Sample records for level stabilize prior

  1. Prior Knowledge, Level Set Representations & Visual Grouping Mikael Rousson (mikael.rousson@siemens.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paragios, Nikos

    Prior Knowledge, Level Set Representations & Visual Grouping Mikael Rousson (mikael.rousson@siemens.com) Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA Nikos Paragios (nikos plane of the prior model modulo a similarity transformation. The optimization of a statistical metric

  2. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M. (GSU); (NIH)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  3. Variational and Shape Prior-based Level Set Model for Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diop, El Hadji S.; Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie [Image and Information Department, Telecom Bretagne / INSERM U650, Brest (France); Ba, Sileye O. [Signal and Communications Department, Telecom Bretagne / Lab-STICC, Brest (France)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new image segmentation model based on level sets approach is presented herein. We deal with radiographic medical images where boundaries are not salient, and objects of interest have the same gray level as other structures in the image. Thus, an a priori information about the shape we look for is integrated in the level set evolution for good segmentation results. The proposed model also accounts a penalization term that forces the level set to be close to a signed distance function (SDF), which then avoids the re-initialization procedure. In addition, a variant and complete Mumford-Shah model is used in our functional; the added Hausdorff measure helps to better handle zones where boundaries are occluded or not salient. Finally, a weighted area term is added to the functional to make the level set drive rapidly to object's boundaries. The segmentation model is formulated in a variational framework, which, thanks to calculus of variations, yields to partial differential equations (PDEs) to guide the level set evolution. Results obtained on both synthetic and digital radiographs reconstruction (DRR) show that the proposed model improves on existing prior and non-prior shape based image segmentation.

  4. Stability of High Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kulkarni, N.S.; Spear, K.E.; Vienna, J.D.; Hanni, J.B.; Crum, J.D.; Hrma, P.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the DOE Office of Science-Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) High-Level Waste Workshop held on January 19-20, 2005 at the Savannah River Site.

  5. Costs of mixed low-level waste stabilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Cooley, C.R.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selection of final waste forms to be used for disposal of DOE`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) depends on the waste form characteristics and total life cycle cost. In this paper the various cost factors associated with production and disposal of the final waste form are discussed and combined to develop life-cycle costs associated with several waste stabilization options. Cost factors used in this paper are based on a series of treatment system studies in which cost and mass balance analyses were performed for several mixed low-level waste treatment systems and various waste stabilization methods including vitrification, grout, phosphate bonded ceramic and polymer. Major cost elements include waste form production, final waste form volume, unit disposal cost, and system availability. Production of grout costs less than the production of a vitrified waste form if each treatment process has equal operating time (availability) each year; however, because of the lower volume of a high temperature slag, certification and handling costs and disposal costs of the final waste form are less. Both the total treatment cost and life cycle costs are higher for a system producing grout than for a system producing high temperature slag, assuming equal system availability. The treatment costs decrease with increasing availability regardless of the waste form produced. If the availability of a system producing grout is sufficiently greater than a system producing slag, then the cost of treatment for the grout system will be less than the cost for the slag system, and the life cycle cost (including disposal) may be less depending on the unit disposal cost. Treatment and disposal costs will determine the return on investment in improved system availability.

  6. Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant, such as bullets, detonated-mine-induced soil ejecta, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), shell or turbine frag of high-fidelity material-constitutive models capa- ble of describing the behavior of fibers

  7. Analysis of stability of community structure across multiple hierarchical levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui-Jia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of stability of community structure is an important problem for scientists from many fields. Here, we propose a new framework to reveal hidden properties of community structure by quantitatively analyzing the dynamics of Potts model. Specifically we model the Potts procedure of community structure detection by a Markov process, which has a clear mathematical explanation. Critical topological information regarding to multivariate spin configuration could also be inferred from the spectral significance of the Markov process. We test our framework on some example networks and find it doesn't have resolute limitation problem at all. Results have shown the model we proposed is able to uncover hierarchical structure in different scales effectively and efficiently.

  8. Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Arnold Andre?

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    importance to good site selection. The combination of a properly operated site having good geologic and hydrologic characteristics were considered the only barriers necessary to isolate low-level radioactive waste from the environment (Pollard 1986... of the waste. The only means of ultimate disposal is to allow time for the radioactivity to decay (Cember 1983), while providing adequate pmtection against dispersal to the environment. Low-level wastes may be defined as those which would have to be diluted...

  9. Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Arnold Andre?

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    importance to good site selection. The combination of a properly operated site having good geologic and hydrologic characteristics were considered the only barriers necessary to isolate low-level radioactive waste from the environment (Pollard 1986... of the waste. The only means of ultimate disposal is to allow time for the radioactivity to decay (Cember 1983), while providing adequate pmtection against dispersal to the environment. Low-level wastes may be defined as those which would have to be diluted...

  10. Application Level Optimizations for Energy Efficiency and Thermal Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coskun, Ayse

    -efficiency, and (ii) the effect of temperature optimization on system-level energy consumption. 1. INTRODUCTION Recent]. A closely related issue is ther- mal management: High power consumption not only increases opera- tional challenges--Performance, Energy, and Temperature (PET)--solely through novel hardware design. We know

  11. Dynamic Stability and Thermodynamic Characterization in an Enzymatic Reaction at the Single Molecule Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moisés Santillán

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study, at the single molecular level, the thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of an enzymatic reaction comprising a rate limiting step. We investigate how the stability of the enzyme-state stationary probability distribution, the reaction velocity, and its efficiency of energy conversion depend on the system parameters. We employ in this study a recently introduced formalism for performing a multiscale thermodynamic analysis in continuous-time discrete-state stochastic systems.

  12. The stability of low levels of ethylene oxide in gas sampling bags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swerzenski, Peter

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be no interactive effect between initial EtO concentration and bag type but high relative humidities may adversely affect the stability of EtO in gas sampling bags especially at EtO levels around 10-15 ppm. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank Dr. Richard B. Konzen... exposure, medical surveillance. signs and labels, regulated areas, training, record keeping and emergency response were also included within the EtO standard. Even though a reference to a short term exposure limit (STEL) of 10 ppm over a 15 minute period...

  13. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  14. Design Guidelines for Test Level 3 (TL-3) Through Test Level 5 (TL-5) Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez Barrios, Deeyvid 1980-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR TEST LEVEL 3 (TL-3) THROUGH TEST LEVEL 5 (TL-5) ROADSIDE BARRIER SYSTEMS PLACED ON MECHANICALLY STABILIZED EARTH (MSE) RETAINING WALL A Dissertation by DEEYVID OSCAR SAEZ BARRIOS Submitted to the Office... ............................................................................................. 28 2.2.3 Full-Scale Crash Testing for TL-4 .............................................................. 32 2.2.4 Full-Scale Crash Testing for TL-5 .............................................................. 34 2.3 Background on Design Impact...

  15. A study of low-level wind and temperature profiles as a function of stability in the surface boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Morgan Glenn

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF LOW-LEVEL WIND AND TEMPERATURE PROFILES AS A FUNCTION OF STABILITY IN THE SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER A Thesis By Morgan Glenn Williams Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... and content by: . . jy ~( (Chairman of Committee) (lread of Dep. ent) ', ea'ocr) ~!A|I)~ Decemb. r 19 70 ABSTRACT A Study of I. ow-Level Wind and Temperature Profiles as a Function of Stability in the Surface Boundary Layer (December 1970) Morgan...

  16. Compositional Policy Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, David

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a probabilistic framework for incorporating structured inductive biases into reinforcement learning. These inductive biases arise from policy priors, probability distributions over optimal policies. ...

  17. Stabilization

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryantis here April and Error

  18. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  19. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  20. COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    90e COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION J. Wrathall, T.of coal during combustion. The process involves the additionCOAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION Lawrence Berkeley

  1. Motion Integration Using Competitive Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shuang; Lu, Hongjing; Lee, Alan; Yuille, Alan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate motion integration across orientation andspace. VSS 2006. Motion integration using competitive priorsMotion integration using competitive priors Shuang Wu 1 ,

  2. Motion Integration Using Competitive Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang Wu; Hongjing Lu; Alan Lee; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate motion integration across orientation andspace. VSS 2006. Motion integration using competitive priorsMotion integration using competitive priors Shuang Wu 1 ,

  3. Seepage flow-stability analysis of the riverbank of Saigon river due to river water level fluctuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oya, A; Hiraoka, N; Fujimoto, M; Fukagawa, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saigon River, which flows through the center of Ho Chi Minh City, is of critical importance for the development of the city as forms as the main water supply and drainage channel for the city. In recent years, riverbank erosion and failures have become more frequent along the Saigon River, causing flooding and damage to infrastructures near the river. A field investigation and numerical study has been undertaken by our research group to identify factors affecting the riverbank failure. In this paper, field investigation results obtained from multiple investigation points on the Saigon River are presented, followed by a comprehensive coupled finite element analysis of riverbank stability when subjected to river water level fluctuations. The river water level fluctuation has been identified as one of the main factors affecting the riverbank failure, i.e. removal of the balancing hydraulic forces acting on the riverbank during water drawdown.

  4. In Situ Stabilization of Inactive Low Level Waste Pipelines in the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cange, J.; Cox, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coye, St. [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Skinner, R. [US DOE Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shaw, K. [Restoration Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McGinley, S. [Pro2Serve, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contained an inactive waste pipeline system consisting of approximately 12 kilometers of buried waste pipelines and over 142 m{sup 3} in surface/subsurface appurtenances (e.g., vents, valve pits, pump vaults, etc.). Historically, the system was used to transport liquid low level and process waste between generator facilities in Melton Valley, storage and disposal sites in Melton Valley, and storage/treatment facilities in Bethel Valley. The selected remedy in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for inactive pipelines was isolation, removal, or stabilization. Pipeline remediation activities began in the summer of 2005 and were completed in the spring of 2006. The task entailed an iterative process of selecting pipeline access points, excavating and exposing pipelines, performing tapping, draining and cutting activities, either installing fittings for grouting or plugging and capping the lines. Grouting was accomplished using paired access points, with one location serving as the grout injection point and the other as vent/drain and grout confirmation point. Grouting was conducted by pumping a cement-bentonite grout into the specially installed fittings and typically proceeded from a low point to a high point to ensure complete filling of the pipeline (i.e., no void space). The project successfully grouted a total of 8,454 meters (linear distance) of pipeline; another 3,573 meters of pipeline was stabilized through isolation. (authors)

  5. Fermi level stabilization and band edge energies in Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detert, Douglas M.; Tom, Kyle B.; Dubon, Oscar D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Battaglia, Corsin; Javey, Ali [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Denlinger, Jonathan D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lim, Sunnie H. N. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, Kin M.; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the band edge energies of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O thin films as a function of composition by three independent techniques: we determine the Fermi level stabilization energy by pinning the Fermi level with ion irradiation, measure the binding energy of valence band states and core levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and probe shifts in the conduction band and valence band density of states using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, respectively. The three techniques find consensus in explaining the origin of compositional trends in the optical-bandgap narrowing upon Cd incorporation in wurtzite ZnO and widening upon Zn incorporation in rocksalt CdO. The conduction band minimum is found to be stationary for both wurtzite and rocksalt alloys, and a significant upward rise of the valence band maximum accounts for the majority of these observed bandgap changes. Given these band alignments, alloy disorder scattering is found to play a negligible role in decreasing the electron mobility for all alloys. These band alignment details, combined with the unique optical and electrical properties of the two phase regimes, make CdZnO alloys attractive candidates for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  6. Prior Fiscal Years

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  7. NatPriorLst

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECTpi/LFebruary 1999

  8. Prior Fiscal Years

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  9. A quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR frequency metrology system with ultra-narrow linewidth and $1\\times 10^{-13}$-level absolute frequency stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Michael G; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Schiller, Stephan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a powerful tool for high-resolution mid-IR spectroscopy and frequency metrology with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). We have implemented frequency stabilization of a QCL to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) reference cavity, via upconversion to the near-IR spectral range, at a level of $1\\times10^{-13}$. The absolute frequency of the QCL is measured relative to a hydrogen maser, with instability $<1\\times10^{-13}$ and inaccuracy $5\\times10^{-13}$, using a frequency comb phase-stabilized to an independent ultrastable laser. The QCL linewidth is determined to be 60 Hz, dominated by fiber noise. Active suppression of fiber noise could result in sub-10 Hz linewidth.

  10. Polar versus temperate grounding-line sedimentary systems and marine glacier stability during sea level rise by global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.D. (Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Geology Dept.); Pyne, A.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Antarctic Research Center); Hunter, L.E.; Rynes, N.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine-ending glaciers may retreat with global warming as sea level rises by ocean thermal expansion. If the sea floor rises by sediment accumulation, then glaciers may not feel the effect of sea level rise. A submersible ROV and other techniques have been used to collect data from temperate and polar glaciers to compare sediment production and mass balance of their grounding-line systems. Temperature Alaskan valley glaciers flow at about 0.2--2 km/a and have high volumes of supraglacial, englacial and subglacial debris. However, most sediment contributed to the base of their tidewater cliffs comes from subglacial streams or squeezing out subglacial sediment and pushing it with other marine sediment into a morainal bank. Blue Glacier, a thin, locally fed polar glacier in Antarctica, flows slowly and has minimal glacial debris. The grounding-line system at the tidewater cliff is a morainal bank that forms solely by pushing of marine sediment. An Antarctic polar outlet glacier, Mackay Glacier, terminating as a floating glacier-tongue, has similar volumes of basal debris to Alaskan temperature glaciers and flows at 250 m/a. However, no subglacial streams issued from Mackay's grounding line and all sedimentation was by rockfall and grainfall rainout from seawater undermelt of the tongue. A grounding-line wedge of glacimarine diamicton is deposited over subglacial (lodgement ) till. Although Antarctic grounding-line accumulation rates are three orders of magnitude smaller than Alaskan rates, both are capable of compensating for predicted rises in sea level by thermal heating from global warming.

  11. Varying the prior 29 Appendix C. Quality of the posterior estimates from prior replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varying the prior 29 Appendix C. Quality of the posterior estimates from prior replacement replacement may out-perform prior-specific training in some aspects of the quality of the estimated posterior, since the prior is known analytically, the posterior can also be estimated by prior replacement. To do

  12. Minimally Informative Prior Distributions for PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana L. Kelly; Robert W. Youngblood; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A salient feature of Bayesian inference is its ability to incorporate information from a variety of sources into the inference model, via the prior distribution (hereafter simply “the prior”). However, over-reliance on old information can lead to priors that dominate new data. Some analysts seek to avoid this by trying to work with a minimally informative prior distribution. Another reason for choosing a minimally informative prior is to avoid the often-voiced criticism of subjectivity in the choice of prior. Minimally informative priors fall into two broad classes: 1) so-called noninformative priors, which attempt to be completely objective, in that the posterior distribution is determined as completely as possible by the observed data, the most well known example in this class being the Jeffreys prior, and 2) priors that are diffuse over the region where the likelihood function is nonnegligible, but that incorporate some information about the parameters being estimated, such as a mean value. In this paper, we compare four approaches in the second class, with respect to their practical implications for Bayesian inference in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The most commonly used such prior, the so-called constrained noninformative prior, is a special case of the maximum entropy prior. This is formulated as a conjugate distribution for the most commonly encountered aleatory models in PSA, and is correspondingly mathematically convenient; however, it has a relatively light tail and this can cause the posterior mean to be overly influenced by the prior in updates with sparse data. A more informative prior that is capable, in principle, of dealing more effectively with sparse data is a mixture of conjugate priors. A particular diffuse nonconjugate prior, the logistic-normal, is shown to behave similarly for some purposes. Finally, we review the so-called robust prior. Rather than relying on the mathematical abstraction of entropy, as does the constrained noninformative prior, the robust prior places a heavy-tailed Cauchy prior on the canonical parameter of the aleatory model.

  13. Bayesian Policy Search with Policy Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, David

    We consider the problem of learning to act in partially observable, continuous-state-and-action worlds where we have abstract prior knowledge about the structure of the optimal policy in the form of a distribution over ...

  14. An Assessment of the Stability and the Potential for In-Situ Synthesis of Regulated Organic Compounds in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Babad, H.; Hallen, R.T.; Jackson, L.P.; Lerchen, M.E.

    1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability assessment examined 269 non-detected regulated compounds, first seeking literature references of the stability of the compounds, then evaluating each compound based upon the presence of functional groups using professional judgment. Compounds that could potentially survive for significant periods in the tanks (>1 year) were designated as stable. Most of the functional groups associated with the regulated organic compounds were considered unstable under tank waste conditions. The general exceptions with respect to functional group stability are some simple substituted aromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds that resist oxidation and the multiple substituted aliphatic and aromatic halides that hydrolyze or dehydrohalogenate slowly under tank waste conditions. One-hundred and eighty-one (181) regulated, organic compounds were determined as likely unstable in the tank waste environment.

  15. Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches for Policy and Project Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Free, Prior, and...

  16. Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  17. PRIOR HAB ADVICE POINTS - STATE OF THE SITE MEETINGS GENERAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO Website Directory PPPO WebsitePREP |Dan5, 2013 1 PRIOR

  18. [3] E. Harabetian and S. Osher, Stabilizing illposed problems vis the level set approach, preprint. [4] B. Merriman, J. Bence, and S. Osher, Motion of multiple junctions : A level set approach,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Tony F.

    . [4] B. Merriman, J. Bence, and S. Osher, Motion of multiple junctions : A level set approach, J. Comp of essentially nonoscillatory schemes i, J. Comp.Phys., 83 (1989), pp. 32--78. [10] M. Sussman, Ph.d thesis, UCLA of multiple junc­ tions and interfaces in 3­d and application to domain decomposition, Preprint. 32 #12; Let F

  19. Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, J.B.

    1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  20. Necessary conditions for stabilization agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zili.; Jacoby, Henry D.

    The Climate Convention calls for stabilization of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper considers the issues that must be faced in formulating a plan to meet any such target, using a proposed CO2 level ...

  1. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  2. Spanish Major Requirements Option B: Literature and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior to Fall 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Spanish Major Requirements Option B: Literature and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior: Introduction to Hispanic Cultures 224: Introduction to Hispanic Literatures Literature (12 credits) Spanish 322: Survey of Early Hispanic Literature _____ another 300-level literature survey (324: Modern Spanish, 326

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING --ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Interacting Geometric Priors For Robust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are often the factors leading to biased estimation. Furthermore, the energy can be efficiently minimized- mulated as an energy minimization task, where the energy function includes fitting error a novel energy with high-level geometric priors that consider interactions between geometric models

  4. Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    covers the adjustment data report for fiscal years prior to 2008. energydatareport.xls More Documents & Publications Reporting Guidance for Federal Agency Annual Report on Energy...

  5. acid treatment prior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

  6. androgen withdrawal prior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

  7. analyzing prior mammograms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

  8. amniotic fluid prior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

  9. Stability of High-Level Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Vienna, John D.

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the proposed effort is to use a new approach to develop solution models of complex waste glass systems and spent fuel that are predictive with regard to composition, phase separation, and volatility. The effort will also yield thermodynamic values for waste components that are fundamentally required for corrosion models used to predict the leaching/corrosion behavior for waste glass and spent fuel material. This basic information and understanding of chemical behavior can subsequently be used directly in computational models of leaching and transport in geologic media, in designing and engineering waste forms and barrier systems, and in prediction of chemical interactions.

  10. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  11. ROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION USING MULTIPLE PRIOR MODELS FOR SPEECH RECONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, DeLiang "Leon"

    speech recognition to enhance noisy speech. Typically, a single prior model is trained by pooling normalization (CMN), while others preprocess noisy speech using speech enhancement techniques. If noise samplesROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION USING MULTIPLE PRIOR MODELS FOR SPEECH RECONSTRUCTION Arun Narayanan

  12. Combining prior day contours to improve automated prostate segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godley, Andrew; Sheplan Olsen, Lawrence J.; Stephans, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States); Zhao Anzi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 and Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of automatically segmented prostate, rectum, and bladder contours required for online adaptive therapy. The contouring accuracy on the current image guidance [image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)] scan is improved by combining contours from earlier IGRT scans via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: Six IGRT prostate patients treated with daily kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) had their original plan CT and nine CBCTs contoured by the same physician. Three types of automated contours were produced for analysis. (1) Plan: By deformably registering the plan CT to each CBCT and then using the resulting deformation field to morph the plan contours to match the CBCT anatomy. (2) Previous: The contour set drawn by the physician on the previous day CBCT is similarly deformed to match the current CBCT anatomy. (3) STAPLE: The contours drawn by the physician, on each prior CBCT and the plan CT, are deformed to match the CBCT anatomy to produce multiple contour sets. These sets are combined using the STAPLE algorithm into one optimal set. Results: Compared to plan and previous, STAPLE improved the average Dice's coefficient (DC) with the original physician drawn CBCT contours to a DC as follows: Bladder: 0.81 {+-} 0.13, 0.91 {+-} 0.06, and 0.92 {+-} 0.06; Prostate: 0.75 {+-} 0.08, 0.82 {+-} 0.05, and 0.84 {+-} 0.05; and Rectum: 0.79 {+-} 0.06, 0.81 {+-} 0.06, and 0.85 {+-} 0.04, respectively. The STAPLE results are within intraobserver consistency, determined by the physician blindly recontouring a subset of CBCTs. Comparing plans recalculated using the physician and STAPLE contours showed an average disagreement less than 1% for prostate D98 and mean dose, and 5% and 3% for bladder and rectum mean dose, respectively. One scan takes an average of 19 s to contour. Using five scans plus STAPLE takes less than 110 s on a 288 core graphics processor unit. Conclusions: Combining the plan and all prior days via the STAPLE algorithm to produce treatment day contours is superior to the current standard of deforming only the plan contours to the daily CBCT. STAPLE also improves the precision, with a substantial decrease in standard deviation, a key for adaptive therapy. Geometrically and dosimetrically accurate contours can be automatically generated with STAPLE on prostate region kV CBCT in a time scale suitable for online adaptive therapy.

  13. A Bayesian Approach for Image Segmentation with Shape Priors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Hang; Yang, Qing; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Color and texture have been widely used in image segmentation; however, their performance is often hindered by scene ambiguities, overlapping objects, or missingparts. In this paper, we propose an interactive image segmentation approach with shape prior models within a Bayesian framework. Interactive features, through mouse strokes, reduce ambiguities, and the incorporation of shape priors enhances quality of the segmentation where color and/or texture are not solely adequate. The novelties of our approach are in (i) formulating the segmentation problem in a well-de?ned Bayesian framework with multiple shape priors, (ii) ef?ciently estimating parameters of the Bayesian model, and (iii) multi-object segmentation through user-speci?ed priors. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a set of natural and synthetic images.

  14. Photometric Redshift with Bayesian Priors on Physical Properties of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of photometric redshifts with Bayesian priors on physical properties of galaxies. This concept is particularly suited for upcoming/on-going large imaging surveys, in which only several broad-band filters are available and it is hard to break some of the degeneracies in the multi-color space. We construct model templates of galaxies using a stellar population synthesis code and apply Bayesian priors on physical properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate. These priors are a function of redshift and they effectively evolve the templates with time in an observationally motivated way. We demonstrate that the priors help reduce the degeneracy and deliver significantly improved photometric redshifts. Furthermore, we show that a template error function, which corrects for systematic flux errors in the model templates as a function of rest-frame wavelength, delivers further improvements. One great advantage of our technique is that we simultaneously measure redshifts...

  15. Presentation: Introduction to Current & Prior Studies of the DOE Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Comission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories on current and prior studies of the DOE Laboratories delivered by Mark Taylor, Susannah Howieson, and...

