National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for level stabilize prior

  1. Level-set segmentation of pulmonary nodules in megavolt electronic portal images using a CT prior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schildkraut, J. S.; Prosser, N.; Savakis, A.; Gomez, J.; Nazareth, D.; Singh, A. K.; Malhotra, H. K.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary nodules present unique problems during radiation treatment due to nodule position uncertainty that is caused by respiration. The radiation field has to be enlarged to account for nodule motion during treatment. The purpose of this work is to provide a method of locating a pulmonary nodule in a megavolt portal image that can be used to reduce the internal target volume (ITV) during radiation therapy. A reduction in the ITV would result in a decrease in radiation toxicity to healthy tissue. Methods: Eight patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were used in this study. CT scans that include the pulmonary nodule were captured with a GE Healthcare LightSpeed RT 16 scanner. Megavolt portal images were acquired with a Varian Trilogy unit equipped with an AS1000 electronic portal imaging device. The nodule localization method uses grayscale morphological filtering and level-set segmentation with a prior. The treatment-time portion of the algorithm is implemented on a graphical processing unit. Results: The method was retrospectively tested on eight cases that include a total of 151 megavolt portal image frames. The method reduced the nodule position uncertainty by an average of 40% for seven out of the eight cases. The treatment phase portion of the method has a subsecond execution time that makes it suitable for near-real-time nodule localization. Conclusions: A method was developed to localize a pulmonary nodule in a megavolt portal image. The method uses the characteristics of the nodule in a prior CT scan to enhance the nodule in the portal image and to identify the nodule region by level-set segmentation. In a retrospective study, the method reduced the nodule position uncertainty by an average of 40% for seven out of the eight cases studied.

  2. Stabilization of liquid low-level and mixed wastes: a treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, S.; Cheng, Yu-Cheng; Yellowhorse, L.; Peterson, P.

    1996-02-01

    A treatability study has been conducted on liquid low-level and mixed wastes using the stabilization agents Aquaset, Aquaset II, Aquaset II-H, Petroset, Petroset-H, and Petroset and Petroset II. A total of 40 different waste types with activities ranging from 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}4} curies/ml have been stabilized. Reported data for each waste include its chemical and radiological composition and the optimum composition or range of compositions (weight of agent/volume of waste) for each stabilization agent used. All wastes were successfully stabilized with one or more of the stabilization agents and all final waste forms passed the Paint Filter Liquids Test (EPA Method 9095).

  3. Dynamic Stability and Thermodynamic Characterization in an Enzymatic Reaction at the Single Molecule Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moisés Santillán

    2011-05-27

    In this work we study, at the single molecular level, the thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of an enzymatic reaction comprising a rate limiting step. We investigate how the stability of the enzyme-state stationary probability distribution, the reaction velocity, and its efficiency of energy conversion depend on the system parameters. We employ in this study a recently introduced formalism for performing a multiscale thermodynamic analysis in continuous-time discrete-state stochastic systems.

  4. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badescu, Viorel; Bolonkin, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with...

  5. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  6. Chemical reactions at the single molecule level Two molecules may have greater stability as a complex or as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Réka

    Chemical reactions at the single molecule level · Two molecules may have greater stability is the more favorable one · For two molecules to undergo a chemical reaction, they must encounter each other. · In a gaseous mixture of two molecular species the average probability that a reaction takes place is = (c dt

  7. Prior distribution Andrew Gelman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Prior distribution Andrew Gelman Volume 3, pp 1634­1637 in Encyclopedia of Environmetrics (ISBN, 2002 #12;Prior distribution The prior distribution is a key part of Bayesian infer- ence (see Bayesian with the probability distribution of new data to yield the posterior distribution, which in turn is used for future

  8. Compositional Policy Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, David

    2013-04-12

    This paper describes a probabilistic framework for incorporating structured inductive biases into reinforcement learning. These inductive biases arise from policy priors, probability distributions over optimal policies. ...

  9. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  10. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  11. Seepage flow-stability analysis of the riverbank of Saigon river due to river water level fluctuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oya, A; Hiraoka, N; Fujimoto, M; Fukagawa, R

    2015-01-01

    The Saigon River, which flows through the center of Ho Chi Minh City, is of critical importance for the development of the city as forms as the main water supply and drainage channel for the city. In recent years, riverbank erosion and failures have become more frequent along the Saigon River, causing flooding and damage to infrastructures near the river. A field investigation and numerical study has been undertaken by our research group to identify factors affecting the riverbank failure. In this paper, field investigation results obtained from multiple investigation points on the Saigon River are presented, followed by a comprehensive coupled finite element analysis of riverbank stability when subjected to river water level fluctuations. The river water level fluctuation has been identified as one of the main factors affecting the riverbank failure, i.e. removal of the balancing hydraulic forces acting on the riverbank during water drawdown.

  12. COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, J.

    2013-01-01

    90e COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION J. Wrathall, T.of coal during combustion. The process involves the additionCOAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION Lawrence Berkeley

  13. In Situ Stabilization of Inactive Low Level Waste Pipelines in the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cange, J.; Cox, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coye, St. [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Skinner, R. [US DOE Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shaw, K. [Restoration Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McGinley, S. [Pro2Serve, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contained an inactive waste pipeline system consisting of approximately 12 kilometers of buried waste pipelines and over 142 m{sup 3} in surface/subsurface appurtenances (e.g., vents, valve pits, pump vaults, etc.). Historically, the system was used to transport liquid low level and process waste between generator facilities in Melton Valley, storage and disposal sites in Melton Valley, and storage/treatment facilities in Bethel Valley. The selected remedy in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for inactive pipelines was isolation, removal, or stabilization. Pipeline remediation activities began in the summer of 2005 and were completed in the spring of 2006. The task entailed an iterative process of selecting pipeline access points, excavating and exposing pipelines, performing tapping, draining and cutting activities, either installing fittings for grouting or plugging and capping the lines. Grouting was accomplished using paired access points, with one location serving as the grout injection point and the other as vent/drain and grout confirmation point. Grouting was conducted by pumping a cement-bentonite grout into the specially installed fittings and typically proceeded from a low point to a high point to ensure complete filling of the pipeline (i.e., no void space). The project successfully grouted a total of 8,454 meters (linear distance) of pipeline; another 3,573 meters of pipeline was stabilized through isolation. (authors)

  14. Fermi level stabilization and band edge energies in Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detert, Douglas M.; Tom, Kyle B.; Dubon, Oscar D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Battaglia, Corsin; Javey, Ali [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Denlinger, Jonathan D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lim, Sunnie H. N. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, Kin M.; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We have measured the band edge energies of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O thin films as a function of composition by three independent techniques: we determine the Fermi level stabilization energy by pinning the Fermi level with ion irradiation, measure the binding energy of valence band states and core levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and probe shifts in the conduction band and valence band density of states using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, respectively. The three techniques find consensus in explaining the origin of compositional trends in the optical-bandgap narrowing upon Cd incorporation in wurtzite ZnO and widening upon Zn incorporation in rocksalt CdO. The conduction band minimum is found to be stationary for both wurtzite and rocksalt alloys, and a significant upward rise of the valence band maximum accounts for the majority of these observed bandgap changes. Given these band alignments, alloy disorder scattering is found to play a negligible role in decreasing the electron mobility for all alloys. These band alignment details, combined with the unique optical and electrical properties of the two phase regimes, make CdZnO alloys attractive candidates for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  15. Logistic regression Weakly informative priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Bayesian generalized linear models default p #12;Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Classical logistic regression The problem of separation Bayesian solution Logistic regression -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 y = logit

  16. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after low dose radiation exposure. Cells viability/cytotoxicity analysis data are currently being analyzed to determine how these endpoints are affected under our experimental conditions. The results from this study will be translatable to risk assessment for assigning limits to radiation workers, pre-dosing for more effective radiotherapy and the consequences of long duration space flight. The data from this study has been presented a various scientific meetings/workshops and a manuscript, containing the findings, is currently being prepared for publication. Due to unforeseen challenges in collecting the data and standardizing experimental procedures, the second and third aims have not been completed. However, attempts will be made, based on the availability of funds, to continue this project so that these aims can be satisfied.

  17. Controlling risk prior to offshore application development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Controlling risk prior to offshore application development Cor-Jan Jager, Stefan Vos, Michiel;Controlling risk prior to offshore application development 2 Controlling risk prior to offshore application This master thesis investigates operational risk occurrence in offshore (custom) application development

  18. Bayesian Policy Search with Policy Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, David

    We consider the problem of learning to act in partially observable, continuous-state-and-action worlds where we have abstract prior knowledge about the structure of the optimal policy in the form of a distribution over ...

  19. Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Models with Structured Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Models with Structured Priors W:D:Penny 1 and S:J:Roberts 2 (1) learning algorithm for param- eter estimation and model order selection in Multivariate Autoregressive (MAR and electro-encephalogram (EEG) data. 2 #12; 1 Introduction The Multivariate Autoregressive (MAR) process

  20. Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008 Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008 Document covers the adjustment data report for fiscal years prior to...

  1. Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

    1984-01-01

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  2. Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches for Policy and Project Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Free, Prior, and...

  3. Membrane stabilizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  4. Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, J.B.

    1997-07-17

    This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  5. Necessary conditions for stabilization agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zili.; Jacoby, Henry D.

    The Climate Convention calls for stabilization of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper considers the issues that must be faced in formulating a plan to meet any such target, using a proposed CO2 level ...

  6. Laser Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

  7. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCE; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; PLUTONIUM; PYROCHLORE; STABILITY; THERMODYNAMICS; WASTE FORMS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; BACKFILLING; RADIOACTIVE WASTE...

  8. Theoretical priors on modified growth parametrisations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yong-Seon; Hollenstein, Lukas; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: Lukas.Hollenstein@unige.ch E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    Next generation surveys will observe the large-scale structure of the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. This will enable us to test the relationships between matter over-densities, the curvature perturbation and the Newtonian potential. Any large-distance modification of gravity or exotic nature of dark energy modifies these relationships as compared to those predicted in the standard smooth dark energy model based on General Relativity. In linear theory of structure growth such modifications are often parameterised by virtue of two functions of space and time that enter the relation of the curvature perturbation to, first, the matter over- density, and second, the Newtonian potential. We investigate the predictions for these functions in Brans-Dicke theory, clustering dark energy models and interacting dark energy models. We find that each theory has a distinct path in the parameter space of modified growth. Understanding these theoretical priors on the parameterisations of modified growth is essential to reveal the nature of cosmic acceleration with the help of upcoming observations of structure formation.

  9. Spanish Major Requirements Option B: Literature and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior to Fall 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Spanish Major Requirements Option B: Literature and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior: Introduction to Hispanic Cultures 224: Introduction to Hispanic Literatures Literature (12 credits) Spanish 322: Survey of Early Hispanic Literature _____ another 300-level literature survey (324: Modern Spanish, 326

  10. U31: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Electronic Stability Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Delorenzis, Damon; LaClair, Tim J; Lim, Alvin; Pape, Doug

    2011-01-01

    A team led by NTRCI is working to improve the roll and yaw stability of heavy duty combination trucks through developing stability algorithms, assembling demonstration hardware, and investigating robust wireless communication. Modern electronic stability control (ESC) products automatically slow a vehicle rounding a corner too quickly or apply individual brakes when necessary to improve the steering characteristics of a vehicle. Air brake systems in North America provide no electronic communication between a tractor and semitrailer, limiting the degree to which control systems can be optimized. Prior research has demonstrated stability improvements where dynamic measurements and control commands are communicated between units of a vehicle. Three related activities were undertaken: (1) Develop an algorithm for the optimum yaw and roll control of a combination vehicle. Vehicle state parameters needed to control the vehicle and the proper brake response were determined. An integrated stability control for the tractor and semitrailer requires communication between the two units. Dynamic models were used to assess the algorithm. (2) Implement the ESC algorithm in the laboratory. Hardware components suitable for the harsh environment for measurement, sensor-to-controller communication, and semitrailer-to-tractor communication and brake actuation were specified and assembled as a working system. The goal was to collect the needed vehicle state information, transmit the information to the ESC system, and then actuate the brakes in response to controller commands. (3) Develop a wireless network with the data rate and reliability necessary to communicate dynamic signals for a vehicle stability control system. Adaptive connectivity-aware, multi-hop routing was selected because it can perform in the harsh environment where packet collisions and fading often will exist. The protocol is to give high priority to urgent messages.

  11. Aperture Photometry Uncertainties assuming Priors and Correlated Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    1 Aperture Photometry Uncertainties assuming Priors and Correlated Noise F. Masci, version 2.0, 10 aperture photometry assuming (i) prior pixel-flux uncertainties are available for the image (e.g., computed photometry is being performed. One way to do this is to compare the uncertainties with the local RMS pixel

  12. Technical Note Diffusion-based spatial priors for functional magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    .M. Harrison, W. Penny, J. Daunizeau, and K.J. Friston Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL, London, UK priors [Harrison, L.M., Penny, W., Ashburner, J., Trujillo-Barreto, N., Friston, K.J., 2007. Diffusion are a generalization of conventional Laplacian priors [Penny, W.D., Trujillo-Barreto, N.J., Friston, K.J., 2005

  13. Chassis stabilization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claxton, Gerald L. (Fresno, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A stabilizing suspension system is provided for vehicles carrying telescopic booms or aerial work platforms having a fixed axle and a oscillating axle. Hydraulic cylinders are connected to each end of the oscillating axle, each cylinder being capable of extending and retracting. An off level sensor senses the angle of tilt of the chassis in both left and right directions and, when a predetermined threshold of tilt has been detected, the hydraulic cylinder on the downhill side of the chassis is locked against retracting, but is free to move in the downhill direction to allow the downhill wheel to remain in contact with the ground.

  14. A Bayesian Approach for Image Segmentation with Shape Priors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Hang; Yang, Qing; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-06-20

    Color and texture have been widely used in image segmentation; however, their performance is often hindered by scene ambiguities, overlapping objects, or missingparts. In this paper, we propose an interactive image segmentation approach with shape prior models within a Bayesian framework. Interactive features, through mouse strokes, reduce ambiguities, and the incorporation of shape priors enhances quality of the segmentation where color and/or texture are not solely adequate. The novelties of our approach are in (i) formulating the segmentation problem in a well-de?ned Bayesian framework with multiple shape priors, (ii) ef?ciently estimating parameters of the Bayesian model, and (iii) multi-object segmentation through user-speci?ed priors. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a set of natural and synthetic images.

  15. Using Prior Knowledge in the Design of Classifiers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahrokh Esfahani, Mohammad

    2014-04-18

    Small samples are commonplace in genomic/proteomic classification, the result being inadequate classifier design and poor error estimation. A promising approach to alleviate the problem is the use of prior knowledge. On ...

  16. Curvature Prior for MRF-Based Segmentation and Shape Inpainting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Pushmeet

    Kohli2 , and Carsten Rother2 1 Center for Machine Perception, Czech Technical University 2 Microsoft with an 8-connected pairwise MRF which encodes a standard length prior. (c) Completion of the shape with our

  17. Presentation: Introduction to Current & Prior Studies of the DOE Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Comission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories on current and prior studies of the DOE Laboratories delivered by Mark Taylor, Susannah Howieson, and...

  18. Prior experience and its effects on audience design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Kerry

    2008-06-27

    PRIOR EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON AUDIENCE DESIGN. Abstract Objective Audience design involves tailoring utterances to suit the needs of your partner. The current experiment was interested in whether a speaker’s ...

  19. Process to upgrade coal liquids by extraction prior to hydrodenitrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Abraham (Overbrook Hills, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE); Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Scheibel, Edward G. (Media, PA)

    1982-01-01

    Oxygen compounds are removed, e.g., by extraction, from a coal liquid prior to its hydrogenation. As a result, compared to hydrogenation of such a non-treated coal liquid, the rate of nitrogen removal is increased.

  20. What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

    The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

  1. Material Stabilization Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-09-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

  2. Prior-Independent Mechanisms for Scheduling Shuchi Chawla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartline, Jason D.

    ignoring incentives (a.k.a. the first-best solution) cannot be implemented in an incentive compatible considers inputs drawn from a distribution (a.k.a. the prior) and looks for the mechanism that maximizes the objective in expectation over the distribution (a.k.a. the second-best solution). The second-best solution

  3. POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE ACCREDITATION OF PRIOR LEARNING (APL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    to enter a programme of study at an advanced point of entry (for example, year two) on the basis IS AN ACCREDITATION OF PRIOR LEARNING (APL) CLAIM NOT REQUIRED? 5 2.1 The applicant is requesting entry to a course on the basis of non-standard qualifications and/or experience. 5 2.2 The applicant is requesting Direct Entry

  4. Prior knowledge in economic applications of data mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feelders, Ad

    -monotonic counterparts. 1 Introduction The estimation of economic relationships from empirical data is studied and explanatory variables. Economic theory would state that people tend to buy less of a product if its pricePrior knowledge in economic applications of data mining A.J. Feelders Tilburg University Faculty

  5. PUBLISHED VERSION The effects of impurities and core pressure on pedestal stability in Joint European Torus (JET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author with the stability calculations using the experimental profiles. Numerically, we find that the consistency

  6. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Kröll

    2006-11-05

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  7. Precursors prior to type IIn supernova explosions are common: Precursor rates, properties, and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Steinbok, Aviram; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Tal, David; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Shaviv, Nir J. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    There is a growing number of Type IIn supernovae (SNe) which present an outburst prior to their presumably final explosion. These precursors may affect the SN display, and are likely related to poorly charted phenomena in the final stages of stellar evolution. By coadding Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) images taken prior to the explosion, here we present a search for precursors in a sample of 16 Type IIn SNe. We find five SNe IIn that likely have at least one possible precursor event (PTF 10bjb, SN 2010mc, PTF 10weh, SN 2011ht, and PTF 12cxj), three of which are reported here for the first time. For each SN we calculate the control time. We find that precursor events among SNe IIn are common: at the one-sided 99% confidence level, >50% of SNe IIn have at least one pre-explosion outburst that is brighter than 3 × 10{sup 7} L{sub ?} taking place up to 1/3 yr prior to the SN explosion. The average rate of such precursor events during the year prior to the SN explosion is likely ? 1 yr{sup –1}, and fainter precursors are possibly even more common. Ignoring the two weakest precursors in our sample, the precursors rate we find is still on the order of one per year. We also find possible correlations between the integrated luminosity of the precursor and the SN total radiated energy, peak luminosity, and rise time. These correlations are expected if the precursors are mass-ejection events, and the early-time light curve of these SNe is powered by interaction of the SN shock and ejecta with optically thick circumstellar material.

  8. RCRA facility stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program`s management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies.

  9. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  10. Distance Priors from \\emph{Planck} 2015 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Guo Huang; Ke Wang; Sai Wang

    2015-09-03

    We update the distance priors by adopting $Planck~ \\textrm{TT,TE,EE}+\\textrm{lowP}$ data released in 2015, and our results impose at least $30\\%$ tighter constraints than those from $Planck~ \\textrm{TT}+\\textrm{lowP}$. Combining the distance priors with the combination of supernova Union~2.1 compilation of 580 SNe (Union~2.1) and low redshift Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data, we constrain the cosmological parameters in the freely binned dark energy (FBDE) and FBDE$+\\Omega_k$ models respectively, and find that the equations of state of dark energy in both models are consistent with $w=-1$. Furthermore, we show that the tension with the BAO data at $z=2.34$ from Ly$\\alpha$ forest (Ly$\\alpha$F) auto-correlation and Combined Ly$\\alpha$F cannot be relaxed in the FBDE and FBDE$+\\Omega_k$ models.

  11. Natural Priors, CMSSM Fits and LHC Weather Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben C Allanach; Kyle Cranmer; Christopher G Lester; Arne M Weber

    2007-07-05

    Previous LHC forecasts for the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), based on current astrophysical and laboratory measurements, have used priors that are flat in the parameter tan beta, while being constrained to postdict the central experimental value of MZ. We construct a different, new and more natural prior with a measure in mu and B (the more fundamental MSSM parameters from which tan beta and MZ are actually derived). We find that as a consequence this choice leads to a well defined fine-tuning measure in the parameter space. We investigate the effect of such on global CMSSM fits to indirect constraints, providing posterior probability distributions for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) sparticle production cross sections. The change in priors has a significant effect, strongly suppressing the pseudoscalar Higgs boson dark matter annihilation region, and diminishing the probable values of sparticle masses. We also show how to interpret fit information from a Markov Chain Monte Carlo in a frequentist fashion; namely by using the profile likelihood. Bayesian and frequentist interpretations of CMSSM fits are compared and contrasted.

