middle East. Continued disputes between local governments in the eastern oil producing regions of Libya and the central government in Tripoli combined with worker strikes at

10

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 1 3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Front month futures prices for the Brent and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil benchmarks fell in September. The Brent contract settled at $109.00 per barrel on October 3, a decline of $6.68 per barrel since September 3, and WTI settled at $103.31 per barrel on October 3, falling by $5.23 per barrel over the same period (Figure 1). These changes marked the first month-over-month declines in crude oil prices since May 2013. The return of some Libyan production and declining refinery runs during September helped put downward pressure on crude oil prices. This is a regular monthly companion to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook

11

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

February 23, 2012 February 23, 2012 Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S Proposal: Modify the frame of the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," from a census to a sample, and use sampling methods to estimate the sales revenues and customer counts by sector and state for the remaining industry. Use random sampling, if needed, to estimate for changes in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and time-based tariff programs. Proposal: Create a new Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form), for the respondents that have been removed from the Form EIA-861 frame. The form would ask them for contact information and would contain a series of yes/no questions to query their status. In addition, it would collect limited data for use in estimating. Once every five years, the

12

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil benchmarks moved higher in November, showing their first month-over-month increase since August, while U.S. crude oil prices moved higher during the first week of December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $110.98 per barrel on December 5, an increase of $5.07 per barrel since its close on November 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.77 per barrel compared to November 1, settling at $97.38 per barrel on December 5. A combination of better-than-expected economic data and a continuation of supply outages buoyed international crude oil prices in November. Recent manufacturing data for the United States and China were above expectations, supporting demand for

13

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Office of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis 1 Office of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis 1 October 2012 Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility Summary * Correlations among changes in the prices of commodities, and between the prices of commodities and other asset classes, generally increased from 2007 until 2012. One reason often cited for the increase in the correlation of commodity and asset price movements has been increasing economic growth in emerging market economies. * When correlations of crude oil prices with prices of multiple commodities decline, it usually implies that a supply side issue is affecting the crude oil market. When the correlation of crude oil price movements with the price movements for a specific

14

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

highest since March of 2012. Although there was no single major disruption in oil production over the last month, lower exports from South Sudan, Iraq, and Libya and a...

15

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

About the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1 April 30, 2012 About the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code...

16

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Preciado (james.preciado@eia.gov) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2013 2 Crude oils of both medium and light API gravity on the U.S....

17

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration (EIA) has changed the format of the Short-Term Energy Outlook tables for electricity industry overview (Table 7a), electricity generation (Table 7d), electricity...

18

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Impacts of Rising Construction and Equipment Costs on Energy Industries (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Costs related to the construction industry have been volatile in recent years. Some of the volatility may be related to higher energy prices. Prices for iron and steel, cement, and concretecommodities used heavily in the construction of new energy projects rose sharply from 2004 to 2006, and shortages have been reported. How such price fluctuations may affect the cost or pace of new development in the energy industries is not known with any certainty, and short-term changes in commodity prices are not accounted for in the 25-year projections in AEO2007. Most projects in the energy industries require long planning and construction lead times, which can lessen the impacts of short-term trends.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

World Oil Prices in AEO2006 (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World oil prices in the AEO2006 reference case are substantially higher than those in the AEO2005 reference case. In the AEO2006 reference case, world crude oil prices, in terms of the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refiners, decline from current levels to about $47 per barrel (2004 dollars) in 2014, then rise to $54 per barrel in 2025 and $57 per barrel in 2030. The price in 2025 is approximately $21 per barrel higher than the corresponding price projection in the AEO2005 reference case.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

AEO2008 defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both above ground and below ground factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non- OECD countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. EIA will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Impacts of Uncertainty in Energy Project Costs (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

From the late 1970s through 2002, steel, cement, and concrete prices followed a general downward trend. Since then, however, iron and steel prices have increased by 8 percent in 2003, 10 percent in 2004, and 31 percent in 2005. Although iron and steel prices declined in 2006, early data for 2007 show another increase. Cement and concrete prices, as well as the composite cost index for all construction commodities, have shown similar trends but with smaller increases in 2004 and 2005.

Information Center

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

24

World Oil Prices in AEO2007 (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the long term, the AEO2007 projection for world oil pricesdefined as the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refinersis similar to the AEO2006 projection. In the near term, however, AEO2007 projects prices that are $8 to $10 higher than those in AEO2006.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

AEO | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO AEO Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

26

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World oil prices in AEO2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

AEO2011: Electricity Trade | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trade Trade Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Interregional Electricity trade, gross domestic sales, international electricity trade, imports and exports to Canada and Mexico. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA electricity trade Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Trade- Reference Case (xls, 34.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

31

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview 3 AEO2014 Early Release Overview decade for the first time ...

32

AEO2011: Petroleum Product Prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4932 4932 Varnish cache server AEO2011: Petroleum Product Prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 12, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses 2009 dollars per gallon. The data is broken down into crude oil prices, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and refined petroleum product prices. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Petroleum prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Petroleum Product Prices- Reference Case (xls, 129.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

33

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

34

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

AEO2013 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Early Release Overview 3 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. This early release focuses on the AEO2013 Reference case, which provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2013 is released in early 2013, exploring key uncertainties in the Reference case. Major highlights in the AEO2013 Reference case include:

36

Alaskan Natural Gas Pipeline Developments (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2007 reference case projects that an Alaska natural gas pipeline will go into operation in 2018, based on EIAs current understanding of the projects time line and economics. There is continuing debate, however, about the physical configuration and the ownership of the pipeline. In addition, the issue of Alaskas oil and natural gas production taxes has been raised, in the context of a current market environment characterized by rising construction costs and falling natural gas prices. If rates of return on investment by producers are reduced to unacceptable levels, or if the project faces significant delays, other sources of natural gas, such as unconventional natural gas production and LNG imports, could fulfill the demand that otherwise would be served by an Alaska pipeline.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

AEO2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Early Release Overview December 2009 Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO- 2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and com- pared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 2009 1 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties in- herent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market trans- formation, or active changes in legislation, the refer- ence case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is re- leased in order to gain perspective on how variations

38

AEO2008 Overview - Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08 08 Overview Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for the Annual Energy Out- look 2008 (AEO2008), the Energy Information Ad- ministration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. 1 This over- view focuses on one case, the reference case, which is presented and compared with the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) reference case (see Table 1). Readers are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in other sections of AEO2008. As in previous editions of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), the reference case assumes that current poli- cies affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period. Some possible pol- icy changes-notably, the adoption of policies to limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions-could change the reference case projections

39

AEO2012 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2012 Early Release Overview Total U.S. consumption of liquid fuels, including both fossil fuels and biofuels, grows from 37.2 quadrillion Btu (19.2 million barrels per day)...

40

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

42

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

43

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

44

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

45

AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

46

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

47

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

48

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9643 9643 Varnish cache server AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 82, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Michigan projections Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

49

AEO2011: Natural Gas Imports and Exports | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imports and Exports Imports and Exports Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 135, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA exports imports Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Imports and Exports- Reference Case (xls, 48.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

50

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

51

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

52

AEO2011: Imported Liquids by Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imported Liquids by Source Imported Liquids by Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 146, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, light refined products and heavy refined products. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA imports liquids Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Imported Liquids by Source- Reference Case (xls, 85.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

53

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

54

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

55

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

56

AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Disposition, and Prices Supply, Disposition, and Prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

57

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

58

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

59

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 99, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Florida Fuel Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

60

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

62

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The early release provides a basis for the examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or possible technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2014 is released in 2014, exploring key

64

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy intensity trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

intensity trends in AEO2010 intensity trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Figure 17. Trends in U.S. oil prices, energy consumption, and economic output, 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy intensity—energy consumption per dollar of real GDP—indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

65

D:\0myfiles\AEO2007\Final for PDF\AEO2007\AEO2007.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (AEO2007), pre- pared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy sup- ply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projec- tions are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2007 reference case. The next section, "Leg- islation and Regulations," discusses evolving legisla- tion and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light- duty trucks finalized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in March 2006. It also provides an update on the handling of key provi- sions in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT2005) that could not be incorporated in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) because of the absence