  16. Low dose tomographic fluoroscopy: 4D intervention guidance with running prior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, Barbara; Kuntz, Jan; Brehm, Marcus; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Kueres, Rolf [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bartling, Sönke [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Theodor–Kutzer–Ufer 1–3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Theodor–Kutzer–Ufer 1–3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Today's standard imaging technique in interventional radiology is the single- or biplane x-ray fluoroscopy which delivers 2D projection images as a function of time (2D+T). This state-of-the-art technology, however, suffers from its projective nature and is limited by the superposition of the patient's anatomy. Temporally resolved tomographic volumes (3D+T) would significantly improve the visualization of complex structures. A continuous tomographic data acquisition, if carried out with today's technology, would yield an excessive patient dose. Recently the authors proposed a method that enables tomographic fluoroscopy at the same dose level as projective fluoroscopy which means that if scanning time of an intervention guided by projective fluoroscopy is the same as that of an intervention guided by tomographic fluoroscopy, almost the same dose is administered to the patient. The purpose of this work is to extend authors' previous work and allow for patient motion during the intervention.Methods: The authors propose the running prior technique for adaptation of a prior image. This adaptation is realized by a combination of registration and projection replacement. In a first step the prior is deformed to the current position via affine and deformable registration. Then the information from outdated projections is replaced by newly acquired projections using forward and backprojection steps. The thus adapted volume is the running prior. The proposed method is validated by simulated as well as measured data. To investigate motion during intervention a moving head phantom was simulated. Real in vivo data of a pig are acquired by a prototype CT system consisting of a flat detector and a continuously rotating clinical gantry.Results: With the running prior technique it is possible to correct for motion without additional dose. For an application in intervention guidance both steps of the running prior technique, registration and replacement, are necessary. Reconstructed volumes based on the running prior show high image quality without introducing new artifacts and the interventional materials are displayed at the correct position.Conclusions: The running prior improves the robustness of low dose 3D+T intervention guidance toward intended or unintended patient motion.

  17. Chassis stabilization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claxton, Gerald L. (Fresno, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilizing suspension system is provided for vehicles carrying telescopic booms or aerial work platforms having a fixed axle and a oscillating axle. Hydraulic cylinders are connected to each end of the oscillating axle, each cylinder being capable of extending and retracting. An off level sensor senses the angle of tilt of the chassis in both left and right directions and, when a predetermined threshold of tilt has been detected, the hydraulic cylinder on the downhill side of the chassis is locked against retracting, but is free to move in the downhill direction to allow the downhill wheel to remain in contact with the ground.

  18. Progress Toward a Stabilization and Preconditioning Protocol for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Deline, C. A.; Rummel, S. R.; Anderberg, A.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can exhibit substantial variation in measured performance depending on prior exposure history. This study examines the metastable performance changes in these PV modules with the goal of establishing standard preconditioning or stabilization exposure procedures to mitigate measured variations prior to current-voltage (IV) measurements.

  19. Finding a Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Distribution Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly; Corwin Atwood

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straight-forward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in closed form, and so an approximate beta distribution is used in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial aleatory model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that is often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  20. Finding A Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straightforward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson \\lambda, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in the form of a standard distribution (e.g., beta, gamma), and so a beta distribution is used as an approximation in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that are often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  1. Approximate Message Passing with Restricted Boltzmann Machine Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tramel, Eric W; Krzakala, Florent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximate Message Passing (AMP) has been shown to be an excellent statistical approach to signal inference and compressed sensing problem. The AMP framework provides modularity in the choice of signal prior; here we propose a hierarchical form of the Gauss-Bernouilli prior which utilizes a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM) trained on the signal support to push reconstruction performance beyond that of simple iid priors for signals whose support can be well represented by a trained binary RBM. We present and analyze two methods of RBM factorization and demonstrate how these affect signal reconstruction performance within our proposed algorithm. Finally, using the MNIST handwritten digit dataset, we show experimentally that using an RBM allows AMP to approach oracle-support performance.

  2. Expected Behavior of Quantum Thermodynamic Machines with Prior Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the expected behavior of a quantum model of heat engine when we have incomplete information about external macroscopic parameters, like magnetic field controlling the intrinsic energy scales of the working medium. We explicitly derive the prior probability distribution for these unknown parameters, $a_i, (i=1,2)$. Based on a few simple assumptions, the prior is found to be of the form $\\Pi(a_i) \\propto 1/a_i$. By calculating the expected values of various physical quantities related to this engine, we find that the expected behavior of the quantum model exhibits thermodynamic-like features. This leads us to a surprising proposal that incomplete information quantified as appropriate prior distribution can lead us to expect classical thermodynamic behavior in quantum models.

  3. Spin Stability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report: IG-0900Market LucianaAsymmetries of

  4. What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

    The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

  5. Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction --Nonlinear stability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ee, Bernard Kuowei

    Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction -- Nonlinear stability analysis Bernard K. Ee hydraulic solutions of the forced Korteweg de-Vries equation is investigated here. For numerical convenience is destabilized by a hydraulic instability in which superexponential growth occurs prior to satura- tion

  6. INTERFACIAL STABILITY OF THIN FILM FIBER-OPTIC HYDROGEN SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERFACIAL STABILITY OF THIN FILM FIBER-OPTIC HYDROGEN SENSORS R. Davis Smith, Ping Liu, Se and utility of these sensors, especially in the configuration that is based upon the optical response hydrogen sensors for use as safety monitors wherever hydrogen is used, stored, or produced. Prior work has

  7. Blind source separation using spatial and temporal priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    #12;Blind source separation using spatial and temporal priors W D Addison Balliol University of Oxford A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Trinity 2009 2 #12;3 #12 for providing such fine accommodation in Oxford and to my wife for her incredible patience while this thesis

  8. Optimality of Thompson Sampling for Gaussian Bandits Depends on Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Optimality of Thompson Sampling for Gaussian Bandits Depends on Priors Junya Honda Akimichi problems, a Bayesian policy called Thompson sampling (TS) has recently attracted much attention for its ex discusses the asymptotic optimality of Thompson sampling (TS) (Thompson, 1933) for the Gaussian model. TS

  9. Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckler, Andrew F.

    Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge Andrew F. Heckler experiments examine the effects of varying the relative concreteness of physics word problems on student performance.Previous studies have found that concrete representations benefit performance for relatively

  10. Brief article Prior knowledge on the illumination position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamassian, Pascal

    -retinal knowledge (Rock, 1983). Recent experimental work has emphasized the study of prior knowledge and P was upside-down and consequently shadows were in the wrong place relative to the light source. The position. This explanation rests on the knowledge that the light source stays at the same location whether or not one

  11. Material Stabilization Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

  12. Using Prior Knowledge in the Design of Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahrokh Esfahani, Mohammad

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    USING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE IN THE DESIGN OF CLASSIFIERS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD SHAHROKH ESFAHANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Edward Russell Dougherty Co-Chair of Committee, Aniruddha Datta Committee Members, Byung-Jun Yoon Ivan Ivanov Head of Department, Chanan Singh May 2014 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering Copyright 2014 Mohammad Shahrokh...

  13. Natural Priors, CMSSM Fits and LHC Weather Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben C Allanach; Kyle Cranmer; Christopher G Lester; Arne M Weber

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous LHC forecasts for the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), based on current astrophysical and laboratory measurements, have used priors that are flat in the parameter tan beta, while being constrained to postdict the central experimental value of MZ. We construct a different, new and more natural prior with a measure in mu and B (the more fundamental MSSM parameters from which tan beta and MZ are actually derived). We find that as a consequence this choice leads to a well defined fine-tuning measure in the parameter space. We investigate the effect of such on global CMSSM fits to indirect constraints, providing posterior probability distributions for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) sparticle production cross sections. The change in priors has a significant effect, strongly suppressing the pseudoscalar Higgs boson dark matter annihilation region, and diminishing the probable values of sparticle masses. We also show how to interpret fit information from a Markov Chain Monte Carlo in a frequentist fashion; namely by using the profile likelihood. Bayesian and frequentist interpretations of CMSSM fits are compared and contrasted.

  14. Standard practice for the ion exchange separation of uranium and plutonium prior to isotopic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard practice for the ion exchange separation of uranium and plutonium prior to isotopic analysis

  15. Longitudinal Stability Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  16. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Kröll

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  17. Natural Priors, CMSSM Fits and LHC Weather Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B C; Cranmer, Kyle; Lester, Christopher G; Weber, Arne M

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ar X iv :0 70 5. 04 87 v3 [ he p- ph ] 5 J ul 20 07 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION DAMTP-2007-18 Cavendish-HEP-2007-03 MPP-2007-36 Natural Priors, CMSSM Fits and LHC Weather Forecasts Benjamin C Allanach1, Kyle Cranmer2... ’s likely discoveries. There are big differences between nature of the questions answered by a forecast, and the ques- tions that will be answered by the experiments themselves when they have acquired compelling data. A weather forecast predicting “severe...

  18. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauzier, Pascal Theriault; Chen Guanghong [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness; images also had a qualitatively more uniform noise spatial distribution when including a statistical model. Conclusions: DR-PICCS enables to reconstruct CT images with lower noise than FBP and the loss of spatial resolution can be mitigated to a large extent. The introduction of statistical modeling in DR-PICCS may improve some noise characteristics, but it also leads to anisotropic spatial resolution properties. A denoising method, such as the directional diffusion filtering, has been demonstrated to reduce anisotropy in spatial resolution effectively when it was combined with DR-PICCS with statistical modeling.

  19. Fourier computational ghost imaging using spectral sparsity and conjugation priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Liheng; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational ghost imaging (CGI) retrieves a target scene from numerous random illumination patterns and corresponding single pixel measurements. Theoretically, these random patterns sample random combinations of the Fourier coefficients of the scene's spatial spectrum in an indiscriminative way, and neglect their intrinsic nonuniform importance. Utilizing the sparsity and conjugation priors of natural images' spatial spectra, this letter proposes a new pattern illuminating strategy termed Fourier computational ghost imaging (FCGI), for highly efficient single pixel imaging. Specifically, FCGI sequentially uses two sinusoidal patterns to sample each Fourier coefficient, instead of their random combinations, in the statistically most informative spectrum band. Benefiting from the new illumination patterns and importance sampling strategy, our approach is able to reduce the requisite number of projected patterns by two orders of magnitude, compared to conventional CGI.

  20. PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS: A SCALE SPACE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Anand

    PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS prior for incorpo- rating information from co-registered anatomical images into PET image reconstruction using mutual information based rigid registration. PET data are then simulated from the au

  1. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  2. 31320-2014-EN Member states -Service contract -Prior Information Notice -Not applicable 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    OJ/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice - Not applicable 1/2 29/01/2014 S20 http://ted.europa.eu/TED Member states - Service contract - Prior Information/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice

  3. Variations on stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Minasian; Alessandro Tomasiello

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of non-abelian dynamics of D-branes on their stability and introduce Hitchin-like modifications to previously-known stability conditions. The relation to brane-antibrane systems is used in order to rewrite the equations in terms of superconnections and arrive at deformed vortex equations.

  4. Variations on stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minasian, R; Minasian, Ruben; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of non-abelian dynamics of D-branes on their stability and introduce Hitchin-like modifications to previously-known stability conditions. The relation to brane-antibrane systems is used in order to rewrite the equations in terms of superconnections and arrive at deformed vortex equations.

  5. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Jonas T., E-mail: jonastyleranderson@gmail.com

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  6. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  7. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maranzana, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Giordana, Anna, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Indarto, Antonius, E-mail: antonius.indarto@che.itb.ac.id; Tonachini, Glauco, E-mail: glauco.tonachini@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Torino, Corso Massimo D’Azeglio 48, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Torino, Corso Massimo D’Azeglio 48, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126, Pisa (Italy)] [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126, Pisa (Italy); Causà, Mauro, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Pavone, Michele, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ?E{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ?E{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A?B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ?B97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ?E{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ?E{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational reference of less than 1 kcal mol{sup ?1}. The zero-point vibrational energy corrected estimates ?(E{sub AB}+ZPE), obtained with the three functionals and the 6-31G(d) and N07T basis sets, are compared with experimental D{sub 0} measures, when available. In particular, this comparison is finally extended to the naphthalene and coronene dimers and to three ??? associations of different PAHs (R, made by 10, 16, or 24 C atoms) and P (80 C atoms)

  8. Improving experimental phases for strong reflections prior to density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Hilgenfeld, Rolf, E-mail: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of (China); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A genetic algorithm has been developed to optimize the phases of the strongest reflections in SIR/SAD data. This is shown to facilitate density modification and model building in several test cases. Experimental phasing of diffraction data from macromolecular crystals involves deriving phase probability distributions. These distributions are often bimodal, making their weighted average, the centroid phase, improbable, so that electron-density maps computed using centroid phases are often non-interpretable. Density modification brings in information about the characteristics of electron density in protein crystals. In successful cases, this allows a choice between the modes in the phase probability distributions, and the maps can cross the borderline between non-interpretable and interpretable. Based on the suggestions by Vekhter [Vekhter (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. D61, 899–902], the impact of identifying optimized phases for a small number of strong reflections prior to the density-modification process was investigated while using the centroid phase as a starting point for the remaining reflections. A genetic algorithm was developed that optimizes the quality of such phases using the skewness of the density map as a target function. Phases optimized in this way are then used in density modification. In most of the tests, the resulting maps were of higher quality than maps generated from the original centroid phases. In one of the test cases, the new method sufficiently improved a marginal set of experimental SAD phases to enable successful map interpretation. A computer program, SISA, has been developed to apply this method for phase improvement in macromolecular crystallography.

  9. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  10. EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

  11. Federal Energy Management Program Procedure for Notifying Congress Prior to Award of ESPCs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays the Federal Energy Management Program’s Procedure for notifying Congress prior to awarding energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs)

  12. T-697: Google Chrome Prior to 13.0.782.107 Multiple Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chrome Prior to 13.0.782.107 Multiple Security Vulnerabilities Releases >> Chrome OS Beta: Channel Update Chromium Security >> Reporting Security Bugs IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High...

  13. anion-exchange chromatography prior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

  14. Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental Directives |andAbout Us /

  15. HAZ hardenability in welded C-Mn steels: The role of prior microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarafinchin, D.; Patchett, B.M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hardenability of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in C-Mn steels is one of the primary influences on susceptibility to HAC in welded structures. Procedure control of HAZ hardness is based on the use of preheat and/or heat input to limit the peak HAZ hardness to 350--450 Hv10, depending on hydrogen level. Determination of procedural conditions depends on material thickness and carbon equivalent, but does not involve prior microstructure. This study investigated the influence of hot-rolled and normalized base metal microstructures on the level, development and location of peak hardness in steels of identical chemical composition. One heat of A516Gr70 steel in the hot-rolled condition was cut in two and one-half was normalized. This produced microstructures of differing grain size and pearlite coarseness. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) fusion welds at two heat inputs (0.5 and 2.5 KJ/mm) were placed in each of the two base metals. Macro-and microhardness surveys and metallographic analysis were used o determine the location and level of HAZ hardness. Carbon gradients due to incomplete dissolution of cementite and lack of time for homogenization by diffusion cause significant differences in macro-and microhardness of HAZ constituents in A516Gr70 weld zones. Increased pearlite grain size, and to a lesser extent, pearlite lamellar thickness, produce martensitic zones of high hardness in hot-rolled A516Gr70 in two regions: at temperatures just over the A{sub 3} and at temperatures just over the A{sub 1}. Of the two, the region just over the A{sub 3} although removed from the fusion line, has the highest HAZ hardness and is most likely to be susceptible to HAC. Normalized steel is likely to be more resistant to HAC in the HAZ than hot-rolled steel of identical chemical composition.

  16. Connection-level dynamics in networks: stability and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montevideo, Uruguay Fernando Paganini Universidad ORT Montevideo, Uruguay Abstract--This paper studies

  17. Stabilized PV system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

    2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized PV system comprises an array of photovoltaic (PV) assemblies mounted to a support surface. Each PV assembly comprises a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the support surface. The array of modules is circumscribed by a continuous, belt-like perimeter assembly. Cross strapping, extending above, below or through the array, or some combination of above, below and through the array, secures a first position along the perimeter assembly to at least a second position along the perimeter assembly thereby stabilizing the array against wind uplift forces. The first and second positions may be on opposite sides on the array.

  18. Epistemic levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Daniel (Daniel Louis)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation I defend some controversial "level-bridging" principles in epistemology. In the first chapter, I defend the KK principle-the principle that if one knows that P, then one knows that one knows that P. I ...

  19. Using Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    , many people annotate their images with captions such as "George and Martha in their canoe" whichUsing Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher Carnegie Mellon this idea and describe the benefits of using a group prior for identifying people in consumer images

  20. 2014-2015 Housing/Dining Agreement Cancellation Policy Academic year cancellations prior to June 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Richard L.

    2014-2015 Housing/Dining Agreement Cancellation Policy Academic year cancellations prior to June 30. Written notice of cancellation must be made to the Office of University Housing to avoid additional of housing and dining fees paid if the notice of cancellation is received prior to the first day of classes

  1. Efficient Bayesian multivariate fMRI analysis using a sparsifying spatio-temporal prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Efficient Bayesian multivariate fMRI analysis using a sparsifying spatio-temporal prior Marcel A Available online 1 December 2009 Keywords: Multivariate analysis Bayesian inference Expectation propagation Laplace prior is introduced as a multivariate approach to the analysis of neuroimaging data. It is shown

  2. A WAVELET-BASED IMAGE DENOISING TECHNIQUE USING SPATIAL PRIORS Aleksandra PIZURICA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizurica, Aleksandra

    A WAVELET-BASED IMAGE DENOISING TECHNIQUE USING SPATIAL PRIORS Aleksandra PIZURICA 1 , Wilfried, Belgium ABSTRACT We propose a new wavelet-based method for image denoising that applies the Bayesian framework, using prior knowledge about the spatial clustering of the wavelet coefficients. Local spatial

  3. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  4. 2009 No part may be reproduced in any form without prior authorization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    /Tamper Detection 3. Comm. Protocol Security 4. Risk Mgmt. Enhancement 5. High Speed Encryption 1. Self Healing Grid without prior authorization. Goal: Optimize controls to compensate for damage or failure conditions prior authorization. Intelligent Flight Control System: Example ­ complete hydraulic failure (1997) #12

  5. Stability and Complexity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

  6. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  7. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  8. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  9. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  10. Stability of Coupling Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkasale, Abhineeth

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, K. B. Nakshatrala Committee Members, Steve Suh J. N. Reddy Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal May 2011 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Stability of Coupling Algorithms. (May 2011) Abhineeth Akkasale, B.E., Bangalore... step. iv To Amma and Anna v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First and foremost, I thank Dr. Kalyana B. Nakshatrala for being an incredible advisor and for his time and patience in constantly guiding me through my research. I am indebted to him for his guidance...

  11. Simplex stability Dhruv Mubayi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubayi, Dhruv

    Simplex stability Dhruv Mubayi Reshma Ramadurai November 5, 2008 Abstract A d-simplex that contains no d-simplex. We prove that if |G| (1 - o(1)) n-1 k-1 , then there is a vertex x of G such that the Ai's form a d-simplex, and A contains an element of j=iAj for each i. This generalizes, in asymptotic

  12. Codeword Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cross; Graeme Smith; John A. Smolin; Bei Zeng

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unifying approach to quantum error correcting code design that encompasses additive (stabilizer) codes, as well as all known examples of nonadditive codes with good parameters. We use this framework to generate new codes with superior parameters to any previously known. In particular, we find ((10,18,3)) and ((10,20,3)) codes. We also show how to construct encoding circuits for all codes within our framework.

  13. A technique for estimating 4D-CBCT using prior knowledge and limited-angle projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a technique to estimate onboard 4D-CBCT using prior information and limited-angle projections for potential 4D target verification of lung radiotherapy.Methods: Each phase of onboard 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation from one selected phase (prior volume) of the planning 4D-CT. The deformation field maps (DFMs) are solved using a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique. In the MM-FD technique, the DFMs are estimated using a motion model which is extracted from planning 4D-CT based on principal component analysis (PCA). The motion model parameters are optimized by matching the digitally reconstructed radiographs of the deformed volumes to the limited-angle onboard projections (data fidelity constraint). Afterward, the estimated DFMs are fine-tuned using a FD model based on data fidelity constraint and deformation energy minimization. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso phantom was used to evaluate the MM-FD technique. A lung patient with a 30 mm diameter lesion was simulated with various anatomical and respirational changes from planning 4D-CT to onboard volume, including changes of respiration amplitude, lesion size and lesion average-position, and phase shift between lesion and body respiratory cycle. The lesions were contoured in both the estimated and “ground-truth” onboard 4D-CBCT for comparison. 3D volume percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass shift (COMS) were calculated to evaluate the estimation accuracy of three techniques: MM-FD, MM-only, and FD-only. Different onboard projection acquisition scenarios and projection noise levels were simulated to investigate their effects on the estimation accuracy.Results: For all simulated patient and projection acquisition scenarios, the mean VPD (±S.D.)/COMS (±S.D.) between lesions in prior images and “ground-truth” onboard images were 136.11% (±42.76%)/15.5 mm (±3.9 mm). Using orthogonal-view 15°-each scan angle, the mean VPD/COMS between the lesion in estimated and “ground-truth” onboard images for MM-only, FD-only, and MM-FD techniques were 60.10% (±27.17%)/4.9 mm (±3.0 mm), 96.07% (±31.48%)/12.1 mm (±3.9 mm) and 11.45% (±9.37%)/1.3 mm (±1.3 mm), respectively. For orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle, the corresponding results were 59.16% (±26.66%)/4.9 mm (±3.0 mm), 75.98% (±27.21%)/9.9 mm (±4.0 mm), and 5.22% (±2.12%)/0.5 mm (±0.4 mm). For single-view scan angles of 3°, 30°, and 60°, the results for MM-FD technique were 32.77% (±17.87%)/3.2 mm (±2.2 mm), 24.57% (±18.18%)/2.9 mm (±2.0 mm), and 10.48% (±9.50%)/1.1 mm (±1.3 mm), respectively. For projection angular-sampling-intervals of 0.6°, 1.2°, and 2.5° with the orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle, the MM-FD technique generated similar VPD (maximum deviation 2.91%) and COMS (maximum deviation 0.6 mm), while sparser sampling yielded larger VPD/COMS. With equal number of projections, the estimation results using scattered 360° scan angle were slightly better than those using orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle. The estimation accuracy of MM-FD technique declined as noise level increased.Conclusions: The MM-FD technique substantially improves the estimation accuracy for onboard 4D-CBCT using prior planning 4D-CT and limited-angle projections, compared to the MM-only and FD-only techniques. It can potentially be used for the inter/intrafractional 4D-localization verification.

  14. INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES OF DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartemink, Alexander

    INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES operating in three phases of the cycle as shown in Figure 2. This synthetic cell cycle consists of cell

  15. Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior bertrand.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers

  16. Spanish Major Requirements Option A: Language and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior to Fall 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Spanish Major Requirements Option A: Language and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior (12 credits) 311: Introduction to Advanced Language Practice 320: Spanish Phonetics _____ 3 additional course (322: Early Hispanic, 324: Modern Spanish, 326: Spanish American) Spanish 322 is recommended

  17. Clinical Symptoms and Angiographic Findings of Patients Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography without Prior Stress Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdallah, Mouin Sami

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Many patients undergo elective coronary angiography without prior stress testing, precluding an assessment of their appropriateness for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). If, however, these patients have more severe angina...