  12. Standard practice for the ion exchange separation of uranium and plutonium prior to isotopic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    Standard practice for the ion exchange separation of uranium and plutonium prior to isotopic analysis

  13. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  14. Conditioning of carbonaceous material prior to physical beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA); Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material such as coal is conditioned by contact with a supercritical fluid prior to physical beneficiation. The solid feed material is contacted with an organic supercritical fluid such as cyclohexane or methanol at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature and pressures of 1 to 4 times the critical pressure. A minor solute fraction is extracted into critical phase and separated from the solid residuum. The residuum is then processed by physical separation such as by froth flotation or specific gravity separation to recover a substantial fraction thereof with reduced ash content. The solute in supercritical phase can be released by pressure reduction and recombined with the low-ash, carbonaceous material.

  15. Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport forRetirementAdministration /Administration prior to

  16. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauzier, Pascal Theriault; Chen Guanghong

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness; images also had a qualitatively more uniform noise spatial distribution when including a statistical model. Conclusions: DR-PICCS enables to reconstruct CT images with lower noise than FBP and the loss of spatial resolution can be mitigated to a large extent. The introduction of statistical modeling in DR-PICCS may improve some noise characteristics, but it also leads to anisotropic spatial resolution properties. A denoising method, such as the directional diffusion filtering, has been demonstrated to reduce anisotropy in spatial resolution effectively when it was combined with DR-PICCS with statistical modeling.

  17. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  18. Variations on stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Minasian; Alessandro Tomasiello

    2002-05-07

    We explore the effects of non-abelian dynamics of D-branes on their stability and introduce Hitchin-like modifications to previously-known stability conditions. The relation to brane-antibrane systems is used in order to rewrite the equations in terms of superconnections and arrive at deformed vortex equations.

  19. Variations on stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minasian, R; Minasian, Ruben; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2001-01-01

    We explore the effects of non-abelian dynamics of D-branes on their stability and introduce Hitchin-like modifications to previously-known stability conditions. The relation to brane-antibrane systems is used in order to rewrite the equations in terms of superconnections and arrive at deformed vortex equations.

  20. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  1. Thermal Stability Of Formohydroxamic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Rudisill, T. S.

    2011-10-21

    The thermal stability of formohydroxamic acid (FHA) was evaluated to address the potential for exothermic decomposition during storage and its use in the uranium extraction process. Accelerating rate calorimetry showed rapid decomposition at a temperature above 65 {degree}?C; although, the rate of pressure rise was greater than two orders of magnitude less than the lower bound for materials which have no explosive properties with respect to transportation. FHA solutions in water and nitric acid did not reach runaway conditions until 150 {degree}?C. Analysis by differential scanning calorimetry showed that FHA melted at 67 {degree}?C and thermally decomposed at 90 {degree}?C with an enthalpy of -1924 J/g. The energics of the FHA thermal decomposition are comparable to those measured for aqueous solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate. Solid FHA should be stored in a location where the temperature does not exceed 20-25 {degree}?C. As a best practice, the solid material should be stored in a climate-controlled environment such as a refrigerator or freezer. FHA solutions in water are not susceptible to degradation by acid hydrolysis and are the preferred way to handle FHA prior to use.

  2. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maranzana, Andrea E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Giordana, Anna E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Indarto, Antonius Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Causà, Mauro E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Pavone, Michele E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ?E{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ?E{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A?B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ?B97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ?E{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ?E{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational reference of less than 1 kcal mol{sup ?1}. The zero-point vibrational energy corrected estimates ?(E{sub AB}+ZPE), obtained with the three functionals and the 6-31G(d) and N07T basis sets, are compared with experimental D{sub 0} measures, when available. In particular, this comparison is finally extended to the naphthalene and coronene dimers and to three ??? associations of different PAHs (R, made by 10, 16, or 24 C atoms) and P (80 C atoms)

  3. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Climate Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Climate Stabilization: Framing Regional Options L A U R A S C reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut The call to cut global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by up to 80% below 2000 levels, which researchers

  4. Model Parameterization, Prior Distributions, and the General Time-Reversible Model in Bayesian Phylogenetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwickl, Derrick J.; Holder, Mark T.

    2004-01-01

    .— Bayesian phylo^enetic methods reiiuire Ihe selection of prior probability distribulions for all parameters of the model of evolution. These distribulii>ns allow one to incorporate prior information into a liayesian analysis, but even in the absence...

  5. Improving experimental phases for strong reflections prior to density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Hilgenfeld, Rolf, E-mail: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of (China); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    A genetic algorithm has been developed to optimize the phases of the strongest reflections in SIR/SAD data. This is shown to facilitate density modification and model building in several test cases. Experimental phasing of diffraction data from macromolecular crystals involves deriving phase probability distributions. These distributions are often bimodal, making their weighted average, the centroid phase, improbable, so that electron-density maps computed using centroid phases are often non-interpretable. Density modification brings in information about the characteristics of electron density in protein crystals. In successful cases, this allows a choice between the modes in the phase probability distributions, and the maps can cross the borderline between non-interpretable and interpretable. Based on the suggestions by Vekhter [Vekhter (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. D61, 899–902], the impact of identifying optimized phases for a small number of strong reflections prior to the density-modification process was investigated while using the centroid phase as a starting point for the remaining reflections. A genetic algorithm was developed that optimizes the quality of such phases using the skewness of the density map as a target function. Phases optimized in this way are then used in density modification. In most of the tests, the resulting maps were of higher quality than maps generated from the original centroid phases. In one of the test cases, the new method sufficiently improved a marginal set of experimental SAD phases to enable successful map interpretation. A computer program, SISA, has been developed to apply this method for phase improvement in macromolecular crystallography.

  6. Charged Vacuum Bubble Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    1998-10-20

    A type of scenario is considered where electrically charged vacuum bubbles, formed from degenerate or nearly degenerate vacuua separated by a thin domain wall, are cosmologically produced due to the breaking of a discrete symmetry, with the bubble charge arising from fermions residing within the domain wall. Stability issues associated with wall tension, fermion gas, and Coulombic effects for such configurations are examined. The stability of a bubble depends upon parameters such as the symmetry breaking scale and the fermion coupling. A dominance of either the Fermi gas or the Coulomb contribution may be realized under certain conditions, depending upon parameter values.

  7. Stability of dendritic arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.A. ); Langer, J.S. )

    1990-09-15

    We propose an approximate method for studying steady-state properties and linear stability of the dendritic arrays that are formed in directional solidification of alloys. Our analysis is valid at high growth rates where the primary spacing between dendrites is larger than the velocity-dependent solutal diffusion length. We compute a neutral stability boundary and find that, in the situations where we expect our results to be valid, the experimental data of Somboonsuk, Mason, and Trivedi (Metall. Trans. A 15A, 967 (1984)) lie in the stable region, well away from the boundary.

  8. Thermodynamic Stability of Nanobubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Attard

    2015-03-15

    The observed stability of nanobubbles contradicts the well-known result in classical nucleation theory, that the critical radius is both microscopic and thermodynamically unstable. Here nanoscopic stability is shown to be the combined result of two non-classical mechanisms. It is shown that the surface tension decreases with increasing supersaturation, and that this gives a nanoscopic critical radius. Whilst neither a free spherical bubble nor a hemispherical bubble mobile on an hydrophobic surface are stable, it is shown that an immobilized hemispherical bubble with a pinned contact rim is stable and that the total entropy is a maximum at the critical radius.

  9. Stabilized PV system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

    2002-12-17

    A stabilized PV system comprises an array of photovoltaic (PV) assemblies mounted to a support surface. Each PV assembly comprises a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the support surface. The array of modules is circumscribed by a continuous, belt-like perimeter assembly. Cross strapping, extending above, below or through the array, or some combination of above, below and through the array, secures a first position along the perimeter assembly to at least a second position along the perimeter assembly thereby stabilizing the array against wind uplift forces. The first and second positions may be on opposite sides on the array.

  10. Cytoskeletal stability and heat shock-mediated thermoprotection of central pattern generation in Locusta migratoria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Meldrum

    on returning to room temperature. We found that concanavalin A mimicked the effects of a prior heat stress and expression of heat-shock proteins) that protect organisms from subsequent stress (Dalle-Donne et al., 2001Cytoskeletal stability and heat shock-mediated thermoprotection of central pattern generation

  11. Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Arnold Andre?

    1989-01-01

    MANAGEMENT . . . Historical background Characteristics of radioactive wastes Classification of radioactive wastes Disposal methodology and criteria Handling and storage of radioactive wastes SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES Historical background... Characteristics of the solidified wastes Storage and handling of solid radioactive wastes Shipment of solid radioactive wastes Solidification of waste solutions MATERIALS AND METHODS Ion-exchange methods. High integrity containers (HIC). . tv tx 15 15...

  12. EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2013-05-21

    The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

  13. Nanostructures for enzyme stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.; Wang, Ping

    2006-02-02

    The last decade has witnessed notable breakthroughs in nanotechnology with development of various nanostructured materials such as mesoporous materials and nanoparticles. These nanostructures have been used as a host for enzyme immobilization via various approaches, such as enzyme adsorption, covalent attachment, enzyme encapsulation, and sophisticated combinations of methods. This review discusses the stabilization mechanisms behind these diverse approaches; such as confinement, pore size and volume, charge interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and multipoint attachment. In addition, we will introduce recent rigorous approaches to improve the enzyme stability in these nanostructures or develop new nanostructures for the enzyme stabilization. Especially, we will introduce our recent invention of a nanostructure, called single enzyme nanoparticles (SENs). In the form of SENs, each enzyme molecule is surrounded with a nanometer scale network, resulting in stabilization of enzyme activity without any serious limitation for the substrate transfer from solution to the active site. SENs can be further immobilized into mesoporous silica with a large surface area, providing a hierarchical approach for stable, immobilized enzyme systems for various applications, such as bioconversion, bioremediation, and biosensors.

  14. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  15. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  16. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  17. The stability of enrofloxacin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodge, Meagan A

    2013-02-22

    Scholarships Texas ABcM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 1997-1998 UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM Approved as to style and content by: Dawn Boothe Department of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology Susanna Finnell..., Executive Director Honors Programs and Academic Scholarships Fellows Group: Biology ABSTRACT The Stability of Enrofloxacin Meagan Dodge, (Dr. Dawn Boothe) University Undergraduate Fellow, 1997-1998, Texas ARM University, Department of Veterinary...

  18. Scaling regression inputs by dividing by 2 sd Prior distribution for logistic regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Scaling regression inputs by dividing by 2 sd Prior distribution for logistic regression Comparing Andrew Gelman Some Recent Progress in Simple Statistical Methods #12;Scaling regression inputs by dividing by 2 sd Prior distribution for logistic regression Comparing the upper third to the lower third

  19. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  20. Prior-independent Approximation In the last two chapters we discussed mechanism that performed well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    5 Prior-independent Approximation In the last two chapters we discussed mechanism that performed is natural when deriving mechanisms for games of in- complete information as the Bayes-Nash equilibrium mechanism with it. The goal of prior-independent mechanism design is to identify a single mech- anism

  1. PRIOR RISK ASSESSMENT 005 Bradley / adapted by UoE URPO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    PRIOR RISK ASSESSMENT 005 Version 002 Author Bradley / adapted by UoE URPO Date of version 1 issue the University to undertake a prior risk assessment before commencing a new work activity involving ionising a review of existing risk assessments at appropriate intervals to ensure that they remain suitable

  2. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  3. Theory and modelling of nanocarbon phase stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The transformation of nanodiamonds into carbon-onions (and vice versa) has been observed experimentally and has been modeled computationally at various levels of sophistication. Also, several analytical theories have been derived to describe the size, temperature and pressure dependence of this phase transition. However, in most cases a pure carbon-onion or nanodiamond is not the final product. More often than not an intermediary is formed, known as a bucky-diamond, with a diamond-like core encased in an onion-like shell. This has prompted a number of studies investigating the relative stability of nanodiamonds, bucky-diamonds, carbon-onions and fullerenes, in various size regimes. Presented here is a review outlining results of numerous theoretical studies examining the phase diagrams and phase stability of carbon nanoparticles, to clarify the complicated relationship between fullerenic and diamond structures at the nanoscale.

  4. A technique for estimating 4D-CBCT using prior knowledge and limited-angle projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to estimate onboard 4D-CBCT using prior information and limited-angle projections for potential 4D target verification of lung radiotherapy.Methods: Each phase of onboard 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation from one selected phase (prior volume) of the planning 4D-CT. The deformation field maps (DFMs) are solved using a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique. In the MM-FD technique, the DFMs are estimated using a motion model which is extracted from planning 4D-CT based on principal component analysis (PCA). The motion model parameters are optimized by matching the digitally reconstructed radiographs of the deformed volumes to the limited-angle onboard projections (data fidelity constraint). Afterward, the estimated DFMs are fine-tuned using a FD model based on data fidelity constraint and deformation energy minimization. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso phantom was used to evaluate the MM-FD technique. A lung patient with a 30 mm diameter lesion was simulated with various anatomical and respirational changes from planning 4D-CT to onboard volume, including changes of respiration amplitude, lesion size and lesion average-position, and phase shift between lesion and body respiratory cycle. The lesions were contoured in both the estimated and “ground-truth” onboard 4D-CBCT for comparison. 3D volume percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass shift (COMS) were calculated to evaluate the estimation accuracy of three techniques: MM-FD, MM-only, and FD-only. Different onboard projection acquisition scenarios and projection noise levels were simulated to investigate their effects on the estimation accuracy.Results: For all simulated patient and projection acquisition scenarios, the mean VPD (±S.D.)/COMS (±S.D.) between lesions in prior images and “ground-truth” onboard images were 136.11% (±42.76%)/15.5 mm (±3.9 mm). Using orthogonal-view 15°-each scan angle, the mean VPD/COMS between the lesion in estimated and “ground-truth” onboard images for MM-only, FD-only, and MM-FD techniques were 60.10% (±27.17%)/4.9 mm (±3.0 mm), 96.07% (±31.48%)/12.1 mm (±3.9 mm) and 11.45% (±9.37%)/1.3 mm (±1.3 mm), respectively. For orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle, the corresponding results were 59.16% (±26.66%)/4.9 mm (±3.0 mm), 75.98% (±27.21%)/9.9 mm (±4.0 mm), and 5.22% (±2.12%)/0.5 mm (±0.4 mm). For single-view scan angles of 3°, 30°, and 60°, the results for MM-FD technique were 32.77% (±17.87%)/3.2 mm (±2.2 mm), 24.57% (±18.18%)/2.9 mm (±2.0 mm), and 10.48% (±9.50%)/1.1 mm (±1.3 mm), respectively. For projection angular-sampling-intervals of 0.6°, 1.2°, and 2.5° with the orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle, the MM-FD technique generated similar VPD (maximum deviation 2.91%) and COMS (maximum deviation 0.6 mm), while sparser sampling yielded larger VPD/COMS. With equal number of projections, the estimation results using scattered 360° scan angle were slightly better than those using orthogonal-view 30°-each scan angle. The estimation accuracy of MM-FD technique declined as noise level increased.Conclusions: The MM-FD technique substantially improves the estimation accuracy for onboard 4D-CBCT using prior planning 4D-CT and limited-angle projections, compared to the MM-only and FD-only techniques. It can potentially be used for the inter/intrafractional 4D-localization verification.

  5. Stability conditions of diatomic molecules in Heisenbergs picture: inspired from the stability theory of lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahanpanah, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational motion equations of both homo and hetero-nuclei diatomic molecules are here derived for the first time. A diatomic molecule is first considered as a one dimensional quantum mechanics oscillator. The second and third-order Hamiltonian operators are then formed by substituting the number operator for the quantum number in the corresponding vibrational energy eigenvalues. The expectation values of relative position and linear momentum operators of two oscillating atoms are calculated by solving Heisenbergs equations of motion. Subsequently, the expectation values of potential and kinetics energy operators are evaluated in all different vibrational levels of Morse potential. On the other hand, the stability theory of optical oscillators (lasers) is exploited to determine the stability conditions of an oscillating diatomic molecule.It is peculiarly turned out that the diatomic molecules are exactly dissociated at the energy level in which their equations of motion become unstable. We also determine...

  6. Spanish Major Requirements Option A: Language and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior to Fall 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Spanish Major Requirements Option A: Language and Hispanic Studies (for students declared prior (12 credits) 311: Introduction to Advanced Language Practice 320: Spanish Phonetics _____ 3 additional course (322: Early Hispanic, 324: Modern Spanish, 326: Spanish American) Spanish 322 is recommended

  7. An applied paleoecology case study: Bahia Grande, Texas prior to construction of the Brownsville Ship Channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichlyter, Stephen Alvah

    2006-08-16

    . Unfortunately, because very little is known about Bahia Grande prior to isolation, it is difficult to predict whether the results of the restoration will be comparable to the pre-Ship Channel environment. Paleoecological data provide the best opportunity...

  8. Bayesian Gaussian Graphical models using sparse selection priors and their mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talluri, Rajesh

    2012-10-19

    methods are based on selection and shrinkage priors leading to parsimonious parameterization of the precision (inverse covariance) matrix, which is essential in several applications in learning relationships among the variables. In Chapter I, we employ...

  9. Integrating Ontological Prior Knowledge into Relational Learning Stefan Reckow reckow@mpipsykl.mpg.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresp, Volker

    indicating direct proba- bilistic dependencies. The Hidden Relational Model (HRM) is a particular DAPER model a concrete exam- ple. In the following sections we illustrate the HRM #12;Integrating Ontological Prior

  10. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  11. The NART as an index of prior intellectual functioning: a retrospective validity study covering a 66-year interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2001-01-01

    Background. The National Adult Reading Test (NART) is widely used in research and clinical practice as an estimate of pre-morbid or prior ability. However, most of the evidence on the NART's validity as a measure of prior ...

  12. Phase stabilities at a glance: Stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachhuber, F.; School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland ; Rothballer, J.; Weihrich, R.; Söhnel, T.; Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Auckland

    2013-12-07

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn{sub 2} (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb{sub 2}, and the NiAs{sub 2} types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB{sub 2} structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases.

  13. An Apparent Relation between ELM Occurrence Times and the Prior Phase Evolution of Divertor Flux Loop Measurements in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Apparent Relation between ELM Occurrence Times and the Prior Phase Evolution of Divertor Flux Loop Measurements in JET

  14. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  15. Inoculation of beef with lactic-acid bacteria prior to vacuum packaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Lester Cedric

    1978-01-01

    August 1978 Major Subject: Animal Science INOCULATION OF BEEF WITH LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA PRIOR TO VACUUM PACKAGING A Thesis by LESTER CEDRIC HALL Approved as to style and content by: 1 ( (Co- hairman of C mmittee) (Co-Chakrm 'g of Committee) (He... d of Department ) (Member) August 1978 ABSTRACT Inoculation of Beef with Lactic-Acid Bacteria Prior to Vacuum Packaging. (August 1978) Lester Cedric Hall, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. G. C. Smith and Dr Z...

  16. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  17. Stabilization and Global Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarofim, Marcus C.

    Academic and political debates over long-run climate policy often invoke “stabilization” of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), but only rarely are non-CO2 greenhouse gases addressed explicitly. Even ...

  18. Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep Kiran

    2008-10-10

    Dissertation by PRADEEP KIRAN SARVEPALLI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM STABILIZER CODES... Committee Members, Donald K. Friesen Jennifer L. Welch Scott L. Miller Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Quantum Stabilizer Codes and Beyond. (August 2008) Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli, B.Tech., Indian...