66

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes a forecast of the domestic energy economy in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). During the forecast period of the AEO (currently through 2020), renewable energy technologies have typically not achieved significant growth. The contribution of renewable technologies as electric generators becomes more important, however, in scenarios analyzing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or significant technological advancements. We examined the economic assumptions about wind power used for producing forecasts with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to determine their influence on the projected capacity expansion of this technology. This analysis should help illustrate to policymakers what types of issues may affect wind development, and improve the general understanding of the NEMS model itself. Figure 1 illustrates the model structure and factors relevant to wind deployment. We found that NEMS uses various cost multipliers and constraints to represent potential physical and economic limitations to growth in wind capacity, such as resource depletion, costs associated with rapid manufacturing expansion, and grid stability with high levels of capacity from intermittent resources. The model's flexibility allows the user to make alternative assumptions about the magnitude of these factors. While these assumptions have little effect on the Reference Case forecast for the 1999 edition of the AEO, they can make a dramatic difference when wind is more attractive, such as under a carbon permit trading system. With $100/ton carbon permits, the wind capacity projection for 2020 ranges from 15 GW in the unaltered model (AEO99 Reference Case) to 168 GW in the extreme case when all the multipliers and constraints examined in this study are removed. Furthermore, if modifications are made to the model allowing inter-regional transmission of electricity, wind capacity is forecast to reach 214 GW when all limitations are removed. The figures in the upper end of these ranges are not intended to be viewed as reasonable projections, but their magnitude illustrates the importance of the parameters governing the growth of wind capacity and resource availability in forecasts using NEMS. In addition, many uncertainties exist regarding these assumptions that potentially affect the growth of wind power. We suggest several areas in which to focus future research in order to better model the potential development of this resource. Because many of the assumptions related to wind in the model are also used for other renewable technologies, these suggestions could be applied to other renewable resources as well.

Osborn, Julie G; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Transportation Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 46 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook EIA Energy Information Administration Fuel mode TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Transportation_Sector_Energy_Use_by_Fuel_Type_Within_a_Mode.csv (csv, 144.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

68

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Summary of Provisions (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was signed into law on December 19, 2007, and became Public Law 110-140 [8]. Provisions in EISA2007 that require funding appropriations to be implemented, whose impact is highly uncertain, or that require further specification by Federal agencies or Congress are not included in AEO2008. For example, EIA does not try to anticipate policy responses to the many studies required by EISA2007, nor to predict the impact of research and development (R&D) funding authorizations included in the bill. Moreover, AEO2008 does not include any provision that addresses a level of detail beyond that modeled in NEMS, which was used to develop the AEO2008 projections. AEO2008 addresses only those provisions in EISA2007 that establish specific tax credits, incentives, or standards, including the following:

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

costs, the levelized cost ... 4 These results do not include targeted tax credits such as the production or investment tax credit available for some technologies.

70

EPACT2005 Loan Guarantee Program (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Title XVII of EPACT2005 authorized DOE to issue loan guarantees for projects involving new or improved technologies to avoid, reduce, or sequester GHGs. The law specified that the amount of the guarantee would be up to 80 percent of a project's cost. EPACT2005 also specified that DOE must receive funds equal to the subsidy cost either through the Federal appropriations process or from the firm receiving the guarantee [24]. As discussed in AEO2007, this program, by lowering borrowing costs, can have a major impact on the economics of capital-intensive technologies.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

EIA - AEO2010 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Trends in Economic Activity Real gross domestic product returns to its pre-recession level by 2011 AEO2010 presents three views of economic growth (Figure 31). The rate of growth in real GDP depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.4 percent per year. Figure 31. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labot force, and productivity in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 32. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 33. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2008-2035

72

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

73

AEO2011: Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 14, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA gas oil Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

74

EIA - AEO2010 - State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 To the extent possible, AEO2010 incorporates the impacts of State laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the States. Currently, 30 States and the District of Columbia have enforceable RPS or similar laws (Table 2). Under such standards, each State determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because NEMS provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

75

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

76

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

77

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 12  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 12 Table 3a. Imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil, projected vs. actual Projected price in constant dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12

78

Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

80

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIA - Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. ... such as investment or production tax credits for specified generation sources, ...

82

EIA - AEO2010 - Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 On December 23, 2008, the D.C. Circuit Court remanded but did not vacate CAIR [17], overriding its previous decision on February 8, 2008, to remand and vacate CAIR. The December decision, which is reflected in AEO2010, allows CAIR to remain in effect, providing time for the EPA to modify the rule in order to address objections raised by the Court in its earlier decision. A similar rule, referred to as the CAMR, which was to set up a cap-and-trade system for reducing mercury emissions by approximately 70 percent, is not represented in the AEO2010 projections, because it was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February 2008.

83

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser This analysis was funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy factor trends fails to convey recent improvements in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from wind

84

Capital costs have major impact on projected power sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas-fired power plants dominate the 2011 Annual ... AEO2011 also includes several alternative cases with lower assumed capital costs of nuclear, fossil fuel ...

85

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 25, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

86

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 23, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions East North Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

87

AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 133, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Wellhead prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 59.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

88

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

89

AEO2011: World Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 143, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into Metallurgical coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

90

EIA - AEO2010 - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Summary of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Summary of provisions American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Summary of provisions Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Summary of provisions ARRA, signed into law in mid-February 2009, provides significant new Federal funding, loan guarantees, and tax credits to stimulate investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy. The provisions of ARRA were incorporated initially as part of a revision to the AEO2009 Reference case that was released in April 2009 [5], and they also are included in AEO2010. However, provisions that require funding appropriations to be implemented, whose impact is highly uncertain, or that require further specification by Federal agencies or Congress, are not included. Moreover, AEO2010 does not include any provision that addresses a level of detail beyond that modeled in NEMS.

91

AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minemouth Prices by Region and Minemouth Prices by Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 139, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons and the US Dollar. The data is broken down into production and minemouth prices. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Minemouth Prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region- Reference Case (xls, 41.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

92

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source, New England Source, New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 21, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England- Reference Case (xls, 73.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

93

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

94

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Pacific Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Electric Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This data reflects Table 9, and contains only the reference case. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Pacific Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

95

AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 132, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO crude oil EIA prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 54.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

96

AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

97

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The energy consumption data is broken down by sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power) as well as source, and also provides total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

98

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 24, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA west north central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

99

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 27, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

100

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 28, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Mountain Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

102

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

103

AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 144, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into total coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries - Reference Case (xls, 104 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

104

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 26, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions East South Central EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

105

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 30, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 75.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

106

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source- Middle Atlantic Source- Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 22, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

107

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

108

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

109

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 115, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

110

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

111

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 4, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

112

AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Disposition, and Prices Supply, Disposition, and Prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 13, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA natural gas supply prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices - Reference Case (xls, 91.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

113

AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 142, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into steam coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal flows countries EIA exporting importing Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

114

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Pacific Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 29, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Pacific Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific- Reference Case (xls, 74.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

115

www.eia.gov Key results from the AEO2013 Reference case:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production, particularly from tight oil plays, rises sharply over the next decade Natural gas production is higher throughout the Reference case projection than it was in AEO2012, serving the industrial and power sectors and an expanding export market Motor gasoline consumption reflects the introduction of more stringent fuel economy standards, while diesel fuel consumption is moderated by increased natural gas use in heavy-duty vehicles The U.S. becomes a larger exporter of natural gas and coal than was projected in the AEO2012 Reference case All renewable fuels grow, but biomass and biofuels growth is slower than in AEO2012 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain more than five percent below their 2005 level through 2040, reflecting increased efficiency and the shift to a less carbon-intensive fuel mix

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New England New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

117

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

118

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

119

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

120

State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2009 (Update) (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

To the extent possible, AEO2010 incorporates the impacts of State laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the States. Currently, 30 States and the District of Columbia have enforceable RPS or similar laws). Under such standards, each State determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because NEMS provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2013 Early Release AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09 50.49 8,700 7,450 Pulverized Coal with carbon sequestration 2017 650 4 4,662 1.07 1.03 5,138 4.37 65.31 12,000 9,316

122

EIA - AEO2010 - Coal projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Projections Coal Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Coal Projections Figure 88. Coal production by region, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 89. U.S. coal production in six cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 90. Average annual minemouth coal prices by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 91. Average annual delivered coal prices in four cases, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 92. Change in U.S. coal consumption by end use in two cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Coal production increases at a slower rate than in the past In the AEO2010 Reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation, along with the startup of several CTL plants, leads to growth in coal production averaging 0.2 percent per year from 2008 to 2035. This is significantly less than the 0.9-percent average growth rate for U.S. coal production from 1980 to 2008.