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from ENSDF

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O

  1. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3

  2. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3Be

  3. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2

  4. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2B

  5. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBe

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBeNe

  7. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li

  8. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB from

  9. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromC

  10. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9C

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H6

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58 C

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58

  20. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, A. S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S. Y.

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury stabilization and solidification is a significant challenge for conventional stabilization technologies. This is because of the stringent regulatory limits on leaching of its stabilized products. In a conventional cement stabilization process, Hg is converted at high pH to its hydroxide, which is not a very insoluble compound; hence the preferred route for Hg sulfidation to convert it into insoluble cinnabar (HgS). Unfortunately, efficient formation of this compound is pH-dependent. At a high pH, one obtains a more soluble Hg sulfate, in a very low pH range, insufficient immobilization occurs because of the escape of hydrogen sulfide, while efficient formation of HgS occurs only in a moderately acidic region. Thus, the pH range of 4 to 8 is where stabilization with Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPC) is carried out. This paper discusses the authors experience on bench-scale stabilization of various US Department of Energy (DOE) waste streams containing Hg in the CBPC process. This process was developed to treat DOE's mixed waste streams. It is a room-temperature-setting process based on an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and monopotassium phosphate solution that forms a dense ceramic within hours. For Hg stabilization, addition of a small amount (< 1 wt.%) of Na{sub 2}S or K{sub 2}S is sufficient in the binder composition. Here the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results on CBPC waste forms of surrogate waste streams representing secondary Hg containing wastes such as combustion residues and Delphi DETOX{trademark} residues are presented. The results show that although the current limit on leaching of Hg is 0.2 mg/L, the results from the CBPC waste forms are at least one order lower than this stringent limit. Encouraged by these results on surrogate wastes, they treated actual low-level Hg-containing mixed waste from their facility at Idaho. TCLP results on this waste are presented here. The efficient stabilization in all these cases is attributed to chemical immobilization as both a sulfide (cinnabar) and a phosphate, followed by its physical encapsulation in a dense matrix of the ceramic.

  1. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  2. Algorithms for biomagnetic source imaging with prior anatomical and physiological information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughett, P W [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation derives a new method for estimating current source amplitudes in the brain and heart from external magnetic field measurements and prior knowledge about the probable source positions and amplitudes. The minimum mean square error estimator for the linear inverse problem with statistical prior information was derived and is called the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM). OCLIM includes as special cases the Shim-Cho weighted pseudoinverse and Wiener estimators but allows more general priors and thus reduces the reconstruction error. Efficient algorithms were developed to compute the OCLIM estimate for instantaneous or time series data. The method was tested in a simulated neuromagnetic imaging problem with five simultaneously active sources on a grid of 387 possible source locations; all five sources were resolved, even though the true sources were not exactly at the modeled source positions and the true source statistics differed from the assumed statistics.

  3. Order relations and prior distributions in the estimation of multivariate normal parameters with partial data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Nasir, Abdul Majid Hamza

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBU 'IONS IN 1:-IE ESTXYJiTION OF MULTIVARIATE NOPSLAL PARAI'E&iTiS NI~N PARTIAL DATA A Thesis by ABDUL MAJID HA?ZA AL-NASZR Submitt d o the Grad. nate College oi' Texas UM Univ rsity in partial fu' fillment . f... as to style and content by: Chairman oi Committee Head oF Department ?'? Aug st 1968 ABS ~~CT Order Relations and Prior Distributions in the Bstimation of Multivariate Normal Parameters with Part'al Data. (August 1)68) Abdul Madrid Hamza Al-N!asir B...

  4. Order relations and prior distributions in the estimation of multivariate normal parameters with partial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Nasir, Abdul Majid Hamza

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBU 'IONS IN 1:-IE ESTXYJiTION OF MULTIVARIATE NOPSLAL PARAI'E&iTiS NI~N PARTIAL DATA A Thesis by ABDUL MAJID HA?ZA AL-NASZR Submitt d o the Grad. nate College oi' Texas UM Univ rsity in partial fu' fillment . f... the requirement for the aegree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Statistics ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBUTIONS IJJ THE ESTI1UTION OF MULTIVARIATE NORJJAL PARtuETERS NlTH PARTIAL DATA A Thesis ( by ABDUL IJAJID HANZA AL-NASIR Approved...

  5. Conditional maximum-entropy method for selecting prior distributions in Bayesian statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditional maximum-entropy method (abbreviated here as C-MaxEnt) is formulated for selecting prior probability distributions in Bayesian statistics for parameter estimation. This method is inspired by a statistical-mechanical approach to systems governed by dynamics with largely-separated time scales and is based on three key concepts: conjugate pairs of variables, dimensionless integration measures with coarse-graining factors and partial maximization of the joint entropy. The method enables one to calculate a prior purely from a likelihood in a simple way. It is shown in particular how it not only yields Jeffreys's rules but also reveals new structures hidden behind them.

  6. Effects of administering a selected ergogenic aid prior to strenuous activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Jacqueline

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF ADMINISTERING A SELECTED ERGOGENIC AID PRIOR TO STRENUOUS ACTIVITY A Thesis by JACQUELINE LAMBERT Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Un1versity in partial fulf1llment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... of Department Member August 1973 111 ABSTRACT Effects of Adm1nistering a Selected Ergogenic A 1d Prior to Strenuous Act1v1ty. (August 1973) Jacqueline Lambert, B. S. E. , Abilene Chr1stian College D1rected by: Dr. Homer Toison Purpose The purpose...

  7. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  8. WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS: The UK Threat Level is decided by the Government's Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC). It is the system to assess the threat to the UK from Threat Levels: Low - an attack is unlikely Moderate - an attack is possible, but not likely Substantial

  9. Fertility in China in 2000: a county level analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrell, Heather Kathleen Mary

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    one-child policy were efforts to expedite the demographic transition in the country. The ultimate goal was the stabilization and eventual decline of the population, via fertility at below-replacement levels for an extended period of time. According...

  10. Phase stabilities at a glance: Stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachhuber, F. [University of Regensburg, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany) [University of Regensburg, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Rothballer, J.; Weihrich, R., E-mail: richard.weihrich@chemie.uni-r.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Söhnel, T. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand) [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn{sub 2} (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb{sub 2}, and the NiAs{sub 2} types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB{sub 2} structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases.

  11. Octonions and vacuum stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail V. Gorbatenko

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper addresses one of nontrivial octonion related facts. According to paper gr-qc/0409095, the most stable space-time state is the one described by real Dirac matrices in 11-dimensional space of signature 1(-)&10(+). The internal subspace is 7-dimensional, and its stability is due to a high ``zero'' energy packing density when using an oblique-angled basis from fundamental vectors of lattice E_8 for the spinor degrees of freedom. The nontrivial fact consists in the following: Dirac symbols with octonion matrix elements can be used to describe states of the space of internal degrees of freedom if and only if the space corresponds either to stable vacuum states or states close to the just mentioned ones. The coincidence of the internal space dimension and signature for absolutely different and independent approaches to the consideration of this issue seems to predetermine the internal space vacuum properties and the apparatus, which is able to constitute the basis of the unified interaction theory.

  12. Lessons Learned from Prior Attempts at National Security Reform The Project on National Security Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    Lessons Learned from Prior Attempts at National Security Reform The Project on National Security Reform Overarching Issues Working Group Drew Cramer & Grant Mullins Thomas Jefferson Program in Public battles that ensue when attempting to change the national security apparatus can hinder effective reform

  13. Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino, Mikko

    Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12 Theme session H the male phase and reproduce as females already in their first reproductive season) responds is parameterized for Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (common names: brown #12;marbled grouper or flowery cod

  14. The Articulated Scene Model: Model-less Priors for Robot Object Learning?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    The Articulated Scene Model: Model-less Priors for Robot Object Learning? Agnes Swadzba, Niklas to design an articu- lated scene modeling approach [1] which enables a robot to extract articulated scene / articulated scene parts Ot. The moving persons are tracked using a particle filter with a weak cylinder model

  15. The Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    The Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption Sara A. Pozzi* Oak Ridge Accepted July 25, 2005 Abstract ­ We propose a simple analytical model to describe the statistics, the energy transfer and the collision num- ber are related quantities, and therefore, the statistics of

  16. SemiSupervised Learning Using Prior Probabilities and EM Rebecca Bruce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Andrew

    of the parameters of a probabil­ ity model is formulated from a small amount of tagged data via a stochastic from the tagged data via a stochastic inference process. Intuitively, the inference process starts in a larger tagged data sam­ ple from the same population. The pseudo­counts form­ ing the prior distribution

  17. Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior to your event date Today: ____________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Assistance Required Number of Blue and Gold members needed: _______ Arrival Time: __: __ Departing Time: __: __ Blue and Gold Society attire: Formal (suit) Casual (rugby shirt) Other Any Additional Information

  18. Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers of brain pathologies

  19. Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior to and Following Elevated Flows in the Central Platte River, Spring 2008 Flows in the Central Platte River, Nebraska, Spring 2008 By Paul J. Kinzel Prepared in cooperation

  20. SOURCE SEPARATION USING SPARSE DISCRETE PRIOR MODELS Radu Balan, Justinian Rosca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balan, Radu V.

    SOURCE SEPARATION USING SPARSE DISCRETE PRIOR MODELS Radu Balan, Justinian Rosca Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East Princeton, NJ 08540 e-mail: radu.balan,justinian.rosca¡ @siemens, in their origi- nal domain, or transformed domain (e.g. frequency domain). The mixing model is either

  1. Penalized and weighted K-means for clustering with noise and prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, George C. "Chien-Cheng"

    Penalized and weighted K-means for clustering with noise and prior information incorporation George;Outline Intro of cluster analysis Model-based clustering Heuristic methods Hierarchical clustering K-means & K-memoids ...... A motivating example (yeast cell cycle microarray data) Penalized weighted K-means

  2. MARKOV RANDOM FIELD IMAGE PRIOR MODELS FOR MAP RECONSTRUCTION OF MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAM IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    MARKOV RANDOM FIELD IMAGE PRIOR MODELS FOR MAP RECONSTRUCTION OF MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAM IMAGES Brian as a classical inverse imaging prob- lem, which for MEG is notoriously ill posed and requires strong sam- ple grid. The second model permits simulating an MRF over the non-uniform grid required

  3. Construction of an Informative Hierarchical Prior Distribution: Application to Electricity Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the wavelet transform to forecast the load curve seen as a functional-valued autoregressive Hilbertian processConstruction of an Informative Hierarchical Prior Distribution: Application to Electricity Load the methodology to a working model for the electricity load forecasting on both simulated and real datasets, where

  4. Evaluation of In-House Windrow Composting as a Poultry Litter Treatment Prior to Land Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Scott

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    . An experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of in-house windrow composting (IWC) of poultry litter prior to land application in terms of bacteria, odors and nutrients compared to untreated (fresh) litter. In the second part of the research...

  5. California Institute of Technology Request for Employee Clearance Prior to Termination Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraon, Andrei

    California Institute of Technology Date: Request for Employee Clearance Prior to Termination Date/Supervisor Name: Phone Number: Termination Date: International Scholar Services Library Lock and Key Shop P by employee. The following departments will be notified by Human Resources after the termination date: Campus

  6. Interactive Graph Cut Based Segmentation With Shape Priors Daniel Freedman and Tao Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactive Graph Cut Based Segmentation With Shape Priors Daniel Freedman and Tao Zhang Computer segmentation can be very chal- lenging, a small amount of user input can often resolve ambiguous decisions can be very chal- lenging, a small amount of user input can often resolve am- biguous decisions

  7. Fuzzy Classification of Genome Sequences Prior to Assembly Based on Similarity Measures*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolescu, Monica

    Fuzzy Classification of Genome Sequences Prior to Assembly Based on Similarity Measures* Sara number: 0447416). Abstract - Nucleotide sequencing of genomic data is an important step towards building into the overall genome. However, the existence of insertions, deletions and substitutions can complicate

  8. Master of Science in Bioinformatics Plan of Study (prior to Fall 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    in Bioinformatics (3 cr.) INFO B619 Structural Bioinformatics (3 cr.) INFO B646 Computational System Biology (3 cr.) CSCI 590 Algorithms in Bioinformatics (3 cr.) INFO B590 Computational Methods for Analyzing HighMaster of Science in Bioinformatics Plan of Study (prior to Fall 2013) Degree requirements listed

  9. Master of Science in Bioinformatics Plan of Study (prior to Fall 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    .) INFO-B 619 Structural Bioinformatics (3 cr.) INFO-B 646 Computational System Biology (3 cr.) INFO to Informatics (3 cr.) INFO-B 519 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr.) INFO-B 556 Biological DatabaseMaster of Science in Bioinformatics Plan of Study (prior to Fall 2012) Note: these requirements

  10. Diffusion imaging of cerebral white matter in persons who stutter: evidence for network-level anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Shanqing

    Deficits in brain white matter have been a main focus of recent neuroimaging studies on stuttering. However, no prior study has examined brain connectivity on the global level of the cerebral cortex in persons who stutter ...

  11. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  12. Geometry of Weak Stability Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Belbruno; Marian Gidea; Francesco Topputo

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of a weak stability boundary has been successfully used to design low energy trajectories from the Earth to the Moon. The structure of this boundary has been investigated in a number of studies, where partial results have been obtained. We propose a generalization of the weak stability boundary. We prove analytically that, in the context of the planar circular restricted three-body problem, under certain conditions on the mass ratio of the primaries and on the energy, the weak stability boundary about the heavier primary coincides with a branch of the global stable manifold of the Lyapunov orbit about one of the Lagrange points.

  13. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material.

  14. STABILITY OF PRODUCTION-INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEMS CONSIDERING INVENTORY SHORTAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkateswaran, Jayendran

    STABILITY OF PRODUCTION-INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEMS CONSIDERING INVENTORY SHORTAGES Jayendran@iitb.ac.in) Extended Abstract The modelling and analysis of the production-inventory control systems of manufacturing in inventory levels, production releases, stock-outs; and ultimately affecting the profit of the firm

  15. WORKING PAPER N 2009 -38 Existence and stability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    generally that life expectancy is increasing with output per capita, and, thus, with individ- ual consumption, whatever the consumption level is. However, empirical evidence on the e¤ect of overconsumption life expectancy is a non-monotonic function of consumption. The existence, uniqueness and stability

  16. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion ...

  17. Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep Kiran

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM STABILIZER CODES AND BEYOND A Dissertation by PRADEEP KIRAN SARVEPALLI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM STABILIZER CODES AND BEYOND A Dissertation by PRADEEP KIRAN SARVEPALLI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  18. JOINT UNITED STATES/IAEA PROPOSED APPROACH FOR SAFEGUARDS DURING PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND SHIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. KWEI; B. SMITH; ET AL

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For safety reasons, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to stabilize and package plutonium oxide currently subject to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) beginning in the year 2001. The Hanford Site will also stabilize and package plutonium materials under IAEA safeguards. The U.S. and the IAEA began consultations in late 1996 to develop an approach to the application of safeguards during stabilization and packaging. With the plans to ship RFETS plutonium to Savannah River for interim storage prior to final disposition, this work has been extended to include safeguards during shipment. This paper will discuss the elements of a joint U.S./IAEA proposal for this task.

  19. Inoculation of beef with lactic-acid bacteria prior to vacuum packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Lester Cedric

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    d of Department ) (Member) August 1978 ABSTRACT Inoculation of Beef with Lactic-Acid Bacteria Prior to Vacuum Packaging. (August 1978) Lester Cedric Hall, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. G. C. Smith and Dr Z... packaging was rapidly becoming an established business and would revolu- tionize the future of the wholesale beef market. Vacuum packaging is advantageous in that it (a) reduces weight losses from evaporation and trimming, (b) preserves meat color, (c...

  20. Stability comparison of two absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillot, Pierre; Landragin, Arnaud; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Merlet, Sébastien

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the direct comparison between the stabilities of two mobile absolute gravimeters of different technology: the LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter and FG5X\\#216 of the Universit\\'e du Luxembourg. These instruments rely on two different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. The comparison took place in the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in Luxembourg, at the beginning of the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2013. We analyse a 2h10 duration common measurement, and find that the CAG shows better immunity with respect to changes in the level of vibration noise, as well as a slightly better short term stability.

  1. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  2. MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Pavlish

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were presented in two reports: Mercury Study Report to Congress and Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units-Final Report to Congress. The first congressional report addressed both human health and the environmental effects of anthropogenic mercury emissions, while the second report addressed the risk to public health posed by emissions of HAPs from steam electricity-generating units. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is also required by the CAAAs to investigate mercury and determine a safe threshold level of exposure. Recently the National Academy of Sciences has also been commissioned by Congress to complete a report, based the available scientific evidence, regarding safe threshold levels of mercury exposure. Although the EPA reports did not state that mercury controls on coal-fired electric power stations should be required given the current state of the art, they did indicate that EPA views mercury as a potential threat to human health. It is likely that major sources of mercury emissions, including fossil-fired combustion systems, will be controlled at some point. In fact, municipal waste combustion units are already regulated. In anticipation of additional control measures, much research has been done (and continues) regarding the development of control technologies for mercury emitted from stationary sources to the atmosphere. Most approaches taken to date involve sorbent injection technologies or improve upon removal of mercury using existing technologies such as flue gas desulfurization scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators. Depending on the fly ash chemistry and the form of mercury present in the flue gas, some of these existing technologies can be effective at capturing vapor-phase mercury from the flue gas stream. Although much research has been done on enhancing the removal of mercury from flue gas streams, little research has focused on what happens to the mercury when it is captured and converted and/or transferred to a solid or aqueous solution. The stability (or mobility) of mercury in this final process is critical and leads to the questions, What impact will the increased concentration of mercury have on utilization, disposal, and reuse? and Is the mercury removed from the flue gas really removed from the environment or rereleased at a later point? To help answer these questions, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement did a series of experiments using thermal desorption and leaching techniques. This report presents the results from these tests.

  3. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klei, Herbert E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Moriarty, Nigel W., E-mail: nwmoriarty@lbl.gov; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Baldwin, Eric T. [Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Natural Discovery LLC, Princeton, NJ 08542-0096 (United States); Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana [Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR leverages prior knowledge from earlier structures to facilitate ligand placement in the current structure.

  4. UNDERSTANDING FORCES THAT CONTRIBUTE TO PROTEIN STABILITY: APPLICATION FOR INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hailong

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for increasing protein stability. Finally, using a combination of eight previously identified stabilizing mutations; we successfully designed two RNase Sa variants (7S, 8S) that have both much higher Tms and conformational stabilities than wild-type protein over...

  5. An investigation of the production of rosebushes by the budding of understocks prior to rooting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Jack Morgan

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with 0. 1% indole butyric acid (IBA) by dipping the basal end of the cutting. Treatment Number 4-. Unrooted understock budded with buds soaked in 25 ppm kinetin solution at room temperature for approximately one hour prior to 10 bud. ding. Data..., 1966; the second time from April 2) to I'iay 19, 1966. The plant material was obtained from a commercial source near Tyler, Texas. Unrooted cuttings of Rosa multiflora were used as the understock; budwood from the hybrid tea rose 'Red Radiance...

  6. Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of quantum error correction in paving the way to build a practical quantum computer is no longer in doubt. This dissertation makes a threefold contribution to the mathematical theory of quantum error-correcting codes. Firstly, it extends the framework of an important class of quantum codes -- nonbinary stabilizer codes. It clarifies the connections of stabilizer codes to classical codes over quadratic extension fields, provides many new constructions of quantum codes, and develops further the theory of optimal quantum codes and punctured quantum codes. Secondly, it contributes to the theory of operator quantum error correcting codes also called as subsystem codes. These codes are expected to have efficient error recovery schemes than stabilizer codes. This dissertation develops a framework for study and analysis of subsystem codes using character theoretic methods. In particular, this work establishes a close link between subsystem codes and classical codes showing that the subsystem codes can be constructed from arbitrary classical codes. Thirdly, it seeks to exploit the knowledge of noise to design efficient quantum codes and considers more realistic channels than the commonly studied depolarizing channel. It gives systematic constructions of asymmetric quantum stabilizer codes that exploit the asymmetry of errors in certain quantum channels.

  7. Stabilization of Layered Metal Oxides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stabilizing cations and anions (NH 4 ) 3 AlF 6 ; NH 4 PF 6 ; NH 4 BF 4 in water, methanol, etc molarity of solutions 2.5 x 10 -3 M pH 6.0 - 6.5 Composition used:...

  8. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  9. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  10. The Beta decay of antimony 134 to levels in tellurium 134

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probst, Lloyd Joseph

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which lie far from the line of 1/4 B stability. A very fruitful way to populate states in a doubly-magic region near stability is to use particle transfer or heavy-ion induced compound reactions. Unfortunately a trivial prerequisite... technique of irradiation of a gold foil. The 2 polyethylene tubes are offset approximately 6 inches immediately inside the reactor wall so that core gamma rays can be absorbed by concrete shielding prior to penetrating to the region near the glove box...

  11. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  12. Stability of Gas-Fluidized Beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandich, Kevin Matthew

    R. The mechanics of fluidised beds: Part I: The stability ofR. The mechanics of fluidised beds: Part I: The stability ofof an Inclined Fluidised Bed. Kagaku Kogaku Ronbunshu, 15 (

  13. Factors influencing antioxidant phytochemical stability of teas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Youngmok

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    polyphenolic profile of teas. To present fundamental information of phytochemical stability during tea storage, studies to determine the impacts of tea processing, different packaging materials, and various storage conditions on the phytochemical stability were...

  14. Copyright! 2010!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be! reproduced!in!any!form!without!prior!authorization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    !ENERGY!&!GREEN!DESIGN!" Smart!Grid!Cities Material!from!the!Electric!prior!authorization. Smart!Grid:!Integrate!Dispersed!Energy!Sources!into!a! Modern!Grid electrical energy infrastructure ­ Transform!the!Network!into!a!Smart!Grid ­ Develop

  15. TILT STABILITY, UNIFORM QUADRATIC GROWTH, AND STRONG ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tilt stability, variational analysis, subdifferentials, quadratic growth, strong metric .... Some convex analysis. ..... Example 3.5 (Failure of subdifferential continuity).

  16. Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

  17. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  18. Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia Trade Agreement@bu.edu #12;Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia Trade Agreement SerieBrief # 66 | Abril 2011 Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia

  19. STABILITY CONDITIONS IN PIECEWISE SMOOTH DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Samuel

    -fold singularities. More specifically, we are interested in discussing stability problems of such systems around of those of Asymptotic and Lya- punov stability respectively. For technical reasons they will be presented in Subsection 2.6. Our main results exhibit conditions for the A- and L- stability of a two-fold singularity

  20. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  1. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  2. Structural stability of the Weeks Island oil repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preece, D.S.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-D finite element analysis was performed to evaluate the stability of the SPR upper and lower oil storage levels at Weeks Island. The mechanical analysis predicted stresses and strains from which pillar stability was inferred using a fracture criterion developed from previous testing of Weeks Island salt. This analysis simulated the sequential mining of the two levels and subsequent oil fill of the mine. The predicted subsidence rates compare well to those measured over the past few years. Predicted failure mechanisms agree with observations made at the time the mine was being modified for oil storage. The modeling technique employed here treats an infinite array of pillars and is a reasonable representation of the behavior at the center of the mine. This analysis predicts that the lower level pillars, at the center of the mine, have fractured and their stability at this time is questionable. Localized pillar fracturing is predicted and implies that the mine is entering a phase of continual time dependent deterioration. Continued and expanded monitoring of the facility and development of methods to assess and predict its behavior are more important now than ever.