  19. Semiparametric Bernstein-von Mises theorem and bias, illustrated with Gaussian process priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Ismaël

    further property of the convergence is given by the so-called Bernstein-von Mises theorem (abbreviated BvM frequentist ones. The extension of the BvM theorem to semiparametric frameworks has recently sparked off works hazards model and obtained the semiparametric BvM for L´evy-type priors, exploiting their partial

  20. The Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    , the energy transfer and the collision num- ber are related quantities, and therefore, the statistics ofThe Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption Sara A. Pozzi* Oak Ridge Accepted July 25, 2005 Abstract ­ We propose a simple analytical model to describe the statistics

  1. Compression without a common prior: an information-theoretic justification for ambiguity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    that information theory generally assumes a common prior probability distribution shared by the encoder and decoder to a far greater extent than existing digital communication protocols. We also use information theory theory, linguistics 1 Introduction It is well-known that information theory sheds light on natural

  2. Timedomain MRSI quantitation combining multivoxel processing, FIR based solvent suppression and prior knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time­domain MRSI quantitation combining multivoxel processing, FIR based solvent suppression and prior knowledge P. Pels#, L. Vanhamme#, S. Van Hu#el#, and P. Van Hecke + # Katholieke Universiteit processing using a FIR filter for solvent suppression. The advantage of this multivoxel approach

  3. Gibbs Sampling for Logistic Normal Topic Models with Graph-Based Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Andrew

    in the T - 1 simplex (i.e., a T-dimensional logistic normal random variable) can be generated as follows: 1Gibbs Sampling for Logistic Normal Topic Models with Graph-Based Priors David Mimno, Hanna M relationships. Models for spatial and temporal data often rely on real-valued state space models such as dynamic

  4. Automatic Detection of Student Mental Models during Prior Knowledge Activation in MetaTutor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rus, Vasile

    to automatically detecting students' mental models in MetaTutor based on student-generated paragraphs during prior students. According to the experiments, a word-weighting method, which uses tf-idf values calculated from and combined with the machine learning algorithm of Logistic Regression. 1. Introduction We address

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING --ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Interacting Geometric Priors For Robust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING -- ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Interacting Geometric Priors For Robust Multi-Model Fitting Trung T. Pham, Student Member, IEEE, Tat-Jun Chin, Member, IEEE, Konrad Schindler, Senior Member, IEEE and David Suter Abstract--Recent works on multi-model fitting are often for

  6. Information and Diverse Populations Specialization Prior to Fall 2013 Core Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    Information and Diverse Populations Specialization ­ Prior to Fall 2013 Core Courses: Must be completed within the first 18 credits of the program: _____ LBSC 601 Users and Information Context OR LBSC 605 Archival Principles, Practices and Programs OR LBSC 640 School Librarians as Information

  7. Variational Inference for Stick-Breaking Beta Process Priors John Paisley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carin, Lawrence

    Variational Inference for Stick-Breaking Beta Process Priors John Paisley1 jpaisley-parameter IBP, and does not extend to the beta process presented in (Hjort, 1990). Recently, Paisley et al., 2007); we discuss this difference in Sec- tion 4. Paisley et al. (2010) presented an inference

  8. Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior to your event date Today: ____________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Assistance Required Number of Blue and Gold members needed: _______ Arrival Time: __: __ Departing Time: __: __ Blue and Gold Society attire: Formal (suit) Casual (rugby shirt) Other Any Additional Information

  9. CAN THE SUN'S DIRECTION BE ESTIMATED PRIOR TO THE DETERMINATION OF SHAPE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chojnacki, Wojtek

    CAN THE SUN'S DIRECTION BE ESTIMATED PRIOR TO THE DETERMINATION OF SHAPE? WOJCIECH CHOJNACKI to estimate the direction of the "sun" (light source) from a given image. In this paper, we argue distant sun from the direction determined by the unit vector l = (l1, l2, l3). Then the image

  10. Using microbial desalination cells to reduce water salinity prior to reverse Maha Mehanna,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using microbial desalination cells to reduce water salinity prior to reverse osmosis Maha Mehannand February 2010, Accepted 16th June 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c002307h A microbial desalination cell (MDC the energy efficiency of a downstream reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system. We investigated here the use

  11. Fuzzy Classification of Genome Sequences Prior to Assembly Based on Similarity Measures*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolescu, Monica

    Fuzzy Classification of Genome Sequences Prior to Assembly Based on Similarity Measures* Sara number: 0447416). Abstract - Nucleotide sequencing of genomic data is an important step towards building into the overall genome. However, the existence of insertions, deletions and substitutions can complicate

  12. Evaluation of In-House Windrow Composting as a Poultry Litter Treatment Prior to Land Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Scott

    2013-08-05

    . An experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of in-house windrow composting (IWC) of poultry litter prior to land application in terms of bacteria, odors and nutrients compared to untreated (fresh) litter. In the second part of the research...

  13. Stability conditions of diatomic molecules in Heisenbergs picture: inspired from the stability theory of lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar Jahanpanah; Mohsen Esmaeilzadeh

    2015-08-29

    The vibrational motion equations of both homo and hetero-nuclei diatomic molecules are here derived for the first time. A diatomic molecule is first considered as a one dimensional quantum mechanics oscillator. The second and third-order Hamiltonian operators are then formed by substituting the number operator for the quantum number in the corresponding vibrational energy eigenvalues. The expectation values of relative position and linear momentum operators of two oscillating atoms are calculated by solving Heisenbergs equations of motion. Subsequently, the expectation values of potential and kinetics energy operators are evaluated in all different vibrational levels of Morse potential. On the other hand, the stability theory of optical oscillators (lasers) is exploited to determine the stability conditions of an oscillating diatomic molecule.It is peculiarly turned out that the diatomic molecules are exactly dissociated at the energy level in which their equations of motion become unstable. We also determine the minimum oscillation frequency (cut-off frequency) of a diatomic molecule at the dissociation level of Morse potential. At the end, the energy conservation is illustrated for the vibrational motion of a diatomic molecule.

  14. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nutt, Gerald L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  15. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  16. Technical Note Graph-partitioned spatial priors for functional magnetic resonance images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    .M. Harrison a, , W. Penny a , G. Flandin a , C.C. Ruff a,b , N. Weiskopf a , K.J. Friston a a Wellcome Trust-univariate analyses. Recently diffusion-based spatial priors [Harrison, L.M., Penny, W., Daunizeau, J., and Friston, K neighbouring voxels (Flandin and Penny, 2007; Gossl et al., 2001; Penny et al., 2005; Woolrich et al., 2004

  17. HDAC3 regulates stability of estrogen receptor ? mRNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oie, Shohei; Matsuzaki, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Wataru; Murayama, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ? HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ER? mRNA in MCF-7 cells. ? HDAC3 is involved in maintaining ER? mRNA stability in MCF-7 cells. ? ER? mRNA instability by knockdown of HDAC3 reduces the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ER?-positive MCF-7 cells. ? HDAC3 specific inhibitor will be one of new drugs for ER?-positive breast cancers. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. HDAC inhibitors have been demonstrated to down-regulate ER? expression in ER?-positive breast cancer cell lines, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we showed that HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ER? mRNA, and that knockdown of HDAC3 decreases the stability of ER? mRNA and suppresses estrogen-dependent proliferation of ER?-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In the Oncomine database, expression levels of HDAC3 in ER?-positive tumors are higher than those in ER?-negative tumors, thus suggesting that HDAC3 is necessary for ER? mRNA stability, and is involved in the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ER?-positive tumors.

  18. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  19. Stability of charged thin shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2011-05-15

    In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.

  20. STABILITY OF WASTE CONTAINMENT FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    placement or regrading, (v) typical landfilling, and (vi) final closure. After identifying the potential containment facilities. These failures include landfill liner and cover systems and involve both natural recirculation, lateral and vertical expansions, and interim or temporary slopes on the stability of landfills

  1. Stabilization of Layered Metal Oxides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stabilizing cations and anions (NH 4 ) 3 AlF 6 ; NH 4 PF 6 ; NH 4 BF 4 in water, methanol, etc molarity of solutions 2.5 x 10 -3 M pH 6.0 - 6.5 Composition used:...

  2. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  3. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  4. Basis Document for Sludge Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILKINS, N.E.

    2000-04-03

    Vault personnel have begun a program of radiographing plutonium metal cans. Metal that appears to be corroded will be processed through the furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C. The fire suppression system activation temperature will be deleted because it is not maintained by PFP Stabilization.

  5. Radial gradients of phase space density of the outer radiation belt electrons prior to sudden solar wind pressure enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    PSD radial gradient at and beyond GEO prior to a sudden solar wind pressure impact based on the fact by a sudden solar wind pressure enhancement, dayside trapped electrons are transported radially inwards), Radial gradients of phase space density of the outer radiation belt electrons prior to sudden solar wind

  6. Plasma stability in a dipole magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simakov, Andrei N., 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The MHD and kinetic stability of an axially symmetric plasma, confined by a poloidal magnetic field with closed lines, is considered. In such a system the stabilizing effects of plasma compression and magnetic field ...

  7. Structural stability of the Weeks Island oil repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preece, D.S.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1994-06-01

    A 3-D finite element analysis was performed to evaluate the stability of the SPR upper and lower oil storage levels at Weeks Island. The mechanical analysis predicted stresses and strains from which pillar stability was inferred using a fracture criterion developed from previous testing of Weeks Island salt. This analysis simulated the sequential mining of the two levels and subsequent oil fill of the mine. The predicted subsidence rates compare well to those measured over the past few years. Predicted failure mechanisms agree with observations made at the time the mine was being modified for oil storage. The modeling technique employed here treats an infinite array of pillars and is a reasonable representation of the behavior at the center of the mine. This analysis predicts that the lower level pillars, at the center of the mine, have fractured and their stability at this time is questionable. Localized pillar fracturing is predicted and implies that the mine is entering a phase of continual time dependent deterioration. Continued and expanded monitoring of the facility and development of methods to assess and predict its behavior are more important now than ever.

  8. Characterization of Instrumental Phase Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Y. Kubo; T. R. Hunter; R. D. Christensen; P. I. Yamaguchi

    2007-04-17

    Atmospheric water vapor causes significant undesired phase fluctuations for the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer, particularly in its highest frequency observing band of 690 GHz. One proposed solution to this atmospheric effect is to observe simultaneously at two separate frequency bands of 230 and 690 GHz. Although the phase fluctuations have a smaller magnitude at the lower frequency, they can be measured more accurately and on shorter timescales due to the greater sensitivity of the array to celestial point source calibrators at this frequency. In theory, we can measure the atmospheric phase fluctuations in the 230 GHz band, scale them appropriately with frequency, and apply them to the data in 690 band during the post-observation calibration process. The ultimate limit to this atmospheric phase calibration scheme will be set by the instrumental phase stability of the IF and LO systems. We describe the methodology and initial results of the phase stability characterization of the IF and LO systems.

  9. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  10. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klei, Herbert E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Moriarty, Nigel W., E-mail: nwmoriarty@lbl.gov; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Baldwin, Eric T. [Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Natural Discovery LLC, Princeton, NJ 08542-0096 (United States); Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana [Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR leverages prior knowledge from earlier structures to facilitate ligand placement in the current structure.

  11. Geometric conditions for robust stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapellat, Herve?

    1987-01-01

    ) Michael T. Lo gnecker (Member) Jo W. Howze (Head of Department) December 1987 ABSTRACT Ceometric Conditions for Robust Stability (Decenrber 1987) Herve Chapellat, B. S. , E. N. S. T. (Paris) Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S. P. Bhsttacharyya.... Georghiades and M. T. Longnecker for their comments and for taking time in reviewing this thesis. Finally, I wish to express deep gratitude to my former school in Paris, the Ecole ?ationale Supericure des Telecornrnurdcations (E. lV. S. T. ), that allosved...

  12. Radial stability in stratified stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Jonas P

    2015-01-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting two any phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  13. Radial stability in stratified stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas P. Pereira; Jorge A. Rueda

    2015-01-12

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting two any phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  14. Methods of and apparatus for recording images occurring just prior to a rapid, random event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, E.F.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for recording images of events in a medium wherein the images that are recorded are of conditions existing just prior to and during the occurrence of an event that triggers recording of these images. The apparatus and method use an optical delay path that employs a spherical focusing mirror facing a circular array of flat return mirrors around a central flat mirror. The image is reflected in a symmetric pattern which balances astigmatism which is created by the spherical mirror. Delays on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds are possible.

  15. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  16. Stabilization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor GuidelinesPlasma Physics and Error

  17. Investigations in Ceramicrete Stabilization of Hanford Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, A. S.; Antink, A.; Maloney, M. D.; Thomson, G. H.

    2003-02-26

    This paper provides a summary of investigations done on feasibility of using Ceramicrete technology to stabilize high level salt waste streams typical of Hanford and other sites. We used two non-radioactive simulants that covered the range of properties from low activity to high level liquids and sludges. One represented tank supernate, containing Cr, Pb, and Ag as the major hazardous metals, and Cs as the fission products; the other, a waste sludge, contained Cd, Cr, Ag, Ni, and Ba as the major hazardous contaminants, and Cs, and Tc as the fission products.

  18. L1 Stability for scalar balance laws. L1 Stability for scalar balance laws.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Magali

    L1 Stability for scalar balance laws. L1 Stability for scalar balance laws. Control 2010 Magali Mercier (Institut Camille Jordan, Lyon) L1 Stability for scalar balance laws. Parma, 15th February 2010 1 / 30 #12;L1 Stability for scalar balance laws. Introduction. Introduction Scalar balance

  19. Nonlinear effects in charge stabilized colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kreer; J. Horbach; A. Chatterji

    2006-02-10

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to study the effective interactions in charged stabilized colloidal suspensions. For not too high macroion charges and sufficiently large screening, the concept of the potential of mean force is known to work well. In the present work, we focus on highly charged macroions in the limit of low salt concentrations. Within this regime, nonlinear corrections to the celebrated DLVO theory [B. Derjaguin and L. Landau, Acta Physicochem. USSR {\\bf 14}, 633 (1941); E.J.W. Verwey and J.T.G. Overbeck, {\\em Theory of the Stability of Lyotropic Colloids} (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1948)] have to be considered. For non--bulklike systems, such as isolated pairs or triples of macroions, we show, that nonlinear effects can become relevant, which cannot be described by the charge renormalization concept [S. Alexander et al., J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 80}, 5776 (1984)]. For an isolated pair of macroions, we find an almost perfect qualitative agreement between our simulation data and the primitive model. However, on a quantitative level, neither Debye-H\\"uckel theory nor the charge renormalization concept can be confirmed in detail. This seems mainly to be related to the fact, that for small ion concentrations, microionic layers can strongly overlap, whereas, simultaneously, excluded volume effects are less important. In the case of isolated triples, where we compare between coaxial and triangular geometries, we find attractive corrections to pairwise additivity in the limit of small macroion separations and salt concentrations. These triplet interactions arise if all three microionic layers around the macroions exhibit a significant overlap. In contrast to the case of two isolated colloids, the charge distribution around a macroion in a triple is found to be anisotropic.

  20. DETECTION OF AN OUTBURST ONE YEAR PRIOR TO THE EXPLOSION OF SN 2011ht

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, M.; Magee, M.; Kotak, R.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Polshaw, J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Drake, A. J. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Advanced Computing Research, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Boles, T. [Coddenham Astronomical Observatory, Suffolk IP6 9QY (United Kingdom); Lee, C.-H. [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Draper, P. W. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, P. A., E-mail: m.fraser@qub.ac.uk [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2013-12-10

    Using imaging from the Pan-STARRS1 survey, we identify a precursor outburst at 287 and 170 days prior to the reported explosion of the purported Type IIn supernova (SN) 2011ht. In the Pan-STARRS data, a source coincident with SN 2011ht is detected exclusively in the z {sub P1} and y {sub P1}-bands. An absolute magnitude of M{sub z} ? –11.8 suggests that this was an outburst of the progenitor star. Unfiltered, archival Catalina Real Time Transient Survey images also reveal a coincident source from at least 258 to 138 days before the main event. We suggest that the outburst is likely to be an intrinsically red eruption, although we cannot conclusively exclude a series of erratic outbursts which were observed only in the redder bands by chance. This is only the fourth detection of an outburst prior to a claimed SN, and lends credence to the possibility that many more interacting transients have pre-explosion outbursts, which have been missed by current surveys.

  1. Conceptual Evaluation for the Installation of Treatment Capability for Mixed Low Level Waste at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-11-24

    National Security Technologies, LLC, initiated an evaluation of treatment technologies that they would manage and operate as part of the mixed low-level waste (MLLW) disposal facilities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The NNSS Disposal Facility has been receiving radioactive waste from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex since the 1960s, and since 2005 the NNSS Disposal Facility has been receiving radioactive and MLLW for disposal only. In accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), all mixed waste must meet land disposal restrictions (LDRs) prior to disposal. Compliance with LDRs is attained through treatment of the waste to mitigate the characteristics of the listed waste hazard. Presently, most generators utilize commercial capacity for waste treatment prior to shipment to the NNSS Disposal Facility. The objectives of this evaluation are to provide a conceptual study of waste treatment needs (i.e., demand), identify potential waste treatment technologies to meet demand, and analyze implementation considerations for initiating MLLW treatment capacity at the NNSS Disposal Facility. A review of DOE complex waste generation forecast data indicates that current and future Departmental demand for mixed waste treatment capacity will remain steady and strong. Analysis and screening of over 30 treatment technologies narrowed the field of treatment technologies to four: • Macroencapsulation • Stabilization/microencapsulation • Sort and segregation • Bench-scale mercury amalgamation The analysis of treatment technologies also considered existing permits, current the NNSS Disposal Facility infrastructure such as utilities and procedures, and past experiences such as green-light and red-light lessons learned. A schedule duration estimate has been developed for permitting, design, and construction of onsite treatment capability at the NNSS Disposal Facility. Treatment capability can be ready in 20 months.

  2. Code constructions and code families for nonbinary quantum stabilizer code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketkar, Avanti Ulhas

    2005-11-01

    Stabilizer codes form a special class of quantum error correcting codes. Nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes are studied in this thesis. A lot of work on binary quantum stabilizer codes has been done. Nonbinary stabilizer codes have received much...

  3. Tritium systems test assembly stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W. G. (William G.); Michelotti, R. A. (Roy A.); Anast, K. R. (Kurt R.); Tesch, Charles

    2004-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium technology Research and Development (R&D) primarily for future fusion power reactors. The facility was conceived in mid 1970's, operations commenced in early 1980's, stabilization and deactivation began in 2000 and were completed in 2003. The facility will remain in a Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) mode until the Department of Energy (DOE) funds demolition of the facility, tentatively in 2009. A safe and stable end state was achieved by the TSTA Facility Stabilization Project (TFSP) in anticipation of long term S&M. At the start of the stabilization project, with an inventory of approximately 140 grams of tritium, the facility was designated a Hazard Category (HC) 2 Non-Reactor Nuclear facility as defined by US Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-1027-92 (1997). The TSTA facility comprises a laboratory area, supporting rooms, offices and associated laboratory space that included more than 20 major tritium handling systems. The project's focus was to reduce the tritium inventory by removing bulk tritium, tritiated water wastes, and tritium-contaminated high-inventory components. Any equipment that remained in the facility was stabilized in place. All of the gloveboxes and piping were rendered inoperative and vented to atmosphere. All equipment, and inventoried tritium contamination, remaining in the facility was left in a safe-and-stable state. The project used the End Points process as defined by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (web page http://www.em.doe.- gov/deact/epman.htmtlo) document and define the end state required for the stabilization of TSTA Facility. The End Points process added structure that was beneficial through virtually all phases of the project. At completion of the facility stabilization project the residual tritium inventory was approximately 3,000 curies, considerably less than the 1.6-gram threshold for a HC 3 facility. TSTA is now designated as a Radiological Facility. Innovative approaches were employed for characterization and removal of legacy wastes and high inventory components. Major accomplishments included: (1) Reduction of tritium inventory, elimination of chemical hazards, and identification and posting of remaining hazards. (2) Removal of legacy wastes. (3) Transferred equipment for reuse in other DOE projects, including some at other DOE facilities. (4) Transferred facility in a safe and stable condition to the S&M organization. The project successfully completed all project goals and the TSTA facility was transferred into S&M on August 1,2003. This project demonstrates the benefit of radiological inventory reduction and the removal of legacy wastes to achieve a safe and stable end state that protects workers and the environment pending eventual demolition of the facility.

  4. FDP Prior Approval and Other Requirements Matrix AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF ONR USDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    FDP Prior Approval and Other Requirements Matrix April 2004 AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF Requirements Matrix April 2004 AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF ONR USDA Inclusion of unrecovered F&A costs

  5. A Simple Method for Estimating Informative Node Age Priors for the Fossil Calibration of Molecular Divergence Time Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Michael D.; Smith, Andrew B; Simpson, Carl; Zwickl, Derrick J.

    2013-06-05

    an informative parametric prior probability distribution on a node age. Specifically, our method uses the extant diversity and the stratigraphic distribution of fossil lineages confidently assigned to a clade to fit a branching model of lineage diversification...

  6. Lyapunov functions and relative stability in reaction-diffusion systems with multiple stationary states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, N.F.; Ross, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-05-09

    In prior work on a thermodynamic and stochastic theory of chemical systems far from equilibrium, the excess work (a Lyapunov function) was shown to predict relative stability of stationary states in reaction-diffusion systems with multiple stationary states. This theory predicts equistability when the excess work from one stationary state to the stable inhomogeneous concentration profile separating the two stable stationary states equals the excess work from the other stable stationary state to that profile. Here we prove that any Lyapunov function of the deterministic reaction-diffusion equations of a given form can be used to predict equistability. Further, we show that the spatial derivative of any Lyapunov function for these equations, which is simpler to calculate, can also be used to predict relative stability. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Coiled tubing: Early warning system to detect flaws in flat sheet prior to rolling and welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edens, C.W. )

    1994-05-01

    Through experimentation and dynamic evaluation of skelp at a coiled tubing mill, the use of leakage flux solid state sensing devices shows clearly that the requirement for nondestructively testing skelp can be met. As coiled tubing for drilling purposes gains wider usage, its skelp can take advantage of upstream inspection prior to forming the tubes. A reliable coiled tubing product is one in which every aspect of its manufacturing was considered, from raw material through final inspection. In no other way can the concept of total quality management be satisfied providing reliability of product use. A guarantee of fitness for purpose falls directly on the coiled tubing manufacturer. Purveyors of jointed electronic resistance weld tubulars may also take advantage of this inspection method. The American Petroleum Institute (API) has recently established a committee to study and formulate recommended practices for coiled tubing operations.