123

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

Efficiency and Intensity in the AEO 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Session 9 Session 9 Energy Efficiency: Measuring Gains and Quantifying Opportunities April 7, 2010 2010 Energy Conference Washington, DC Steve Wade, Economist Efficiency and Intensity in the AEO 2010 Steve Wade, 2010 Energy Conference, April 7, 2010 2 * What are the sources of efficiency in the AEO 2010? * What is the contribution of energy efficiency to projected U.S. energy intensity? * How do AEO scenarios relate to technical potential? Overview Steve Wade, 2010 Energy Conference, April 7, 2010 3 * Technology - Stock turnover - Progress and learning * Mandates - CAFÉ, efficiency standards (NAECA, EPACT), building codes... - Renewable fuel standards * Incentives - Tax credits, loan guarantees, grants, ...  Energy efficiency and renewables - ACESA, ARRA (stimulus bill) ...  Investment tax credits

125

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO82 to AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

126

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In the case of a classical linear sea-level rise of one meter per century, the use of DIVA generally decreases the protection fraction of the coastline, and results in a smaller protection cost because of high ...

Sugiyama, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EIA - AEO2010 - Comparison With Other Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison With Other Projections Comparison With Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Comparison With Other Projections Only IHS Global Insights, Inc. (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2010. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2010 projections. Economic growth Projections of the average annual growth rate of real GDP in the United States from 2008 to 2018 range from 2.1 percent to 2.8 percent (Table 9). In the AEO2010 Reference case, real GDP grows by an average of 2.2 percent per year over the period, lower than projected by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the Social Security Administration (SSA), and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—although none of those projections has been updated since August 2009. The AEO2010 projection is similar to the IHSGI projection and slightly higher than projections by the Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland (INFORUM). In March 2009, the consensus Blue Chip projection was for 2.2-percent average annual growth from 2008 to 2018.

128

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series toAEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEO 2004 and AEOon the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts will likely onceof AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

131

EIA - AEO2010 - Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits This section provides a review of the treatment of Federal fuels taxes and tax credits in AEO2010. Excise taxes on highway fuel The treatment of Federal highway fuel taxes remains unchanged from the previous year’s AEO. Gasoline is taxed at 18.4 cents per gallon, diesel fuel at 24.4 cents per gallon, and jet fuel at 4.4 cents per gallon, consistent with current laws and regulations. Consistent with Federal budgeting procedures, which dictate that excise taxes dedicated to a trust fund, if expiring, are assumed to be extended at current rates, these taxes are maintained at their present levels, without adjustment for inflation, throughout the projection [9]. State fuel taxes are calculated on the basis of a volume-weighted average for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels. The State fuel taxes were updated as of July 2009 [10] and are held constant in real terms over the projection period, consistent with historical experience.

132

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

134

AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices This dataset comes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Disposition, and Prices This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is...

135

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

136

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset...

137

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific This dataset comes from the Electric Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This data reflects Table 9, and...

138

Comparing Efficiency Projections (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Realized improvements in energy efficiency generally rely on a combination of technology and economics [47]. The figure below illustrates the role of technology assumptions in the AEO2010 projections for energy efficiency in the residential and commercial buildings sector. Projected energy consumption in the Reference case is compared with projections in the Best Available Technology, High Technology, and 2009 Technology cases and an estimate based on an assumption of no change in efficiency for building shells and equipment.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2009 (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The oil prices reported in AEO2009 represent the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil in 2007 dollars [50]. Projections of future supply and demand are made for liquids, a term used to refer to those liquids that after processing and refining can be used interchangeably with petroleum products. In AEO2009, liquids include conventional petroleum liquidssuch as conventional crude oil and natural gas plant liquidsin addition to unconventional liquids, such as biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Potential for Renewable Energy Development: Alternatives to AEO2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed for analysis of policy initiatives. The reference case projections of the AEO assume continuing market changesLBNL-51499 Potential for Renewable Energy Development: Alternatives to AEO2001 Julie Osborn

142

Energy Technologies on the Horizon (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A key issue in mid-term forecasting is the representation of changing and developing technologies. How existing technologies will evolve, and what new technologies might emerge, cannot be known with certainty. The issue is of particular importance in AEO2006, the first AEO with projections out to 2030.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EPACT2005: Status of Provisions (Update) (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

EPACT2005 was signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, and became Public Law 109-058. A number of provisions from EPACT2005 were included in the AEO2006 projections. Many others were not considered in AEO2006particularly, those that require funding appropriations or further specification by Federal agencies or Congress before implementation.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIA - AEO2010 - World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or “sweet”) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for “total liquids,” which includes conventional petroleum liquids—such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain—in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil. World oil prices can be influenced by a multitude of factors. Some tend to be short term, such as movements in exchange rates, financial markets, and weather, and some are longer term, such as expectations concerning future demand and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2009, the interaction of market factors led prompt month contracts (contracts for the nearest traded month) for crude oil to rise relatively steadily from a January average of $41.68 per barrel to a December average of $74.47 per barrel [38].

147

State Restrictions on Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

By the end of 2005, 25 States had barred, or passed laws banning, any more than trace levels of MTBE in their gasoline supplies, and legislation to ban MTBE was pending in 4 others. Some State laws address only MTBE; others also address ethers such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME). AEO2006 assumes that all State MTBE bans prohibit the use of all ethers for gasoline blending.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric power capacity and generation. electric power capacity and generation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable energy capacity and generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

149

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

150

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation of each renewable energy source. generation of each renewable energy source. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO generation renewable energy renewable energy generating capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

151

EIA - AEO2010 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Issues in Focus Introduction Each year, the Issues in Focus section of the AEO provides an in-depth discussion on topics of special interest, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, supply, and consumption. The first section compares the results of two cases that adopt different assumptions about the future course of existing energy policies. One case assumes the elimination of sunset provisions in existing energy policies. The other case assumes the extension of a selected group of existing policies—CAFE standards, appliance standards, and PTCs—in addition to the elimination of sunset provisions. Other sections include a discussion of end-use energy efficiency trends in AEO2010; an analysis of the impact of incentives on the use of natural gas in heavy freight trucks; factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices; the sensitivity of the projection results to variations in assumptions about the availability of U.S. shale gas resources; the implications of retiring nuclear plants after 60 years of operation; and issues related to accounting for CO2 emissions from biomass energy combustion.

152

EIA - AEO2010 - Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation and Regulations Legislation and Regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Legislation and Regulations Introduction The Reference case projections in AEO2010 generally assume that current laws and regulations affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period (including the implication that laws which include sunset dates do, in fact, become ineffective at the time of those sunset dates). The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards—or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require regulations for which the implementing agency will exercise major discretion, or require appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself—are not reflected in the Reference case projections. However, sensitivity cases that incorporate alternative assumptions about the future of existing policies subject to periodic updates also are included. The Federal and State laws and regulations included in AEO2010 are based on those in effect as of the end of October 2009. In addition, at the request of the Administration and Congress, EIA has regularly examined the potential implications of proposed legislation in Service Reports (see EIA Service Reports released since January 2009).

153

Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and Modeling in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On December 23, 2008, the D.C. Circuit Court remanded but did not vacate CAIR, overriding its previous decision on February 8, 2008, to remand and vacate CAIR. The December decision, which is reflected in AEO2010, allows CAIR to remain in effect, providing time for the EPA to modify the rule in order to address objections raised by the Court in its earlier decision. A similar rule, referred to as the CAMR, which was to set up a cap-and-trade system for reducing mercury emissions by approximately 70 percent, is not represented in the AEO2010 projections, because it was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February 2008.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2024 Date: September 19, 2012 2024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 24, 2012 Item: Hydrogen produced and dispensed in distributed facilities at high-volume refueling stations using current technology and DOE's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 projected prices for industrial natural gas result in a hydrogen levelized cost of $4.49 per gallon-gasoline-equivalent (gge) (untaxed) including compression, storage and dispensing costs. The hydrogen production portion of this cost is $2.03/gge. In comparison, current analyses using low-cost natural gas with a price of $2.00 per MMBtu can decrease the hydrogen levelized cost to $3.68 per gge (untaxed) including

155

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or sweet) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for total liquids, which includes conventional petroleum liquidssuch as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gainin addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minemouth Prices by Region This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is...