  3. Stability-Constrained Optimal Power Flow and Its Application to Pricing Power System Stabilizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    1 Stability-Constrained Optimal Power Flow and Its Application to Pricing Power System Stabilizers locational marginal prices. A power system stabilizer (PSS) is then introduced in the test system Terms-- Angle stability, power system oscillations, elec- tricity markets, optimal power flow

  4. Nonbinary Codeword Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie Chen; Bei Zeng; Isaac L. Chuang

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The codeword stabilized (CWS) quantum codes formalism presents a unifying approach to both additive and nonadditive quantum error-correcting codes (arXiv:0708.1021 [quant-ph]), but only for binary states. Here we generalize the CWS framework to the nonbinary case (of both prime and nonprime dimension) and map the search for nonbinary quantum codes to a corresponding search problem for classical nonbinary codes with specific error patterns. We show that while the additivity properties of nonbinary CWS codes are similar to the binary case, the structural properties of the nonbinary codes differ substantially from the binary case, even for prime dimensions. In particular, we identify specific structure patterns of stabilizer groups, based on which efficient constructions might be possible for codes that encode more dimensions than any stabilizer codes of the same length and distance; similar methods cannot be applied in the binary case. Understanding of these structural properties can help prune the search space and facilitate the identification of good nonbinary CWS codes.

  5. Bounds on Effective Hamiltonians for Stabilizer Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen S. Bullock; Dianne P. O'Leary

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript introduces various notions of k-locality of stabilizer codes inherited from the associated stabilizer groups. A choice of generators for the group leads to a Hamiltonian with the code in its groundspace, while a Hamiltonian holding the code in its groundspace might be called effective if its locality is less than that of a natural choice of generators (or any choice). This paper establishes some conditions under which effective Hamiltonians for stabilizer codes do not exist. Our results simplify in the cases of Calderbank-Shor-Steane stabilizer codes and topologically-ordered stabilizer codes arising from surface cellulations.

  6. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  7. Lyapunov functions and relative stability in reaction-diffusion systems with multiple stationary states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, N.F.; Ross, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In prior work on a thermodynamic and stochastic theory of chemical systems far from equilibrium, the excess work (a Lyapunov function) was shown to predict relative stability of stationary states in reaction-diffusion systems with multiple stationary states. This theory predicts equistability when the excess work from one stationary state to the stable inhomogeneous concentration profile separating the two stable stationary states equals the excess work from the other stable stationary state to that profile. Here we prove that any Lyapunov function of the deterministic reaction-diffusion equations of a given form can be used to predict equistability. Further, we show that the spatial derivative of any Lyapunov function for these equations, which is simpler to calculate, can also be used to predict relative stability. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Code constructions and code families for nonbinary quantum stabilizer code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketkar, Avanti Ulhas

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilizer codes form a special class of quantum error correcting codes. Nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes are studied in this thesis. A lot of work on binary quantum stabilizer codes has been done. Nonbinary stabilizer codes have received much...

  9. A probabilistic investigation of slope stability in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eblen, James Storey

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . LISA (Level I Stability Analysis), a U. S. Forest Service probabilistic, slope stability model, and a deterministic model, dLISA, will be used in this study. The applicability of the two models will be established as follows: 1) Establish parametric... processes. Keaton (1988) developed a probabilistic model to evaluate hazards that are associated with alluvial fan sedimentation in Davis County, Utah. Keaton concluded that most of the canyons which yielded large volumes of sediment in 1983 and 1984 had...

  10. Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex.

  11. Tritium systems test assembly stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W. G. (William G.); Michelotti, R. A. (Roy A.); Anast, K. R. (Kurt R.); Tesch, Charles

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium technology Research and Development (R&D) primarily for future fusion power reactors. The facility was conceived in mid 1970's, operations commenced in early 1980's, stabilization and deactivation began in 2000 and were completed in 2003. The facility will remain in a Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) mode until the Department of Energy (DOE) funds demolition of the facility, tentatively in 2009. A safe and stable end state was achieved by the TSTA Facility Stabilization Project (TFSP) in anticipation of long term S&M. At the start of the stabilization project, with an inventory of approximately 140 grams of tritium, the facility was designated a Hazard Category (HC) 2 Non-Reactor Nuclear facility as defined by US Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-1027-92 (1997). The TSTA facility comprises a laboratory area, supporting rooms, offices and associated laboratory space that included more than 20 major tritium handling systems. The project's focus was to reduce the tritium inventory by removing bulk tritium, tritiated water wastes, and tritium-contaminated high-inventory components. Any equipment that remained in the facility was stabilized in place. All of the gloveboxes and piping were rendered inoperative and vented to atmosphere. All equipment, and inventoried tritium contamination, remaining in the facility was left in a safe-and-stable state. The project used the End Points process as defined by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (web page http://www.em.doe.- gov/deact/epman.htmtlo) document and define the end state required for the stabilization of TSTA Facility. The End Points process added structure that was beneficial through virtually all phases of the project. At completion of the facility stabilization project the residual tritium inventory was approximately 3,000 curies, considerably less than the 1.6-gram threshold for a HC 3 facility. TSTA is now designated as a Radiological Facility. Innovative approaches were employed for characterization and removal of legacy wastes and high inventory components. Major accomplishments included: (1) Reduction of tritium inventory, elimination of chemical hazards, and identification and posting of remaining hazards. (2) Removal of legacy wastes. (3) Transferred equipment for reuse in other DOE projects, including some at other DOE facilities. (4) Transferred facility in a safe and stable condition to the S&M organization. The project successfully completed all project goals and the TSTA facility was transferred into S&M on August 1,2003. This project demonstrates the benefit of radiological inventory reduction and the removal of legacy wastes to achieve a safe and stable end state that protects workers and the environment pending eventual demolition of the facility.

  12. The Dependence of the $A_V$ Prior for SN\\,Ia on Host Mass and Disk Inclination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holwerda, B W; Kenworthy, M A; Mack, K J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae type Ia (SNIa) are used as "standard candles" for cosmological distance scales. To fit their light curve shape -- absolute luminosity relation, one needs to assume an intrinsic color and a likelihood of host galaxy extinction or a convolution of these, a color distribution prior. The host galaxy extinction prior is typically assumed to be an exponential drop-off for the current supernova programs ($P(A_V) \\propto e^{-A_V/\\tau_0}$). We explore the validity of this prior using the distribution of extinction values inferred when two galaxies accidentally overlap (an occulting galaxy pair). We correct the supernova luminosity distances from the SDSS-III Supernova projects (SDSS-SN) by matching the host galaxies to one of three templates from occulting galaxy pairs based on the host galaxy mass and the $A_V$-bias - prior-scale ($\\tau_0$) relation from Jha et al. (2007). We find that introducing an $A_V$ prior that depends on host mass results in lowered luminosity distances for the SDSS-SN on average bu...

  13. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laredo, Jean-Denis, E-mail: jean-denis.laredo@lrb.aphp.fr; Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie (France)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  14. Resection of parathyroid tumor in the aorticopulmonary window without prior neck exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHenry, C.; Walsh, M.; Jarosz, H.; Henkin, R.; Tope, J.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of 522 patients with hyperparathyroidism operated on from 1973 to 1987 at our institution, there were seven (1.3%), each with an ectopic, hyperfunctioning mediastinal parathyroid adenoma, who required median sternotomy. In three of these seven patients, the tumor was located in the aorticopulmonary window. A 61-year-old woman with primary hyperparathyroidism had a preoperative thallium-technetium subtraction scan that showed thallium uptake at the base of the heart without any uptake in the neck. After further workup and without prior neck exploration, a parathyroid adenoma was found in the aorticopulmonary window through a median sternotomy. Six months later, serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone values remain normal. Two other cases of parathyroid adenoma in the aorticopulmonary window are presented. Of these two patients, the thallium scan was a key element in the immediate mediastinal exploration of one, who was transferred from another hospital comatose and intubated, in acute hypercalcemic crisis. Since mediastinal parathyroid tumors that necessitate median sternotomy occur in less than 2% of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, we do not advocate routine preoperative localization studies before an initial cervical operation; localization, however, may be justified in selected cases, such as in critically ill patients or in instances of acute hyperparathyroidism, when the first operation needs to be curative.

  15. Up to four planets around the M dwarf GJ 163. Sensitivity of Bayesian planet detection criteria to prior choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuomi, Mikko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exoplanet Doppler surveys are currently the most efficient means to detect low-mass companions to nearby stars. Among these stars, the light M dwarfs provide the highest sensitivity to detect low-mass exoplanet candidates. Evidence is accumulating that a substantial fraction of these low-mass planets are found in high-multiplicity planetary systems. GJ 163 is a nearby inactive M dwarf with abundant public observations obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We obtain and analyse radial velocities from the HARPS public spectra of GJ 163 and investigate the presence of a planetary companions orbiting it. The number of planet candidates detected might depend on some prior assumptions. Since the impact of prior choice has not been investigated throughly previously, we study the effects of different prior densities on the detectability of planet candidates around GJ 163. We use Bayesian tools, i.e. posterior samplings and model comparisons, when analysing the GJ 163 velocities. We consider models accounting for the...

  16. Codeword stabilized quantum codes on subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeonghwan Shin; Jun Heo; Todd A. Brun

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Codeword stabilized quantum codes provide a unified approach to constructing quantum error-correcting codes, including both additive and non-additive quantum codes. Standard codeword stabilized quantum codes encode quantum information into subspaces. The more general notion of encoding quantum information into a subsystem is known as an operator (or subsystem) quantum error correcting code. Most operator codes studied to date are based in the usual stabilizer formalism. We introduce operator quantum codes based on the codeword stabilized quantum code framework. Based on the necessary and sufficient conditions for operator quantum error correction, we derive a error correction condition for operator codeword stabilized quantum codes. Based on this condition, the word operators of a operator codeword stabilized quantum code are constructed from a set of classical binary errors induced by generators of the gauge group. We use this scheme to construct examples of both additive and non-additive codes that encode quantum information into a subsystem.

  17. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  18. Singular Limits in Polymer Stabilized Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate equilibrium configurations for a polymer stabilized liquid crys- tal material ... eling the cross section of the liquid crystal-polymer fiber composite.

  19. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  20. HOLOMORPHIC MOTIONS AND STRUCTURAL STABILITY FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-70-80T23:59:59.000Z

    namics in one variable, we prove the structural stability of hyperbolic polynomial automor- phisms in ..... This extension is characterized by a harmonic Beltrami.

  1. Optimization Online - Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Zhang

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic Quasi-Variational Inequality Problems and Applications. Jie Zhang(zhangjie04212001 ***at*** ...

  2. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  3. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  4. Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

  5. Adaptive Stabilization of Nonlinear Stochastic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florchinger, P. [URA CNRS No. 399, Departement de Mathematiques, UFR MIM, Universite de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, F 57045 Metz Cedex (France)

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to study the problem of asymptotic stabilization in probability of nonlinear stochastic differential systems with unknown parameters. With this aim, we introduce the concept of an adaptive control Lyapunov function for stochastic systems and we use the stochastic version of Artstein's theorem to design an adaptive stabilizer. In this framework the problem of adaptive stabilization of a nonlinear stochastic system is reduced to the problem of asymptotic stabilization in probability of a modified system. The design of an adaptive control Lyapunov function is illustrated by the example of adaptively quadratically stabilizable in probability stochastic differential systems.

  6. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  7. String GUT scenarios with stabilized moduli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Moster, Sebastian; Plauschinn, Erik [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking into account the recently proposed poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential and combining the racetrack with a Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi, respectively, large volume scenario in an intricate manner, we show that we gain exponential control over the parameters in an effective superpotential. This allows us to dynamically stabilize moduli such that a conventional minimal supersymmetric standard model scenario with the string scale lowered to the grand unified theory scale is realized. Depending on the cycles wrapped by the minimal supersymmetric standard model branes, two different scenarios for the hierarchy of soft masses arise. The first one is a supergravity mediated model with M{sub 3/2}{approx_equal}1 TeV while the second one features mixed anomaly supergravity mediation with M{sub 3/2}{approx_equal}10{sup 10} GeV and split supersymmetry. We also comment on dynamically lowering the scales such that the tree level cosmological constant is of the order {lambda}=(10{sup -3} eV){sup 4}.

  8. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  9. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockley, C.W. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  10. Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck or mounted prior to the machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    or mounted prior to the machining process taking place. Use the correct sized clamp or vise for the stockStandard Operating Procedure (SOP) ­ Lathe · All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck the spindle work has the cup center imbedded; tail, stock and tool rests are securely clamped

  11. http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who Entered the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tague, Patrick

    http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who is intended to summarize the rules of the INI graduate programs. These policies are subject to change and/or modifications and do not constitute a contract. I. INI DEGREE REQUIREMENTS II. COURSE ENROLLMENT III

  12. Light Field Denoising, Light Field Superresolution and Stereo Camera Based Refocussing using a GMM Light Field Patch Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Light Field Denoising, Light Field Superresolution and Stereo Camera Based Refocussing using a GMM Light Field Patch Prior Kaushik Mitra and Ashok Veeraraghavan ECE, Rice University Houston, Tx 77005 Kaushik.Mitra@rice.edu, vashok@rice.edu Abstract With the recent availability of commercial light field

  13. Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense. Take Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to meeting. Date of meeting_____________ Student: Submit Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to SAA Office. SAA Office submits Dissertation

  14. Stability of flows in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajagopal, C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we carry out a systematic linearized stability analysis of the state of uniform fluidization for a fluid infused with granular particles. We carry out an interesting optimization procedure which leads to bounds for certain parameters, within which the state of uniform fluidization is stable. We find that this stability depends critically on the structure of the pressure-like term. (VC)

  15. Stabilization of Mechanical Systems Using Controlled Lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    of an inverted pendulum on a cart and for the problem of stabilization of rotation of a rigid spacecraft about grant DMS--91--57556, AFOSR grant F49620­96­1­ 0100, a GuggenheimFellowship and the Inst. for Advanced. cally provide a Lyapunov function for choosing control gains and proving closed­loop stability. Further

  16. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  17. Entanglement-assisted codeword stabilized quantum codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Jeonghwan; Heo, Jun; Brun, Todd A. [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Communication Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Entangled qubits can increase the capacity of quantum error-correcting codes based on stabilizer codes. In addition, by using entanglement quantum stabilizer codes can be construct from classical linear codes that do not satisfy the dual-containing constraint. We show that it is possible to construct both additive and nonadditive quantum codes using the codeword stabilized quantum code framework. Nonadditive codes may offer improved performance over the more common stabilizer codes. Like other entanglement-assisted codes, the encoding procedure acts only on the qubits on Alice's side, and only these qubits are assumed to pass through the channel. However, errors in the codeword stabilized quantum code framework give rise to effective Z errors on Bob's side. We use this scheme to construct entanglement-assisted nonadditive quantum codes, in particular, ((5,16,2;1)) and ((7,4,5;4)) codes.

  18. Can the correlated stability conjecture be saved?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel; Alexander Patrushev

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlated stability conjecture (CSC) proposed by Gubser and Mitra [1,2] linked the thermodynamic and classical (in)stabilities of black branes. In [3] it was shown that the thermodynamic instabilities, specifically the negative specific heat, indeed result in the instabilities in the hydrodynamic spectrum of holographically dual plasma excitations. Counter-examples of CSC were presented in the context of black branes with scalar hair undergoing a second-order phase transition [4,5]. The latter translationary invariant horizons have scalar hair, raising the question whether the asymptotic parameters of the scalar hair can be appropriately interpreted as additional charges leading to a generalization of the thermodynamic stability criterion. In this paper we show that the generalization of the thermodynamic stability criterion of this type can not save CSC. We further present a simple statistical model which makes it clear that thermodynamic and dynamical (in)stabilities generically are not correlated.

  19. CASL-U-2015-0157-000 Stabilization Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o .7-000 Stabilization Methods for

  20. Approved Sorbents, Stabilizers, and Void Fillers - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal Facility AgreementSorbents, Stabilizers, and

  1. Logarithmic Wind Profile: A Stability Wind Shear Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakagami, Yoshiaki; Haas, Reinaldo; Passos, Julio C; Taves, Frederico F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stability wind shear term of logarithmic wind profile based on the terms of turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. The fraction influenced by thermal stratification is considered in the shear production term. This thermally affected shear is compared with buoyant term resulting in a stability wind shear term. It is also considered Reynolds stress as a sum of two components associated with wind shear from mechanical and thermal stratification process. The stability wind shear is responsible to Reynolds stress of thermal stratification term, and also to Reynolds stress of mechanical term at no neutral condition. The wind profile and its derivative are validated with data from Pedra do Sal experiment in a flat terrain and 300m from shoreline located in northeast coast of Brazil. It is close to the Equator line, so the meteorological condition are strongly influenced by trade winds and sea breeze. The site has one 100m tower with five instrumented levels, one 3D sonic anemometer, and a medium-range wind...

  2. Structural stability of cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrik Omma; James Binney

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations are used to investigate the structural stability of cooling flows that are episodically heated by jets from a central AGN. The radial profile of energy deposition is controlled by (a) the power of the jets, and (b) the pre-outburst density profile. A delay in the ignition of the jets causes more powerful jets to impact on a more centrally concentrated medium. The net effect is a sufficient increase in the central concentration of energy deposition to cause the post-outburst density profile to be less centrally concentrated than that of an identical cluster in which the outburst happened earlier and was weaker. These results suggest that the density profiles of cooling flows oscillate around an attracting profile, thus explaining why cooling flows are observed to have similar density profiles. The possibility is raised that powerful FR II systems are ones in which this feedback mechanism has broken down and a runaway growth of the source parameters has occurred.

  3. The multi-dimensional additionality of innovation policies. A multi-level application to Italy and Spain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    and Spain. Alberto Marzucchi & Sandro Montresor October 2012 Preliminary ­ Do not quote without prior, at the national and regional level (multi-level). An empirical application is carried out for Italy and Spain, while they show output additionality in Spain only, where they are also able to spur innovative

  4. Jacobi stability analysis of the Lorenz system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiberiu Harko; Chor Yin Ho; Chun Sing Leung; Stan Yip

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform the study of the stability of the Lorenz system by using the Jacobi stability analysis, or the Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory. The Lorenz model plays an important role for understanding hydrodynamic instabilities and the nature of the turbulence, also representing a non-trivial testing object for studying non-linear effects. The KCC theory represents a powerful mathematical method for the analysis of dynamical systems. In this approach we describe the evolution of the Lorenz system in geometric terms, by considering it as a geodesic in a Finsler space. By associating a non-linear connection and a Berwald type connection, five geometrical invariants are obtained, with the second invariant giving the Jacobi stability of the system. The Jacobi (in)stability is a natural generalization of the (in)stability of the geodesic flow on a differentiable manifold endowed with a metric (Riemannian or Finslerian) to the non-metric setting. In order to apply the KCC theory we reformulate the Lorenz system as a set of two second order non-linear differential equations. The geometric invariants associated to this system (nonlinear and Berwald connections), and the deviation curvature tensor, as well as its eigenvalues, are explicitly obtained. The Jacobi stability of the equilibrium points of the Lorenz system is studied, and the condition of the stability of the equilibrium points is obtained. Finally, we consider the time evolution of the components of the deviation vector near the equilibrium points.

  5. Effects of plasma shape and profiles on edge stability in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lao, L.L.; Chan, V.S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, L. [Academia Sinica, Beijing (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics] [and others

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of recent experimental and theoretical studies concerning the effects of plasma shape and current and pressure profiles on edge instabilities in DIII-D are presented. Magnetic oscillations with toroidal mode number n {approx} 2--9 and a fast growth time {gamma}{sup {minus}1} = 20--150 {micro}s are often observed prior to the first giant type 1 ELM in discharges with moderate squareness. High n ideal ballooning second stability access encourages edge instabilities by facilitating the buildup of the edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density which destabilize the intermediate to low n modes. Analysis suggests that discharges with large edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density are more unstable to n > 1 modes. Calculations and experimental results show that ELM amplitude and frequency can be varied by controlling access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge through variation of the squareness of the discharge shape. A new method is proposed to control edge instabilities by reducing access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge using high order local perturbation of the plasma shape in the outboard bad curvature region.

  6. Company Level Imports Archives

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level Imports Company Level

  7. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

  8. Carbon Dioxide-Induced Anesthesia Results in a Rapid Increase in Plasma Levels of Vasopressin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    Carbon Dioxide-Induced Anesthesia Results in a Rapid Increase in Plasma Levels of Vasopressin Brian of carbon dioxide, prior to decapitation is considered a more humane alternative for the euthanasia with carbon dioxide until recumbent (20­25 sec), immediately killed via decapitation, and trunk blood

  9. Tropical cyclone genesis efficiency: mid-level versus bottom vortex Xuyang Ge and Tim Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    . Email: timli@hawaii.edu #12;2 Abstract Cloud resolving Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model). Three low-level precursor types have been identified in the WNP. They are: TC energy dispersion induced genesis example. Typhoon Usagi formed in the South China Sea on 9 August 2001. Three days prior

  10. Improved freezing level retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sungwook

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

  11. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. OffshoreOilAnnual Coal<

  13. Media invited to Jefferson Lab prior to April 21 'Science is Cool' Open

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneoTechnologyCHPRC NewsMarch AprilHouse and

  14. Completed form must be received by ODS no later than 5 business days prior to the exam. TEST PROCTORING FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Completed form must be received by ODS no later than 5 business days prior to the exam. TEST-993-2474 Fax: 703-993-4306 Testing Hours: Monday - Friday 9 AM till 5 PM Tuesday 9 AM till 9 PM Email: ods@gmu.edu Website: http://ods.gmu.edu STUDENT INFORMATION (to be completed by student) Name Email Course I have read

  15. Copyright! 2010!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be! reproduced!in!any!form!without!prior!authorization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    !Electrical!Devices!(IEDs)!&!Programmable! Logic!Controllers!(PLCs)!are!being!extensively!used!in! substations!and!power!plants Today, digital!and!Critical!Infrastructure!Security:! Toward!Smarter!and!More!Secure! Power!and!Energy!Infrastructures Material!from!the!Electric!Power!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. Unconventional!Threats!to!Security Connectivity Complexity #12;© 2010!No!part

  16. Towards Understanding the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte Solution in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries. Towards Understanding the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte Solution in...

  17. attitude stability system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as Gravity Gradient stabilization, (more) Rawashdeh, Samir Ahmed 2010-01-01 3 Design of Attitude Stability System for Prolate Dual-spin Satellite in Its Inclined...

  18. Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized Graphene Sheets for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction . Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on...

  19. Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. I. Cross Validation of Polarization Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide...

  20. Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  1. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species. Abstract: Ability to predict the solubility and...

  2. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries....

  3. Advanced Oxidation & Stabilization of PAN-Based Carbon Precursor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Oxidation & Stabilization of PAN-Based Carbon Precursor Fibers Advanced Oxidation & Stabilization of PAN-Based Carbon Precursor...

  4. Composition, stability, and measurement of reduced uranium phases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition, stability, and measurement of reduced uranium phases for groundwater bioremediation at Old Rifle, CO. Composition, stability, and measurement of reduced uranium phases...

  5. Theoretical Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity ofUltrathin Platinum Nanowires. Theoretical Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity...

  6. Density Functional Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires. Density Functional Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity...

  7. Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia under ion irradiation. Abstract: Grain growth, oxygen stoichiometry and phase stability of nanostructurally-stabilized zirconia (NSZ) in...

  8. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular...

  9. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion...

  10. Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Presentation from the U.S. DOE...

  11. Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability, and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability,...