  8. Recursive Pathways to Marginal Likelihood Estimation with Prior-Sensitivity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the utility to contemporary Bayesian studies of recursive, Gauss-Seidel-type pathways to marginal likelihood estimation characterized by reverse logistic regression and the density of states. Through a pair of illustrative, numerical examples (including mixture modeling of the well-known 'galaxy dataset') we highlight both the remarkable diversity of bridging schemes amenable to recursive normalization and the notable efficiency of the resulting pseudo-mixture densities for gauging prior-sensitivity in the model selection context. Our key theoretical contributions show the connection between the nested sampling identity and the density of states. Further, we introduce a novel heuristic ('thermodynamic integration via importance sampling') for qualifying the role of the bridging sequence in marginal likelihood estimation. An efficient pseudo-mixture density scheme for harnessing the information content of otherwise discarded draws in ellipse-based nested sampling is also introduced.

  9. Vacuum Stability of Standard Model^{++}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R; Vlcek, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The latest results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments point to a preferred narrow Higgs mass range (m_h \\simeq 124 - 126 GeV) in which the effective potential of the Standard Model (SM) develops a vacuum instability at a scale 10^{9} -10^{11} GeV, with the precise scale depending on the precise value of the top quark mass and the strong coupling constant. Motivated by this experimental situation, we present here a detailed investigation about the stability of the SM^{++} vacuum, which is characterized by a simple extension of the SM obtained by adding to the scalar sector a complex SU(2) singlet that has the quantum numbers of the right-handed neutrino, H", and to the gauge sector an U(1) that is broken by the vacuum expectation value of H". We derive the complete set of renormalization group equations at one loop. We then pursue a numerical study of the system to determine the triviality and vacuum stability bounds, using a scan of 10^4 random set of points to fix the initial conditions. We show that, if there...

  10. Neutron Star Radii, Universal Relations, and the Role of Prior Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Steiner; J. M. Lattimer; E. F. Brown

    2015-10-26

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. In the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of $1.4~\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$ neutron stars to a be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. We also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.

  11. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  12. The Enterprise Level Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lean Advancement Initiative

    2000-01-01

    The Enterprise Level Roadmap is part of a Transition-To-Lean Guide, a three volume set of materials designed to help a user navigate through the Roadmap at increasingly deeper levels of detail.

  13. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability. Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove {sup 137}CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  14. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  15. Optimization Online - Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Zhang

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic Quasi-Variational Inequality Problems and Applications. Jie Zhang(zhangjie04212001 ***at*** ...

  16. Nonlinear stability of ideal fluid equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holm, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Lyapunov method for establishing stability is related to well- known energy principles for nondissipative dynamical systems. A development of the Lyapunov method for Hamiltonian systems due to Arnold establishes sufficient conditions for Lyapunov stability by using the energy plus other conserved quantities, together with second variations and convexity estimates. When treating the stability of ideal fluid dynamics within the Hamiltonian framework, a useful class of these conserved quantities consists of the Casimir functionals, which Poisson-commute with all functionals of the dynamical fluid variables. Such conserved quantities, when added to the energy, help to provide convexity estimates that bound the growth of perturbations. These convexity estimates, in turn, provide norms necessary for establishing Lyapunov stability under the nonlinear evolution. In contrast, the commonly used second variation or spectral stability arguments only prove linearized stability. As ideal fluid examples, in these lectures we discuss planar barotropic compressible fluid dynamics, the three-dimensional hydrostatic Boussinesq model, and a new set of shallow water equations with nonlinear dispersion due to Basdenkov, Morosov, and Pogutse(1985). Remarkably, all three of these samples have the same Hamiltonian structure and, thus, possess the same Casimir functionals upon which their stability analyses are based. We also treat stability of modified quasigeostrophic flow, a problem whose Hamiltonian structure and Casimirs closely resemble Arnold's original example. Finally, we discuss some aspects of conditional stability and the applicability of Arnold's development of the Lyapunov technique. 100 refs.

  17. Nonlinear symmetric stability of planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, J.C.; Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    The energy-Casimir method is applied to the problem of symmetric stability in the context of a compressible, hydrostatic planetary atmosphere with a general equation of state. Linear stability criteria for symmetric disturbances to a zonally symmetric baroclinic flow are obtained. In the special case of a perfect gas the results of Stevens (1983) are recovered. Nonlinear stability conditions are also obtained that, in addition to implying linear stability, provide an upper bound on a certain positive-definite measure of disturbance amplitude.

  18. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  19. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  20. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  1. Adaptive Stabilization of Nonlinear Stochastic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florchinger, P. [URA CNRS No. 399, Departement de Mathematiques, UFR MIM, Universite de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, F 57045 Metz Cedex (France)

    1998-07-15

    The purpose of this paper is to study the problem of asymptotic stabilization in probability of nonlinear stochastic differential systems with unknown parameters. With this aim, we introduce the concept of an adaptive control Lyapunov function for stochastic systems and we use the stochastic version of Artstein's theorem to design an adaptive stabilizer. In this framework the problem of adaptive stabilization of a nonlinear stochastic system is reduced to the problem of asymptotic stabilization in probability of a modified system. The design of an adaptive control Lyapunov function is illustrated by the example of adaptively quadratically stabilizable in probability stochastic differential systems.

  2. Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winstead, M.L.

    1995-09-14

    Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

  3. Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

    2013-12-31

    Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

  4. The limits of filopodium stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander Pronk; Phillip L. Geissler; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-03-03

    Filopodia are long, finger-like membrane tubes supported by cytoskeletal filaments. Their shape is determined by the stiffness of the actin filament bundles found inside them and by the interplay between the surface tension and bending rigidity of the membrane. Although one might expect the Euler buckling instability to limit the length of filopodia, we show through simple energetic considerations that this is in general not the case. By further analyzing the statics of filaments inside membrane tubes, and through computer simulations that capture membrane and filament fluctuations, we show under which conditions filopodia of arbitrary lengths are stable. We discuss several in vitro experiments where this kind of stability has already been observed. Furthermore, we predict that the filaments in long, stable filopodia adopt a helical shape.

  5. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  6. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  7. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  8. UNDERSTANDING FORCES THAT CONTRIBUTE TO PROTEIN STABILITY: APPLICATION FOR INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hailong

    2010-07-14

    The aim of this study is to further our understanding of the forces that contribute to protein stability and to investigate how site-directed mutagenesis might be used for increasing protein stability. Eleven proteins ...

  9. Analyzing the Stability ofAnalyzing the Stability of --Carotene and PVCarotene and PV--1919

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Analyzing the Stability ofAnalyzing the Stability of --Carotene and PVCarotene and PV--1919 nanoparticles #12;Goals of Second ProjectGoals of Second Project Study of PVStudy of PV--1919 --Determine

  10. Seoul, South Korea -classification deteriorating slope stability -Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION OF TIME DEPENDENT DETERIORATING SLOPES Seoul, Korea, 29 February 2008 Robert Hack Engineering) The Netherlands #12;Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 2 Jan van

  11. Aalborg Universitet Modeling, Stability Analysis and Active Stabilization of Multiple DC-Microgrids Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Modeling, Stability Analysis and Active Stabilization of Multiple DC-Microgrids and Active Stabilization of Multiple DC-Microgrids Clusters. In Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE International of Multiple DC-Microgrid Clusters," in Proc. IEEE International Energy Conference (EnergyCon'14), 2014

  12. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockley, C.W. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  13. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laredo, Jean-Denis, E-mail: jean-denis.laredo@lrb.aphp.fr; Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie (France)

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  14. Exploring uncertainties in dark energy constraints using current observational data with Planck 2015 distance priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We explore the systematic uncertainties in dark energy constraints using the latest observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), galaxy clustering, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy (CMB) data. We use the Joint Lightcurve Analysis (JLA) set of 740 SNe Ia, galaxy clustering measurements of H(z)s and D_A(z)/s (where s is the sound horizon at the drag epoch) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at z=0.35 (SDSS DR7) and z=0.57 (BOSS DR11), and the distance priors that we have derived from the 2015 Planck data (we present the mean values and covariance matrices required for using these). We find that omitting the BOSS DR11 measurement of H(z)s at z=0.57 leads to more concordant cosmological constraints, indicative of possible systematic uncertainties that affect the measurement of the line-of-sight galaxy clustering. We also find that flux-averaging of SNe Ia at z>= 0.5 gives significantly tighter constraints on dark energy; this can be due to the reduction in the distance measurement bias fro...

  15. High-wavenumber solar $f$-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nishant K; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Using the solar surface mode, i.e. the $f$-mode, we attempt to predict the emergence of active regions (ARs) in the days before they can be seen in magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) who showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field which is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the $f$-mode fans out in the diagnostic $k\\omega$ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we exploit this property using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for three ARs 11768, 11158 and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around $3000\\,{\\rm km}$), the $f$-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the $f$-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aiming at understanding the global...

  16. Nanoparticle halos: A new colloid stabilization mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Nanoparticle halos: A new colloid stabilization mechanism Valeria Tohver*, James E. Smay*, Alan, 2001 (received for review February 7, 2001) A new mechanism for regulating the stability of colloidal for tailoring the behavior of com- plex fluids. Colloidal suspensions enjoy widespread use in applications

  17. On the Jacobi-Metric Stability Criterion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Gonzalez Leon; J. L. Hernandez Pastora

    2007-05-30

    We investigate the exact relation existing between the stability equation for the solutions of a mechanical system and the geodesic deviation equation of the associated geodesic problem in the Jacobi metric constructed via the Maupertuis-Jacobi Principle. We conclude that the dynamical and geometrical approaches to the stability/instability problem are not equivalent.

  18. A New Stabilized Nodal Integration Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puso, M; Zywicz, E; Chen, J S

    2006-02-08

    A new stabilized nodal integration scheme is proposed and implemented. In this work, focus is on the natural neighbor meshless interpolation schemes. The approach is a modification of the stabilized conforming nodal integration (SCNI) scheme and is shown to perform well in several benchmark problems.

  19. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Thornton, Jeff W.

    1997-08-01

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  20. Thermal effects on the stability of excited atoms in cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) and TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCT, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40.210-310 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia, Distrito Federal (Brazil) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    An atom, coupled linearly to an environment, is considered in a harmonic approximation in thermal equilibrium inside a cavity. The environment is modeled by an infinite set of harmonic oscillators. We employ the notion of dressed states to investigate the time evolution of the atom initially in the first excited level. In a very large cavity (free space) for a long elapsed time, the atom decays and the value of its occupation number is the physically expected one at a given temperature. For a small cavity the excited atom never completely decays and the stability rate depends on temperature.

  1. RF-Photonic Frequency Stability Gear Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsko, Andrey B; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Seidel, David; Maleki, Lute

    2011-01-01

    An optical technique based on stability transfer among modes of a monolithic optical microresonator is proposed for long therm frequency stabilization of a radiofrequency (RF) oscillator. We show that locking two resonator modes, characterized with dissimilar sensitivity in responding to an applied forcing function, to a master RF oscillator allows enhancing the long term stability of a slave RF oscillator locked to two resonator modes having nearly identical sensitivity. For instance, the stability of a 10 MHz master oscillator characterized with Allan deviation of 10^-7 at 10^4s can be increased and transferred to a slave oscillator with identical stability performance, so that the resultant Allan deviation of the slave oscillator becomes equal to 10-13 at 10^4s. The method does not require absolute frequency references to achieve such a performance.

  2. Can the correlated stability conjecture be saved?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel; Alexander Patrushev

    2011-06-10

    Correlated stability conjecture (CSC) proposed by Gubser and Mitra [1,2] linked the thermodynamic and classical (in)stabilities of black branes. In [3] it was shown that the thermodynamic instabilities, specifically the negative specific heat, indeed result in the instabilities in the hydrodynamic spectrum of holographically dual plasma excitations. Counter-examples of CSC were presented in the context of black branes with scalar hair undergoing a second-order phase transition [4,5]. The latter translationary invariant horizons have scalar hair, raising the question whether the asymptotic parameters of the scalar hair can be appropriately interpreted as additional charges leading to a generalization of the thermodynamic stability criterion. In this paper we show that the generalization of the thermodynamic stability criterion of this type can not save CSC. We further present a simple statistical model which makes it clear that thermodynamic and dynamical (in)stabilities generically are not correlated.

  3. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  4. Nonintrusive stabilization of a conical detonation wave for supersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Fink, S.F. IV

    1995-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies are undertaken of the feasibility of an air-breathing supersonic combustor based on a stabilized, conically configured (oblique) detonation wave. The conical wave is the result of the interaction of a train of spherical detonation waves, each directly initiated by a brief, localized deposition of energy from a very-rapidly-repeated pulsed laser. The laser is tightly focused on a fixed site (in the combustor) where there is a steady uniform supersonic stream of combustible gas. Simple analysis of the requirements for (nonintrusive) direct initiation of an individual spherical detonation wave by a single laser pulse relates the pulse-energy and pulse-duration parameters. Then, an estimate is given of the entropy production associated with the early-time interaction of spherical detonations created in a supersonic reactive stream by a train of laser pulses. The entropy production, which arises from reflected shocks in the already detonated mixture, is reduced by increasing the repetition rate of the laser. Finally, the fuel/air mixing is inevitably imperfect in practical high-speed combustors. The authors investigate that portion of the throughput which is compressed, but not reacted, during transit of the conical detonation wave, because of imperfect mixing. Specifically, they estimate the spatial scale of the cold-mixture inhomogeneity that still permits diffusive burnup, prior to exhaust from the nozzle of the combustor.

  5. Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-27

    A pipe crawler is described having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibility to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in ''inch worm'' fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting. 5 figures.

  6. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  8. How Safe is Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Prior to EVAR?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratby, M. J. Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M.; Loosemore, T. M.; Loftus, I.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To assess the outcomes of patients after bilateral internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods. Thirty-nine patients (age range 55-88 years, mean 72.5 years; 2 women) underwent IIA embolization/occlusion before EVAR. There were 28 patients with aorto-biiliac aneurysms and 6 with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms. Five patients with unilateral CIA aneurysms had previous surgical ligation of the contralateral IIA or inadvertent covering by the stent-graft of the contralateral IIA origin. Outcomes were assessed by clinical follow-up. Results. Severe ischemic complications were limited to spinal cord ischemia in 1 patient (3%) who developed paraparesis following EVAR. No other severe ischemic complications such as buttock necrosis, or bowel or bladder ischemia, occurred. Buttock and/or thigh claudication occurred in 12 patients (31%) and persisted beyond 1 year in 3 patients (9%). Sexual dysfunction occurred in 2 patients (5%). Patients who underwent simultaneous embolization had a 25% (3/12) ischemic complication rate versus 41% (11/27) in those with sequential embolization (p = 0.48). Embolization limited to the main trunk of the IIA resulted in a significantly reduced ischemic complication rate of 16% (3/19) versus 55% (11/20) of patients who had a more distal embolization of the IIA (p = 0.019, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. Severe complications after bilateral IIA embolization are uncommon. Although buttock/thigh claudication occurs in around 30% of patients soon after the procedure, this resolves in the majority after 1 year. There is no obvious benefit for sequential versus simultaneous IIA embolization in our series. Occlusion of the proximal IIA trunk is associated with reduced complications compared with occlusion of the distal IIA.

  9. Jacobi stability analysis of the Lorenz system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiberiu Harko; Chor Yin Ho; Chun Sing Leung; Stan Yip

    2015-04-11

    We perform the study of the stability of the Lorenz system by using the Jacobi stability analysis, or the Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory. The Lorenz model plays an important role for understanding hydrodynamic instabilities and the nature of the turbulence, also representing a non-trivial testing object for studying non-linear effects. The KCC theory represents a powerful mathematical method for the analysis of dynamical systems. In this approach we describe the evolution of the Lorenz system in geometric terms, by considering it as a geodesic in a Finsler space. By associating a non-linear connection and a Berwald type connection, five geometrical invariants are obtained, with the second invariant giving the Jacobi stability of the system. The Jacobi (in)stability is a natural generalization of the (in)stability of the geodesic flow on a differentiable manifold endowed with a metric (Riemannian or Finslerian) to the non-metric setting. In order to apply the KCC theory we reformulate the Lorenz system as a set of two second order non-linear differential equations. The geometric invariants associated to this system (nonlinear and Berwald connections), and the deviation curvature tensor, as well as its eigenvalues, are explicitly obtained. The Jacobi stability of the equilibrium points of the Lorenz system is studied, and the condition of the stability of the equilibrium points is obtained. Finally, we consider the time evolution of the components of the deviation vector near the equilibrium points.

  10. GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS MAKING AN ACCREDITATION OF PRIOR CERTIFICATED LEARNING (APCL) CLAIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    Undergraduate course. In this case you should indicate your desired year of entry in the `point of entry are requesting entry to a course on the basis of non-standard qualifications rather than entry with credit entry to years two or three (that is, to levels I, Intermediate, or H, Honours) of a standard

  11. FORMATION OF COLLOIDAL CRYSTALS FROM NANOPARTICLE STABILIZED COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    FORMATION OF COLLOIDAL CRYSTALS FROM NANOPARTICLE STABILIZED COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS BY WENDY WOONYEE.....................................................................8 2.2 Colloid Stability in Suspension .......................................................................................9 2.3 Nanoparticle-Stabilized Colloidal Suspensions...............................................13

  12. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

  13. Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan · Produce a PhD proposal in Criminal Justice. Completed · Redesign the graduate of senior faculty with strong records of obtaining external funding should become a top priority." · "The

  14. Instrumental learning within the spinal cord: III. Prior exposure to noncontingent shock induces a behavioral deficit that is blocked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, James

    Instrumental learning within the spinal cord: III. Prior exposure to noncontingent shock induces&M University, TX, USA Received 14 May 2002; revised 16 March 2004; accepted 1 April 2004 Available online 5 May, & Edgerton, 1994). This behavioral modification resembles a form of instrumental conditioning in which

  15. http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who Entered the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who is intended to summarize the rules of the INI graduate programs. These policies are subject to change and/or modifications and do not constitute a contract. I. INI DEGREE REQUIREMENTS II. COURSE ENROLLMENT III

  16. Assessing Nurse and Medical Assistant Perceived Needs Prior to Implementation of Expanded Web-based Training in Physician Clinics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Pamela Jean Clinton

    2012-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to assess nurse and medical assistant perceived needs prior to implementing an expended web-based training (WBT) program in physician clinics. This case study was conducted with a mixed-data approach using quantitative...