157

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council NYC-Westchester This dataset comes...

158

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool South This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

159

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Northeast This dataset comes from...

160

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Long Island This dataset comes from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Upstate New York This dataset comes...

162

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

163

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98,...

164

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary

165

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

166

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cost for 1 MW systems with various EP ratios Validated PNNL model using PNNL 1 kW, 1 kWh stack performance data Provided a roadmap for cost effective redox flow battery systems...

167

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Title Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects...

169

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

longer-term market-based forecasts that can be used to more-AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a portion of the gas price forecast through 2010 can beAEO 2006 reference case forecast to conduct a 25-yearAEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9: Two Alternative Price Forecasts (denoted by open circlesAEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices:forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Appendix ATable 1. Forecast Year AEO Predicted Price from 1996-2003

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presents forecasts of energy supply, demand and pricesa reference case forecast with fossil fuel prices close toforecast for wind technologies. The AEOs annual report of energy supply, demand, and prices

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revisions to the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEOon the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts will likely onceComparison of AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to estimate the base-case natural gas price forecast, but toComparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the base-case natural gas price forecast, but to alsoof AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revisions to the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEOsolely on the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts willComparison of AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - AEO2010 - U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement after 60? Background Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating. The nuclear industry has expressed strong interest in continuing the operation of existing nuclear facilities, and no particular technical issues have been identified that would impede their continued operation. Recent AEOs had assumed that existing nuclear units would be retired after 60 years of operation (the initial 40-year license plus one 20-year license renewal). Maintaining the same assumption in AEO2010, with the projection horizon extended to 2035, would result in the retirement of more than one-third of existing U.S. nuclear capacity between 2029 and 2035. Given the uncertainty about when existing nuclear capacity actually will be retired, EIA revisited the assumption for the development of AEO2010 and modified it to allow the continued operation of all existing U.S. nuclear power plants through 2035 in the Reference case.

182

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 13  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 3b. Imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil, projected vs. actual Projected price in nominal dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28

183

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 76, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power midwest projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

184

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

185

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 93, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northwest Power Pool Area projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area (xls, 259.1 KiB)

186

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 86, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

187

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 87, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO central EIA Electric power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

188

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

189

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 78, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester - Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

190

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 74, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Florida projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

191

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliability First Reliability First Corporation / West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 83, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.5 KiB)

192

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

193

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 92, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released August 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO California EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California- Reference Case (xls, 259.5 KiB)

194

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 85, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projection Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway - Reference Case (xls, 259 KiB)

195

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 91, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Southwest WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

196

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 77, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

197

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 94, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Rockies Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 258.8 KiB)

198

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

199

State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2008 (Update) (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

State RPS programs continue to play an important role in AEO2009, growing in number while existing programs are modified with more stringent targets. In total, 28 States and the District of Columbia now have mandatory RPS programs (Table 3), and at least 4 other States have voluntary renewable energy programs. In the absence of a Federal renewable electricity standard, each State determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. The growth in State renewable energy requirements has led to an expansion of renewable energy credit (REC) markets, which vary from State to State. Credit prices depend on the State renewable requirements and how easily they can be met.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2007 reference case and alternative cases generally assume compliance with current laws and regulations affecting the energy sector. Some provisions of the U.S. Tax Code are scheduled to expire, or may be subject to adjustment, before the end of the projection period. In general, scheduled expirations and adjustments provided in legislation or regulations are assumed to occur, unless there is significant historical evidence to support an alternative assumption. This section examines the AEO2007 treatment of three provisions that could have significant impacts on U.S. energy markets: the gasoline excise tax, biofuel (ethanol and biodiesel) tax credits, and the PTC for electricity generation from certain renewable resources.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

California's Move Toward E10 (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In AEO2009, E10a gasoline blend containing 10 percent ethanolis assumed to be the maximum ethanol blend allowed in California RFG, as opposed to the 5.7-percent blend assumed in earlier AEOs. The 5.7-percent blend had reflected decisions made when California decided to phase out use of the additive methyl tertiary butyl ether in its RFG program in 2003, opting instead to use ethanol in the minimum amount that would meet the requirement for 2.0 percent oxygen content under the CAA provisions in effect at that time

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

204

Economic Effects of High Oil Prices (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2006 projections of future energy market conditions reflect the effects of oil prices on the macroeconomic variables that affect oil demand, in particular, and energy demand in general. The variables include real GDP growth, inflation, employment, exports and imports, and interest rates.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2005 (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

AEO2005 provided a summary of 17 State renewable energy programs in existence as of December 31, 2003, in 15 States.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In recent years, the AEO has tracked the growing number of States that have adopted requirements or goals for renewable energy. While there is no Federal renewable generation mandate, the States have been adopting such standards for some time. AEO2005 provided a summary of all existing programs in effect at that time [29], and subsequent AEOs have examined new policies or changes to existing ones [30,31]. Since the publication of AEO2007, four States have enacted new RPS legislation, and five others have strengthened their existing RPS programs. In total, 25 States and the District of Columb

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

217

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of different plausible price projections, using eitherthat renewables can provide price certainty over even longerof AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The levelized cost of energy for distributed PV : a parametric study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maturation of distributed solar PV as an energy source requires that the technology no longer compete on module efficiency and manufacturing cost ($/Wp) alone. Solar PV must yield sufficient energy (kWh) at a competitive cost (c/kWh) to justify its system investment and ongoing maintenance costs. These metrics vary as a function of system design and interactions between parameters, such as efficiency and area-related installation costs. The calculation of levelized cost of energy includes energy production and costs throughout the life of the system. The life of the system and its components, the rate at which performance degrades, and operation and maintenance requirements all affect the cost of energy. Cost of energy is also affected by project financing and incentives. In this paper, the impact of changes in parameters such as efficiency and in assumptions about operating and maintenance costs, degradation rate and system life, system design, and financing will be examined in the context of levelized cost of energy.

Goodrich, Alan C. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the AEO2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 75, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEIO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / East - Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB) Quality Metrics

222

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

No Sunset and Extended Policies Cases (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2010 Reference case is best described as a current laws and regulations case, because it generally assumes that existing laws and fully promulgated regulations will remain unchanged throughout the projection period, unless the legislation establishing them specifically calls for them to end or change. The Reference case often serves as a starting point for the analysis of proposed legislative or regulatory changes, a task that would be difficult if the Reference case included projected legislative or regulatory changes.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

Comparison of costs for alternative mixed low-level waste treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Total life cycle costs (TLCCs), including disposal costs, of thermal, nonthermal and enhanced nonthermal systems were evaluated to guide future research and development programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) consisting of RCRA hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In these studies, nonthermal systems are defined as those systems that process waste at temperatures less than 350 C. Preconceptual designs and costs were developed for thirty systems with a capacity (2,927 lbs/hr) to treat the DOE MLLW stored inventor y(approximately 236 million pounds) in 20 years in a single, centralized facility. A limited comparison of the studies` results is presented in this paper. Sensitivity of treatment costs with respect to treatment capacity, number of treatment facilities, and system availability were also determined. The major cost element is operations and maintenance (O and M), which is 50 to 60% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. Energy costs constitute a small fraction (< 1%) of the TLCCs. Equipment cost is only 3 to 5% of the treatment cost. Evaluation of subsystem costs demonstrate that receiving and preparation is the highest cost subsystem at about 25 to 30% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. These studies found no cost incentives to use nonthermal or hybrid (combined nonthermal treatment with stabilization by vitrification) systems in place of thermal systems. However, there may be other incentives including fewer air emissions and less local objection to a treatment facility. Building multiple treatment facilities to treat the same total mass of waste as a single facility would increase the total treatment cost significantly, and improved system availability decreases unit treatment costs by 17% to 30%.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Harvego, L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Biagi, C. [Morrison Knudsen (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (Update) (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2008 reference case incorporates current regulations that pertain to the energy industry. This section describes the handling of Federal taxes and tax credits in AEO2008, focusing primarily on areas where regulations have changed or the handling of taxes or tax credits has been updated.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Summary of Provisions (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

ARRA, signed into law in mid-February 2009, provides significant new Federal funding, loan guarantees, and tax credits to stimulate investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy. The provisions of ARRA were incorporated initially as part of a revision to the AEO2009 Reference case that was released in April 2009, and they also are included in AEO2010.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

230

A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION OF NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-44070 TP-28529 A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION and market penetration on the U.S. Department of Energy's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast for wind supply mix remains fairly steady, and renewable energy technologies such as wind do not achieve

231

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008-Impacts of Updating the AEO2008 Reference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impacts of Updating the AEO2008 Reference Case Impacts of Updating the AEO2008 Reference Case Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Impacts of Updating the AEO2008 Reference Case EIA's decision to update the AEO2008 early-release reference case was motivated by the enactment in December 2007 of EISA2007, which contains many provisions that will significantly influence future energy trends. The specific EISA2007 provisions modeled in AEO2008 include updates to the renewable fuel standard (RFS) and the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standard for new light-duty vehicles (LDVs); updated and new appliance energy efficiency standards for boilers, dehumidifiers, dish-washers, clothes washers, and commercial walk-in refrigerators and freezers; lighting energy efficiency standards; provisions to reduce energy consumption in Federal buildings; and efficiency standards for in-dustrial electric motors.