  12. This paper focuses on how to design a Store Buffer (STB) well suited to first-level multibanked data caches. Our goal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaragoza, Universidad de

    - level STB, and ii) not checking instruction age in first-level STB prior to forwarding data to loads. Following our guidelines and running SPECint-2K over an 8-way out-of- order processor, a two-level STB

  13. Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification Treatability Study of Mercury Contaminated Soil from the Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb P.; Milian, L.; Yim, S. P.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of past operations, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Plant) has extensive mercury-contamination in building structures, soils, storm sewer sediments, and stream sediments, which are a source of pollution to the local ecosystem. Because of mercury’s toxicity and potential impacts on human health and the environment, DOE continues to investigate and implement projects to support the remediation of the Y-12 site.URS and #9122;CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) under its prime contract with DOE has cleanup responsibilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and is investigating potential mercury-contaminated soil treatment technologies through an agreement with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Y-12, the Y-12 operating contractor to DOE. As part of its investigations, UCOR has subcontracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to conduct laboratory-scale studies evaluating the applicability of the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process using surrogate and actual mixed waste Y-12 soils containing mercury (Hg) at 135, 2,000, and 10,000 ppm.SPSS uses a thermoplastic sulfur binder to convert Hg to stable mercury sulfide (HgS) and solidifies the chemically stable product in a monolithic solid final waste form to reduce dispersion and permeability. Formulations containing 40 – 60 dry wt% Y-12 soil were fabricated and samples were prepared in triplicate for Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing by an independent laboratory. Those containing 50 and 60 wt% soil easily met the study criteria for maximum allowable Hg concentrations (47 and 1 ppb, respectively compared with the TCLP limit of 200 ppb Hg). The lowest waste loading of 40 wt% yielded TCLP Hg concentrations slightly higher (240 ppb) than the allowable limit. Since the Y-12 soil tended to form clumps, the improved leaching at higher waste loadings was probably due to reduction in particle size from friction of the soil mixing, which creates more surface area for chemical conversion. This was corroborated by the fact that the same waste loading pre-treated by ball milling to reduce particle size prior to SPSS processing yielded TCLP concentrations almost 30 times lower, and at 8.5 ppb Hg was well below EPA limits. Pre-treatment by ball milling also allowed a reduction in the time required for stabilization, thus potentially reducing total process times by 30%.Additional performance testing was conducted including measurement of compressive strength to confirm mechanical integrity and immersion testing to determine the potential impacts of storage or disposal under saturated conditions. For both surrogate and actual Y-12 treated soils, waste form compressive strengths ranged between 2,300 and 6,500 psi, indicating very strong mechanical integrity (a minimum of greater than 40 times greater than the NRC guidance for low-level radioactive waste). In general, compressive strength increases with waste loading as the soil acts as an aggregate in the sulfur concrete waste forms. No statistically significant loss in strength was recorded for the 30 and 40 wt% surrogate waste samples and only a minor reduction in strength was measured for the 43 wt% waste forms. The 30 wt% Y-12 soil did not show a significant loss in strength but the 50 wt% samples were severely degraded in immersion due to swelling of the clay soil. The impact on Hg leaching, if any, was not determined.

  14. On stability condition for bifluid flows with surface tension: Application to microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    On stability condition for bifluid flows with surface tension: Application to microfluidics Ce simulations of microfluidic flows using a Level Set method, namely the exploration of different mixing-vol- umes; Microfluidics; Droplets 1. Introduction Analysis and algorithms derived herein are the result

  15. Summary of Papers 1. P. Sauer and M. Pai, "Power System SteadyState Stability and the Load Flow Jacobian," IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Summary of Papers 1. P. Sauer and M. Pai, "Power System SteadyState Stability and the Load Flow, "The Continuation Power Flow: A Tool for SteadyState Voltage Stability Analysis," IEEE Transactions of the system to maintain adequate and controllable voltage levels at all system load buses. The main concern

  16. Mica Surfaces Stabilize Pentavalent Uranium. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ilton ES, A Haiduc, CL Cahill, and AR Felmy.2005."Mica Surfaces Stabilize Pentavalent Uranium."Inorganic Chemistry 44(9):2986-2988. Authors: ES Ilton A Haiduc CL Cahill AR...

  17. Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou December 15, 2008 Abstract An interaction form, 106-112 boulevard de l'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13 - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs

  18. LED Color Stability: 10 Important Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 15, 2014 webinar examined the causes of color shift, and took a look at existing metrics used to describe color shift/color stability in LED lighting. The lumen maintenance lifetime of...

  19. Entanglement-assisted codeword stabilized quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeonghwan Shin; Jun Heo; Todd A. Brun

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Entangled qubit can increase the capacity of quantum error correcting codes based on stabilizer codes. In addition, by using entanglement quantum stabilizer codes can be construct from classical linear codes that do not satisfy the dual-containing constraint. We show that it is possible to construct both additive and non-additive quantum codes using the codeword stabilized quantum code framework. Nonadditive codes may offer improved performance over the more common sta- bilizer codes. Like other entanglement-assisted codes, the encoding procedure acts only the qubits on Alice's side, and only these qubits are assumed to pass through the channel. However, errors the codeword stabilized quantum code framework gives rise to effective Z errors on Bob side. We use this scheme to construct new entanglement-assisted non-additive quantum codes, in particular, ((5,16,2;1)) and ((7,4,5;4)) codes.

  20. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the language of the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 3 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvement of the error threshold of fault tolerant quantum computing. We also derive a modified Hamming bound that applies to all stabilizer codes, including degenerate ones.

  1. Static Stability of Tension Leg Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ning

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The static stability of a Tension Leg Platform (TLP) with an intact tendon system is principally provided by its tendons and hence quite different from those of a conventional ship or even a floating structure positioned by its mooring system...

  2. Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis A. Polyakov Inria Lille of discontinuous control systems using discontinuous Lyapunov functions. Elements of Filippov theory of generalized derivatives and non-smooth Lyapunov functions are considered. The generalized Lyapunov theorems

  3. Soil stabilization properties of flexible intruders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luginbuhl, Katharine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many locations, soil is held in place by the roots of plants. When these plants are removed or die, the soil loses its cohesive strength and erodes away. We seek to create artificial soil stabilizers that use the same ...

  4. A model study of articulated mat stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tetsu

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics of. model articulated mat revetrrient svith respect to different revetmert slope con- ditions. In this experirrent three diFierent slope permeabilities were investigated by layering geotextile filter on the revetment frame. The stability... EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 12 18 A. Geotextile filter B. Stability experiment V WAVE RUNUP 18 21 33 VI VII VIII WAVE RUNDOWN UPLIFTING FORCE SLIDE-UP FORCE 44 IX SLIDE-DOWN FORCE 77 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION REFERENCES . APPENDIX A EXPERIMENTAL...

  5. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  6. Stabilizing windings for tilting and shifting modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardin, Stephen C. (Princeton, NJ); Christensen, Uffe R. (Princeton, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to passive conducting loops for stabilizing a plasma ring against unstable tilting and/or shifting modes. To this end, for example, plasma ring in a spheromak is stabilized by a set of four figure-8 shaped loops having one pair on one side of the plasma and one pair on the other side with each pair comprising two loops whose axes are transverse to each other.

  7. Stabilized fuel with silica support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

  8. Further Results on Finite-Time Partial Stability and Stabilization. Applications to Nonlinear Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammazi, Chaker [Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte Departement de Mathematiques Laboratoire LIM Ecole Polytechnique de Tunisie (Tunisia)

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives Lyapunov type sufficient conditions for partial finite-time and asymptotic stability in which some state variables converge to zero while the rest converge to constant values that possibly depend on the initial conditions. The paper then presents partially asymptotically stabilizing controllers for many nonlinear control systems for which continuous asymptotically stabilizing (in the usual sense) controllers are known not to exist.

  9. Sundman Stability of Natural Planet Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukyanov, L G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of the motion of the planet satellites is considered in the model of the general three-body problem (Sun-planet-satellite). "Sundman surfaces" are constructed, by means of which the concept "Sundman stability" is formulated. The comparison of the Sundman stability with the results of Golubev's c2h method and with the Hill's classical stability in the restricted three-body problem is performed. The constructed Sundman stability regions in the plane of the parameters "energy - moment of momentum" coincide with the analogous regions obtained by Golubev's method, with the value (c2h)cr. The construction of the Sundman surfaces in the three-dimensional space of the specially selected coordinates xyR is carried out by means of the exact Sundman inequality in the general three-body problem. The determination of the singular points of surfaces, the regions of the possible motion and Sundman stability analysis are implemented. It is shown that the singular points of the Sundman surfaces in the coordinate...

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

  11. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

  12. Tank Stabilization September 30, 1999

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TECFinish Line |PaulTable

  13. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  14. DATE SUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign InFutureSUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

  15. Level Crossing Sampling in Feedback Stabilization under Data-Rate Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braslavsky, Julio H.

    ], and higher energy efficiency in digital-to-analog conversion [10]. On the other hand, a main disadvantage Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia Technical Report EE06010 March 7 2006 Abstract This paper introduces a novel and Control, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia jhb@ieee.org #12;Page 2 of 17

  16. Review of Prior Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit Evaluation: A Report to Snohomish Public Utilities District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Snohomish County Public Utilities District (the District or Snohomish PUD) provides electricity to about 325,000 customers in Snohomish County, Washington. The District has an incentive programs to encourage commercial customers to improve energy efficiency: the District partially reimburses the cost of approved retrofits if they provide a level of energy performance improvement that is specified by contract. In 2013 the District contracted with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide a third-party review of the Monitoring and Verification (M&V) practices the District uses to evaluate whether companies are meeting their contractual obligations. This work helps LBNL understand the challenges faced by real-world practitioners of M&V of energy savings, and builds on a body of related work such as Price et al. (2013). The District selected a typical project for which they had already performed an evaluation. The present report includes the District's original evaluation as well as LBNL's review of their approach. The review is based on the document itself; on investigation of the load data and outdoor air temperature data from the building evaluated in the document; and on phone discussions with Bill Harris of the Snohomish County Public Utilities District. We will call the building studied in the document the subject building, the original Snohomish PUD report will be referred to as the Evaluation, and this discussion by LBNL is called the Review.

  17. Colliding During the Squeeze and ?* Levelling in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Lamont, M; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Wenninger, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While significantly more complicated in term of operation, bringing the beams into collisions prior to the ? squeeze rather than after presents some advantages. Indeed, the large tune spread arising from the non-linearity of head-on beam-beam interactions is profitable, as it can damp impedance driven instabilities much more efficiently than external non-linearity such as octupoles. Moreover, this operation allows to level the luminosity in the case when the peak luminosity is too high for the experiments. Operational issues are discussed and experimental results from the LHC are presented.

  18. Performance Stabilization of CdTe PV Modules using Bias and Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversible performance changes due to light exposure frustrate repeatable performance measurements on CdTe PV modules. It is common to use extended light-exposure to ensure that measurements are representative of outdoor performance. We quantify the extent to which such a light-exposed state depends on module temperature and consider bias in the dark to aid in stabilization. We evaluate the use of dark forward bias to bring about a performance state equivalent to that obtained with light exposure, and to maintain a light-exposed state prior to STC performance measurement. Our results indicate that the most promising method for measuring a light-exposed state is to use light exposure at controlled temperature followed by prompt STC measurement with a repeatable time interval between exposure and the STC measurement.

  19. Stability and feasibility of state-constrained linear MPC without stabilizing terminal constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    , an optimal control problem. In this paper we study stability and recursive feasibility of linear MPC schemes] stability and recursive feasibility is shown for controllable linear quadratic systems with mixed linear and control constraints. Stabilizable linear systems are also considered in [18] but in an uncon- strained

  20. Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bronfenbrenner, James C. (Allentown, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Allentown, PA); Tewari, Krishna (Allentown, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

  1. Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpushkin, T. Yu., E-mail: timka83@yandex.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

  2. The (In)Stability of Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rory Barnes; Thomas Quinn

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of numerical simulations which examine the dynamical stability of known planetary systems, a star with two or more planets. First we vary the initial conditions of each system based on observational data. We then determine regions of phase space which produce stable planetary configurations. For each system we perform 1000 ~1 million year integrations. We examine upsilon And, HD83443, GJ876, HD82943, 47UMa, HD168443, and the solar system (SS). We find that the resonant systems, 2 planets in a first order mean motion resonance, (HD82943 and GJ876) have very narrow zones of stability. The interacting systems, not in first order resonance, but able to perturb each other (upsilon And, 47UMa, and SS) have broad regions of stability. The separated systems, 2 planets beyond 10:1 resonance, (we only examine HD83443 and HD168443) are fully stable. Furthermore we find that the best fits to the interacting and resonant systems place them very close to unstable regions. The boundary in phase space between stability and instability depends strongly on the eccentricities, and (if applicable) the proximity of the system to perfect resonance. In addition to million year integrations, we also examined stability on ~100 million year timescales. For each system we ran ~10 long term simulations, and find that the Keplerian fits to these systems all contain configurations which may be regular on this timescale.

  3. Stability Study of the RERTR Fuel Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Dennis Keiser; Brandon Miller; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation stability of the interaction phases at the interface of fuel and Al alloy matrix as well as the stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice is believed to be very important to the U-Mo fuel performance. In this paper the recent result from TEM characterization of Kr ion irradiated U-10Mo-5Zr alloy will be discussed. The focus will be on the phase stability of Mo2-Zr, a dominated second phase developed at the interface of U-10Mo and the Zr barrier in a monolithic fuel plate from fuel fabrication. The Kr ion irradiations were conducted at a temperature of 200 degrees C to an ion fluence of 2.0E+16 ions/cm2. To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated dispersion U-7Mo fuel and monolithic U-10Mo fuel, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel (3.53E+21 fission/cm3) was used for a TEM in-situ heating experiment. The preliminary result showed extraordinary thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of the TEM observation from these two experiments on the fuel microstructural evolution under irradiation will be discussed.

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Trasportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Keister; K, McBride

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository (if licensed) in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge--to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned. The objective of this lessons learned study was to identify successful, best-in-class trends and commonalities from past shipping campaigns, which OCRWM could consider when planning for the development and operation of a repository transportation system. Note: this paper is for analytical and discussion purposes only, and is not an endorsement of, or commitment by, OCRWM to follow any of the comments or trends. If OCRWM elects to make such commitments at a future time, they will be appropriately documented in formal programmatic policy statements, plans and procedures. Reviewers examined an extensive study completed in 2003 by DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP), Office of Environmental Management (EM), as well as plans and documents related to SNF shipments since issuance of the NTP report. OCRWM examined specific planning, business, institutional and operating practices that have been identified by DOE, its transportation contractors, and stakeholders as important issues that arise repeatedly. In addition, the review identifies lessons learned or activities/actions which were found not to be productive to the planning and conduct of SNF shipments (i.e., negative impacts). This paper is a 'looking back' summary of lessons learned across multiple transportation campaigns. Not all lessons learned are captured here, and participants in some of the campaigns have divergent opinions and perspectives about which lessons are most critical. This analysis is part of a larger OCRWM benchmarking effort to identify best practices to consider in future transportation of radioactive materials ('looking forward'). Initial findings from this comprehensive benchmarking analysis are expected to be available in late fall 2006.

  5. Vacuum (meta)stability beyond the MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Kfir; Delaunay, Cedric; Hochberg, Yonit [Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stability of the Higgs potential in the framework of the effective Lagrangian beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). While the leading nonrenormalizable operators can shift the Higgs boson mass above the experimental bound, they also tend to render the scalar potential unbounded from below. The destabilization is correlated with the Higgs mass increase, so that if quantum corrections are small the problem is severe. We show that a supersymmetric subleading correction stabilizes the potential within the domain of validity of the effective theory. Constraints on MSSM parameters as well as on higher dimensional operators are derived, ensuring that our vacuum has a lifetime longer than the present age of the Universe. In addition we show that when effective operators are responsible for evading the LEP bound, stability constraints imply an upper bound on the scale of new physics in the few TeV range.

  6. Sensitivity approximation for robust stability and tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Chris Steven

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (s) such that the Bezout identity is satisfied a(s) s(s) + d(s) &(s) = 1. In the single loop control configuration of Figure 1, the set of all proper stabilizing compensators is of the form &( ) + a(s)k(s) C(s) = z(s) ? b(s) k(s) ' where k(s) is any stable, proper... whether or not a stable proper k(s) exists such that the following is an equality, Ss(s) = a(s)jz(s) ? b(s)k(s)j. (i4) Obviously the properties of causality and stability that k(s) must satisfy to ensure internal stability translate into constraints...

  7. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  8. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Poulin

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code that defines an equivalence class between encoded states. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 4 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure and a wider class of logical operations without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvements of the error threshold of fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  9. Quantum Stabilizer Codes Embedding Qubits Into Qudits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Cafaro; Federico Maiolini; Stefano Mancini

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study, by means of the stabilizer formalism, a quantum error correcting code which is alternative to the standard block codes since it embeds a qubit into a qudit. The code exploits the non-commutative geometry of discrete phase space to protect the qubit against both amplitude and phase errors. The performance of such code is evaluated on Weyl channels by means of the entanglement fidelity as function of the error probability. A comparison with standard block codes, like five and seven qubit stabilizer codes, shows its superiority.

  10. Stability of the Trotter-Suzuki decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ish Dhand; Barry C. Sanders

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trotter-Suzuki decomposition is an important tool for the simulation and control of physical systems. We provide evidence for the stability of the Trotter-Suzuki decomposition. We model the error in the decomposition and determine sufficiency conditions that guarantee the stability of this decomposition under this model. We relate these sufficiency conditions to precision limitations of computing and control in both classical and quantum cases. Furthermore we show that bounded-error Trotter-Suzuki decomposition can be achieved by a suitable choice of machine precision.

  11. Fluid sphere: stability problem and dimensional constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farook Rahaman; Anirudh Pradhan; Nasr Ahmed; Saibal Ray; Bijan Saha; Mosiur Rahaman

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study different dimensional fluids inspired by noncommutative geometry which admit conformal Killing vectors. The solutions of the Einstein field equations examined specifically for five different set of spacetime. We calculate the active gravitational mass and impose stability conditions of the fluid sphere. The analysis thus carried out immediately indicates that at $4$-dimension only one can get a stable configuration for any spherically symmetric stellar system and any other dimensions, lower or higher, becomes untenable as far as the stability of a system is concerned.

  12. Renewable source controls for grid stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Neely, Jason C.; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Schoenwald, David Alan; Grant, Lisa

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the small signal and transient stability of the Western Electric- ity Coordinating Council (WECC) under high penetrations of renewable energy, and to identify control technologies that would improve the system performance. The WECC is the regional entity responsible for coordinating and promoting bulk electric system reliability in the Western Interconnection. Transient stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a large disturbance while small signal stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a small disturbance. Tran- sient stability analysis usually focuses on the relative rotor angle between synchronous machines compared to some stability margin. For this study we employed generator speed relative to system speed as a metric for assessing transient stability. In addition, we evaluated the system transient response using the system frequency nadir, which provides an assessment of the adequacy of the primary frequency control reserves. Small signal stability analysis typically identi es the eigenvalues or modes of the system in response to a disturbance. For this study we developed mode shape maps for the di erent scenarios. Prony analysis was applied to generator speed after a 1.4 GW, 0.5 second, brake insertion at various locations. Six di erent WECC base cases were analyzed, including the 2022 light spring case which meets the renewable portfolio standards. Because of the di culty in identifying the cause and e ect relationship in large power system models with di erent scenarios, several simulations were run on a 7-bus, 5-generator system to isolate the e ects of di erent con gurations. Based on the results of the study, for a large power system like the WECC, incorporating frequency droop into wind/solar systems provides a larger bene t to system transient response than replacing the lost inertia with synthetic inertia. From a small signal stability perspective, the increase in renewable penetration results in subtle changes to the system modes. In gen- eral, mode frequencies increase slightly, and mode shapes remain similar. The system frequency nadir for the 2022 light spring case was slightly lower than the other cases, largely because of the reduced system inertia. However, the nadir is still well above the minimum load shedding frequency of 59.5 Hz. Finally, several discrepancies were identi ed between actual and reported wind penetration, and additional work on wind/solar modeling is required to increase the delity of the WECC models.

  13. Blood lead levels and remediation of an abandoned smelter site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidson, M. [New Mexico Dept. of Health, Santa Fe, NM (United States). Div. of Epidemiology, Evaluation, and Planning; Tollestrup, K. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Family and Community Medicine Dept.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated soil lead levels were documented in a New Mexico community, with levels up to 24,800 ppm in a smelter slag pile, 20 or more feet from residences. The New Mexico Department of Health offered blood lead screening to residents of three geographic areas before and after an emergency cleanup by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Blood lead levels prior to the cleanup ranged from undetectable (< 5 {mu}g/dl) to 29 {mu}g/dl; after the cleanup, they ranged from undetectable to 10 {mu}g/dl. Significant reductions in mean blood lead levels after the cleanup were found for all three geographic areas: from 6.67 {mu}g/dl to 4 {mu}dl (smelter area), from 4.12 {mu}g/dl to 2.5 {mu}g/dl (town area), and from 5.5 {mu}g/dl to 2.5 {mu}g/dl (northeast area). In both years, the mean blood lead levels of individuals who lived near the smelter area were significantly higher than the levels for those living in town for those participating in both years of the study. Mean blood lead levels were significantly higher for smelter area participants who had a household member working at a lead battery plant (19.4 {mu}g/dl) compared to those residents who did not (5.83 {mu}g/dl).

  14. Stabilizing Open Quantum Systems by Markovian Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; Xiaoting Wang

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study open quantum systems whose evolution is governed by a master equation of Kossakowski-Gorini-Sudarshan-Lindblad type and give a characterization of the convex set of steady states of such systems based on the generalized Bloch representation. It is shown that an isolated steady state of the Bloch equation cannot be a center, i.e., that the existence of a unique steady state implies attractivity and global asymptotic stability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a unique steady state are derived and applied to different physical models including two- and four-level atoms, (truncated) harmonic oscillators, composite and decomposable systems. It is shown how these criteria could be exploited in principle for quantum reservoir engineeing via coherent control and direct feedback to stabilize the system to a desired steady state. We also discuss the question of limit points of the dynamics. Despite the non-existence of isolated centers, open quantum systems can have nontrivial invariant sets. These invariant sets are center manifolds that arise when the Bloch superoperator has purely imaginary eigenvalues and are closely related to decoherence-free subspaces.

  15. Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

  16. Level: National Data;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  17. Company Level Imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count the ways. We've13, 2009 InFormWhich

  19. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3. U.S.7.

  20. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  1. Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) : does it give indigenous peoples more control over development of their lands in the Philippines?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Ronilda R. (Ronilda Rosario)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1998 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) grants indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) with regard to development projects undertaken on their ancestral lands. ...