  17. Prior-free Mechanisms The big challenge that separates mechanism design from (non-game-theoretic) optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    Chapter 6 Prior-free Mechanisms The big challenge that separates mechanism design from (non-game-theoretic) optimization is that the incentive constraints in mechanism design bind across all valuation profiles. E design gives a mechanism for all of type-space that must trade-off performance on one input for another

  18. Copyright! 2010!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be! reproduced!in!any!form!without!prior!authorization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    /H.W.!Sweatt!Chair!in!Technological!Leadership Professor,!Electrical &!Computer!Engineering! University!Distinguished!Teaching!Professor URBAN!ENERGY!&!GREEN!part!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. Energy map adapted from the U.S. DOE and LBNL Energy System: Complex and Inefficient #12;© 2010!No!part

  19. The Effects of Placement Examinations and Enforcing Prerequisites on Student Success in EntryLevel Mathematics Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Kent

    ­level mathematics courses at Texas Tech University were a combination of stipulated high school background­Level Mathematics Courses Kent Pearce and Ronald M. Anderson Department of Mathematics and Statistics Texas Tech at Texas Tech University and Mathematics Prerequisite Requirements at Texas Tech University Prior to Fall

  20. The Effects of Placement Examinations and Enforcing Prerequisites on Student Success in Entry-Level Mathematics Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Kent

    -level mathematics courses at Texas Tech University were a combination of stipulated high school background-Level Mathematics Courses Kent Pearce and Ronald M. Anderson Department of Mathematics and Statistics Texas Tech at Texas Tech University and Mathematics Prerequisite Requirements at Texas Tech University Prior to Fall

  1. On stability condition for bifluid flows with surface tension: Application to microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    On stability condition for bifluid flows with surface tension: Application to microfluidics Ce simulations of microfluidic flows using a Level Set method, namely the exploration of different mixing-vol- umes; Microfluidics; Droplets 1. Introduction Analysis and algorithms derived herein are the result

  2. Sanctions and mutualism stability: when should less beneficial mutualists be tolerated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    Sanctions and mutualism stability: when should less beneficial mutualists be tolerated? S. A. WEST a model that shows how such sanctions provide a fitness benefit to the individuals that carry them out sanctions). We have previously argued that appreciable levels of N2 fixation by rhizobia are only likely

  3. Stability of Passive Dynamic Walking on Uneven Terrain Katie Byl and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    and MFPTs on uneven terrain. mh/m a (m) MFPT: std .5° MFPT: std 1.0° walker #1 2.0 .6 20 6 walker #2 0.3 .7 Institute of Technology email: katiebyl@mit.edu, russt@mit.edu, web: http terrain. Although deterministic definitions of stability do not apply, for sufficiently low levels

  4. Thermodynamic stability of oxygen point defects in cubic Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samanta, Amit; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia (ZrO2) is an important material with technological applications which are affected by point defect physics. Ab-initio calculations are performed to understand the structural and electronic properties of oxygen vacancies and interstitials in different charge states in cubic zirconia. We find oxygen interstitials in cubic ZrO2 can have five different configurations - dumbbell, dumbbell, crowd-ion, octahedral, and distorted dumbbell. For a neutral and singly charged oxygen interstitial, the lowest energy configuration is the dumbbell, while for a doubly charged oxygen interstitial the octahedral site is energetically the most favorable. Both the oxygen interstitial and the oxygen vacancy are negative-U, so that the singly charged defects are unstable at any Fermi level. The thermodynamic stability of these defects are studied in terms of Fermi level, oxygen partial pressure and temperature. A method to determine the chemical potential of the system as a function of temperature and pressure is propo...

  5. Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas Authors:...

  6. Stabilizing Topological Phases in Graphene via Random Adsorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stabilizing Topological Phases in Graphene via Random Adsorption Prev Next Title: Stabilizing Topological Phases in Graphene via Random Adsorption Authors: Jiang, Hua ; Qiao,...

  7. Design and control of a passively stabilized multimodal hopping robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantel, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Stabilized Multimodal Hopping Robot A Thesis submitted inStabilized Multimodal Hopping Robot by Erica Pantel Masterfor a multimodal hopping robot. The robot harnesses passive

  8. Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of...

  9. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes...

  10. Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  11. Pyrolysis of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia and its Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FARSHIHAGHRO, EBRAHIM

    2013-01-01

    to produce Yttrium stabilized Zirconia is introduced and theused methods for synthesizing zirconia nanoparticles areyttrium stabilized zirconia is analyzed. Generally, there

  12. Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  13. Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability, and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability,...

  14. Experimental characterization of foam drainage and stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Vikas Rameshchandra

    1993-01-01

    A novel experimental procedure to characterize the stability of foams is established. The procedure involves the unsteady state drainage of liquid from a stationary foam due to an applied pressure difference (forced drainage)- Unlike other bulk...

  15. LED Color Stability: 10 Important Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 15, 2014 webinar examined the causes of color shift, and took a look at existing metrics used to describe color shift/color stability in LED lighting. The lumen maintenance lifetime of...

  16. Singlet-Stabilized Minimal Gauge Mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Yuhsin Tsai

    2011-04-27

    We propose Singlet Stabilized Minimal Gauge Mediation as a simple ISS-based model of Direct Gauge Mediation which avoids both light gauginos and Landau poles. The hidden sector is a massive s-confining SQCD that is distinguished by a minimal SU(5) flavor group. The uplifted vacuum is stabilized by coupling the meson to an additional singlet sector with its own U(1) gauge symmetry via non-renormalizable interactions suppressed by a higher scale Lambda_UV in the electric theory. This generates a nonzero VEV for the singlet meson via the inverted hierarchy mechanism, but requires tuning to a precision ~ (Lambda/Lambda_UV)^2, which is ~ 10^{-4}. In the course of this analysis we also outline some simple model-building rules for stabilizing uplifted ISS models, which lead us to conclude that meson deformations are required (or at least heavily favored) to stabilize the adjoint component of the magnetic meson.

  17. Singlet-Stabilized Minimal Gauge Mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtin, David

    2010-01-01

    We propose Singlet Stabilized Minimal Gauge Mediation as a simple ISS-based model of Direct Gauge Mediation which avoids both light gauginos and Landau poles. The hidden sector is a massive s-confining SQCD that is distinguished by a minimal SU(5) flavor group. The uplifted vacuum is stabilized by coupling the meson to an additional singlet sector with its own U(1) gauge symmetry via non-renormalizable interactions suppressed by a higher scale Lambda_UV in the electric theory. This generates a nonzero VEV for the singlet meson via the inverted hierarchy mechanism, but requires tuning to a precision ~ (Lambda/Lambda_UV)^2, which is ~ 10^{-4}. In the course of this analysis we also outline some simple model-building rules for stabilizing uplifted ISS models, which lead us to conclude that meson deformations are required (or at least heavily favored) to stabilize the adjoint component of the magnetic meson.

  18. Influence of Motion Cueing on Helicopter Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Motion Cueing on Helicopter Stabilization Daniel R. Berger, Cengiz Terzibas, and Heinrich H. Bülthoff Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany Helicopters vestibular and somatosensory cues. To test this hypothesis, we measured helicopter hovering performance

  19. Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis A. Polyakov Inria Lille of discontinuous control systems using discontinuous Lyapunov functions. Elements of Filippov theory of generalized derivatives and non-smooth Lyapunov functions are considered. The generalized Lyapunov theorems

  20. Rocky Flats Ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funston, G.A.

    1995-06-14

    Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. The test will provide information to determine charge sizes, soak times and mesh screen sizes (if available at time of test) for stabilization of Rocky Flats Ash items to be processed in the HC-21C Muffle Furnace Process. Once the charge size and soak times have been established, a program for the temperature controller of the HC-21C Muffle Furnace process will be generated for processing Rocky Flats Ash.

  1. Automatic Stability Checking for Large Analog Circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Parijat 1985-

    2010-12-06

    Small signal stability has always been an important concern for analog designers. Recent advances such as the Loop Finder algorithm allows designers to detect and identify local, potentially unstable return loops without ...

  2. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an ...

  3. Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification Treatability Study of Mercury Contaminated Soil from the Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb P.; Milian, L.; Yim, S. P.

    2012-11-30

    As a result of past operations, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Plant) has extensive mercury-contamination in building structures, soils, storm sewer sediments, and stream sediments, which are a source of pollution to the local ecosystem. Because of mercury’s toxicity and potential impacts on human health and the environment, DOE continues to investigate and implement projects to support the remediation of the Y-12 site.URS and #9122;CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) under its prime contract with DOE has cleanup responsibilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and is investigating potential mercury-contaminated soil treatment technologies through an agreement with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Y-12, the Y-12 operating contractor to DOE. As part of its investigations, UCOR has subcontracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to conduct laboratory-scale studies evaluating the applicability of the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process using surrogate and actual mixed waste Y-12 soils containing mercury (Hg) at 135, 2,000, and 10,000 ppm.SPSS uses a thermoplastic sulfur binder to convert Hg to stable mercury sulfide (HgS) and solidifies the chemically stable product in a monolithic solid final waste form to reduce dispersion and permeability. Formulations containing 40 – 60 dry wt% Y-12 soil were fabricated and samples were prepared in triplicate for Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing by an independent laboratory. Those containing 50 and 60 wt% soil easily met the study criteria for maximum allowable Hg concentrations (47 and 1 ppb, respectively compared with the TCLP limit of 200 ppb Hg). The lowest waste loading of 40 wt% yielded TCLP Hg concentrations slightly higher (240 ppb) than the allowable limit. Since the Y-12 soil tended to form clumps, the improved leaching at higher waste loadings was probably due to reduction in particle size from friction of the soil mixing, which creates more surface area for chemical conversion. This was corroborated by the fact that the same waste loading pre-treated by ball milling to reduce particle size prior to SPSS processing yielded TCLP concentrations almost 30 times lower, and at 8.5 ppb Hg was well below EPA limits. Pre-treatment by ball milling also allowed a reduction in the time required for stabilization, thus potentially reducing total process times by 30%.Additional performance testing was conducted including measurement of compressive strength to confirm mechanical integrity and immersion testing to determine the potential impacts of storage or disposal under saturated conditions. For both surrogate and actual Y-12 treated soils, waste form compressive strengths ranged between 2,300 and 6,500 psi, indicating very strong mechanical integrity (a minimum of greater than 40 times greater than the NRC guidance for low-level radioactive waste). In general, compressive strength increases with waste loading as the soil acts as an aggregate in the sulfur concrete waste forms. No statistically significant loss in strength was recorded for the 30 and 40 wt% surrogate waste samples and only a minor reduction in strength was measured for the 43 wt% waste forms. The 30 wt% Y-12 soil did not show a significant loss in strength but the 50 wt% samples were severely degraded in immersion due to swelling of the clay soil. The impact on Hg leaching, if any, was not determined.

  4. Classical and thermodynamic stability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Monteiro

    2010-06-28

    We consider the stability of black holes within both classical general relativity and the semiclassical thermodynamic description. In particular, we study linearised perturbations and their contribution to the gravitational partition function, addressing technical issues for charged (Reissner-Nordstrom) and rotating (Kerr-AdS) black holes. Exploring the connection between classical and thermodynamic stability, we find classical instabilities of Myers-Perry black holes and bifurcations to new black hole families.

  5. Stabilized fuel with silica support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

  6. A model study of articulated mat stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tetsu

    1990-01-01

    characteristics of. model articulated mat revetrrient svith respect to different revetmert slope con- ditions. In this experirrent three diFierent slope permeabilities were investigated by layering geotextile filter on the revetment frame. The stability... EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 12 18 A. Geotextile filter B. Stability experiment V WAVE RUNUP 18 21 33 VI VII VIII WAVE RUNDOWN UPLIFTING FORCE SLIDE-UP FORCE 44 IX SLIDE-DOWN FORCE 77 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION REFERENCES . APPENDIX A EXPERIMENTAL...

  7. CodingisCoolLevel1 A Nuts & Bolts Introduction to Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CodingisCool­Level1 A Nuts & Bolts Introduction to Computer Science A Workshop for High School Students in Grades 10th-12th This two-day workshop will introduce computer science and coding to high school students using AppInventor and mobile apps. No prior background in computer science or coding

  8. Further Results on Finite-Time Partial Stability and Stabilization. Applications to Nonlinear Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammazi, Chaker [Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte Departement de Mathematiques Laboratoire LIM Ecole Polytechnique de Tunisie (Tunisia)

    2009-03-05

    The paper gives Lyapunov type sufficient conditions for partial finite-time and asymptotic stability in which some state variables converge to zero while the rest converge to constant values that possibly depend on the initial conditions. The paper then presents partially asymptotically stabilizing controllers for many nonlinear control systems for which continuous asymptotically stabilizing (in the usual sense) controllers are known not to exist.

  9. TANK 40 FINAL SB5 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS PRIOR TO NP ADDITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.

    2010-01-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). This sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. Prior to radionuclide inventory analyses, a final sample of the H-canyon Np stream will be added to bound the Np addition anticipated for Tank 40. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB5. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB5 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 239 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four in Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Due to the use of Zr crucibles and Na in the peroxide fusions, Na and Zr cannot be determined from this preparation. Additionally, other alkali metals, such as Li and K that may be contaminants in the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} are not determined from this preparation. Three Analytical Reference Glass - 14 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. The ARG-1 glass allows for an assessment of the completeness of each digestion. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of masses 81-209 and 230-252, and cold vapor atomic absorption (CV-AA) analysis for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the peroxide fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB5 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for ion chromatography (IC), total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC), and total base analyses. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The elemental ratios of the major elements for the SB5 WAPS sample, whose major Tank 51 Qualification sample component underwent Al dissolution, are similar to those measured for the SB4 WAPS sample. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. (3) Fifty percent of the sulfur in the SB5 WAPS sample is insoluble, and this represents a significantly larger fraction than that observed in previous sludge batches. (4) The noble metal and Ag concentrations predicted from the measured values for the Tank 51 Confirmation sample and Tank 40 SB4 WAPS sample using a two-thirds Tank 51, one-third Tank 40 heel blend ratio used to arrive at the final SB5 composition, agree with the values for the Tank 40 SB5 WAPS sample measured for this report.

  10. Tools and Technology Article Stability of Avian Fecal Corticosterone Metabolite Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    detects a stressor (e.g., food shortage, large temp change), a neural signal is sent to the hypothalamus (Levine et al. 1989). The hypothalamus then sends a hormone signal to the pituitary gland, resulting). After the stressor has been alleviated a negative feedback loop shuts off the hypothalamus

  11. Adaptable Chip-Level Microfluidic Packaging for a Micro-Scale Gas Chromatograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Adaptable Chip-Level Microfluidic Packaging for a Micro-Scale Gas Chromatograph Nathan Ward1 the microfluidic package with non-sorbent epoxy. The stability and efficacy of the integrated detector cell. Keywords-microfluidics; chip-level packaging; µGC; chemiresistor array I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATIONS

  12. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  13. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  14. Evaluation of normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) in kVCT using MVCT prior images for radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, M. R. [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)] [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Mackenzie, M.; Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada) [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images.Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms containing bilateral steel inserts are used in all experiments. Two MVCT images, one without any metal artifact corrections and the other corrected using a modified iterative maximum likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT (IMPACT) are translated to pseudo-kVCT images. These are then used as prior images without tissue classification in an NMAR technique for correcting the experimental kVCT image. The IMPACT method in MVCT included an additional model for the pair/triplet production process and the energy dependent response of the MVCT detectors. An experimental kVCT image, without the metal inserts and reconstructed using the filtered back projection (FBP) method, is artificially patched with the known steel inserts to get a reference image. The regular NMAR image containing the steel inserts that uses tissue classified kVCT prior and the NMAR images reconstructed using MVCT priors are compared with the reference image for metal artifact reduction. The Eclipse treatment planning system is used to calculate radiotherapy dose distributions on the corrected images and on the reference image using the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm with 6 MV parallel opposed 5 × 10 cm{sup 2} fields passing through the bilateral steel inserts, and the results are compared. Gafchromic film is used to measure the actual dose delivered in a plane perpendicular to the beams at the isocenter.Results: The streaking and shading in the NMAR image using tissue classifications are significantly reduced. However, the structures, including metal, are deformed. Some uniform regions appear to have eroded from one side. There is a large variation of attenuation values inside the metal inserts. Similar results are seen in commercially corrected image. Use of MVCT prior images without tissue classification in NMAR significantly reduces these problems. The radiation dose calculated on the reference image is close to the dose measured using the film. Compared to the reference image, the calculated dose difference in the conventional NMAR image, the corrected images using uncorrected MVCT image, and IMPACT corrected MVCT image as priors is ?15.5%, ?5%, and ?2.7%, respectively, at the isocenter.Conclusions: The deformation and erosion of the structures present in regular NMAR corrected images can be largely reduced by using MVCT priors without tissue segmentation. The attenuation value of metal being incorrect, large dose differences relative to the true value can result when using the conventional NMAR image. This difference can be significantly reduced if MVCT images are used as priors. Reduced tissue deformation, better tissue visualization, and correct information about the electron density of the tissues and metals in the artifact corrected images could help delineate the structures better, as well as calculate radiation dose more correctly, thus enhancing the quality of the radiotherapy treatment planning.

  15. Implications for the Cosmological Landscape: Can Thermal Inputs from a Prior Universe Account for Relic Graviton Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Beckwith

    2008-03-02

    We present a way to accomodate relic graviton production via worm hole transitions of prior universe thermal / energy density values to our present universe. This is done in the context of providing a mechanism for thermally driven relic gravitons, and also to explain how Park's 2003 observation as to how a thermally scaled vacuum energy value plays a role in forming the early universe emergent field dynamics

  16. Physics Issues Worshop Summary (energetic beams, flow, stability)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Physics Issues Worshop Summary (energetic beams, flow, stability) FRC stability Global stability remains the leading issue affecting the future of FRC research. It must be resolved before the fusion community will embrace FRC as not just an entertaining toy, but a bona fide fusion concept. The stability

  17. On the applicability of local asymptotic stability criteria to stellarator stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuno, Tomoya

    On the applicability of local asymptotic stability criteria to stellarator stability B. A. Carreras, Kyoto, Japan T. Tatsuno Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan Received 22 November 2000; accepted 12 December be the existence of local flattening of the pressure profile at the resonant surfaces. This local flattening

  18. Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bronfenbrenner, James C. (Allentown, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Allentown, PA); Tewari, Krishna (Allentown, PA)

    1985-01-01

    A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

  19. The (In)Stability of Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rory Barnes; Thomas Quinn

    2004-01-09

    We present results of numerical simulations which examine the dynamical stability of known planetary systems, a star with two or more planets. First we vary the initial conditions of each system based on observational data. We then determine regions of phase space which produce stable planetary configurations. For each system we perform 1000 ~1 million year integrations. We examine upsilon And, HD83443, GJ876, HD82943, 47UMa, HD168443, and the solar system (SS). We find that the resonant systems, 2 planets in a first order mean motion resonance, (HD82943 and GJ876) have very narrow zones of stability. The interacting systems, not in first order resonance, but able to perturb each other (upsilon And, 47UMa, and SS) have broad regions of stability. The separated systems, 2 planets beyond 10:1 resonance, (we only examine HD83443 and HD168443) are fully stable. Furthermore we find that the best fits to the interacting and resonant systems place them very close to unstable regions. The boundary in phase space between stability and instability depends strongly on the eccentricities, and (if applicable) the proximity of the system to perfect resonance. In addition to million year integrations, we also examined stability on ~100 million year timescales. For each system we ran ~10 long term simulations, and find that the Keplerian fits to these systems all contain configurations which may be regular on this timescale.

  20. Stability Study of the RERTR Fuel Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Dennis Keiser; Brandon Miller; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    The irradiation stability of the interaction phases at the interface of fuel and Al alloy matrix as well as the stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice is believed to be very important to the U-Mo fuel performance. In this paper the recent result from TEM characterization of Kr ion irradiated U-10Mo-5Zr alloy will be discussed. The focus will be on the phase stability of Mo2-Zr, a dominated second phase developed at the interface of U-10Mo and the Zr barrier in a monolithic fuel plate from fuel fabrication. The Kr ion irradiations were conducted at a temperature of 200 degrees C to an ion fluence of 2.0E+16 ions/cm2. To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated dispersion U-7Mo fuel and monolithic U-10Mo fuel, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel (3.53E+21 fission/cm3) was used for a TEM in-situ heating experiment. The preliminary result showed extraordinary thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of the TEM observation from these two experiments on the fuel microstructural evolution under irradiation will be discussed.

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

    2006-08-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

  2. LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level 2 Lower building Rm.2350 1393 WESTERN ROAD N6G -1G9 UPDATE DRAWN #12;LEVEL 02 FLOOR LEVEL 2 / SECOND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY

  3. Stability and dynamics of magnetocapillary interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rujeko Chinomona; Janelle Lajeunesse; William H. Mitchell; Yao Yao; Saverio E. Spagnolie

    2014-12-16

    Recent experiments have shown that floating ferromagnetic beads, under the influence of an oscillating background magnetic field, can move along a liquid-air interface in a sustained periodic locomotion [Lumay et al., Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 2420]. Dynamic activity arises from a periodically induced dipole-dipole repulsion between the beads acting in concert with capillary attraction. We investigate analytically and numerically the stability and dynamics of this magnetocapillary swimming, and explore other related topics including the steady and periodic equilibrium configurations of two and three beads, and bead collisions. The swimming speed and system stability depend on a dimensionless measure of the relative repulsive and attractive forces which we term the magnetocapillary number. An oscillatory magnetic field may stabilize an otherwise unstable collinear configuration, and striking behaviors are observed in fast transitions to and from locomotory states, offering insight into the behavior and self-assembly of interface-bound micro-particles.

  4. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  5. Image Registration for Stability Testing of MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Blake, Peter N; Morey, Peter A; Landsman, Wayne B; Chambers, Victor J; Moseley, Samuel H; 10.1117/12.872076

    2013-01-01

    Image registration, or alignment of two or more images covering the same scenes or objects, is of great interest in many disciplines such as remote sensing, medical imaging, astronomy, and computer vision. In this paper, we introduce a new application of image registration algorithms. We demonstrate how through a wavelet based image registration algorithm, engineers can evaluate stability of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). In particular, we applied image registration algorithms to assess alignment stability of the MicroShutters Subsystem (MSS) of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This work introduces a new methodology for evaluating stability of MEMS devices to engineers as well as a new application of image registration algorithms to computer scientists.