232

Distributed Generation in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Currently, distributed generation provides a very small share of residential and commercial electricity requirements in the United States. The AEO2005 reference case projects a significant increase in electricity generation in the buildings sector, but distributed generation is expected to remain a small contributor to the sectors energy needs. Although the advent of higher energy prices or more rapid improvement in technology could increase the use of distributed generation relative to the reference case projection, the vast majority of electricity used in buildings is projected to continue to be purchased from the grid.

Information Center

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

234

Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type This dataset comes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140,...

236

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In AEO2013, the 2030 values have fallen to 5,523 million metric tons for total energy-related CO 2 emissions, with 1,874 million metric tons (34 percent) ...

237

AEO2012 considers three cases for the future of world oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... coal-to-liquids, biomass-to-liquids, gas-to-liquids, extra-heavy oils, and oil shale. Download CSV Data. The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) ...

238

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2005 reference case oil price forecast and NYMEX oi lthan the reference case oil price forecast for that year. Inoil futures case where oil prices are based on the NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts (or any other forecast, for that matter) in makingcase natural gas price forecast, but to also examine a wideAEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this hybrid NYMEX-EIA gas price projection still does notonly a portion of the gas price forecast through 2010 of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to estimate the base-case natural gas price forecast, but toComparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

late January 2008, extend its natural gas futures strip anComparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.1 History of Natural Gas8 4.1 U.S. Wellhead and AEO Natural Gas8 4.2 U.S. Wellhead and Henry Hub Natural Gas

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9: Two Alternative Price Forecasts (denoted by openComparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast toNYMEX Futures Prices Date: December 6, 2006 Introduction On

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEO 2004 and AEOcost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generationwith variable price gas-fired generation that are based

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

250

AEO Early Release 2013 - LNG exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas, or LNG. U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas are expected to reach 1.6 trillion cubic feet in 2027, double the export levels projected for that time in last year's outlook . And, according to EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski: "Increasing domestic natural gas production, especially from tight shale formations, and lower

251

Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cost-effectiveness of recommended nurse staffing levels for short-stay skilled nursing facility patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anonymous: Employer Costs for Employee Compensation--BioMed Central Open Access Cost-effectiveness of recommendeddiagnoses. However, the cost-effectiveness of increasing

Ganz, David A; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

EIA - AEO2010 - No Sunset and Extended Policies cases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

No Sunset and Extended Policies cases No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Background The AEO2010 Reference case is best described as a “current laws and regulations” case, because it generally assumes that existing laws and fully promulgated regulations will remain unchanged throughout the projection period, unless the legislation establishing them specifically calls for them to end or change. The Reference case often serves as a starting point for the analysis of proposed legislative or regulatory changes, a task that would be difficult if the Reference case included “projected” legislative or regulatory changes. As might be expected, it is sometimes difficult to draw a line between what should be included or excluded from the Reference case. Areas of particular uncertainty include:

254

Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2005, the EPA finalized two regulations, CAIR and CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the AEO2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several States and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Mercury Emissions Control Technologies (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2006 reference case assumes that States will comply with the requirements of the EPAs new CAMR regulation. CAMR is a two-phase program, with a Phase I cap of 38 tons of mercury emitted from all U.S. power plants in 2010 and a Phase II cap of 15 tons in 2018. Mercury emissions in the electricity generation sector in 2003 are estimated at around 50 tons. Generators have a variety of options to meet the mercury limits, such as: switching to coal with a lower mercury content, relying on flue gas desulfurization or selective catalytic reduction equipment to reduce mercury emissions, or installing conventional activated carbon injection (ACI) technology.

Information Center

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Presenters Biographies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Presenters' Biographies 1 Presenters' Biographies 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Presenters' Biographies (by presentation order) John Conti John J. Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis at EIA. Mr. Conti analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. He also oversees the planning and execution of EIA's analysis and forecasting programs to ensure that EIA models, analyses, and projections meet the highest standards of relevance, reliability, and timeliness. Mr. Conti spent nearly 30 years working for the U.S. Department of Energy. Mr. Conti

257

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Attendance List  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Attendance List 1 Attendance List 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Attendee list In person attendees Mia Adelberg Abengoa Bioenergy Michael Bredehoeft EIA Tom Capehart USDA Terry Carter Biofuels Center of North Carolina Adam Christensen Johns Hopkins University Michael Cole EIA John Conti EIA Lauren Cooper Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Mindi Farber-DeAnda EIA Denise Gerber Fiberight Steve Gerber Fiberight Ryan Graf Policy Navigation Group David L. Greene Oak Ridge National Laboratory Peter Gross EIA Howard Gruenspecht EIA Marilyn Herman Herman & Associates Robert Hershey Robert L. Hershey, P.E. Sean Hill EIA David Hitchcock Virent, Inc. Rob Johansson USDA Sandra Jones CITGO Petroleum Corp Kendell W. Keith TRC Consulting, Ltd.

258

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 34  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 21. Total energy related carbon dioxide emissions, projected vs. actual Projected (million metric tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 5984 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441 5489 5551 5621 5680 5727 5775 5841 5889 5944 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 6087 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 6316

260

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 28  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 15. Total electricity sales, projected vs. actual Projected (billion kilowatt-hours) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 2843 2891 2928 2962 3004 3039 3071 3112 3148 3185 3228 3263 3298 3332 3371 3406 3433 3469 AEO 1995 2951 2967 2983 3026 3058 3085 3108 3134 3166 3204 3248 3285 3321 3357 3396 3433 3475 AEO 1996 2973 2998 3039 3074 3106 3137 3173 3215 3262 3317 3363 3409 3454 3505 3553 3604 AEO 1997 3075 3115 3168 3229 3290 3328 3379 3437 3497 3545 3596 3649 3697 3736 3784

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 15  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 5. Domestic crude oil production, projected vs. actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967

262

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 24  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 12. Total coal consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099

263

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 25  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 13. Coal production, projected vs. actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 999 1021 1041 1051 1056 1066 1073 1081 1087 1098 1107 1122 1121 1128 1143 1173 1201 1223 AEO 1995 1006 1010 1011 1016 1017 1021 1027 1033 1040 1051 1066 1076 1083 1090 1108 1122 1137 AEO 1996 1037 1044 1041 1045 1061 1070 1086 1100 1112 1121 1135 1156 1161 1167 1173 1184 AEO 1997 1028 1052 1072 1088 1105 1110 1115 1123 1133 1146 1171 1182 1190 1193 1201

264

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 14  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 4. Total petroleum consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884

265

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

269

File:AEO2012earlyrelease.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2earlyrelease.pdf 2earlyrelease.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:AEO2012earlyrelease.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.31 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 13 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:09, 28 March 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:09, 28 March 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 13 pages (1.31 MB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

270

AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

271

AEO2011: Coal Minemouth Prices by Region and Type | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minemouth Prices by Region and Type Minemouth Prices by Region and Type Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 141, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons and the US Dollar. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, Gulf, Dakota medium, western Montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Minemouth Prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Minemouth Prices by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 121.6 KiB)

272

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Texas Regional Entity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 73, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Texas Regional Entity - Reference Case (xls, 259.4 KiB)

273

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool /  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 89, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB)

274

AEO2011: Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Regions Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 138, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in billion cubic feet per year. The data is broken down into New England, Middle Atlantic, East North Central, West Central, South Atlantic, East South Central, West South Central, Mountain, Pacific, Florida, Arizona/New Mexico, California. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIS Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Regions- Reference Case (xls, 60 KiB)