  2. Presidential MAGNET Fellowship for Students Admitted Prior to 2013 The Presidential MAGNET Fellowship is a five-year recruitment fellowship for incoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennehy, John

    education. Please note: The Presidential MAGNET Fellows are not permitted to hold any other Graduate CenterPresidential MAGNET Fellowship for Students Admitted Prior to 2013 The Presidential MAGNET

  3. Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program Pilot Evaluation: Second Year Report April 2013 Prepared for Compass Working Capital Boston, MA Prepared by Delia Kimbrel, Research Associate Institute, MA #12;Compass Working Capital Compass Working Capital ("Compass") provides incentive-based financial

  4. Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program Pilot Evaluation: Final Report 1 April 2014 Prepared for Compass Working Capital Boston, MA Prepared by Delia Kimbrel, Research Associate Sandra Venner Brandeis University, Waltham, MA #12;2 Compass Working Capital ("Compass") provides incentive

  5. A Stability Index for Local Effectivity Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Stability Index for Local Effectivity Functions Joseph Abdou October 9, 2009 Abstract We study - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs-00389003,version1-14Oct2009 Author manuscript, published setting (see Abdou and Keiding (2003) for the general notion of effectiv- ity structure), we shall focus

  6. A DOUBLY STABILIZED BUNDLE METHOD FOR NONSMOOTH ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 13, 2013 ... As is widely accepted, the most efficient optimization techniques ... (ii) a stability center xk (some previous iterate, usually the “best” point generated by the iterative .... unit-commitment problem in the energy sector, two-stage stochastic linear programming, and ..... data, the case analyzed in Section 4 below.

  7. Power Systems Stability Control : Reinforcement Learning Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    1 Power Systems Stability Control : Reinforcement Learning Framework Damien Ernst, Member, IEEE systems. We describe some challenges in power system control and discuss how some of those challenges with the real power system and the off-line mode in which the interaction occurs with a simulation model

  8. The effect of convection on pulsational stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Houdek

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review on the current state of mode physics in classical pulsators is presented. Two, currently in use, time-dependent convection models are compared and their applications on mode stability are discussed with particular emphasis on the location of the Delta Scuti instability strip.

  9. Threedimensional stability of Burgers vortices Thierry Gallay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallay, Thierry

    Three­dimensional stability of Burgers vortices Thierry Gallay Institut Fourier Universitâ??e de Grenoble I BP 74 38402 Saint­Martin­d'Hâ??eres, France Thierry.Gallay@ujf­grenoble.fr Yasunori Maekawa and then in the general case by Gallay and Wayne [9], see also [2, 12, 13]. Moreover, a lot is known about the spectrum

  10. Metal Nanowires: Quantum Transport, Cohesion, and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stafford, Charles

    nature's ultimate limit of conductors down to a single atom in thickness. In the past eight years. In this article, we discuss our generalization of the free-electron model to describe nanoscale conductors [15 to surface tension [23], but we find that electron-shell effects can stabilize arbitrarily long nanowires [22

  11. PID Controller Synthesis with Specified Stability Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundes, A. N.

    PID Controller Synthesis with Specified Stability Requirement for Some Classes of MIMO Systems T. S+Integral+Derivative (PID) con- trollers, where the closed-loop poles can be assigned to the left of an axis shifted PID-controllers with this property of small negative real-part assignability of closed-loop poles

  12. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  13. http://www.pppl.gov Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    MHD. 2. Flow pattern of magnetic propulsion. 3. Theory of stabilization. 4. Flow locked mode. 5 of magnetic propulsion (cont.) Magnetic propulsion makes MHD of intense lithium streams compatible 8 #12; 2 Flow pattern of magnetic propulsion (cont.) Driving pressure pwall j outlet > 1 atm; p wall

  14. Agent Based Power System Transient Stability Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Agent Based Power System Transient Stability Enhancement M. S. Rahman, Student Member, IEEE, M. J. Hossain and H. R. Pota Abstract--This paper describes an intelligent agent approach to power system fault electric power system is most capital investive and vast complex network with increasing interconnections

  15. Stabilization of Mechanical Systems Using Controlled Lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    for the problem of sta- bilization of an inverted pendulum on a cart and for the problem of stabilization­91­57556, AFOSR grant F49620-96-1- 0100, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Inst. for Advanced Study. 2 can make use of energy methods which automati- cally provide a Lyapunov function for choosing control

  16. Stability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    fields" Department of Astrophysical Sciences Spring Colloquium Steve Cowley (UK Atomic Energy Authority of solar-wind turbulence" Chris Chen (UC Berkeley) 2:40pm "Energy spectra in MHD turbulenceStability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in Astrophysical, Fusion, and Solar Plasmas 8

  17. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

  18. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The stabilization of the plutonium-bearing materials substantially reduced the radiological risk to the environment and security concerns regarding the potential for terrorists to acquire the non-stabilized plutonium products for nefarious purposes. The work was done In older facilities which were never designed for the long-term storage of plutonium, and required working with materials that were extremely radioactive, hazardous, pyrophoric, and In some cases completely unique. I n some Instances, one-of-a-kind processes and equipment were designed, installed, and started up. The SPP was completed ahead of schedule, substantially beating all Interim progress milestone dates set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and in the Hanford Site's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and finished $1-million under budget.

  19. Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    buckling L length of beam vx lateral de¯ection measured in the minor- axis direction (which rotates with yLateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

  20. ROCTECtm STABILIZATION TREATMENT OF WERF ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Lessing; William J. Quapp; Gary Renlund; Bob Clark; Colin Hundley; James Cornwell; Dave Schlier; John Bulko; Gene Pollack

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a process to stabilize mixed waste flyash generated by the combustion of mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL's) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator such that it will meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) Universal Treatment Standards.

  1. A switched state feedback law for the stabilization of LTI systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarelli, Keith R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by prior work in the design of switched feedback controllers for second order systems, we develop a switched state feedback control law for the stabilization of LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. The control law operates by switching between two static gain vectors in such a way that the state trajectory is driven onto a stable n - 1 dimensional hyperplane (where n represents the system dimension). We begin by briefly examining relevant geometric properties of the phase portraits in the case of two-dimensional systems to develop intuition, and we then show how these geometric properties can be expressed as algebraic constraints on the switched vector fields that are applicable to LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. We then derive necessary and sufficient conditions to ensure stabilizability of the resulting switched system (characterized primarily by simple conditions on eigenvalues), and describe an explicit procedure for designing stabilizing controllers. We then show how the newly developed control law can be applied to the problem of minimizing the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding closed-loop state trajectories, and we illustrate the closed-loop transient performance of these switched state feedback controllers via multiple examples.

  2. Extreme non-linear response of ultra-narrow optical transitions in cavity QED for laser stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Martin; D. Meiser; J. W. Thomsen; Jun Ye; M. J. Holland

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of direct spectroscopy of ultra-narrow optical transitions of atoms localized in an optical cavity. In contrast to stabilization against a reference cavity, which is the approach currently used for the most highly stabilized lasers, stabilization against an atomic transition does not suffer from Brownian thermal noise. Spectroscopy of ultra-narrow optical transitions in a cavity operates in a very highly saturated regime in which non-linear effects such as bistability play an important role. From the universal behavior of the Jaynes-Cummings model with dissipation, we derive the fundamental limits for laser stabilization using direct spectroscopy of ultra-narrow atomic lines. We find that with current lattice clock experiments, laser linewidths of about 1 mHz can be achieved in principle, and the ultimate limitations of this technique are at the 1 $\\mu$ Hz level.

  3. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  4. Pinning down energy levels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    levels Pinning down energy levels Released: September 12, 2014 Scientists discover the energy differences behind green fluorescent protein's glow The research begins with (a)...

  5. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  6. The desorption purge time and thermal stability of 1,3-butadiene in a charcoal sampling tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Jianghua

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION 1, 3-butadiene is a widely used monomer in the production of rubber, latex, butadiene polymers, and ABS resins. Since it exhibits low acute inhalation toxicity, there was an extended debate prior to the decision to lower the Occupational Safety... and Health Administration (OSHA) eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 1000 ppm permissible exposure level (PEL). ' However, after years of toxicity studies, 1, 3-butadiene has been found to be associated with an increased risk of leukemia, lung tumors...

  7. Sufficient Conditions for Uniform Stability of Regularization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the stability and generalization properties of penalized empirical-risk minimization algorithms. We propose a set of properties of the penalty term that is sufficient to ensure uniform ?-stability: ...

  8. Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Sherry Qianwen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic model for viscosity as a function of shear rate, two parameters were found...

  9. Title of dissertation: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM AND STABILITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM AND STABILITY OF CENTRIFUGALLY CONFINED PLASMAS Yi-Min Huang, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation directed by: Professor Adil B. This dissertation addresses the equilib- rium and stability of this configuration within the framework

  10. Electronic Structure and Stability of Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hod, Oded

    Electronic Structure and Stability of Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons Vero´nica Barone, Oded stability of semiconducting graphene nanoribbons. We consider ribbons with different edge nature including band structure of graphene (a single infinite sheet of graphite). Depending on their chirality

  11. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  12. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow...

  13. The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries. The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries....

  14. Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Abstract: Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C...

  15. Fourier-Mukai transforms and stability conditions on abelian threefolds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyaratne, Hathurusinghege Dulip Bandara

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction of Bridgeland stability conditions on a given Calabi-Yau threefold is an important problem and this thesis realizes the rst known examples of such stability conditions. More precisely, we construct a dense ...

  16. Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

  17. Stabilized finite element methods with fast iterative solution ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer methods in applied mechanics and engineering. Stabilized finite ... Department of Mathemutics, Purdue Universi@, 1395 Mathematical Science ...

  18. Lyapunov stability of flowing magnetohydrodynamic plasmas surrounded by resistive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasso, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Throumoulopoulos, G. N. [Association Euratom-Hellenic Republic, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general stability condition for plasma-vacuum systems with resistive walls is derived by using the Frieman Rotenberg Lagrangian stability formulation [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)]. It is shown that the Lyapunov stability limit for external modes does not depend upon the gyroscopic term but upon the sign of the perturbed potential energy only. In the absence of dissipation in the plasma such as viscosity, it is expected that the flow cannot stabilize the system.

  19. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Mode stabilization mechanism of buried waveguide lasers with lateral diffused junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K.L.; Chen, T.R.; Koren, U.; Lau, K.Y.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode stabilization behavior of the buried active waveguide with lateral diffused junction is theoretically investigated. The study shows that for an active waveguide of width around 5 ..mu..m with a lateral diffused junction in the middle, the single fundamental transverse mode is preferred as the injection level is raised. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results observed in the groove transverse junction InGaAsP/InP laser.

  1. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

  2. WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

  3. Advanced PID type fuzzy logic power system stabilizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiyama, Takashi; Kugimiya, Masahiko; Satoh, Hironori (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced fuzzy logic control scheme has been proposed for a micro-computer based power system stabilizer to enhance the overall stability of power systems. The proposed control scheme utilizes the PID information of the generator speed. The input signal to the stabilizer is the real power output of a study unit. Simulations show the effectiveness of the advanced fuzzy logic control scheme.

  4. Local Exponential H2 Stabilization of a 2 2 Quasilinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of boundary stabilization for a quasilinear 2Ã?2 system of first-order hyperbolic PDEs. We design a full stability of the closed-loop system. The proof of stability is based on the construction of a strict pipelines or road traffic models. This problem has been previously considered for 2 Ã? 2 systems [8] and even

  5. Polymeric Stabilized Emulsions: Steric Effects and Deformation in Soft Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    used to control emulsion and foam stability.1,2 An understanding of the underlying stabilizing) was used to extend these studies to a larger range of underlying surfaces including zirconia,8 glass,9 and foams at low water content and to operate at the edge of stability, it is crucial to gain a more

  6. The materials listed below are housed in the Special Collections Department at CU-Boulder. Special Collections has limited hours of operation. Please call 303.492.6144 to confirm prior to visiting or email spc@colorado.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Collections has limited hours of operation. Please call 303.492.6144 to confirm prior to visiting or email spc

  7. Plutonium stabilization and handling (PuSH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses construction of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. The major sections of the project are: site preparation; SPS Procurement, Installation, and Testing; storage vault modification; and characterization equipment additions. The SPS will be procured as part of a Department of Energy nationwide common procurement. Specific design crit1460eria for the SPS have been extracted from that contract and are contained in an appendix to this document.

  8. HVDC models used in stability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of detailed models for HVDC systems has recently been applied in power system stability programs. These models represent the high speed dynamics of the converter controllers as well as the L/R dynamics of the dc transmission. Older dc models such as those described in reference which are based upon pseudo-steady state relationships are however still in general use. The latter models remain popular since they require a minimum of data and significantly less computer resources than the detailed models. The following questions therefore need to be answered concerning the two types of models: (1) To what extent is simulation accuracy impacted by using the older HVDC model. (2) Is the difference in precision significant compared to other uncertainties which are inherent in stability calculations. This paper addresses these questions and also considers a third type of HVDC model described in Appendix I which relieves some of the assumptions associated with the pseudo steady state models.

  9. On Stabilization of Nonautonomous Nonlinear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanov, A. Yu. [Faculty of Mathematics and IT, Ulyanovsk State University, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., Ulyanovsk, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedures to obtain the sufficient conditions of asymptotic stability for nonlinear nonstationary continuous-time systems are discussed. We consider different types of the following general controlled system: x = X(t,x,u) = F(t,x)+B(t,x)u, x(t{sub 0}) = x{sub 0}. (*) The basis of investigation is limiting equations, limiting Lyapunov functions, etc. The improved concept of observability of the pair of functional matrices is presented. By these results the problem of synthesis of asymptotically stable control nonlinear nonautonomous systems (with linear parts) involving the quadratic time-dependent Lyapunov functions is solved as well as stabilizing a given unstable system with nonlinear control law.

  10. Stability Analysis of Large-Scale Incompressible Flow Calculations on Massively Parallel Computers 1 Stability Analysis of Large-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stability Analysis of Large-Scale Incompressible Flow Calculations on Massively Parallel Computers 1 Stability Analysis of Large- Scale Incompressible Flow Calculations on Massively Parallel disturbances aligned with the associated eigenvectors will grow. The Cayley transformation, cou- pled

  11. LASER STABILIZATION FOR NEAR ZERO NO{sub x} GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Khanna

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the development of new industrial gas turbines has been primarily driven by the intent to achieve higher efficiency, lower operating costs and lower emissions. Higher efficiency and lower cost is obtained through higher turbine operating temperatures, while reduction in emissions is obtained by extending the lean operating limit of the combustor. However reduction in the lean stability limit of operation is limited greatly by the chemistry of the combustion process and by the occurrence of thermo-acoustic instabilities. Solar Turbines, CFD Research Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have teamed to advance the technology associated with laser-assisted ignition and flame stabilization, to a level where it could be incorporated onto a gas turbine combustor. The system being developed is expected to enhance the lean stability limit of the swirl stabilized combustion process and assist in reducing combustion oscillations. Such a system has the potential to allow operation at the ultra-lean conditions needed to achieve NO{sub x} emissions below 5 ppm without the need of exhaust treatment or catalytic technologies. The research effort was focused on analytically modeling laser-assisted flame stabilization using advanced CFD techniques, and experimentally demonstrating the technology, using a solid-state laser and low-cost durable optics. A pulsed laser beam was used to generate a plasma pool at strategic locations within the combustor flow field such that the energy from the plasma became an ignition source and helped maintain a flame at ultra lean operating conditions. The periodic plasma generation and decay was used to nullify the fluctuations in the heat release from the flame itself, thus decoupling the heat release from the combustor acoustics and effectively reducing the combustion oscillations. The program was built on an existing technology base and includes: extending LANL's existing laser stabilization experience to a sub-scale combustor rig, performing and validating CFD predictions, and ultimately conducting a full system demonstration in a multi-injector combustion system at Solar Turbines.

  12. Stabilization of spent calcium-based sorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shires, P.J.; Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.B.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents applicable to both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed coal combustion systems (partial gasification). The project is a 40-month effort. A key technical issue for the utilization of calcium sorbents in advanced coal technologies is the subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced by such systems.

  13. Oxygen stabilized zirconium vanadium intermetallic compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr.sub.x OV.sub.y where x=0.7 to 2.0 and y=0.18 to 0.33. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 450.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO.sub.2.

  14. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  15. Discrete Symmetry and Stability in Hamiltonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tassos Bountis; George Chechin; Vladimir Sakhnenko

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this tutorial we address the existence and stability of periodic and quasiperiodic orbits in N degree of freedom Hamiltonian systems and their connection with discrete symmetries. Of primary importance in our study are the nonlinear normal modes (NNMs), i.e periodic solutions which represent continuations of the system's linear normal modes in the nonlinear regime. We examine the existence of such solutions and discuss different methods for constructing them and studying their stability under fixed and periodic boundary conditions. In the periodic case, we employ group theoretical concepts to identify a special type of NNMs called one-dimensional "bushes". We describe how to use linear combinations such NNMs to construct s(>1)-dimensional bushes of quasiperiodic orbits, for a wide variety of Hamiltonian systems and exploit the symmetries of the linearized equations to simplify the study of their destabilization. Applying this theory to the Fermi Pasta Ulam (FPU) chain, we review a number of interesting results, which have appeared in the recent literature. We then turn to an analytical and numerical construction of quasiperiodic orbits, which does not depend on the symmetries or boundary conditions. We demonstrate that the well-known "paradox" of FPU recurrences may be explained in terms of the exponential localization of the energies Eq of NNM's excited at the low part of the frequency spectrum, i.e. q=1,2,3,.... Thus, we show that the stability of these low-dimensional manifolds called q-tori is related to the persistence or FPU recurrences at low energies. Finally, we discuss a novel approach to the stability of orbits of conservative systems, the GALIk, k=2,...,2N, by means of which one can determine accurately and efficiently the destabilization of q-tori, leading to the breakdown of recurrences and the equipartition of energy, at high values of the total energy E.

  16. How Nature Fine Tunes Protein Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickstrom, Megan

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2007 Major: Biology ii ABSTRACT How Nature Fine Tunes Protein Stability (April 2007) Megan Wickstrom Department of Biology Texas A&M University Fellows Co-Advisors: Dr. C. Nick Pace Department of Medical Biochemistry... appreciate their loving support. Also, this thesis is dedicated to my fiancé who has been a constant source of motivation and inspiration. v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my sincere thanks and appreciation to my supervisor and mentor, Dr. C. Nick Pace...

  17. The Dark Energy Star and Stability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyali Bhar; Farook Rahaman

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have proposed a new model of dark energy star consisting of five zones namely, solid core of constant energy density, the thin shell between core and interior, an inhomogeneous interior region with anisotropic pressures, thin shell and the exterior vacuum region. We have discussed various physical properties. The model satisfies all the physical requirements. The stability condition under small linear perturbation has also been discussed.

  18. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazarus, Kyren A. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia) [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)] [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); To, Sarah Q. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia) [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chand, Ashwini L. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)] [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Clyne, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.clyne@princehenrys.org [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER?ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER? and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor ? (ER?) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER? cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER? cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER? breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER? compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER? versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ER?. Our data demonstrates that in ER? cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER? cells as well as ER? tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER? tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER? and ER+ breast cancer.

  19. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  20. 308 Building zone I stabilization and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, I.L.; Schwartz, K.E.; Rich, J.W.; Benecke, M.W.; Lanham, G.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 308 Building located on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is currently in transition to shutdown status. After this transition is complete, the facility will be maintained/surveilled and given to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) for utilization, remedial action, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This may require that the facility be maintained in the shutdown status for as long as 30 yrs. To date, all of the special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed, potential fuel supply equipment preserved, surplus materials and equipment excessed, and enclosure cleanup and stabilization completed. A major activity in support of the 308 Building shutdown was the cleanup and stabilization of the enclosures and surface contamination areas. This document discusses the specific designs, processes, and methods used to stabilize and confine the radiological material within the enclosure and exhaust ducts to allow the shutdown of the active support systems. The process and designs employed were effective, yet simple, and maximized the use of current technologies and commercial products.

  1. 308 Building Zone I stabilization and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, I.L.; Schwartz, K.E.; Rich, J.W.; Benecke, M.W.; Rasmussen, D.E.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 308 Building (Fast Flux Test Facility [FFTF] fuel supply) at the Hanford Site, located in Richland, Washington, is currently in transition to shutdown status. After shutdown, the facility will be maintained/surveilled and turned over to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) for utilization, remedial action, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This may require that the facility be maintained in the shutdown mode for up to 30 years. To date, all of the special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed from the facility, potential fuel supply equipment has been preserved, surplus materials and equipment have been excessed, and enclosure cleanup and stabilization has begun. Shutdown planning has been completed, which outlines the major tasks, scope, methodology, and timing for the shutdown activities. A major activity in support of the 308 Building shutdown is the cleanup and stabilization of the enclosures and surface contamination areas. This document identifies the specific designs, processes, and methods to stabilize and confine the radiological material within the enclosures and exhaust ducts to allow shutdown of the active support systems. The designs and steps planned will be effective, are simple, and make maximum use of current technologies and commercial items.

  2. Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

  3. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures.

  4. Morphological stability and metabolic activity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) protoplasts in media supplemented with polyamines and divalent cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikary, Bharat Raj

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of variance for different chemicals on the effects of time, level and time x level interaction on mozphological stability 22 IV 14 C-Histidine uptake by protoplasts incubated under various treatment levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Result... tendency, Spermidine TABLE IV 14 C-Histidine uptake by protoplasts incubated under various treatment levels (cpm/100ul), Mean of 2 observations. Treatment Incubation Time (Hours) 12 18 24 Cadaverine lmM 10mM 20mM 47 50 44 299 709 545 1758...

  5. Recent progress in degradation and stabilization of organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Huanqi; He, Weidong; Mao, Yiwu; Lin, Xiao; Ishikawa, Ken; Dickerson, James H.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability is of paramount importance in organic semiconductor devices, especially in organic solar cells (OSCs). Serious degradation in air limits wide applications of these flexible, light-weight and low-cost power-generation devices. Studying the stability of organic solar cells will help us understand degradation mechanisms and further improve the stability of these devices. There are many investigations into the efficiency and stability of OSCs. The efficiency and stability of devices even of the same photoactive materials are scattered in different papers. In particular, the extrinsic degradation that mainly occurs near the interface between the organic layer and the cathode is a major stability concern. In the past few years, researchers have developed many new cathodes and cathode buffer layers, some of which have astonishingly improved the stability of OSCs. In this review article, we discuss the recent developments of these materials and summarize recent progresses in the study of the degradation/stability of OSCs, with emphasis on the extrinsic degradation/stability that is related to the intrusion of oxygen and water. The review provides detailed insight into the current status of research on the stability of OSCs and seeks to facilitate the development of highly-efficient OSCs with enhanced stability.

  6. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  7. Abl-kinase-sensitive levels of ERK5 and its intrinsic basal activity contribute to leukaemia cell survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Axel

    Abl-kinase-sensitive levels of ERK5 and its intrinsic basal activity contribute to leukaemia cell of the MAPK ERK5 with the tyrosine kinase c-Abl and its oncogenic variants v-Abl and Bcr/Abl disclosed the cellular amount of ERK5, at least in part, by stabilizing the protein. The resulting level of ERK5 and its

  8. Results of screening activities in salt states prior to the enactment of the Nationall Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbiener, W.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of potential sites for a nuclear waste repository through screening procedures in the salt states is a well-established, deliberate process. This screening process has made it possible to carry out detailed studies of many of the most promising potential sites, and general studies of all the sites, in anticipation of the siting guidelines specified in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The screening work completed prior to the passage of the Act allowed the Secretary of Energy to identify seven salt sites as potentially acceptable under the provisions of Section 116(a) of the Act. These sites were formally identified by letters from Secretary Hodel to the states of Texas, Utah, Mississippi, and Louisiana on February 2, 1983. The potentially acceptable salt sites were in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties in Texas; Davis and Lavender Canyons in the Gibson Dome location in Utah; Richton and Cypress Creek Domes in Mississippi; and Vacherie Dome in Louisiana. Further screening will include comparison of each potentially acceptable site against disqualification factors and selection of a preferred site in each of the three geohydrologic settings from those remaining, in accordance with the siting guidelines. These steps will be documented in statutory Environmental Assessments prepared for each site to be nominated for detailed characterization. 9 references.