  6. Performance Stabilization of CdTe PV Modules using Bias and Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2014-07-01

    Reversible performance changes due to light exposure frustrate repeatable performance measurements on CdTe PV modules. It is common to use extended light-exposure to ensure that measurements are representative of outdoor performance. We quantify the extent to which such a light-exposed state depends on module temperature and consider bias in the dark to aid in stabilization. We evaluate the use of dark forward bias to bring about a performance state equivalent to that obtained with light exposure, and to maintain a light-exposed state prior to STC performance measurement. Our results indicate that the most promising method for measuring a light-exposed state is to use light exposure at controlled temperature followed by prompt STC measurement with a repeatable time interval between exposure and the STC measurement.

  7. A Bayesian Mean-Value Approach with a Self-Consistently Determined Prior Distribution for the Ranking of College Football Teams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashburn, J R; Ashburn, James R.; Colvert, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian mean-value approach for ranking all college football teams using only win-loss data. This approach is unique in that the prior distribution necessary to handle undefeated and winless teams is calculated self-consistently. Furthermore, we will show statistics supporting the validity of the prior distribution. Finally, a brief comparison with other football rankings will be presented.

  8. Stabilizing Open Quantum Systems by Markovian Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; Xiaoting Wang

    2010-06-09

    We study open quantum systems whose evolution is governed by a master equation of Kossakowski-Gorini-Sudarshan-Lindblad type and give a characterization of the convex set of steady states of such systems based on the generalized Bloch representation. It is shown that an isolated steady state of the Bloch equation cannot be a center, i.e., that the existence of a unique steady state implies attractivity and global asymptotic stability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a unique steady state are derived and applied to different physical models including two- and four-level atoms, (truncated) harmonic oscillators, composite and decomposable systems. It is shown how these criteria could be exploited in principle for quantum reservoir engineeing via coherent control and direct feedback to stabilize the system to a desired steady state. We also discuss the question of limit points of the dynamics. Despite the non-existence of isolated centers, open quantum systems can have nontrivial invariant sets. These invariant sets are center manifolds that arise when the Bloch superoperator has purely imaginary eigenvalues and are closely related to decoherence-free subspaces.

  9. Renewable source controls for grid stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Neely, Jason C.; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Schoenwald, David Alan; Grant, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the small signal and transient stability of the Western Electric- ity Coordinating Council (WECC) under high penetrations of renewable energy, and to identify control technologies that would improve the system performance. The WECC is the regional entity responsible for coordinating and promoting bulk electric system reliability in the Western Interconnection. Transient stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a large disturbance while small signal stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a small disturbance. Tran- sient stability analysis usually focuses on the relative rotor angle between synchronous machines compared to some stability margin. For this study we employed generator speed relative to system speed as a metric for assessing transient stability. In addition, we evaluated the system transient response using the system frequency nadir, which provides an assessment of the adequacy of the primary frequency control reserves. Small signal stability analysis typically identi es the eigenvalues or modes of the system in response to a disturbance. For this study we developed mode shape maps for the di erent scenarios. Prony analysis was applied to generator speed after a 1.4 GW, 0.5 second, brake insertion at various locations. Six di erent WECC base cases were analyzed, including the 2022 light spring case which meets the renewable portfolio standards. Because of the di culty in identifying the cause and e ect relationship in large power system models with di erent scenarios, several simulations were run on a 7-bus, 5-generator system to isolate the e ects of di erent con gurations. Based on the results of the study, for a large power system like the WECC, incorporating frequency droop into wind/solar systems provides a larger bene t to system transient response than replacing the lost inertia with synthetic inertia. From a small signal stability perspective, the increase in renewable penetration results in subtle changes to the system modes. In gen- eral, mode frequencies increase slightly, and mode shapes remain similar. The system frequency nadir for the 2022 light spring case was slightly lower than the other cases, largely because of the reduced system inertia. However, the nadir is still well above the minimum load shedding frequency of 59.5 Hz. Finally, several discrepancies were identi ed between actual and reported wind penetration, and additional work on wind/solar modeling is required to increase the delity of the WECC models.

  10. Fluid sphere: stability problem and dimensional constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farook Rahaman; Anirudh Pradhan; Nasr Ahmed; Saibal Ray; Bijan Saha; Mosiur Rahaman

    2015-04-14

    We study different dimensional fluids inspired by noncommutative geometry which admit conformal Killing vectors. The solutions of the Einstein field equations examined specifically for five different set of spacetime. We calculate the active gravitational mass and impose stability conditions of the fluid sphere. The analysis thus carried out immediately indicates that at $4$-dimension only one can get a stable configuration for any spherically symmetric stellar system and any other dimensions, lower or higher, becomes untenable as far as the stability of a system is concerned.

  11. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

  12. Review of Prior Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit Evaluation: A Report to Snohomish Public Utilities District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip

    2014-12-22

    Snohomish County Public Utilities District (the District or Snohomish PUD) provides electricity to about 325,000 customers in Snohomish County, Washington. The District has an incentive programs to encourage commercial customers to improve energy efficiency: the District partially reimburses the cost of approved retrofits if they provide a level of energy performance improvement that is specified by contract. In 2013 the District contracted with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide a third-party review of the Monitoring and Verification (M&V) practices the District uses to evaluate whether companies are meeting their contractual obligations. This work helps LBNL understand the challenges faced by real-world practitioners of M&V of energy savings, and builds on a body of related work such as Price et al. (2013). The District selected a typical project for which they had already performed an evaluation. The present report includes the District's original evaluation as well as LBNL's review of their approach. The review is based on the document itself; on investigation of the load data and outdoor air temperature data from the building evaluated in the document; and on phone discussions with Bill Harris of the Snohomish County Public Utilities District. We will call the building studied in the document the subject building, the original Snohomish PUD report will be referred to as the Evaluation, and this discussion by LBNL is called the Review.

  13. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. Singh, M.K.; Inkratas, C. Fleming, I.R. McBean, E.

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  14. of Flow on Morphological Stability Directional Solidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Tim

    Effects During of Flow on Morphological Stability Directional Solidification S.H. DAVIS and T.P. SCHULZE Research involving the interaction of flow with morphological instability during directional solidifi- cation of binary alloys is reviewed. In general, flow may arise during the solidification process

  15. Stability of discrete breathers in magnetic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    Stability of discrete breathers in magnetic metamaterials Dmitry Pelinovsky1 and Vassilis Rothos2 1 describing magnetic metamaterials which consist of periodic arrays of split- ring resonators [4, 7]: ¨qn + V criterion to the multi-site breathers in magnetic metamaterials. 2 Formalism In what follows, we shall use

  16. GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK Section Engineering Geology, Centre for Technical-mail: hack@itc.nl (Received 2 June, 2000; Accepted 4 September, 2000) Abstract. A pre-requisite in slope Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;424 ROBERT HACK the slope material with, for example, manganese

  17. Stability and folds in an elastocapillary system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Akbari; Reghan J. Hill; Theo G. M. van de Ven

    2015-05-27

    We examine the equilibrium and stability of an elastocapillary system to model drying-induced structural failures. The model comprises a circular elastic membrane with a hole at the center that is deformed by the capillary pressure of simply connected and doubly connected menisci. Using variational and spectral methods, stability is related to the slope of equilibrium branches in the liquid content versus pressure diagram for the constrained and unconstrained problems. The second-variation spectra are separately determined for the membrane and meniscus, showing that the membrane out-of-plane spectrum and the in-plane spectrum at large elatocapillary numbers are both positive, so that only meniscus perturbations can cause instability. At small elastocapillary numbers, the in-plane spectrum has a negative eigenvalue, inducing wrinkling instabilities in thin membranes. In contrast, the smallest eigenvalue of the meniscus spectrum always changes sign at a pressure turning point where stability exchange occurs in the unconstrained problem. We also examine configurations in which the meniscus and membrane are individually stable, while the elastocapillary system as a whole is not; this emphasizes the connection between stability and the coupling of elastic and capillary forces.

  18. Hydrothermal stability of high silica zeolites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, David

    1988-01-01

    This thesis concerns the hydrothermal stability of two zeolite molecular sieves with the MFI structure, ZSM-5 and its 'aluminium free' form silicalite. Silicalite was synthesised from low pH alkali metal free aqueous gels at 95°C and characterised...

  19. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Phillip D; Wander, Marc J

    2014-11-04

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  20. Stability of AdS black strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Delsate

    2008-08-14

    We review the recent developements in the stability problem and phase diagram for asymptotically locally $AdS$ black strings. First, we quickly review the case of locally flat black string before turning to the case of locally $AdS$ spacetimes.

  1. Enhancing Power Grid Stability through Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoba, Taras I.

    Enhancing Power Grid Stability through Analytics: Information is Power, and Power is Information no dummies). · But... many challenges in the North American power grid revolve around coordinating? Power is Information · Refrain in many quarters of the power grid today says that we must "extract

  2. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  3. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  4. http://www.pppl.gov Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    MHD. 2. Flow pattern of magnetic propulsion. 3. Theory of stabilization. 4. Flow locked mode. 5 of magnetic propulsion (cont.) Magnetic propulsion makes MHD of intense lithium streams compatible 8 #12; 2 Flow pattern of magnetic propulsion (cont.) Driving pressure pwall j outlet > 1 atm; p wall

  5. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  6. Foams Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Heerschap; John N. Marafino; Kristin McKenna; Kevin L. Caran; Klebert Feitosa

    2015-09-11

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. Novel surfactant architectures with multi-cephalic and multi-tailed molecules have reportedly enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group, but their ability to produce and stabilize foam is mostly unknown. Here we report on experiments with tris-cationic, triple-headed, double- and single-tailed amphiphiles and their foamability and foam stability with respect to head group, tail number and tail length. The amphiphiles are composed of an aromatic mesitylene core and three benzylic amonium bromide groups, with alkyl chains attached to one or two of the head groups. Whereas shorter (14 carbons in length) double-tailed molecules are found to produce very stable foams, foams made with single tail molecules of the same length show poor foamability and stability, and foams with longer (16 carbons in length) double-tail molecules do not foam with the methods used. By contrast, the structure of the non-tail-bearing head group (trimethylammonium vs. pyridinium) has no impact on foamability. Furthermore, observations of the coarsening rate at nearly constant liquid content indicate that the enhanced foam stability is a result of lower gas permeability through the surfactant monolayer. Finally, the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of the surfactants demonstrates to be a good predictor of foamability and foam stability for these small molecule surfactants. This results inform how surfactant architecture can be tailored to produce stable foams.

  7. Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, DR; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael; Clauser, Karl; Qiao, Jana; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri; Ruggles, Kelly; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. T.; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narcisco; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-07-01

    Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have sparked efforts to characterize the proteomes of tumor samples to provide complementary and unique information inaccessible by genomics. Tumor samples are usually not accrued with proteomic characterization in mind, raising concerns regarding effects of undocumented sample ischemia on protein abundance and phosphosite stoichiometry. Here we report the effects of cold ischemia time on clinical ovarian cancer samples and patient-derived basal and luminal breast cancer xenografts. Tumor tissues were excised and collected prior to vascular ligation, subjected to accurately defined ischemia times up to 60 min, and analyzed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics using isobaric tags and high-performance, multidimensional LC-MS/MS. No significant changes were detected at the protein level in each tumor type after 60 minutes of ischemia, and the majority of the >25,000 phosphosites detected were also stable. However, large, reproducible increases and decreases in protein phosphorylation at specific sites were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome starting as early as 5 minutes post-excision. Early and sustained activation of stress response, transcriptional regulation and cell death pathways were observed in common across tumor types. Tissue-specific changes in phosphosite stability were also observed suggesting idiosyncratic effects of ischemia in particular lineages. Our study provides insights into the information that may be obtained by proteomic characterization of tumor samples after undocumented periods of ischemia, and suggests caution especially in interpreting activation of stress pathways in such samples as they may reflect sample handling rather than tumor physiology.

  8. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  9. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  10. A switched state feedback law for the stabilization of LTI systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarelli, Keith R.

    2009-09-01

    Inspired by prior work in the design of switched feedback controllers for second order systems, we develop a switched state feedback control law for the stabilization of LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. The control law operates by switching between two static gain vectors in such a way that the state trajectory is driven onto a stable n - 1 dimensional hyperplane (where n represents the system dimension). We begin by briefly examining relevant geometric properties of the phase portraits in the case of two-dimensional systems to develop intuition, and we then show how these geometric properties can be expressed as algebraic constraints on the switched vector fields that are applicable to LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. We then derive necessary and sufficient conditions to ensure stabilizability of the resulting switched system (characterized primarily by simple conditions on eigenvalues), and describe an explicit procedure for designing stabilizing controllers. We then show how the newly developed control law can be applied to the problem of minimizing the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding closed-loop state trajectories, and we illustrate the closed-loop transient performance of these switched state feedback controllers via multiple examples.

  11. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    stability: the Storegga Slide. EGS XXVII General Assembly.of magnetic susceptibility. EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly:

  12. Fourier-Mukai transforms and stability conditions on abelian threefolds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyaratne, Hathurusinghege Dulip Bandara

    2014-11-27

    Construction of Bridgeland stability conditions on a given Calabi-Yau threefold is an important problem and this thesis realizes the rst known examples of such stability conditions. More precisely, we construct a dense ...

  13. Stability analysis for class of switched nonlinear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaker, Hamid Reza

    Stability analysis for a class of switched nonlinear systems is addressed in this paper. Two linear matrix inequality (LMI) based sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability are proposed for switched nonlinear systems. ...

  14. Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

    2006-04-01

    This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

  15. Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Sherry Qianwen

    1998-01-01

    The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic model for viscosity as a function of shear rate, ...

  16. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  17. Sufficient Conditions for Uniform Stability of Regularization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we study the stability and generalization properties of penalized empirical-risk minimization algorithms. We propose a set of properties of the penalty term that is sufficient to ensure uniform ?-stability: ...

  18. Exploiting Elements of Transcriptional Machinery to Enhance Protein Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, John J.

    Exploiting Elements of Transcriptional Machinery to Enhance Protein Stability Nora H. Barakat Ltd. All rights reserved. *Corresponding author Keywords: protein design; protein stability of protein design aspires to engineer proteins of specific function. Function is correlated directly

  19. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  20. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazarus, Kyren A.; Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 ; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C.; To, Sarah Q.; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 ; Chand, Ashwini L.; Clyne, Colin D.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER?ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER? and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor ? (ER?) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER? cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER? cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER? breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER? compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER? versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ER?. Our data demonstrates that in ER? cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER? cells as well as ER? tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER? tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER? and ER+ breast cancer.

  1. Lyapunov stability of flowing magnetohydrodynamic plasmas surrounded by resistive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasso, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Throumoulopoulos, G. N. [Association Euratom-Hellenic Republic, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-07-15

    A general stability condition for plasma-vacuum systems with resistive walls is derived by using the Frieman Rotenberg Lagrangian stability formulation [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)]. It is shown that the Lyapunov stability limit for external modes does not depend upon the gyroscopic term but upon the sign of the perturbed potential energy only. In the absence of dissipation in the plasma such as viscosity, it is expected that the flow cannot stabilize the system.

  2. System Design Description PFP Thermal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-04-25

    The purpose of this document is to provide a system design description (SDD) and design basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Thermal Stabilization project. The chief objective of the SDD is to document the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) that establish and maintain the facility Safety Envelope necessary for normal safe operation of the facility; as identified in the FSAR, the OSRs, and Safety Assessment Documents (SADs). This safety equipment documentation should satisfy guidelines for the SDD given in WHC-SD-CP-TI-18 1, Criteria for Identification and Control of Equipment Necessary for Preservation of the Safety Envelope and Safe Operation of PFP. The basis for operational, alarm response, maintenance, and surveillance procedures are also identified and justified in this document. This document and its appendices address the following elements of the PFP Thermal Stabilization project: Functional and design requirements; Design description; Safety Envelope Analysis; Safety Equipment Class; and Operational, maintenance and surveillance procedures.

  3. Switching Quantum Dynamics for Fast Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Scaramuzza; Francesco Ticozzi

    2015-04-16

    Control strategies for dissipative preparation of target quantum states, both pure and mixed, and subspaces are obtained by switching between a set of available semigroup generators. We show that the class of problems of interest can be recast, from a control--theoretic perspective, into a switched-stabilization problem for linear dynamics. This is attained by a suitable affine transformation of the coherence-vector representation. In particular, we propose and compare stabilizing time-based and state-based switching rules for entangled state preparation, showing that the latter not only ensure faster convergence with respect to non-switching methods, but can designed so that they retain robustness with respect to initialization, as long as the target is a pure state or a subspace.

  4. Plutonium stabilization and handling (PuSH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-01-23

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses construction of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. The major sections of the project are: site preparation; SPS Procurement, Installation, and Testing; storage vault modification; and characterization equipment additions. The SPS will be procured as part of a Department of Energy nationwide common procurement. Specific design crit1460eria for the SPS have been extracted from that contract and are contained in an appendix to this document.

  5. Moduli stabilization with Fayet-Iliopoulos uplift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Dudas; Y. Mambrini; S. Pokorski; A. Romagnoni

    2007-11-30

    In the recent years, phenomenological models of moduli stabilization were proposed, where the dynamics of the stabilization is essentially supersymmetric, whereas an O'Rafearthaigh supersymmetry breaking sector is responsible for the "uplift" of the cosmological constant to zero. We investigate the case where the uplift is provided by a Fayet-Iliopoulos sector. We find that in this case the modulus contribution to supersymmetry breaking is larger than in the previous models. A first consequence of this class of constructions is for gauginos, which are heavier compared to previous models. In some of our explicit examples, due to a non-standard gauge-mediation type negative contribution to scalars masses, the whole superpartner spectrum can be efficiently compressed at low-energy. This provides an original phenomenology testable at the LHC, in particular sleptons are generically heavier than the squarks.

  6. On Stabilization of Nonautonomous Nonlinear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanov, A. Yu. [Faculty of Mathematics and IT, Ulyanovsk State University, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., Ulyanovsk, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-30

    The procedures to obtain the sufficient conditions of asymptotic stability for nonlinear nonstationary continuous-time systems are discussed. We consider different types of the following general controlled system: x = X(t,x,u) = F(t,x)+B(t,x)u, x(t{sub 0}) = x{sub 0}. (*) The basis of investigation is limiting equations, limiting Lyapunov functions, etc. The improved concept of observability of the pair of functional matrices is presented. By these results the problem of synthesis of asymptotically stable control nonlinear nonautonomous systems (with linear parts) involving the quadratic time-dependent Lyapunov functions is solved as well as stabilizing a given unstable system with nonlinear control law.

  7. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Gas Generation Rates as an Indicator for the Long Term Stability of Radioactive Waste Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steyer, S.; Brennecke, P.; Bandt, G.; Kroger, H.

    2007-07-01

    Pursuant to the 'Act on the Peaceful Utilization of Atomic Energy and the Protection against its Hazards' (Atomic Energy Act) the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) is legally responsible for the construction and operation of federal facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. Within the scope of this responsibility, particular due to par. 74(1) Ordinance on Radiation Protection, BfS defines all safety-related requirements on waste packages envisaged for disposal, establishes guidelines for the conditioning of radioactive waste and approves the fulfillment of the waste acceptance requirements within the radioactive waste quality control system. BfS also provides criteria to enable the assessment of methods for the treatment and packaging of radioactive waste to produce waste packages suitable for disposal according to par. 74(2) Ordinance on Radiation Protection. Due to the present non-availability of a repository in Germany, quality control measures for all types of radioactive waste products are carried out prior to interim storage with respect to the future disposal. As a result BfS approves the demonstrated properties of the radioactive waste packages and confirms the fulfillment of the respective requirements. After several years of storage the properties of waste packages might have changed. By proving, that such changes have no significant impact on the quality of the waste product, the effort of requalification could be minimized. Therefore, data on the long-term behavior of radioactive waste products need to be acquired and indicators to prove the long-term stability have to be quantified. Preferably, such indicators can be determined easily with non-destructive methods, even for legacy waste packages. A promising parameter is the gas generation rate. The relationship between gas generation rate and long term stability is presented as first result of an ongoing study on behalf of BfS. Permissible gas generation rates that ensure adequate product stability with respect to future disposal are to be identified. (authors)

  9. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jingjie [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States); Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)] [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States); Li, Xuejun, E-mail: xjli@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Huang, Chuanshu, E-mail: chuanshu.huang@nyumc.org [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)] [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ? SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ? SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ? SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  10. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  11. Stability of local quantum dissipative systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Lucia, Angelo; Michalakis, Spyridon; Perez-Garcia, David

    2015-04-07

    in the engineered Liouvillian itself. Once again, stability against local perturbations – this time for many-body Liouvillians rather than Hamiltonians – is of crucial importance. Indeed, in [53] the authors consider depolarizing noise acting on top of a dissipative... the canonical basis for Hx. Scalar product in Hx will be denoted by ??|??, and rank-one linear maps by |????|. For each finite subset ? ? ? , the associated Hilbert space is given by H? = ? x?? Hx, (1) and the algebra of observables supported on ? is defined...