275

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of AEO2005. In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sectorbulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool /  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 90, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 259 KiB)

277

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

278

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices: using the Energy Information Administration's ''Annual Energy Outlook'' forecasted price (AEO) and the ''Henry Hub'' compared to U.S. Wellhead futures price. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the relative accuracy of the two measures in the recent past. A statistical analysis suggests that the Henry Hub futures price provides a more accurate average forecast of natural gas prices than the AEO. For example, the Henry Hub futures price underestimated the natural gas price by 35 cents per thousand cubic feet (11.5 percent) between 1996 and 2003 and the AEO underestimated by 71 cents per thousand cubic feet (23.4 percent). Upon closer inspection, a liner regression analysis reveals that two distinct time periods exist, the period between 1996 to 1999 and the period between 2000 to 2003. For the time period between 1996 to 1999, AEO showed a weak negative correlation (R-square = 0.19) between forecast price by actual U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub with a weak positive correlation (R-square = 0.20) between forecasted price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. During the time period between 2000 to 2003, AEO shows a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.37) between forecasted natural gas price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub that show a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.36) between forecast price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. These results suggest that agencies forecasting natural gas prices should consider incorporating the Henry Hub natural gas futures price into their forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Our analysis is very preliminary and is based on a very small data set. Naturally the results of the analysis may change, as more data is made available.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimation of Capital and Levelized Estimation of Capital and Levelized Cost for Redox Flow Batteries V. Viswanathan, A. Crawford, L. Thaller 1 , D. Stephenson, S. Kim, W. Wang, G. Coffey, P. Balducci, Z. Gary Yang 2 , Liyu Li 2 , M. Kintner-Meyer, V. Sprenkle 1 Consultant 2 UniEnergy Technology September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1 What are we trying to accomplish? PNNL grid analytics team has established ESS cost targets for various applications PNNL cost/performance model estimates cost for redox flow battery systems of various chemistries drives research internally to focus on most important components/parameters/metrics for cost reduction and performance improvement

280

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 14, 2009, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2010 were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in itigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings.

Bolinger, Mark A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost of stockouts in the microprocessor business and its impact in determining the optimal service level/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to develop optimal inventory policies, it is essential to know the consequences of stockouts and the costs related to each kind of stockout; at Intel, however, such costs have not yet been quantified. The primary ...

Sonnet, Maria Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

283

Comparative analysis of energy costing methodologies. Appendix: report on levelized busbar-costing workshop held at MITRE/Metrek, June 29-30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings of a workshop on levelized busbar costing methodologies which was held at MITRE/Metrek on June 29 and 30, 1978 are described. Particular emphasis was placed on consideration of geothermal energy sources. The objective of the workshop was to determine whether a consensus could be developed regarding the most appropriate methodologies and assumptions for levelized energy costing. The workshop was attended by representatives from energy resource, utility and engineering design companies, and by representatives of the Division of Geothermal Energy and R and D contractors for this Division. It was found that year-by-year calculations in current dollars were generally preferred, using either Discounted Cash Flow or Revenue Requirements methods. No consensus emerged on choice of discount rate or financial parameters such as debt/equity ratio, and tax credit carry forward/carry back provisions. It was felt that engineering aspects deserve close attention.

Leigh, J.G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 26  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 14a. Average electricity prices, projected vs. actual Projected price in constant dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 1992 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 7.20 7.20 7.30 7.30 7.40 7.50 7.60

285

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 22  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 11a. Coal prices to electric generating plants, projected vs. actual Projected price in constant dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92

286

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 17  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 7a. Natural gas wellhead prices, projected vs. actual Projected price in constant dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47

287

Transportation Energy Use by Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-15T17:11:53Z 2011-06-03T20:30:54Z http:eia.govforecastsaeoexcelaeotab7.xls I accessed this dataset from a public site. Annually To...

288

Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008: Summary of Provisions (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-343), which was signed into law on October 3, 2008, incorporates EIEA2008 in Division B. Provisions in EIEA2008 that require funding appropriations to be implemented, whose impact is highly uncertain or that require further specification by Federal agencies or Congress, are not included in AEO2009.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, ... detailed and overviews. ... Draft cost and performance characteristics;

290

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

291

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Scalable Methodology for Cost Estimation in a Transformational High-Level Design Space Exploration Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective of the methodology presented in this paper is to perform design space exploration on a high level of abstraction by applying high-level transformations. To realize a design loop which is close and settled on upper design levels, a high-level estimation step is integrated. In this paper, several estimation methodologies fixed on different states of the high-level synthesis process are examined with respect to their aptitude on controlling the transformational design space exploration process.

Gerlach

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Table G1 - Summary of the AEO2000 Cases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2000 Cases AEO2000 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference in text Reference in Appendix G Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated — — Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated p. 50 — High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case.

295

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type by Region and Type Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AE2011: Coal Production by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 122.3 KiB)

296

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Volumetric Excise Tax Credit for Alternative Fuels (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On August 10, 2005, President Bush signed into law the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)]. The act includes authorization for a multitude of transportation infrastructure projects, establishes highway safety provisions, provides for R&D, and includes a large number of miscellaneous provisions related to transportation, most of which are not included in AEO2006 because their energy impacts are vague or undefined.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Apples and oranges: don't compare levelized cost of renewables: Joskow  

SciTech Connect

MIT Prof. Paul Joskow points out that the levelized metric is inappropriate for comparing intermittent generating technologies like wind and solar with dispatchable generating technologies like nuclear, gas combined cycle, and coal. The levelized comparison fails to take into account differences in the production profiles of intermittent and dispatchable generating technologies and the associated large variations in the market value of the electricity they supply. When the electricity is produced by an intermittent generating technology, the level of output and the value of the electricity at the times when the output is produced are key variables that should be taken into account.

NONE

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne ...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

From: Mark Bolinger and Ryan Wiser, Berkeley Lab (LBNL) Subject: Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices Date: January 4, 2010 1. Introduction, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better

305

Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40 percent of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, EIA has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. In AEO2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

Information Center

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2006 (Update) (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

AEO2006 provided a review of renewable energy programs that were in effect in 23 States at the end of 2005 [37]. Since then (as of September 1, 2006), no new State programs have been adopted; however, several States with renewable energy programs in place have made changes as they have gained experience and identified areas for improvement. Revisions made over the past year range from clarification or modification of program definitions, such as which resources qualify, to substantial increases in targets for renewable electricity generation or capacity. The following paragraphs provide an overview of substantive changes in the design or implementation of State renewable energy programs.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Loan Guarantees and the Economics of Electricity Generating Technologies (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The loan guarantee program authorized in Title XVII of EPACT2005 is not included in AEO2007, because the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 requires congressional authorization of loan guarantees in an appropriations act before a Federal agency can make a binding loan guarantee agreement. As of October 2006, Congress had not provided the legislation necessary for DOE to implement the loan guarantee program (see Legislation and Regulations). In August 2006, however, DOE invited firms to submit pre applications for the first $2 billion in potential loan guarantees.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fuel Economy Standards for New Light Trucks (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In March 2006, NHTSA finalized CAFE standards requiring higher fuel economy performance for light-duty trucks in MY 2008 through 2011. Unlike the proposed CAFE standards discussed in AEO2006 [13], which would have established minimum fuel economy requirements by six footprint size classes, the final reformed CAFE standards specify a continuous mathematical function that determines minimum fuel economy requirements by vehicle footprint, defined as the wheelbase (the distance from the front axle to the center of the rear axle) times the average track width (the distance between the center lines of the tires) of the vehicle in square feet.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Busbar Cost Data 47 Windanalysis. energy (wind, in particular), as well as the costwind capital cost estimates from EPRI/DOE Renewable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 21  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 10. Natural gas net imports, projected vs. actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 2.02 2.40 2.66 2.74 2.81 2.85 2.89 2.93 2.95 2.97 3.00 3.16 3.31 3.50 3.57 3.63 3.74 3.85 AEO 1995 2.46 2.54 2.80 2.87 2.87 2.89 2.90 2.90 2.92 2.95 2.97 3.00 3.03 3.19 3.35 3.51 3.60 AEO 1996 2.56 2.75 2.85 2.88 2.93 2.98 3.02 3.06 3.07 3.09 3.12 3.17 3.23 3.29 3.37 3.46 AEO 1997 2.82 2.96 3.16 3.43 3.46 3.50 3.53 3.58 3.64 3.69 3.74 3.78 3.83 3.87 3.92