  9. Cost estimate and economic issues associated with the MOX option (prior to DOE`s record of decision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.; Miller, J.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the January 1997 Record of Decision (ROD), the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) evaluated three technologies for the disposition of {approximately}50 MT of surplus plutonium from defense-related programs-reactors, immobilization, and deep boreholes. As part of the process supporting the ROD, and comprehensive assessment of technical viability, cost, and schedule was conducted by DOE-MD and its national laboratory contractors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed and coordinated the life-cycle cost (LCC) assessment effort for this program. This report discusses the economic analysis methodology and the results for the reactor options considered prior to ROD. A secondary intent of the report is to discuss major technical and economic issues that impact cost and schedule. To evaluate the economics of the reactor option and other technologies on an equitable basis, a set of cost-estimating guidelines and a common cost-estimating format were utilized by all three technology teams. This report includes the major economic analysis assumptions and the comparative constant-dollar and discounted-dollar LCCs for all nine reactor scenarios.

  10. Sea Level Rise Media Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

  11. Uv-Light Stabilization Additive Package For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Klemchuk, Peter P. (Watertown, CT)

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultraviolet light stabilization additive package is used in an encapsulant material that may be used in solar cell modules, laminated glass and a variety of other applications. The ultraviolet light stabilization additive package comprises a first hindered amine light stabilizer and a second hindered amine light stabilizer. The first hindered amine light stabilizer provides thermal oxidative stabilization, and the second hindered amine light stabilizer providing photo-oxidative stabilization.

  12. Prior poling effect on thermal phase stability in ,,110...-cut Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...0.74Ti0.26O3 single crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ceramics, and therefore have great potential for designing high performance actuators and sensors.1­3 Many capacitance and resistance. A Janis CCS-450 cold head was used with a Lakeshore 340 controller and the ramping

  13. Cross-level Validation of Topological Quantum Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandru Paler; Simon J. Devitt; Kae Nemoto; Ilia Polian

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computing promises a new approach to solving difficult computational problems, and the quest of building a quantum computer has started. While the first attempts on construction were succesful, scalability has never been achieved, due to the inherent fragile nature of the quantum bits (qubits). From the multitude of approaches to achieve scalability topological quantum computing (TQC) is the most promising one, by being based on an flexible approach to error-correction and making use of the straightforward measurement-based computing technique. TQC circuits are defined within a large, uniform, 3-dimensional lattice of physical qubits produced by the hardware and the physical volume of this lattice directly relates to the resources required for computation. Circuit optimization may result in non-intuitive mismatches between circuit specification and implementation. In this paper we introduce the first method for cross-level validation of TQC circuits. The specification of the circuit is expressed based on the stabilizer formalism, and the stabilizer table is checked by mapping the topology on the physical qubit level, followed by quantum circuit simulation. Simulation results show that cross-level validation of error-corrected circuits is feasible.

  14. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  15. An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a,*, Emmanuel Detournay b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a the relevant tip asymptotics in hydraulic fracture simulators is critical for the accuracy and stability for a propagating hydraulic fracture. A number of char- acteristics of the governing equations for hydraulic

  16. Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

  17. Energy-aware 3-level coding and control co-design for sensor network systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy-aware 3-level coding and control co-design for sensor network systems CARLOS CANUDAS energy consumption (energy-aware). To this aim, we propose to use a coding strategy with the ability that this coding algorithm preserves closed loop stability. Index Terms-- Control of sensor networks, energy-aware

  18. Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesch, Chuck; Carlson, Richard; Michelotti, Roy; Rogers, Mike; Willms, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) project was begun in 1978 to develop, design, and demonstrate the technology and safe operation of selected tritium processing systems required for a fusion reactor. In 2001, the US Department of Energy (DOE) determined that TSTA's mission was complete and that the facility should be stabilized.At the completion of the stabilization project in 2003, TSTA was categorized as a radiological facility. Before stabilization was complete, the tritium inventory at TSTA was grouped in the following categories: tritium gas mixed with hydrogen isotopes, tritiated water absorbed on molecular sieve, tritium held up as a hydride on various metals, and tritium held up in process components. For each of these, tritium content was characterized, a path for removal was determined, and the proper disposal package was developed. Hydrogen exchange, calorimetry, direct sampling, pressure/composition/temperature, radiological smear surveys, and controlled regeneration were used to determine the tritium inventory for each category of tritium.After removal, the tritium inventory was either (1) sent to other facilities for reuse processing or (2) buried at the LANL radioactive waste disposal site. One complete experimental system was packaged and transferred to another DOE site for future use. Special burial containers were designed and fabricated for the inventory buried at the LANL radioactive waste disposal site. The project was conducted with low tritium emission to the environment and negligible personnel exposure. After the tritium removal was complete, all remaining hardware and piping were opened and vented; the facility emission was below 1 Ci per day.

  19. Stability Properties of Magnetic Tower Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanori Nakamura; Hui Li; Shengtai Li

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability properties of ``magnetic tower'' jets propagating in the gravitationally stratified background have been examined by performing three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The current-carrying, Poynting flux-dominated magnetic tower jet, which possesses a highly wound helical magnetic field, is subject to the current-driven instability (CDI). We find that, under general physical conditions including small perturbations in the initial background profiles, the propagating magnetic tower jets develop the non-axisymmetric, $m=1$ kink mode of the CDI. The kink mode grows on the local Alfv\\'en crossing time scale. In addition, two types of kink modes appear in the system. At the central region where external thermal pressure confinement is strong, only the internal kink mode is excited and will grow. A large distance away from the central region where the external thermal pressure becomes low, the external kink mode is observed. As a result, the exterior of magnetic tower jets will be deformed into a large-scale wiggled structure. We also discuss extensively the different physical processes that contribute to the overall stability properties of the magnetic tower jets. Specifically, when the jet propagates in an initially unperturbed background, we find that they can survive the kink mode beyond the point predicted by the well-known Kruskal-Shafranov (K-S) criterion. The stabilization in this case comes mainly from the dynamical relaxation of magnetic twists during the propagation of magnetic towers; the magnetic pitch is reduced and the corresponding K-S critical wavelength becomes longer as the tower jet proceeds. Furthermore, we show that the pressure-driven and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities do not occur in the magnetic tower jets.

  20. Stability, Higgs Boson Mass and New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Branchina; Emanuele Messina

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    When the particle with mass $\\sim 126$ GeV discovered at LHC is identified with the Higgs boson of the Standard Model, intriguing and challenging questions arise. Among them, the issue of the EW vacuum stability. We find that, despite claims to the contrary, the latter strongly depends on new physics interactions. In particular, if $\\tau$ is the lifetime of the EW vacuum, new physics can turn $\\tau$ from $\\tau >> T_U$ to $\\tau << T_U$, where $T_U$ is the age of the Universe.

  1. Stabilizing feedback controls for quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazyar Mirrahimi; Ramon van Handel

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    No quantum measurement can give full information on the state of a quantum system; hence any quantum feedback control problem is neccessarily one with partial observations, and can generally be converted into a completely observed control problem for an appropriate quantum filter as in classical stochastic control theory. Here we study the properties of controlled quantum filtering equations as classical stochastic differential equations. We then develop methods, using a combination of geometric control and classical probabilistic techniques, for global feedback stabilization of a class of quantum filters around a particular eigenstate of the measurement operator.

  2. Oxygen stabilized zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula (Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.2-u (V.sub.1-y Fe.sub.y)O.sub.z where x=0.0 to 0.9, y=0.01 to 0.9, z=0.25 to 0.5 and u=0 to 1. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 200.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  3. Radiation stability of graphene under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sunil, E-mail: kumar.sunil092@gmail.com; Tripathi, Ambuj; Khan, Saif A.; Pannu, Compesh; Avasthi, Devesh K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report radiation stability of graphene under extreme condition of high energy density generated by 150?MeV Au ion irradiation. The experiment reveals that graphene is radiation resistant for irradiation at 10{sup 14?}ions/cm{sup 2} of 150?MeV Au ions. It is significant to note that annealing effects are observed at lower fluences whereas defect production occurs at higher fluences but significant crystallinity is retained. Our results demonstrate applicability of graphene based devices in radiation environment and space applications.

  4. Supergravity chaotic inflation and moduli stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S C [Service de Physique Theorique, Orme des Merisiers, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Postma, M, E-mail: sdavis@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: mpostma@nikhef.nl, E-mail: postma@mail.desy.de [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic inflation predicts a large gravitational wave signal which can be tested by the upcoming Planck satellite. We discuss a supergravity implementation of chaotic inflation in the presence of moduli fields, and find that inflation does not work with a generic Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi moduli stabilization potential. A viable model can be constructed with a fine-tuned moduli sector, but only for a very specific choice of Kaehler potential. Our analysis also shows that inflation models satisfying {partial_derivative}{sub i}W{sub inf}=0 for all inflation sector fields {phi}{sub i} can be combined successfully with a fine-tuned moduli sector.

  5. Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking and moduli stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwis, S. P. de [Physics Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic lesson of string theory is that the coupling constants of an effective low energy theory are determined by the vacuum values of a set of fields - the so-called moduli - some of which are stabilized at relatively low masses by nonperturbative effects. We argue that the physics of these moduli cannot be separated from the issues of dynamical and gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. To illustrate this point we present a modified version of the type IIB Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi model where the criteria for gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking may be realized.

  6. Global optimization for the phase stability problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floudas, C.; McDonald, C.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gibbs tangent plane criterion is an important tool in determining the quality of obtained solutions to the phase and chemical equilibrium problem. The ability to determine if a postulated solution is thermodynamically stable is very useful in the search for the equilibrium solution. In this work simpler formulations are presented for the phase stability problem where non-ideal liquid phases are modeled using the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. It is shown how the global minimum of the tangent plane distance function can be obtained. Computational results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed global optimization algorithms.

  7. Criterion of stability of the superconducting state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iogann Tolbatov

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose to draw attention to the stability criterion of the superconductor current state. We use for this purpose the rough systems mathematical apparatus allowing us to relate the desired criterion with the dielectric permittivity of the matter and to identify the type of all possible phonons trajectories in its superconducting state. The state of superconductivity in the matter can be explained only by the phonons behavior peculiarity. And on the basis of the above-mentioned assumption, the corresponding mathematical model is constructed.

  8. Stability of Two-Dimensional Soft Quasicrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Jiang; Jiajun Tong; Pingwen Zhang; An-Chang Shi

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative stability of two-dimensional soft quasicrystals is examined using a recently developed projection method which provides a unified numerical framework to compute the free energy of periodic crystal and quasicrystals. Accurate free energies of numerous ordered phases, including dodecagonal, decagonal and octagonal quasicrystals, are obtained for a simple model, i.e. the Lifshitz-Petrich free energy functional, of soft quasicrystals with two length-scales. The availability of the free energy allows us to construct phase diagrams of the system, demonstrating that, for the Lifshitz-Petrich model, the dodecagonal and decagonal quasicrystals can become stable phases, whereas the octagonal quasicrystal stays as a metastable phase.

  9. Stabilizing System Pressure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archiveSpringStabilizing

  10. Stability Breakout Session | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpring O&M Users GroupStability Breakout Session

  11. Vacuum Stability and Higgs Diphoton Decay Rate in the Zee-Babu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chao; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yongchao Zhang

    2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent Higgs data from ATLAS and CMS are compatible with a Standard Model (SM) signal at $2\\sigma$ level, both experiments see indications for an excess in the diphoton decay channel, which points to new physics beyond the SM. Given such a low Higgs mass $m_H \\sim 125 {\\rm GeV}$, another sign indicating the existence of new physics beyond the SM is the vacuum stability problem, i.e., the SM Higgs quartic coupling may run to negative values at a scale below the Planck scale. In this paper, we study the vacuum stability and enhanced Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model, which was used to generate tiny Majorana neutrino masses at two-loop level. We find that it is rather difficult to find overlapping regions allowed by the vacuum stability and diphoton enhancement constraints. As a consequence, it is almost inevitable to introduce new ingredients into the model, in order to resolve these two issues simultaneously.

  12. Tools Developed to Prepare and Stabilize Reactor Spent Fuel for Retrieval from Tile Holes - 12251

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horne, Michael; Clough, Malcolm [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear reactors is stored in the waste management areas on site. This fuel is contained within carbon steel spent fuel cans that are stored inside vertical carbon steel lined concrete pipes in the ground known as tile holes. The fuel cans have been stored in the tile holes for greater than 30 years. Some of the fuel cans have experienced corrosion which may have affected their structural integrity as well as the potential to form hydrogen gas. In addition to these potential hazards, there was a need to clean contaminated surfaces inside of and around the exposed upper surface of the tile holes. As part of the site waste management remediation plan spent fuel will be retrieved from degraded tile holes, dried, and relocated to a new purpose built above ground storage facility. There have been a number of tools that are required to be developed to ensure spent fuel cans are in a safe condition prior to retrieval and re-location. A series of special purpose tools have been designed and constructed to stabilize the contents of the tile holes, to determine the integrity of the fuel containers and to decontaminate inside and around the tile holes. Described herein are the methods and types of tools used. Tools that have been presented here have been used, or will be used in the near future, in the waste management areas of the CRL Site in preparation for storage of spent fuel in a new above ground facility. The stabilization tools have been demonstrated on mock-up facilities prior to successful use in the field to remove hydrogen gas and uranium hydrides from the fuel cans. A lifting tool has been developed and used successfully in the field to confirm the integrity of the fuel cans for future relocation. A tool using a commercial dry ice blaster has been developed and is ready to start mock-up trials and is scheduled to be used in the field during the summer of 2012. (authors)

  13. Validation of a STATCOM Transient Stability Model through Small-Disturbance Stability Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    . INTRODUCTION Power system operators are constantly striving to keep power networks secure by guaranteeing models. For instance, the TS models proposed for a series of Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS used in small-disturbance stability studies of large, interconnected power grids as well as microgrids

  14. ITER MHD stability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnbull, A.D.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the final results and conclusions from work done for ITER under the DOE Task 18 (Raytheon Task ITER-GA 4002E). The work was performed in collaboration with D. Pearlstein and R. Bulmer of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in close conjunction with D. Boucher of the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT). The work was partly done at General Atomics in San Diego and partly at LLNL. Approximately eight hours per week were spent from August 1994 through June 1995, with a no-cost extension through December 1995. The report covers work on the ideal MHD stability analysis for the ITER TAC scenarios and DIII-D ITER Demonstration Discharges, code modifications performed in order to efficiently and accurately complete the stability calculations, and additional collaborative efforts involving code benchmarking and dissemination of the DIII-D ITER Demonstration Discharge data. The work spawned several presentations and reports, including significant contributions to published IAEA Proceedings, and these are also summarized. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  16. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  17. Confirmation of Dissertation/ Executive Position Paper Committee DIRECTIONS: Prior to the defense, complete required information and print the form. Send the original copy with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Dissertation/ Executive Position Paper Committee DIRECTIONS: Prior to the defense, complete required of Graduate and Professional Education when Dissertation/Executive Position Paper Committee has been finalized. (Form revised: Feb 2007) DISSERTATION/EXECUTIVE POSITION PAPER COMMITTEE COMPOSITION: Each dissertation

  18. Neuroprotection at Drosophila Synapses Conferred by Prior Shanker Karunanithi,1 Jeffrey W. Barclay,2 R. Meldrum Robertson,2 Ian R. Brown,3 and Harold L. Atwood1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Meldrum

    ; heat shock proteins; quanta; thermal stress; presynaptic; postsynaptic; neuromuscular Prior exposure such as synaptic function from subse- quent stress. The neurophysiological consequences of heat shock have not been is down-regulated during ther- mal stress, but the predominant heat shock protein hsp70 is rapidly induced

  19. Fiberglass Duct Cleaning Safe Work Practices Duct Cleaning -Prior to reaching a decision to clean a duct, an investigation of possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    ­ Locations should be noted prior to conducting work. Lockers, Showers, and Hand Wash Sinks ­ Should to be sure that there are no hazardous containing materials in the duct system such as Asbestos. Asbestos into particulate collection equipment. 3. All equipment located outside should be placed downwind and away from

  20. A review of "Defining the Jacobean Church: the Politics of Religious Controversy, 1603-1625." by Charles W.A. Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parry, Graham

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    literature of the period 1600-40 remains almost wholly unstudied, and much historiographi- cal debate has focused on a tiny sample of surviving material.? Prior has made some inroads into this terra incognita and encountered a number of little- known...

  1. Procedure for Termination A termination should be processed when a student's job is ending prior to the originally scheduled end date. (The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    Procedure for Termination A termination should be processed when a student's job is ending prior to the originally scheduled end date. (The system will automatically terminate a job when the scheduled end date is reached.) NOTE: A termination will only terminate the selected job for the student. It will not terminate

  2. Guidelines for assessment PhD dissertation and public defence The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question. Prior to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 of 5 Guidelines for assessment ­ PhD dissertation and public defence The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question. Prior to the submission that the PhD process has been satisfactory and that all formal requirements have been met

  3. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment and Alignment Central Station Antenna Crew Deployment Description Leveling, Alignment, and Pointing Radioisotope

  4. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  5. Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Hill, J.; Berman, L.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Broadbent, A.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by beam stability requirements at the NSLS II synchrotron, such that the desired small beam sizes and high brightness are both realized and stable, a comprehensive study has been launched seeking to provide assurances that stability at the nanometer level at critical x-ray beam-lines, is achievable, given the natural and cultural vibration environment at the selected site. The study consists of (a) an extensive investigation of the site to evaluate the existing ground vibration, in terms of amplitude, frequency content and coherence, and (b) of a numerical study of wave propagation and interaction with the infrastructure of the sensitive lines. The paper presents results from both aspects of the study.

  6. Thermal-noise-limited crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonator for laser stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alnis, J.; Wang, C. Y.; Hofer, J.; Haensch, T. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have stabilized an external cavity diode laser to a whispering gallery mode resonator formed by a protrusion of a single-crystal magnesium fluoride cylinder. The cylinder's compact dimensions ((less-or-similar sign)1 cm{sup 3}) reduce the sensitivity to vibrations and simplify the stabilization of its temperature in a compact setup. In a comparison to an ultrastable laser used for precision metrology we determine a minimum Allan deviation of 20 Hz at an optical wavelength of 972 nm, corresponding to a relative Allan deviation of 6x10{sup -14}, at an integration time of 100 ms. This level of instability is compatible with the limits imposed by fundamental fluctuations of the material's refractive index at room temperature.

  7. The Triple Helix Model and the Meta-Stabilization of Urban Technologies in Smart Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Triple Helix model of university-industry-government relations can be generalized from a neo-institutional model of networks to a neo-evolutionary model of how three selection environments operate upon one another. The neo-evolutionary model enables us to appreciate both organizational integration in university-industry-government relations and differentiation among functions like the generation of intellectual capital, creation of wealth, and their attending legislation. The specification of innovation systems in terms of nations, sectors, cities, and regions can then be formulated as empirical questions: is synergy generated among functions in networks of relations? This Triple Helix model enables us to study the knowledge base of an urban economy in terms of a trade-off between locally stabilized and (potentially locked-in) trajectories versus the techno-economic and cultural development regimes which work with one more degree of freedom at the global level. The meta-stabilizing potentials of urban tec...

  8. Litt om evolusjonr spillteori. 1. ESS: Evolusjonrt Stabile Strategier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    Litt om evolusjonær spillteori. 1. ESS: Evolusjonært Stabile Strategier I klassisk spillteori har konstant i tid. Spørsm°alet er om man kan si noe om denne (stabile) strategifordelingen. 1.1. ESS. La være av befolk- ningen. Vi sier at p er en Evolusjonært Stabil Strategi (ESS) hvis p ikke kan bli invadert

  9. Evaluation of the performance of polypropylene fibers on soil stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangineni, Srinivas Meherji

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Chattanooga, TN 37416. Its product name is "Fibergrids". These are one inch long 1000 denier fibers having a specific gravity of 0. 91. Sand (SM) was stabilized with type I portland cement and clay (CL) was stabilized with lime. Moisture-Density tests... of soil aggregates, especially when small contents of chemical stabilizer (portland cement or lime) was added and the stress-strain curves for these composites have increased post cracking ductility which is an important property where there is impact...

  10. Stability of stainless-steel nanoparticle and water mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, You Young; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of such mixtures, especially for heavy metallic particles. For 0.017 wt% stainless steel-distilled water nanoparticle-fluid, the thermal conductivity increases by 8.3 % at the optimal stability condition of pH 11. Keywords: Stainless steel, Nanofluid, Stability... of larger particle density related to metallic particles, metallic nanoparticle-fluids have been studied much less than oxides or nanotube dispersions. An important characteristic of a nanoparticle-fluid mixture or nanofluid is its stability with respect...

  11. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  12. additive waste stabilization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mean of random variables which are naturally defined on the Clifford group. Graeme Smith; Debbie Leung 2006-12-15 408 Geometry of Weak Stability Boundaries Nonlinear Sciences...

  13. activity state stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    screened for compounds containing the pharmacophore. Forty-seven compounds resulted from Marshall, Garland R. 5 Stability and Activation Gaps of Parafermionic Hall States in the...

  14. Optimization Online - A stabilized model and an efficient solution ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Guigues

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 24, 2011 ... A stabilized model and an efficient solution method for the yearly optimal power management. Vincent Guigues(vguigues ***at*** puc-rio.br).

  15. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Sheng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directlyof the mirror with a Peltier element attached directly tostabilization based on a Peltier element have shown a

  16. attentional stability neural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Stability Region of a Neural Network with a General Distribution of Delays R Campbell, Sue Ann 38 A neural oscillator model of binaural auditory selective attention...

  17. Optimization Online - On the Dynamic Stability of Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor M. Zavala

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 31, 2011 ... On the Dynamic Stability of Electricity Markets. Victor M. Zavala (vzavala ***at*** mcs.anl.gov) Mihai Anitescu (anitescu ***at*** mcs.anl.gov).

  18. Nonrelativistic hydrogen type stability problems on nonparabolic 3-manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batu Güneysu

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend classical Euclidean stability theorems corresponding to the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians of ions with one electron to the setting of non parabolic Riemannian 3-manifolds.

  19. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

  20. apolipoprotein stabilized nanodisk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability wrt measurement error) Then can achieve GAS Assume: s.t. 12; Liberzon, Daniel 49 A Novel Function of Apolipoprotein E: Upregulation of ATP-Binding Cassette...

  1. A STABILIZED MODEL AND AN EFFICIENT SOLUTION METHOD ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a stabilized model for the electricity generation management problem ... electricity consumption, the availability rates of the thermal plants and the ...

  2. Stability estimates for the hyperbolic Dirichlet to Neumann map in ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this paper we consider the question of stability, that is, whether if two Dirichlet to .... associated to two metrics are the same to conclude that the harmonic ...

  3. Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Evaluation es011yakovleva2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion...

  4. Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed Acid Based Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes. Abstract: The Vanadium (V) cation structures in mixed acid based...

  5. Advanced Oxidation & Stabilization of PAN-Based Carbon Precursor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Oxidation & Stabilization of PAN-Based Carbon Precursor Fibers Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Oxidation &...

  6. Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Bob McCormick (PI) with Colleen Alexander, Teresa Alleman, Robb Barnitt, Wendy Clark, John Ireland, Keith...

  7. area uranium stabilization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gyroscope which meets the stringent stability requirements for high accuracy Hart, Gus 26 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

  8. Nevada 2012: Budget Stability and Hope for Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Robert P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guy (2011) “Ruling Bites Budget Plans,” Reno Gazette-University of Utah. Budget Stability and Hope forBureau (2010) Revenue and Budget. Carson City, Nevada:

  9. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

  10. On the Difficulty of Deciding Asymptotic Stability of Cubic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    to other families of nonlinear dynamics. The problem of deciding stability of ... Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. E-mail: a a a@mit.edu. The origin ...