  12. The Dark Energy Star and Stability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyali Bhar; Farook Rahaman

    2015-01-12

    We have proposed a new model of dark energy star consisting of five zones namely, solid core of constant energy density, the thin shell between core and interior, an inhomogeneous interior region with anisotropic pressures, thin shell and the exterior vacuum region. We have discussed various physical properties. The model satisfies all the physical requirements. The stability condition under small linear perturbation has also been discussed.

  13. APCS2009, Nagoya STABILITY OF TENSEGRITY STRUCTURES WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guest, Simon

    APCS2009, Nagoya STABILITY OF TENSEGRITY STRUCTURES WITH DIHEDRAL SYMMETRY Jingyao Zhang1) , Makoto that using symmetry can be of great benefit in an investigation of the stability of tensegrity structures: we are able to find the general super stability condition for a class of structures with the same type

  14. HARETU AND THE STABILITY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diacu, Florin

    HARETU AND THE STABILITY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM1 Florin Diacu2 Pacific Institute for the Mathematical the contributions of Spiru Haretu to the problem of the solar system's stability and show their importance relative and the consequences of Haretu's results. Keywords: stability, solar system, n-body problem. #12;Is the solar system

  15. April 23, 2003 Statistical Learning : CVloo stability is sufficient for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    @ai.mit.edu #12;Abstract Solutions of learning problems by Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when- ror. Our second observation is that for bounded loss classes, CVloo stability of ERM is necessary and sufficient for consistency of ERM. We conclude that CVloo stability is the weakest form of stability which

  16. Electrostatic Stabilization of Colloids in Carbon Dioxide: Electrophoresis and Dielectrophoresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrostatic Stabilization of Colloids in Carbon Dioxide: Electrophoresis and Dielectrophoresis in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (scCO2). Herein we demonstrate that colloids may also be stabilized in CO2 the behavior of steric stabilization in compressed supercritical fluids1-3 including carbon dioxide,4

  17. Generalized Lyapunov Function for Stability Analysis of Interconnected Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Generalized Lyapunov Function for Stability Analysis of Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud of Lyapunov function is necessary to analyze the stability of a system. This paper presents an idea for formulating generalized Lyapunov function for the stability analysis of interconnected power systems. Lyapunov

  18. Review article Progress on yttria-stabilized zirconia sensors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Review article Progress on yttria-stabilized zirconia sensors for hydrothermal pH measurements S.N., Ulyanov, S.M., 2003. Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Membrane Electrode, US Patent #6, S17, 694] flow-through, yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pH sensor has been further tested. The Nernstian behavior and precision

  19. On stability of standing waves of nonlinear Dirac equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabile Boussaid; Scipio Cuccagna

    2012-02-28

    We consider the stability problem for standing waves of nonlinear Dirac models. Under a suitable definition of linear stability, and under some restriction on the spectrum, we prove at the same time orbital and asymptotic stability. We are not able to get the full result proved by Cuccagna for the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, because of the strong indefiniteness of the energy.

  20. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  1. 308 Building zone I stabilization and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, I.L.; Schwartz, K.E.; Rich, J.W.; Benecke, M.W.; Lanham, G.W.

    1994-08-01

    The 308 Building located on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is currently in transition to shutdown status. After this transition is complete, the facility will be maintained/surveilled and given to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) for utilization, remedial action, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This may require that the facility be maintained in the shutdown status for as long as 30 yrs. To date, all of the special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed, potential fuel supply equipment preserved, surplus materials and equipment excessed, and enclosure cleanup and stabilization completed. A major activity in support of the 308 Building shutdown was the cleanup and stabilization of the enclosures and surface contamination areas. This document discusses the specific designs, processes, and methods used to stabilize and confine the radiological material within the enclosure and exhaust ducts to allow the shutdown of the active support systems. The process and designs employed were effective, yet simple, and maximized the use of current technologies and commercial products.

  2. 308 Building Zone I stabilization and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, I.L.; Schwartz, K.E.; Rich, J.W.; Benecke, M.W.; Rasmussen, D.E.

    1993-10-01

    The 308 Building (Fast Flux Test Facility [FFTF] fuel supply) at the Hanford Site, located in Richland, Washington, is currently in transition to shutdown status. After shutdown, the facility will be maintained/surveilled and turned over to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) for utilization, remedial action, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This may require that the facility be maintained in the shutdown mode for up to 30 years. To date, all of the special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed from the facility, potential fuel supply equipment has been preserved, surplus materials and equipment have been excessed, and enclosure cleanup and stabilization has begun. Shutdown planning has been completed, which outlines the major tasks, scope, methodology, and timing for the shutdown activities. A major activity in support of the 308 Building shutdown is the cleanup and stabilization of the enclosures and surface contamination areas. This document identifies the specific designs, processes, and methods to stabilize and confine the radiological material within the enclosures and exhaust ducts to allow shutdown of the active support systems. The designs and steps planned will be effective, are simple, and make maximum use of current technologies and commercial items.

  3. Absence of second stability in ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, N.; Lynch, V.E.

    1995-07-01

    Ideal Mercier and ballooning modes for three-dimensional (3-D) equilibria of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) are studied in detail. These modes are found to introduce instability limits at modest beta values for pressure profiles for which previous results, based on a two-dimensional (2-D) equilibrium approximation, predicted the existence of a second stability region. This absence of second stability is in agreement with an analysis by Cooper et al. who used a simplified model for the ATF plasma boundary. The increased instability is found to result from the 3-D feature of the Pfirsch-Schlueter current. Furthermore, a strong quadrupole field is found to decrease the beta limit of these modes, contrary to the results obtained using the 2-D equilibria. Although direct comparison with measured beta values is not possible owing to the absence of profile data for ATF plasmas, pressure profiles used previously to model ATF data as well as in the 2-D analysis are used to obtain the results. The details of the pressure profiles and the plasma configurations strongly influence the stability limits on average beta which remains below 3%.

  4. LASER STABILIZATION FOR NEAR ZERO NO{sub x} GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Khanna

    2002-09-30

    Historically, the development of new industrial gas turbines has been primarily driven by the intent to achieve higher efficiency, lower operating costs and lower emissions. Higher efficiency and lower cost is obtained through higher turbine operating temperatures, while reduction in emissions is obtained by extending the lean operating limit of the combustor. However reduction in the lean stability limit of operation is limited greatly by the chemistry of the combustion process and by the occurrence of thermo-acoustic instabilities. Solar Turbines, CFD Research Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have teamed to advance the technology associated with laser-assisted ignition and flame stabilization, to a level where it could be incorporated onto a gas turbine combustor. The system being developed is expected to enhance the lean stability limit of the swirl stabilized combustion process and assist in reducing combustion oscillations. Such a system has the potential to allow operation at the ultra-lean conditions needed to achieve NO{sub x} emissions below 5 ppm without the need of exhaust treatment or catalytic technologies. The research effort was focused on analytically modeling laser-assisted flame stabilization using advanced CFD techniques, and experimentally demonstrating the technology, using a solid-state laser and low-cost durable optics. A pulsed laser beam was used to generate a plasma pool at strategic locations within the combustor flow field such that the energy from the plasma became an ignition source and helped maintain a flame at ultra lean operating conditions. The periodic plasma generation and decay was used to nullify the fluctuations in the heat release from the flame itself, thus decoupling the heat release from the combustor acoustics and effectively reducing the combustion oscillations. The program was built on an existing technology base and includes: extending LANL's existing laser stabilization experience to a sub-scale combustor rig, performing and validating CFD predictions, and ultimately conducting a full system demonstration in a multi-injector combustion system at Solar Turbines.

  5. Information System Security Critical Elements Please note that prior to including this language in the performance plans of employees covered by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information System Security Critical Elements Please note that prior to including this language fulfilled. Stand-Alone Critical Elements Senior Agency Information Security Officer/Chief Information Security Officer/ Information Technology Security Officer Critical Element and Objective · Senior Agency

  6. Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) : does it give indigenous peoples more control over development of their lands in the Philippines?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Ronilda R. (Ronilda Rosario)

    2008-01-01

    The 1998 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) grants indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) with regard to development projects undertaken on their ancestral lands. ...

  7. The Perceptions of Black High School Students Regarding Their Experiences Prior to an Assignment to a District Alternative Educational Placement: A Phenomenological Single Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Margie

    2014-04-28

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological single case study was to understand the perceptions of Black high school students regarding their experiences prior to being sent to a district’s discipline alternative ...

  8. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

  9. Insertion of Self-Expandable Nitinol Stents Without Previous Balloon Angioplasty Reduces Restenosis Compared with PTA Prior to Stenting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnek, Jan [Heart-Lung Division, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Zoucas, Evita [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Stenram, Unne [Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Cwikiel, Wojciech [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the development of intimal hyperplasia after deployment of a self-expanding nitinol stent with and without previous percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA), with the results after PTA alone. Methods: In nine healthy pigs, the iliac arteries were divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 6 arteries) was treated with PTA; group 2 n 6)with insertion of self-expanding stents after PTA; and group 3 (n = 6) with stent insertion without previous PTA. After 8 weeks the vessels were examined with intravascular ultrasonography,histologic examination and morphometric analysis. Results: Although the injury index in group 1 (0.17{+-} 0.57) was lower (p <0.05) than in group 2 (0.26 {+-} 0.06) and group 3 (0.26 {+-} 0.08), PTA-treated arteries showed significantly (p <0.05) reduced mean luminal gain (0.53 {+-} 2.84) compared with arteries treated with PTA prior to stenting (2.58 {+-} 1.38) and compared with stenting alone (4.65 {+-}5.34). Stenting after PTA resulted in a higher (p<0.05) restenosis index (2.63 {+-} 1.06) compared with stenting without PTA (1.35 {+-} 0.59). Group 2 also had a significantly thicker intimap <0.05) and 83% and 74% higher intima/mediaratio (p <0.05) compared with groups 1 and 3, respectively. Conclusion: Insertion of a self-expandable nitinol stent without previous PTA results in less intimalhyperplasia than if PTA is performed prior to stenting, suggesting that direct stenting can be used in angioplasty sessions with a favorable outcome.

  10. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  11. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures.

  12. Abl-kinase-sensitive levels of ERK5 and its intrinsic basal activity contribute to leukaemia cell survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Axel

    Abl-kinase-sensitive levels of ERK5 and its intrinsic basal activity contribute to leukaemia cell of the MAPK ERK5 with the tyrosine kinase c-Abl and its oncogenic variants v-Abl and Bcr/Abl disclosed the cellular amount of ERK5, at least in part, by stabilizing the protein. The resulting level of ERK5 and its

  13. NatPriorLst

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJ ,E-23N

  14. Prior Fiscal Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices inPrincipal Investigatorsmaneras

  15. Prior Fiscal Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices inPrincipal

  16. Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical/Support Level III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical supervision Problem Solving Refers to procedures, technical aids, co-workers, or supervisors to solve routine are varied and non-routine Uses knowledge of standardized rules, procedures, and operations to resolve

  17. The diskmass survey. VIII. On the relationship between disk stability and star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Robert A.

    2014-04-10

    We study the relationship between the stability level of late-type galaxy disks and their star-formation activity using integral-field gaseous and stellar kinematic data. Specifically, we compare the two-component (gas+stars) stability parameter from Romeo and Wiegert (Q {sub RW}), incorporating stellar kinematic data for the first time, and the star-formation rate estimated from 21 cm continuum emission. We determine the stability level of each disk probabilistically using a Bayesian analysis of our data and a simple dynamical model. Our method incorporates the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) and yields robust SVE measurements for over 90% of our sample. Averaging over this subsample, we find a meridional shape of ?{sub z}/?{sub R}=0.51{sub ?0.25}{sup +0.36} for the SVE and, at 1.5 disk scale lengths, a stability parameter of Q {sub RW} = 2.0 ± 0.9. We also find that the disk-averaged star-formation-rate surface density ( ?-dot {sub e,?}) is correlated with the disk-averaged gas and stellar mass surface densities (? {sub e,} {sub g} and ? {sub e,} {sub *}) and anti-correlated with Q {sub RW}. We show that an anti-correlation between ?-dot {sub e,?} and Q {sub RW} can be predicted using empirical scaling relations, such that this outcome is consistent with well-established statistical properties of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, ?-dot {sub e,?} is not correlated with the gas-only or star-only Toomre parameters, demonstrating the merit of calculating a multi-component stability parameter when comparing to star-formation activity. Finally, our results are consistent with the Ostriker et al. model of self-regulated star-formation, which predicts ?-dot {sub e,?}/?{sub e,g}??{sub e,?}{sup 1/2}. Based on this and other theoretical expectations, we discuss the possibility of a physical link between disk stability level and star-formation rate in light of our empirical results.

  18. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  19. Criterion of stability of the superconducting state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iogann Tolbatov

    2009-10-23

    In this paper, we propose to draw attention to the stability criterion of the superconductor current state. We use for this purpose the rough systems mathematical apparatus allowing us to relate the desired criterion with the dielectric permittivity of the matter and to identify the type of all possible phonons trajectories in its superconducting state. The state of superconductivity in the matter can be explained only by the phonons behavior peculiarity. And on the basis of the above-mentioned assumption, the corresponding mathematical model is constructed.

  20. Linear Stability Analysis of Dynamical Quadratic Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitry Ayzenberg; Kent Yagi; Nicolas Yunes

    2014-03-18

    We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical, quadratic gravity in the high-frequency, geometric optics approximation. This analysis is based on a study of gravitational and scalar modes propagating on spherically-symmetric and axially-symmetric, vacuum solutions of the theory. We find dispersion relations that do no lead to exponential growth of the propagating modes, suggesting the theory is linearly stable on these backgrounds. The modes are found to propagate at subluminal and superluminal speeds, depending on the propagating modes' direction relative to the background geometry, just as in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

  1. Thermal stability of radiant black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathi Majumdar

    2006-04-06

    Beginning with a brief sketch of the derivation of Hawking's theorem of horizon area increase, based on the Raychaudhuri equation, we go on to discuss the issue as to whether generic black holes, undergoing Hawking radiation, can ever remain in stable thermal equilibrium with that radiation. We derive a universal criterion for such a stability, which relates the black hole mass and microcanonical entropy, both of which are well-defined within the context of the Isolated Horizon, and in principle calculable within Loop Quantum Gravity. The criterion is argued to hold even when thermal fluctuations of electric charge are considered, within a {\\it grand} canonical ensemble.

  2. Oxygen stabilized zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula (Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.2-u (V.sub.1-y Fe.sub.y)O.sub.z where x=0.0 to 0.9, y=0.01 to 0.9, z=0.25 to 0.5 and u=0 to 1. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 200.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  3. Radiation stability of graphene under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sunil, E-mail: kumar.sunil092@gmail.com; Tripathi, Ambuj; Khan, Saif A.; Pannu, Compesh; Avasthi, Devesh K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-09-29

    In this letter, we report radiation stability of graphene under extreme condition of high energy density generated by 150?MeV Au ion irradiation. The experiment reveals that graphene is radiation resistant for irradiation at 10{sup 14?}ions/cm{sup 2} of 150?MeV Au ions. It is significant to note that annealing effects are observed at lower fluences whereas defect production occurs at higher fluences but significant crystallinity is retained. Our results demonstrate applicability of graphene based devices in radiation environment and space applications.

  4. Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ); Bischoff, Brian L. (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

  5. Shear thickening in Electrically Stabilized Colloidal Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kaldasch; Bernhard Senge; Jozua Laven

    2011-07-25

    A theory is presented for the onset of shear thickening in colloidal suspensions of particles, stabilized by an electrostatic repulsion. Based on an activation model a critical shear stress can be derived for the onset of shear thickening in dense suspensions for a constant potential and a constant charge approach of the spheres. Unlike previous models the total interaction potential is taken into account (sum of attraction and repulsion). The critical shear stress is related to the maximum of the total interaction potential scaled by the free volume per particle. A comparison with experimental investigations shows the applicability of the theory.

  6. Shear Thickening in Polymer Stabilized Colloidal Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kaldasch; Bernhard Senge

    2012-07-11

    This paper adopts a previously developed activation model of shear thickening, published by the authors, to sterically stabilized colloidal suspensions. When particles arranged along the compression axis of a sheared suspension, they may overcome the repulsive interaction and form hydroclusters associated with shear thickening. Taking advantage of the total interaction potential of polymeric brush coating and van der Waals attraction, the applicability of the activation model is shown within the validity range of a continuum theory. For the comparison with an extensive experimental investigation, where some parameters are not available, the onset of shear thickening can be predicted with realistic assumptions of the model parameters.

  7. Stability of Two-Dimensional Soft Quasicrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Jiang; Jiajun Tong; Pingwen Zhang; An-Chang Shi

    2015-05-26

    The relative stability of two-dimensional soft quasicrystals is examined using a recently developed projection method which provides a unified numerical framework to compute the free energy of periodic crystal and quasicrystals. Accurate free energies of numerous ordered phases, including dodecagonal, decagonal and octagonal quasicrystals, are obtained for a simple model, i.e. the Lifshitz-Petrich free energy functional, of soft quasicrystals with two length-scales. The availability of the free energy allows us to construct phase diagrams of the system, demonstrating that, for the Lifshitz-Petrich model, the dodecagonal and decagonal quasicrystals can become stable phases, whereas the octagonal quasicrystal stays as a metastable phase.

  8. Sensitivity approximation for robust stability and tracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Chris Steven

    1984-01-01

    ) Norman W. Na gle (Member) Don R. Halverson (Member) William B. Jones (Head of Department) May 1984 1n Abstract Sensitivity Approximation for Robust Stability and Tracking. (May 1984) Chris Steven McLean, B. S, , Louisiana Tech University... indispensable to the completion of this thesis. I would like to thank Dr. S. P. Bhattacharyya for introducing me to the wonders of automatic control. I also would like to thank Dr. D. R. Halverson and Dr. N. W. Naugle for serving on my committee, Dr. John...

  9. Stellar stability in brane-worlds revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel A. García-Aspeitia; L. Arturo Ureña-López

    2014-12-28

    We consider here the general conditions for the stability of brane stars that obey a so called a "minimal setup": the nonlocal anisotropic stress and energy flux are everywhere absent, and the only permitted Weyl correction is the interior solution of the nonlocal energy density. Along with a series of simple conditions, we show that the Germani-Maartens solution with a constant density sets up the upper bound for the compactness of that particular class of brane stars. The general demonstration is based upon the properties of the interior solutions of the stars, although we also show that the minimal setup implies a Schwarzschild exterior.

  10. Uv-Light Stabilization Additive Package For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Klemchuk, Peter P. (Watertown, CT)

    2002-03-05

    An ultraviolet light stabilization additive package is used in an encapsulant material that may be used in solar cell modules, laminated glass and a variety of other applications. The ultraviolet light stabilization additive package comprises a first hindered amine light stabilizer and a second hindered amine light stabilizer. The first hindered amine light stabilizer provides thermal oxidative stabilization, and the second hindered amine light stabilizer providing photo-oxidative stabilization.

  11. Optimally robust shortcuts to population inversion in two-level quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ruschhaupt; Xi Chen; D. Alonso; J. G. Muga

    2012-06-08

    We examine the stability versus different types of perturbations of recently proposed shortcuts-to-adiabaticity to speed up the population inversion of a two-level quantum system. We find optimally robust processes using invariant based engineering of the Hamiltonian. Amplitude noise and systematic errors require different optimal protocols.

  12. An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a,*, Emmanuel Detournay b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a the relevant tip asymptotics in hydraulic fracture simulators is critical for the accuracy and stability for a propagating hydraulic fracture. A number of char- acteristics of the governing equations for hydraulic

  13. Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level coupled to the process of protein folding in vivo. While previous studies have provided invaluable insight into the effect of crowding on the stability and folding rate of protein tertiary structures, very little is known

  14. Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

  15. Vacuum Stability and Higgs Diphoton Decay Rate in the Zee-Babu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chao; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yongchao Zhang

    2012-12-26

    Although recent Higgs data from ATLAS and CMS are compatible with a Standard Model (SM) signal at $2\\sigma$ level, both experiments see indications for an excess in the diphoton decay channel, which points to new physics beyond the SM. Given such a low Higgs mass $m_H \\sim 125 {\\rm GeV}$, another sign indicating the existence of new physics beyond the SM is the vacuum stability problem, i.e., the SM Higgs quartic coupling may run to negative values at a scale below the Planck scale. In this paper, we study the vacuum stability and enhanced Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model, which was used to generate tiny Majorana neutrino masses at two-loop level. We find that it is rather difficult to find overlapping regions allowed by the vacuum stability and diphoton enhancement constraints. As a consequence, it is almost inevitable to introduce new ingredients into the model, in order to resolve these two issues simultaneously.