312

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 10  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Table 2. Real gross domestic product, projected vs. actual Projected Real GDP growth trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2%

313

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 32  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 19. Total delivered industrial energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2

314

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 20  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Table 9. Natural gas production, projected vs. actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25

315

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tax Credits and Renewable Generation (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Tax incentives have been an important factor in the growth of renewable generation over the past decade, and they could continue to be important in the future. The Energy Tax Act of 1978 (Public Law 95-618) established ITCs for wind, and EPACT92 established the Renewable Electricity Production Credit (more commonly called the PTC) as an incentive to promote certain kinds of renewable generation beyond wind on the basis of production levels. Specifically, the PTC provided an inflation-adjusted tax credit of 1.5 cents per kilowatthour for generation sold from qualifying facilities during the first 10 years of operation. The credit was available initially to wind plants and facilities that used closed-loop biomass fuels [75] and were placed in service after passage of the Act and before June 1999.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA - AEO2010 - Updated State air emissions regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Updated State air emissions regulations Updated State air emissions regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their CO2 emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 mega-watts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [30]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap is expected to be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements are expected to cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from the region's electric power sector. Overall, the RGGI States as a whole must maintain covered emissions at a level of 188 million tons CO2 for the next 4 years, after which a mandatory 2.5-percent annual decrease in CO2 emissions through 2018 is expected to reduce the total for covered CO2 emissions in the RGGI States to 10 percent below the initial calculated bud-get. Although each State was given its own emissions budget, allowances are auctioned at a uniform price across the entire region.

322

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

323

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description http://en.openei.org/w/skins/openei/images/ui-bg_gloss_wave-medium_40_d6...); background-attachment: scroll; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: rgb(214, 235, 225); line-height: 17px; width: 650px; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat; ">This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 3, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

324

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

13 SEER Standard for Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In January 2004, after years of litigation in a case that pitted environmental groups and Attorneys General from 10 States against the U.S. Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reestablished the central air conditioner and heat pump standard originally set in January 2001 [3]. The Courts ruling, which struck down a May 2002 rollback of the 2001 standard to a 12 SEER, mandates that all new central air conditioners and heat pumps meet a 13 SEER standard by January 2006, requiring a 30-percent increase in efficiency relative to current law. The AEO2005 reference case incorporates the 13 SEER standard as mandated by the Courts ruling.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbonof renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty,energy, including the fossil fuel hedge value of renewable

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 27  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 14b. Average electricity prices, projected vs. actual Projected price in nominal dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 6.95 7.12 7.41 7.59 7.79 8.01 8.36 8.62 9.02 9.32 9.76 10.08 10.42 10.94 11.32 11.87 12.45 13.05 AEO 1995 6.95 7.16 7.23 7.40 7.59 7.81 8.04 8.42 8.70 9.12 9.43 9.75 10.24 10.57 11.10 11.47 12.02

332

Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release Author: Britney Vest Subject: EIA-861 Frame and Statistical Methodology Created Date: 9/10/2012 8:57:30 AM ...

333

Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

uptick in unplanned crude oil production outages and increased tensions in the ... since May of this year, ... 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release Author:

334

AEO Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

335

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 19  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19 19 Table 8. Total natural gas consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00

336

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 30  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 17. Total delivered residential energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 10.96 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7

337

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 33  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 20. Total delivered transportation energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9

338

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 18. Total delivered commercial energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0

339

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versus out-of-state renewable energy project development andbarriers to renewable energy in many states, but these costsPV technology or renewable energy generated in-state. For an

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

344

State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

States are moving forward with implementation plans for the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) [42]. The program, promulgated by the EPA in March 2005, is a cap-and-trade system designed to reduce emissions of SO2 and NOx. States originally had until March 2007 to submit implementation plans, but the deadline has been extended by another year. CAIR covers 28 eastern States and the District of Columbia. States have the option to participate in the cap-andtrade plan or devise their own plans, which can be more stringent than the Federal requirements. To date, no State has indicated an intent to form NOx and SO2 programs with emissions limits stricter than those in CAIR, and it is expected that all States will participate in the EPA-administered cap-and-trade program. CAIR remains on schedule for implementation, and AEO2008 includes CAIR by assuming that all required States will meet only the Federal requirement and will trade credits.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third partys use or the results of such use, of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights. The views expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1307, Revision 13, is not a substitute for NRC regulations, and compliance is not required. The approaches and/or methods described in this NUREG are provided for information only. Publication of this report does not necessarily A requirement placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is that licensees must annually adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is revised periodically, explains the formula that is acceptable to the NRC for determining the minimum decommissioning fund requirements for nuclear power plants. The sources of information used in the formula are identified, and the values developed for the estimation of radioactive waste burial/disposition costs, by site and by year, are given. Licensees may use the formula, coefficients, and burial/disposition adjustment factors from this report in their cost analyses,

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

EIA - AEO2010 - Naturall gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks. In 2008, U.S. freight trucks used more than 2 million barrels of petroleum-based diesel fuel per day. In the AEO2010 Reference case, they are projected to use 2.7 million barrels per day in 2035. Petroleum-based diesel use by freight trucks in 2008 accounted for 15 percent of total petroleum consumption (excluding biofuels and other non-petroleum-based products) in the transportation sector (13.2 million barrels per day) and 12 percent of the U.S. total for all sectors (18.7 million barrels per day). In the Reference case, oil use by freight trucks grows to 20 percent of total transportation use (13.7 million barrels per day) and 14 percent of the U.S. total (19.0 million barrels per day) by 2035. The following analysis examines the potential impacts of policies aimed at increasing sales of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (HDNGVs) and the use of natural gas fuels, and key factors that lead to uncertainty in these estimates.

347

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance (O&M) costs, renewable energy productionrenewable energy technologies are modeled becomes critical. The structure of NEMS makes cost

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Greenhouse Gas Concerns and Power Sector Planning (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Concerns about potential climate change driven by rising atmospheric concentrations of GHGs have grown over the past two decades, both domestically and abroad. In the United States, potential policies to limit or reduce GHG emissions are in various stages of development at the State, regional, and Federal levels. In addition to ongoing uncertainty with respect to future growth in energy demand and the costs of fuel, labor, and new plant construction, U.S. electric power companies must consider the effects of potential policy changes to limit or reduce GHG emissions that would significantly alter their planning and operating decisions. The possibility of such changes may already be affecting planning decisions for new generating capacity.

Information Center

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Assumptions Wind power is often found to be the least-cost renewable energycost studies. The capacity value of renewable energy (wind,wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price Forecasts The difference between renewable energy

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost to further test the effects of the assumptions about wind energyEnergy Outlook 1999, December 1998. Although the cost of windcost of wind in the input file by half (before learning-by-doing and other factors are assessed) is tested, wind energy

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and /kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewables can provide price certainty over longer terms. In6 This additiona l level of price discovery in longer-datedreplicate the long-term price stability that renewables can

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

As part of CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a MACT floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

364

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the Federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10-percent Federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

369

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

370

Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On July 11, 2006, the EPA issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with MY 2007 [16], engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Federal and State Ethanol and Biodiesel Requirements (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

EPACT2005 requires that the use of renewable motor fuels be increased from the 2004 level of just over 4 billion gallons to a minimum of 7.5 billion gallons in 2012, after which the requirement grows at a rate equal to the growth of the gasoline pool. The law does not require that every gallon of gasoline or diesel fuel be blended with renewable fuels. Refiners are free to use renewable fuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, in geographic regions and fuel formulations that make the most sense, as long as they meet the overall standard. Conventional gasoline and diesel can be blended with renewables without any change to the petroleum components, although fuels used in areas with air quality problems are likely to require adjustment to the base gasoline or diesel fuel if they are to be blended with renewables.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

372

Proposed Revisions to Light Truck Fuel Economy Standard (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In August 2005, NHTSA published proposed reforms to the structure of CAFE standards for light trucks and increases in light truck CAFE standards for model years 2008 through 2011 [8]. Under the proposed new structure, NHTSA would establish minimum fuel economy levels for six size categories defined by the vehicle footprint (wheelbase multiplied by track width), as summarized in Table 3. For model years 2008 through 2010, the new CAFE standards would provide manufacturers the option of complying with either the standards defined for each individual footprint category or a proposed average light truck fleet standard of 22.5 miles per gallon in 2008, 23.1 miles per gallon in 2009, and 23.5 miles per gallon in 2010. All light truck manufacturers would be required to meet an overall standard based on sales within each individual footprint category after model year 2010.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity dierences at the rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of rms with dierent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing rms. We nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across rm productivity. The evidence we nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Farias; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

375

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

377

Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

King, Robert Dean (Schenectady, NY); DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson (Malvern, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

OpenEI - AEO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:www.eia.govforecastsaeoindex.cfm
...