  11. The robust stabilization problem for discrete-time descriptor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudiu Dinicu

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 23, 2014 ... Abstract: We investigate the robust stabilization problem for the descriptor discrete-time systems and build an optimal solution in the case when ...

  12. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Radion Physics, Stability and Cosmological issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Lorenzana, Abdel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N. Apdo. Post. 14-740, 07000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Santos, Eli [Centro de Estudios en Fisica y Matematicas Basicas y Aplicadas, UNACH, 4a Oriente Norte 1428, C.P. 29000 Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Moduli fields are a known ingredient of models that involve extra compact dimensions, as the Kaluza-Klein theories, String theory, and models with compact extra dimensions. They are scalar fields that emerge when the configuration of the compact space is perturbed. The radion is a particular example of this type of fields, which is associated to the variations of the total volume of compact space. Radions usually couple to all other fields, affecting the definition of coupling constants and gravity strength. They also modify gravitational potentials in a way that may be tested in table top experiments. Usually, these fields are run away modes which manifest the difficulties to stabilize the shape of the compact manifold of extra space. This is feature that can be a threat for cosmology on the early Universe. Here we provide a brief discussion of these general aspects of the radion physics.

  14. Stability of a jet in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilak, Miloš; Bagheri, Shervin; Chevalier, Mattias; Henningson, Dan S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have produced a fluid dynamics video with data from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a jet in crossflow at several low values of the velocity inflow ratio R. We show that, as the velocity ratio R increases, the flow evolves from simple periodic vortex shedding (a limit cycle) to more complicated quasi-periodic behavior, before finally exhibiting asymmetric chaotic motion. We also perform a stability analysis just above the first bifurcation, where R is the bifurcation parameter. Using the overlap of the direct and the adjoint eigenmodes, we confirm that the first instability arises in the shear layer downstream of the jet orifice on the boundary of the backflow region just behind the jet.

  15. Mesoscale Quantization and Self-Organized Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall D. Peters

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the world of technology, one of the most important forms of friction is that of rolling friction. Yet it is one of the least studied of all the known forms of energy dissipation. In the present experiments we investigate the oscillatory free-decay of a rigid cube, whose side-length is less than the diameter of the rigid cylinder on which it rests. The resulting free-decay is one of harmonic motion with damping. The non-dissipative character of the oscillation yields to a linear differential equation; however, the damping is found to involve more than a deterministic nonlinearity. Dominated by rolling friction, the damping is sensitive to the material properties of the contact surfaces. For `clean' surfaces of glass on glass, the decay shows features of mesoscale quantization and self-organized stability.

  16. Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

  17. Ab-initio simulations of chemical stability indicators of the bis-DGA-type molecule and its radiation degradation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koubsky, T.; Kalvoda, L.; Drab, M. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Dept. of Solid State Engineering, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For hydrometallurgical treatment of the high level liquid waste (HLLW) in the DIAMEX and SANEX processes, organic compounds of the bis-DGA family are used as cation extractants in apolar solvents. For the compound of m-xylylene-bis-diglycolamide high distribution coefficients for Eu and Am were found. Since the environment of the process is highly radioactive and acidic (nitric acid), it is necessary to ensure the stability of the extractants. In order to analyse the process theoretically, the molecule of m-xylylene-bis- diglycolamide and two of its degradation products were simulated by the DFT computational methods (PBE, RPBE, BLYP, B3LYP) available within the simulation environment DMol{sup 3} 6.1 and Gaussian 09 software. The local chemical stability of some locations of the molecule was assessed from the calculated stability indicators (electrostatic potential, Fukui function, HOMO localization). In connection with the chemical treatment, especially the stability against an electrophilic attack was tested. The results of calculated bond orders and spatial distribution of electrostatic potential and HOMO were are successfully correlated with the local and general stability determined by the experiment. These results should be helpful for the further development of the separation process. (authors)

  18. Levelling of microprofiles in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, K.G.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses current distribution phenomena in the smoothing of advancing and receding microprofiles during electrodeposition in the following areas: levelling in the presence of inhibitors, levelling in the presence of corrosive agents, and levelling caused by periodic current reversal. These phenomena are relevant to many commercial electrodeposition processes. Theoretical analysis of moving boundaries in electrodeposition is addressed, focusing on the levelling of microscopic surface contours. The literature relevant to the solution of current distribution problems is reviewed. Convection of inhibitors to the depth of trenches is evaluated using the finite element method, and characterized as a function of Reynolds number, notch angle, and depth. Secondary flows are shown to noticeably enhance transport into microscopic trenches only at high Peclet numbers, i.e. at very high flow velocities. The boundary element method (BEM) is used to analyze levelling caused by inhibitors consumed at the transport limiting rate during electrodeposition. It is predicted that (1) better levelling performance can be obtained if the microscopic surface waviness is oriented perpendicular to the convective flow, and (2) for surface roughness oriented parallel to the flow, there is an optimum boundary layer thickness, or flux of additive, which results in superior levelling performance. Profilometry and photomicrography is applied to obtain the current distribution, current efficiency and levelling performance on novel microprofiled electrodes for two orientations with respect to the fluid flow during nickel electrodeposition in the presence of coumarin. Slightly better levelling occurs in flows transverse to grooves, and the deposit thickness increases in the flow direction. It is concluded that coumarin acts by simultaneously lowering the current efficiency, and blocking metal deposition. 331 refs., 86 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Evaluation of Solvita compost stability and maturity tests for assessment of quality of end-products from mixed latrine style compost toilets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Geoffrey B., E-mail: geoff.hill@geog.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Geography, 1984 West Mall, Vancouver, Canada V6T 1Z2 (Canada); Baldwin, Susan A. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Vinnerås, Bjorn [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7032, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Solvita® stability and maturity tests used on composting toilet end-product. • Solvita® ammonia better suited in evaluation of feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. • No clear value of Solvita® stability test due to prevalent inhibition of decomposition by ammonia. - Abstract: It is challenging and expensive to monitor and test decentralized composting toilet systems, yet critical to prevent the mismanagement of potentially harmful and pathogenic end-product. Recent studies indicate that mixed latrine composting toilets can be inhibited by high ammonia content, a product of urea hydrolysis. Urine-diverting vermicomposting toilets are better able to accomplish the goals of remote site human waste management by facilitating the consumption of fecal matter by earthworms, which are highly sensitive to ammonia. The reliability of Solvita® compost stability and maturity tests were evaluated as a means of determining feedstock suitability for vermicomposting (ammonia) and end-product stability/completeness (carbon dioxide). A significant linear regression between Solvita® ammonia and free ammonia gas was found. Solvita® ranking of maturity did not correspond to ranking assigned by ammonium:nitrate standards. Solvita® ammonia values 4 and 5 contained ammonia levels below earthworm toxicity limits in 80% and 100% of samples respectively indicative of their use in evaluating feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. Solvita® stability tests did not correlate with carbon dioxide evolution tests nor ranking of stability by the same test, presumably due to in situ inhibition of decomposition and microbial respiration by ammonia which were reported by the Solvita® CO{sub 2} test as having high stability values.

  20. The Role of Energy Storage for Mini-Grid Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Role of Energy Storage for Mini-Grid Stabilization Report IEA-PVPS T11-02:2011 hal-00802927 Program The role of energy storage for mini-grid stabilization IEA PVPS Task 11 Report IEA-PVPS T11 Foreword 5 Executive Summary 7 1 Introduction 10 2 Scope of the study 14 3 The role of energy storage

  1. Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homsy, G.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplished and proposed work for the fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media. Topics discussed include: viscous fingering in miscible displacements; polymer flow interactions in free shear layers of viscoelastic fluids; effect of nonmonotonic viscosity profiles on the stability of miscible displacements in porous media; and references. (JL)

  2. Stability and Controllability of Planar, Conewise Linear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broucke, Mireille E.

    Stability and Controllability of Planar, Conewise Linear Systems Ari Arapostathis a,2 and Mireille and controllability of piecewise-linear systems defined on a conic partition of R2. This includes necessary. Key words: switched systems, piecewise linear systems, stability, controllability 1 Introduction

  3. Stability Improvement of Wind Farms using Shunt and Series Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Stability Improvement of Wind Farms using Shunt and Series Compensation T. F. Orchi, Student Member in stability improvement of wind farms. Static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) and static synchronous series enhance the performance of wind farms, however, they can be selected for a system depending on the system

  4. A New Environmentally Friendly AL/ZR-Based Clay Stabilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Monier, Ilham Abdallah

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay stabilizers are means to prevent fines migration and clay swelling, which are caused by the contact of formation with low salinity or high pH brines at high temperature. Previous clay stabilizers including: Al and Zr compounds and cationic...

  5. Stability of K-Means Clustering Alexander Rakhlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakhlin, Alexander "Sasha"

    Stability of K-Means Clustering Alexander Rakhlin Department of Computer Science UC Berkeley phrase K-means clustering as an empirical risk minimization procedure over a class HK and explicitly calculate the covering number for this class. Next, we show that stability of K-means clustering

  6. On the Simultaneous Stabilization of Three or More Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the Simultaneous Stabilization of Three or More Plants Christophe Fonte, Michel Zasadzinski stabilization of three multivariable plants is addressed. We consider the general case where the existence controller for three multivariable plants. The sufficient conditions given in this paper lead

  7. STABILIZING LINEAR MPC WITH EFFICIENT PRIORITIZED INFEASIBILITY HANDLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    is illustrated on a simulated distillation column, and we present a novel stability result for this infeasibilitySTABILIZING LINEAR MPC WITH EFFICIENT PRIORITIZED INFEASIBILITY HANDLING Jostein Vada Olav predictive controller fails to compute a control input, all practical MPC implementations should havea means

  8. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  9. Borehole stability analysis at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Henry

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coporo-1 is an 18,000-ft dry hole located in the tectonically active foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. A mechanical stability analysis allowed explaining most of the drilling stability-related problems and elaborating an optimal mud...

  10. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams L. E. Zakharov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a stabilization mechanism independent of the plasma properties. 2. Interaction of lithium streams with externalStabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams L. E. Zakharov, Princeton Plasma Physics-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated

  11. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams L. E. Zakharov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    a stabilization mechanism independent of the plasma properties. 2 Interaction of lithium streams with externalStabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams L. E. Zakharov, Princeton Plasma Physics-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated

  12. ON THE ACOUSTIC SINGLE LAYER POTENTIAL: STABILIZATION AND FOURIER ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffa, Annalisa

    ON THE ACOUSTIC SINGLE LAYER POTENTIAL: STABILIZATION AND FOURIER ANALYSIS A. BUFFA AND S. SAUTER in the stability and convergence estimates attains its minumum. Key words. Acoustic scattering, Galerkin boundary discretizations for the Helmholtz problem suffer from the pollution effect, i.e., the constants in the Galerkin

  13. Initial assessment of the MHD stability of TMX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexsen, W.E.

    1983-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In its operation to date TMX-U has reached values of beta which, for all except the hot electron beta, are close to the proposal values and has not encountered MHD stability problems. The hot electron beta values are presently limited by gyrotron output power and pulse length as well as ion confinement time. Further exploration of stability awaits full thermal barrier operation.

  14. Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law Emmanuel Witrant the problem of remote stabilization via communication networks involving some time- varying delays of known average dynamics. This problem arises when the control law is remotely implemented and leads

  15. Contribution Allocation for Voltage Stability In Deregulated Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution Allocation for Voltage Stability In Deregulated Power Systems Garng M. Huang, Senior, stability margin I. INTRODUCTION The deregulated power system is based on transactions; each part Member, IEEE, Kun Men Abstract: With deregulation of power systems, it is of great importance to know who

  16. Generalized Lyapunov Function for Stability Analysis of Interconnected Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Generalized Lyapunov Function for Stability Analysis of Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud for formulating generalized Lyapunov function for the stability analysis of interconnected power systems. Lyapunov function is formulated based on the total energy of power system where the system is considered as a single

  17. biocompatibility, stability, , p-p multi-drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    , biocompatibility, stability, , p-p .2 Ø multi-drug resistance gene co- delivered photothermal , , . Ø , biocompatibility, stability, , p-p .2 Ø multi-drug resistance gene co graphene oxide-para amino benzoic acid nanosheet as effective drug delivery system to treat drug resistant

  18. Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{ Maruti Uppalapati- or nanoscale active transport when integrated into microscale devices. However, the stability and limited shelf to their implementation. Here we demonstrate that freeze-drying or critical point-drying kinesins adsorbed to glass

  19. On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study With the increase in transactions on the bulk power system, there is a critical need to determine transient security

  20. Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale modelling in short-term prediction Jake Nielsen, Henrik Madsen, John Tøfting Title: Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale. Mesoscale modelling has been carried out using KAMM at this location. The characteristics of the measured

  1. Characterization and stabilization of arsenic in water treatment residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Hun Young

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -arsenic compounds. However, it is suggested that the ordinary Portland cement (OPC) should be added with the lime for the long term stabilization because lime can be slowly consumed when directly exposed to atmospheric CO2. The solidification and stabilization (S...

  2. Stabilization of a purely dipolar quantum gas against collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    statistical effect that also appears in an ideal gas, the physics of Bose­Einstein condensates (BECs, stabilizing a purely dipolar quantum gas. In the case of a homogeneous Bose­Einstein condensate (BECLETTERS Stabilization of a purely dipolar quantum gas against collapse T. KOCH, T. LAHAYE, J. METZ

  3. Stability radius of an optimal schedule: a survey and recent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdeburg, Universität

    Stability radius of an optimal schedule: a survey and recent developments Sotskov / Tanaev / Werner Abstract The usual assumption that the processing times of the operations are known in advance on the problem data. We survey some recent results in the calculation of the stability radius of an optimal

  4. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  5. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  6. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

  7. Challenges for Large-Field Inflation and Moduli Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfried Buchmuller; Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Alexander Westphal; Clemens Wieck; Martin Wolfgang Winkler

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the interplay between K\\"ahler moduli stabilization and chaotic inflation in supergravity. While heavy moduli decouple from inflation in the supersymmetric limit, supersymmetry breaking generically introduces non-decoupling effects. These lead to inflation driven by a soft mass term, $m_\\varphi^2 \\sim m m_{3/2}$, where $m$ is a supersymmetric mass parameter. This scenario needs no stabilizer field, but the stability of moduli during inflation imposes a large supersymmetry breaking scale, $m_{3/2} \\gg H$, and a careful choice of initial conditions. This is illustrated in three prominent examples of moduli stabilization: KKLT stabilization, K\\"ahler Uplifting, and the Large Volume Scenario. Remarkably, all models have a universal effective inflaton potential which is flattened compared to quadratic inflation. Hence, they share universal predictions for the CMB observables, in particular a lower bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r \\gtrsim 0.05$.

  8. The role of molybdenum additions and prior deformation on acicular ferrite formation in microalloyed Nb-Ti low-carbon line-pipe steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Zhenghua [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)], E-mail: n22323784@yahoo.com; Stumpf, Waldo [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructures in Nb-Ti-microalloyed line-pipe steels with various molybdenum additions, consisted mostly of acicular ferrite plus polygonal ferrite after hot rolling and rapid cooling. Structure-sensitive surface relief after etching on shadowed extraction replicas, allowed quantification of the acicular and polygonal ferrite contents. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams of two alloys, one Mo-free and the other containing 0.22% Mo, were determined for cooling rates from 0.1 to 40 deg. C s{sup -1} without and with prior deformation of the austenite below the nil-recrystallisation temperature. Molybdenum additions slightly enhanced the acicular ferrite formation in the strain-free austenite whereas prior deformation had a much greater effect, and strongly promoted acicular ferrite formation in both alloys. Thin foil electron microscopy of acicular ferrite in these low-inclusion content alloys showed a preference for parallel acicular ferrite laths with less 'chaotically' nucleated laths.

  9. Promoting system-level learning from project-level lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong, Amos A. de, E-mail: amosdejong@gmail.com [Innovation Management, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Section of Environmental Governance, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Piety R., E-mail: piety.runhaar@wur.nl [Organisational Psychology and Human Resource Development, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend J., E-mail: Akolhoff@eia.nl [The Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, Utrecht (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@geo.uu.nl [Department of Innovation and Environment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A growing number of low and middle income nations (LMCs) have adopted some sort of system for environmental impact assessment (EIA). However, generally many of these EIA systems are characterised by a low performance in terms of timely information dissemination, monitoring and enforcement after licencing. Donor actors (such as the World Bank) have attempted to contribute to a higher performance of EIA systems in LMCs by intervening at two levels: the project level (e.g. by providing scoping advice or EIS quality review) and the system level (e.g. by advising on EIA legislation or by capacity building). The aims of these interventions are environmental protection in concrete cases and enforcing the institutionalisation of environmental protection, respectively. Learning by actors involved is an important condition for realising these aims. A relatively underexplored form of learning concerns learning at EIA system-level via project level donor interventions. This 'indirect' learning potentially results in system changes that better fit the specific context(s) and hence contribute to higher performances. Our exploratory research in Ghana and the Maldives shows that thus far, 'indirect' learning only occurs incidentally and that donors play a modest role in promoting it. Barriers to indirect learning are related to the institutional context rather than to individual characteristics. Moreover, 'indirect' learning seems to flourish best in large projects where donors achieved a position of influence that they can use to evoke reflection upon system malfunctions. In order to enhance learning at all levels donors should thereby present the outcomes of the intervention elaborately (i.e. discuss the outcomes with a large audience), include practical suggestions about post-EIS activities such as monitoring procedures and enforcement options and stimulate the use of their advisory reports to generate organisational memory and ensure a better information dissemination.

  10. Bench-scale simulation of quenching and stabilization of MIS retorts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, F.A. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Boysen, J.E. [Resource Technology Corp., Inc., Laramie, WY (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted to evaluate in situ retort stabilization methods. The objective of the bench-scale simulations was to evaluate possible post-retorting operating procedures for the optimum cleaning of spent retorts. After simulating conditions of modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the time retorting had ended, procedures to accelerate retort cleanup without using large volumes of water were investigated. Samples from various levels of the retort were used to determine the amount of water-soluble constituents in the spent shale and the rehydration characteristics of the spent shale.

  11. Bench-scale simulation of quenching and stabilization of MIS retorts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, F.A. (Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)); Boysen, J.E. (Resource Technology Corp., Inc., Laramie, WY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted to evaluate in situ retort stabilization methods. The objective of the bench-scale simulations was to evaluate possible post-retorting operating procedures for the optimum cleaning of spent retorts. After simulating conditions of modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the time retorting had ended, procedures to accelerate retort cleanup without using large volumes of water were investigated. Samples from various levels of the retort were used to determine the amount of water-soluble constituents in the spent shale and the rehydration characteristics of the spent shale.

  12. Observation of the long term stability of water stations in the Pierre Auger surface detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allekotte, I.; Arisaka, K.; Barnhill, D.; Bertou, Xavier; Bonifazi, C.; Healy, M.D.; Lee, J.; Medina, C.; Ohnuki, T.; Tripathi, A.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a study examining the long-term behavior of Pierre Auger surface detectors is presented. The station properties, such as water quality, liner reflectivity and the water level must be continuously monitored. Such monitoring provides information on the long-term stability of the detectors, which have been designed to operate for twenty years. Using pulse height and shapes of cosmic ray muons, water quality changes are monitored and a technique developed to identify and monitor long-term trends in the array.

  13. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  14. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  15. Stability of edge states in strained graphene (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big* - ' E 1 1"Stability of

  16. High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHigh Level

  17. THE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    profound impacts on the distribution of sediments sources of mineral and water resources the stability IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGE "Much

  18. Islands in the stream: The effect of plasma flow on tearing stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Brennan, D. P. [University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing plasma flow clearly decreases the stability of tearing modes in multiple regimes (sawtooth, hybrid) in both high- and low-aspect-ratio tokamaks (DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], Joint European Torus [M. Keilhacker and the JET Team, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 301 (1999)], National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng, Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], each with distinct means of lessening rotation). Further, reducing flow makes pre-existing 'saturated' islands larger at the same beta (beta). Thus lower plasma flow impairs high-beta operation owing both to the destabilization and to the impact of tearing-mode islands. Experimental results suggest that flow shear (not flow) at the tearing rational surface is classically stabilizing, making the effective tearing stability index DELTA{sup '} of the total current density profile more negative (more stable). In this picture, with profiles and all else the same, the minimum metastable beta at which neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can destabilize is proportional to -DELTA{sup '} and hence lower flow and flow shear lead to possible destabilization (depending on seeding) at lower beta. Similarly, if destabilized, the saturated NTM island width is proportional to -beta/DELTA{sup '} and thus increases as flow and flow shear are reduced. A working model gives a significant level of stabilizing shear if the plasma toroidal angular flow shear -dOMEGA{sub p}hi/dr at a given rational surface is of order of the inverse of the product of the local values of the parallel magnetic shear length L{sub s} and the Alfven time tau{sub A}. Experimental data are fitted for the effect of this normalization of flow shear in a simple empirical model for both onset and saturation of tearing modes. Most theoretical literature is on the consequence of flow shear on tearing stability at zero beta; tokamaks at high beta have large magnetic Prandtl number (an issue for the sign of the flow effect) and very large Lundquist number. It is in this regime that theory will be compared with experimentally based empirical models. The consequence for future tokamaks with low rotation may be lower tearing stability than now expected.

  19. Space elevator systems level analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laubscher, B. E. (Bryan E.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Space Elevator (SE) represents a major paradigm shift in space access. It involves new, untried technologies in most of its subsystems. Thus the successful construction of the SE requires a significant amount of development, This in turn implies a high level of risk for the SE. This paper will present a systems level analysis of the SE by subdividing its components into their subsystems to determine their level of technological maturity. such a high-risk endeavor is to follow a disciplined approach to the challenges. A systems level analysis informs this process and is the guide to where resources should be applied in the development processes. It is an efficient path that, if followed, minimizes the overall risk of the system's development. systems level analysis is that the overall system is divided naturally into its subsystems, and those subsystems are further subdivided as appropriate for the analysis. By dealing with the complex system in layers, the parameter space of decisions is kept manageable. Moreover, A rational way to manage One key aspect of a resources are not expended capriciously; rather, resources are put toward the biggest challenges and most promising solutions. This overall graded approach is a proven road to success. The analysis includes topics such as nanotube technology, deployment scenario, power beaming technology, ground-based hardware and operations, ribbon maintenance and repair and climber technology.

  20. Entropic Stabilization of Proteins by TMAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Samuel S; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the mechanism of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) induced stabilization of folded protein states, we systematically investigated the action of TMAO on several model dipeptides (Leucine, L2, Serine, S2, Glutamine, Q2, Lysine, K2, and Glycine, G2) in order to elucidate the effect of residue-specific TMAO interactions on small fragments of solvent-exposed conformations of the denatured states of proteins. We find that TMAO preferentially hydrogen bonds with the exposed dipeptide backbone, but generally not with nonpolar or polar side chains. However, interactions with the positively charged Lys are substantially greater than with the backbone. The dipeptide G2, is a useful model of pure amide backbone, interacts with TMAO by forming a hydrogen bond between the amide nitrogen and the oxygen in TMAO. In contrast, TMAO is depleted from the protein backbone in the hexapeptide G6, which shows that the length of the polypeptide chain is relevant in aqueous TMAO solutions. These simulations lead to the hypot...