379

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-1 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEOC.1.2 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEO 2003) AEOdoes not require electricity price trends and discount

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 3  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 0.9 40.4 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 33.3 20.5 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 32.8 21.6 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 5.2 63.7 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.2 62.0 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 9.9 63.7

387

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

391

Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, New York, 1981. MIL-HDBK-881, Handbook Work BreakdownWBS level-3 cost elements [MIL- HDBK-881, 1998]. In general,

Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of ...

393

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

397

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

398

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

399

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

400

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

402

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

403

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

404

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Capital cost for electricity plants; Retrospective Review for AEO2012; Thank You. We welcome your comments or suggestions (optional).

405

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Capital costs for new technologies were updated for AEO2013, ... Energy intensity; Energy production and imports; Electricity generation; ...

406

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

PHENIX WBS notes. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Full Economic Costing:-Updated guidance notes for peer reviewers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the level of resources required to undertake the project and not their unit cost. In particular, peer are as follows: 1) Directly Incurred costs: These are costs which are specific to a project and will be charged to the project on the basis of actual costs incurred. They must be supported by an audit record, which

410

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

412

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

AEO Early Release 2013 - oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut U.S. reliance on foreign oil The United States is expected to continue cutting its dependence on petroleum and liquid fuels imports over the rest of this decade because of growing domestic crude oil production and more fuel-efficient vehicles on America's highways. The new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows America's dependence on imported petroleum and liquid fuels will decline from 45 percent of domestic demand last year to 34 percent by 2019. U.S. dependence on imported oil had reached 60 percent as recently as 2005. EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski explains: "The United States will be able to meet more of its own energy needs because of two key

415

EIA - AEO2010 - Executive Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Executive Summary In 2009, U.S. energy markets continued to show the impacts of the economic downturn that began in late 2007. After falling by 1 percent in 2008, total electricity generation dropped by another 3 percent in 2009. Although other factors, including weather, contributed to the decrease, it was the first time in the 60-year data series maintained by the EIA that electricity use fell in two consecutive years. Over the next few years, the key factors influencing U.S. energy markets will be the pace of the economic recovery, any lasting impacts on capital-intensive energy projects from the turmoil in financial markets, and the potential enactment of legislation related to energy and the environment.

416

Supplement to AEO99 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 as of 9/13/99 1. Tables 36-43 which contain supplementary data for the industrial sector have been revised. These revisions were made to better reflect energy consumption that had been incorrectly allocated to the individual industrial sectors. The revisions do not affect the total industrial consumption reported in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999. (change made on 2/9/99) 2. Tables 59-71 which contain regional electric generator data have been revised. These revisions were made to cogeneration and net energy for load values. (change made on 3/19/99) 3. The historical Lower 48 average and regional crude oil wellhead prices for 1997 were incorrectly reported in Table 79 of the Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999. The correct prices are as follows:

417

AEO2012 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

long-term projection from IHS Global Insight, Inc.; and an updated representation of biomass supply. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 History 2010...

418

AEO2008 Overview - Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Report :DOEEIA-0383(2008) Released Date: December 2007 Next Release Date: December 2008 (full report available early 2008) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)...

419

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to evolve, and improvements in efficiency are expected with the introduction of light-emitting diode (LED) backlighting for TV screens and with new efficiency standards adopted in...

420

EIA - AEO2010 - CAFE standards  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

economy requirement of 34.1 mpg by 2016. Because the CO2-equivalent standards cover all vehicle emissions related to GHGs, manufacturers who do not implement technologies that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

422

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

423

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

424

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

425

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

426

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

427

Automatic monitoring helps reduce lighting costs  

SciTech Connect

A Benton, Arkansas utility is using a dimmable ballast system to curb high-intensity-discharge (HID) lighting costs. The system also incorpoates a monitoring control system. This control automatically maintains minimum illumination levels.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

El-Khoury, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Parameter inference of cost-sensitive boosting algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several cost-sensitive boosting algorithms have been reported as effective methods in dealing with class imbalance problem. Misclassification costs, which reflect the different level of class identification importance, are integrated into the weight ...

Yanmin Sun; A. K. C. Wong; Yang Wang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative Island approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this islands used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an islands cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

433

Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs (2009). The cost per square foot was determined fromcost for basement levels is given at $36.40 per square foot

Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

For appliances, choosing the most cost-effective option depends on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumers in the market for new appliances have a wide range of choices that likely vary by cost, options, and efficiency level. If energy cost effectiveness is a ...

435

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy Evolution of Texture in...

440

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

442

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

444

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given companys cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

446

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

448

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urinals Vary water cost, frequency of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION This calculator assumes that early replacement of a urinal or toilet will take place with...

452

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing,...

453

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

454

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and...

458

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

459

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

463

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.

465

Incremental cost analysis of advanced concept CAES systems  

SciTech Connect

The costs of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems using thermal energy storage (TES) are compared to the costs of CAES systems without TES and simple cycle gas turbine systems. Comparisons are made in terms of the system energy costs levelized over the operating life of the systems. These are in 1985 price levels which is the assumed first year of operation for the systems.

Knutsen, C.A.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

468

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

469

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

470

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

471

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

472

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin goals.

Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

474

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

475

Evidence of cost growth under cost-plus and fixed-price contracting  

SciTech Connect

As defined by the US Department of Energy (DOE), privatization refers to a shifting of responsibilities for the completion of projects from a cost-plus Management and Operations (M and O) contract, to incentive-based contracts with the private sector. DOE`s new vision is to arrange cleanup work around incentives-based contracts, which are won via competitive bidding. Competition in awarding cleanup contracts can make use of market incentives to lower project costs and reduce slippage time. Fixed-price contracts encourage contractors to minimize schedule delays and cost overruns once the scope of a project has been negotiated. Conversely, cost-plus contracting offers weak incentives for contractors to select cost-minimizing production and management approaches. Because privatization explicitly allocates more risk to the contractor, it forces the government to better define its goals and methods. This study summarizes actual cost experiences with government contracts performed under cost-plus and fixed-price incentive structures at all levels of government. The first section provides some background on the problem of making contractor activity more cost-efficient. Following this are sections on the measurement of performance and the costs of projects, limitations on measurement, and findings of similar studies. The study concludes with appendices discussing the details of the performance measurement methodology and the project data sets used in the study.

Scott, M.J.; Paananaen, O.H.; Redgate, T.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Jaksch, J.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Cost and Performance Tradeoff Analysis of Cell Planning Levels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In wireless communication systems, optimal placement of base station locations, i.e.,cell planning, has been considered one of major tools for performance improvement.However, the cell (more)

Gao, Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions : costs associated with farm level mitigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions within New Zealand account for 48 percent of all national greenhouse gas emissions. With the introduction of the emissions trading scheme (more)

Wolken, Antony Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Figure 80. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gas combined cycle Wind Nuclear Coal Capital O&M Fuel Transmission 2040.00 2020.00 1.35 5.88 5.98 6.61 1.71 6.98 7.73 8.32 0.20 1.31 1.16 0.68 0.20 1.31 1.16 0.68 6 ...

479

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation NREL, Ren Anderson Building America Technical Update Meeting July 25 th , 2012 Issue 5 - How Much Insulation is Too Much? How do we define the cost-effective limit for improvements in enclosure efficiency? Key Factors to Consider: -Cost of savings vs. cost of grid-supplied energy -Cost of efficiency savings vs. cost of savings from renewable generation. -Savings from envelope improvements vs. other efficiency options Context * It is widely believed that code-specified insulation levels also represent cost-effective limits. * However, the cost-effective insulation levels exceed IECC values in many climates. * The homeowner-driven value of modest increases in enclosure performance can create economies of scale that will reduce

480

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levelized costs aeo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.