  16. Higgs portal valleys, stability and inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillermo Ballesteros; Carlos Tamarit

    2015-09-30

    The measured values of the Higgs and top quark masses imply that the Standard Model potential is very likely to be unstable at large Higgs values. This is particularly problematic during inflation, which sources large perturbations of the Higgs. The instability could be cured by a threshold effect induced by a scalar with a large vacuum expectation value and directly connected to the Standard Model through a Higgs portal coupling. However, we find that in a minimal model in which the scalar generates inflation, this mechanism does not stabilize the potential because the mass required for inflation is beyond the instability scale. This conclusion does not change if the Higgs has a direct weak coupling to the scalar curvature. On the other hand, if the potential is absolutely stable, successful inflation in agreement with current CMB data can occur along a valley of the potential with a Mexican hat profile. We revisit the stability conditions, independently of inflation, and clarify that the threshold effect cannot work if the Higgs portal coupling is too small. We also show that inflation in a false Higgs vacuum appearing radiatively for a tuned ratio of the Higgs and top masses leads to an amplitude of primordial gravitational waves that is far too high, ruling out this possibility.

  17. Stability of Horndeski vector-tensor interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán [Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology, Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Louvain University, 2 Chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve, 1348 (Belgium); Durrer, Ruth; Heisenberg, Lavinia [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ansermet, Genève 4, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Thorsrud, Mikjel, E-mail: jose.beltran@uclouvain.be, E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch, E-mail: lavinia.heisenberg@unige.ch, E-mail: mikjel.thorsrud@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, Oslo, N-0315 (Norway)

    2013-10-01

    We study the Horndeski vector-tensor theory that leads to second order equations of motion and contains a non-minimally coupled abelian gauge vector field. This theory is remarkably simple and consists of only 2 terms for the vector field, namely: the standard Maxwell kinetic term and a coupling to the dual Riemann tensor. Furthermore, the vector sector respects the U(1) gauge symmetry and the theory contains only one free parameter, M{sup 2}, that controls the strength of the non-minimal coupling. We explore the theory in a de Sitter spacetime and study the presence of instabilities and show that it corresponds to an attractor solution in the presence of the vector field. We also investigate the cosmological evolution and stability of perturbations in a general FLRW spacetime. We find that a sufficient condition for the absence of ghosts is M{sup 2} > 0. Moreover, we study further constraints coming from imposing the absence of Laplacian instabilities. Finally, we study the stability of the theory in static and spherically symmetric backgrounds (in particular, Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter). We find that the theory, quite generally, do have ghosts or Laplacian instabilities in regions of spacetime where the non-minimal interaction dominates over the Maxwell term. We also calculate the propagation speed in these spacetimes and show that superluminality is a quite generic phenomenon in this theory.

  18. Validation of a STATCOM Transient Stability Model through Small-Disturbance Stability Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    . INTRODUCTION Power system operators are constantly striving to keep power networks secure by guaranteeing models. For instance, the TS models proposed for a series of Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS used in small-disturbance stability studies of large, interconnected power grids as well as microgrids

  19. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: stability and pattern formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam David Christdoss Pushpam; Madivala G. Basavaraj; Ethayaraja Mani

    2015-10-20

    Binary mixture of oppositely charged of colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interactions between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square and hexagonal arrangement of particles on emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. Distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous-shells derived from thereof.

  20. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  1. Distinguishability and chiral stability in solution: Effects of decoherence and intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Heekyung; Wardlaw, David M.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2014-05-28

    We examine the effect of decoherence and intermolecular interactions (chiral discrimination energies) on the chiral stability and the distinguishability of initially pure versus mixed states in an open chiral system. Under a two-level approximation for a system, intermolecular interactions are introduced by a mean-field theory, and interaction between a system and an environment is modeled by a continuous measurement of a population difference between the two chiral states. The resultant equations are explored for various parameters, with emphasis on the combined effects of the initial condition of the system, the chiral discrimination energies, and the decoherence in determining: the distinguishability as measured by a population difference between the initially pure and mixed states, and the decoherence process; the chiral stability as measured by the purity decay; and the stationary state of the system at times long relative to the time scales of the system dynamics and of the environmental effects.

  2. Natural Analoges as a Check of Predicted Drift Stability at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Stuckless

    2006-03-10

    Calculations made by the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project as part of the licensing of a proposed geologic repository (in southwestern Nevada) for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, predict that emplacement tunnels will remain open with little collapse long after ground support has disintegrated. This conclusion includes the effects of anticipated seismic events. Natural analogues cannot provide a quantitative test of this conclusion, but they can provide a reasonableness test by examining the natural and anthropogenic examples of stability of subterranean openings. Available data from a variety of sources, combined with limited observations by the author, show that natural underground openings tend to resist collapse for millions of years and that anthropogenic subterranean openings have remained open from before recorded history through today. This stability is true even in seismically active areas. In fact, the archaeological record is heavily skewed toward preservation of underground structures relative to those found at the surface.

  3. The Triple Helix Model and the Meta-Stabilization of Urban Technologies in Smart Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    The Triple Helix model of university-industry-government relations can be generalized from a neo-institutional model of networks to a neo-evolutionary model of how three selection environments operate upon one another. The neo-evolutionary model enables us to appreciate both organizational integration in university-industry-government relations and differentiation among functions like the generation of intellectual capital, creation of wealth, and their attending legislation. The specification of innovation systems in terms of nations, sectors, cities, and regions can then be formulated as empirical questions: is synergy generated among functions in networks of relations? This Triple Helix model enables us to study the knowledge base of an urban economy in terms of a trade-off between locally stabilized and (potentially locked-in) trajectories versus the techno-economic and cultural development regimes which work with one more degree of freedom at the global level. The meta-stabilizing potentials of urban tec...

  4. Chemically modified polymeric resins for solid-phase extraction and group separation prior to analysis by liquid or gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, L.W.

    1993-07-01

    Polystyrene divinylbenzene was modified by acetyl, sulfonic acid, and quaternary ammonium groups. A resin functionalized with an acetyl group was impregnated in a PTFE membrane and used to extract and concentrate phenolic compounds from aqueous samples. The acetyl group created a surface easily wetted, making it an efficient adsorbent for polar compounds in water. The membrane stabilized the resin bed. Partially sulfonated high surface area resins are used to extract and group separate an aqueous mixture of neutral and basic organics; the bases are adsorbed electrostatically to the sulfonic acid groups, while the neutraons are adsorbed hydrophobically. A two-step elution is then used to separate the two fractions. A partially functionalized anion exchange resin is used to separate organic acids and phenols from neutrals in a similar way. Carboxylic acids are analyzed by HPLC and phenols by GC.

  5. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  6. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-12-31

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  7. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  8. Long term voltage stability analysis for small disturbances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Men, Kun

    2009-05-15

    design and optimize the system. ?? Challenge 2, accurately estimating voltage stability margin online remains as a dream for industry. So far, due to heavy computation burden, the major thrust in voltage stability analysis, especially for large... of load dynamics to restore power consumption beyond the capability of the combined transmission and generation system. ? This definition try to emphasize that load is the main driving force of a voltage collapse, and voltage stability is a stuctural...

  9. Bi-level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-01-06

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The package has at least two levels of circuits for making electrical interconnections to a pair of microelectronic devices. The result is a compact, low-profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device(s).

  10. Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands with stabilized localization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands with stabilized localization mixed finite elements. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands...

  11. Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality, Stability, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Bob McCormick (PI) with Colleen Alexander, Teresa Alleman, Robb Barnitt, Wendy Clark, John Ireland, Keith...

  12. Stability and Rate Capability of Al Substituted Lithium-Rich...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium-Rich High-Manganese Content Oxide Materials for Li-Ion Batteries The structures, electrochemical properties and thermal stability of Al-substituted lithium-excess...

  13. STABILITY OF COUPLED-PHYSICS INVERSE PROBLEMS WITH ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-14

    stability for the non-linear problem of recovering ? from one internal measurement. ..... depends on this collection of tubular neighborhoods we use a partition of ...

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Amorphous Silicon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Silicon Anodes Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings...

  15. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

  16. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  17. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directlyof the mirror with a Peltier element attached directly tostabilization based on a Peltier element have shown a

  18. Evaluation of crystallinity and film stress in yttria-stabilized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Evaluation of crystallinity and film stress in yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of crystallinity and...

  19. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1984-10-17

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

  20. Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es011yakovleva2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Stabilized...

  1. Ionic conductivity of stabilized zirconia networks in composite SOFC electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamahara, Keiji; Sholklapper, Tal Z.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-01

    of the corresponding LSM-zirconia composites. Fig 7. a.CONDUCTIVITY OF STABILIZED ZIRCONIA NETWORKS IN COMPOSITEconductivities in the zirconia networks of porous LSM-YSZ

  2. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Review Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United States b Department of Food Science

  3. In-plane orientation effects on the electronic structure stability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    effects on the electronic structure stability and Raman scattering of monolayer graphene on Ir(111). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-plane orientation effects...

  4. Stabilization of Pt monolayer catalysts under harsh conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stabilization of Pt monolayer catalysts under harsh conditions of fuel cells Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 21, 2016 Title:...

  5. Stabilizing the false vacuum. Mott skyrmions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanász-Nagy, M.; Dóra, B.; Demler, E. A.; Zaránd, G.

    2015-01-13

    Topological excitations keep fascinating physicists since many decades. While individual vortices and solitons emerge and have been observed in many areas of physics, their most intriguing higher dimensional topological relatives, skyrmions (smooth, topologically stable textures) and magnetic monopoles emerging almost necessarily in any grand unified theory and responsible for charge quantization remained mostly elusive. Here we propose that loading a three-component nematic superfluid such as 23Na into a deep optical lattice and thereby creating an insulating core, one can create topologically stable skyrmion textures. The skyrmion’s extreme stability and its compact geometry enable one to investigate the skyrmion’s structure, andmore »the interplay of topology and excitations in detail. In particular, the superfluid’s excitation spectrum as well as the quantum numbers are demonstrated to change dramatically due to the skyrmion, and reflect the presence of a trapped monopole, as imposed by the skyrmion’s topology.« less

  6. Linear stability analysis of transverse dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melo, Hygor P M; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    Sand-moving winds blowing from a constant direction in an area of high sand availability form transverse dunes, which have a fixed profile in the direction orthogonal to the wind. Here we show, by means of a linear stability analysis, that transverse dunes are intrinsically unstable. Any along-axis perturbation on a transverse dune amplify in the course of dune migration due to the combined effect of two main factors, namely: the lateral transport through avalanches along the dune's slip-face, and the scaling of dune migration velocity with the inverse of the dune height. Our calculations provide a quantitative explanation for recent observations from experiments and numerical simulations, which showed that transverse dunes moving on the bedrock cannot exist in a stable form and decay into a chain of crescent-shaped barchans.

  7. Linear stability analysis of transverse dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hygor P. M. Melo; Eric J. R. Parteli; José S. Andrade Jr; Hans J. Herrmann

    2012-02-16

    Sand-moving winds blowing from a constant direction in an area of high sand availability form transverse dunes, which have a fixed profile in the direction orthogonal to the wind. Here we show, by means of a linear stability analysis, that transverse dunes are intrinsically unstable. Any along-axis perturbation on a transverse dune amplify in the course of dune migration due to the combined effect of two main factors, namely: the lateral transport through avalanches along the dune's slip-face, and the scaling of dune migration velocity with the inverse of the dune height. Our calculations provide a quantitative explanation for recent observations from experiments and numerical simulations, which showed that transverse dunes moving on the bedrock cannot exist in a stable form and decay into a chain of crescent-shaped barchans.

  8. Mesoscale Quantization and Self-Organized Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall D. Peters

    2005-06-16

    In the world of technology, one of the most important forms of friction is that of rolling friction. Yet it is one of the least studied of all the known forms of energy dissipation. In the present experiments we investigate the oscillatory free-decay of a rigid cube, whose side-length is less than the diameter of the rigid cylinder on which it rests. The resulting free-decay is one of harmonic motion with damping. The non-dissipative character of the oscillation yields to a linear differential equation; however, the damping is found to involve more than a deterministic nonlinearity. Dominated by rolling friction, the damping is sensitive to the material properties of the contact surfaces. For `clean' surfaces of glass on glass, the decay shows features of mesoscale quantization and self-organized stability.

  9. Stability of a jet in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilak, Miloš; Bagheri, Shervin; Chevalier, Mattias; Henningson, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    We have produced a fluid dynamics video with data from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a jet in crossflow at several low values of the velocity inflow ratio R. We show that, as the velocity ratio R increases, the flow evolves from simple periodic vortex shedding (a limit cycle) to more complicated quasi-periodic behavior, before finally exhibiting asymmetric chaotic motion. We also perform a stability analysis just above the first bifurcation, where R is the bifurcation parameter. Using the overlap of the direct and the adjoint eigenmodes, we confirm that the first instability arises in the shear layer downstream of the jet orifice on the boundary of the backflow region just behind the jet.

  10. Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canonico, J.S.

    1995-07-26

    Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

  11. Service Level Agreement/Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Service Level Agreement/Specification For Maintenance and Associated Risk Management Services Team c. Contract Labour 4. REACTIVE MAINTENANCE 5. ESTATE DATA REQUIREMENTS 6. ESTATE EMERGENCY. RISK MANAGEMENT a. General b. Scope of Service c. Statement of Intent Service Level Agreement 2007 Vers

  12. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment Description Leveling and Alignment Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS) Crew Deployment Description Leveling to deplo~nent. Design of ALSEP allows deployment when sun angle is from 5 to 45 degrees. 2 #12;CENTRAL

  13. Stability of chromite interconnections in dual environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.W.; Raney, P.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-11-01

    One of the most critical technical concerns in high-temperature SOFCs is the physical, chemical, and electrical stability of the interconnect (typically a doped lanthanum chromite) in the dual (oxidizing and reducing atmosphere) SOFC environment. The reducing or fuel side may experience oxygen partial pressures (P(O{sub 2})) from 10{sup {minus}18} to 10{sup {minus}6} atmospheres, while the oxidizing side may have P(O{sub 2}) from 10{sup {minus}6} to greater than 1 atm. These conditions limit the possible candidate materials to lanthanum or yttrium chromites. In the past decade, much work has centered on development of air-sinterable chromites and understanding their physical properties; little work, however, has focused on the stability of these chromites in dual environments. Chromite powders were synthesized using the glycine-nitrate process. The powders were calcined at 1,000 C for 1 hour and then uniaxially pressed into bars (46mm x 16mm x 3mm) at 55 MPa and isostatically pressed at 138 MPa. Samples were sintered in air. The dependence of the physical properties of sintered lanthanum chromites upon ambient P(O{sub 2}) and temperature (using dilatometry, thermogravimetric analysis, and oxygen permeation measurements) were studied. La{sub 1{minus}x}A{sub x}CrO{sub 3} and Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}CrO{sub 3}, where A is Ca or Sr and x was varied from 0.1 to 0.4 were evaluated in this study. The P(O{sub 2}) was varied using a buffered CO{sub 2}/Ar-4%H{sub 2} gas system, enabling expansion measurements to be made over a partial pressure range from 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}18} atmosphere at 800, 900, and 1,000 C.

  14. Local structures surrounding Zr in nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia: Structural origin of phase stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soo, Y. L.; Chen, P. J.; Huang, S. H.; Shiu, T. J.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chow, Y. H.; Lin, Y. C.; Weng, S. C.; Chang, S. L. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wang, G.; Cheung, C. L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sabirianov, R. F.; Mei, W. N. [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Namavar, F.; Haider, H.; Garvin, K. L. [Department of Orthopaedics Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States); Lee, J. F. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, H. Y.; Chu, P. P. [Department of Chemistry, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2008-12-01

    Local environment surrounding Zr atoms in the thin films of nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) has been investigated by using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. These films prepared by the ion beam assisted deposition exhibit long-range structural order of cubic phase and high hardness at room temperature without chemical stabilizers. The local structure around Zr probed by EXAFS indicates a cubic Zr sublattice with O atoms located on the nearest tetragonal sites with respect to the Zr central atoms, as well as highly disordered locations. Similar Zr local structure was also found in a ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystal sample prepared by a sol-gel method. Variations in local structures due to thermal annealing were observed and analyzed. Most importantly, our x-ray results provide direct experimental evidence for the existence of oxygen vacancies arising from local disorder and distortion of the oxygen sublattice in nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}. These oxygen vacancies are regarded as the essential stabilizing factor for the nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia.

  15. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Lantz

    2012-09-21

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized in the fact sheet.

  16. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Louis (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd (Albuquerque, NM); Aaronson, Gene (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  17. Self-Stabilizing Byzantine Agreement in a Synchronous Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolev, Danny

    Self-Stabilizing Byzantine Agreement in a Synchronous Network A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science by Tomer Harpaz Supervised by Prof. Danny and love. #12;Abstract This thesis presents an algorithm that provides self-stabilizing Byzantine agreement

  18. Self-Stabilizing Robot Formations over Unreliable Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    -stabilization ensures that the robots can adapt to changes in the desired target formation. Categories and Subject17 Self-Stabilizing Robot Formations over Unreliable Networks SETH GILBERT Ecole Polytechnique F Descriptors: F.1.2 [Computation by Abstract Devices]: Modes of Compu- tation--Interactive and reactive

  19. STABILITY OF JACKSON-TYPE QUEUEING NETWORKS, I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Serguei

    Petri nets or GSMP's. The paper also provides new results on the Jackson-type networks with iSTABILITY OF JACKSON-TYPE QUEUEING NETWORKS, I Franc¸ois Baccelli INRIA Centre Sophia Antipolis of Jackson-type queueing networks allowing the derivation of stability and convergence theorems under general

  20. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams Leonid E. Zakharov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    . There are two stabilizing e#11;ects associated with lithium streams. First, streams enable an e#11;ective modes [1,2]. The #12;rst e#11;ect is straightforward and can be considered within the existing theory on nonideal e#11;ects which together with the plasma rotation may lead to a stabilization (see, e

  1. Stability Region of Opportunistic Scheduling in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Lin

    be stabilized. Detailed numerical examples and simulations are given to illustrate the stability region-based scheduling in [3] which aims to maximize a pre-defined utility based on the long-term achievable throughput here is because, without considering the stochastic characteristic of incoming traffic, although

  2. Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary I. Matsuyama1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies I. Matsuyama1 and F. Nimmo2 Received 11 consider the true polar wander (rotational variations driven by mass redistribution) of tidally deformed planetary bodies. The rotation pole of bodies without tidal deformation is stabilized by the component

  3. The Role of Energy Storage for Mini-Grid Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Role of Energy Storage for Mini-Grid Stabilization Report IEA-PVPS T11-02:2011 hal-00802927 Program The role of energy storage for mini-grid stabilization IEA PVPS Task 11 Report IEA-PVPS T11 Foreword 5 Executive Summary 7 1 Introduction 10 2 Scope of the study 14 3 The role of energy storage

  4. LINEAR STABILITY OF ELECTRON-FLOW HYDRODYNAMICS IN UNGATED SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Mihir

    LINEAR STABILITY OF ELECTRON-FLOW HYDRODYNAMICS IN UNGATED SEMICONDUCTORS A Dissertation Submitted All Rights Reserved #12;LINEAR STABILITY OF ELECTRON-FLOW HYDRODYNAMICS IN UNGATED SEMICONDUCTORS Abstract by Williams R. Calder´on Mu~noz Semiconductors play an important role in modern electronic

  5. Borehole stability analysis at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Henry

    2000-01-01

    Coporo-1 is an 18,000-ft dry hole located in the tectonically active foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. A mechanical stability analysis allowed explaining most of the drilling stability-related problems and elaborating an optimal mud...

  6. Stabilization of finite-dimensional control systems: a survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Stabilization of finite-dimensional control systems: a survey Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Stabilization of finite-dimensional control systems #12;Purpose of the talk Given a control system x = f (x, u) with an equilibrium point f (O, 0) = 0 which is globally

  7. Bifurcation and Stability Properties of Periodic Solutions to Two Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Bernold

    motions of suspension bridges. Though they were able to replicate the phenomena observed on the Tacoma in suspen- sion bridges. We contrast the multiplicity, bifurcation, and stability of periodic solutions-doubling and quadrupling) differs significantly. Keywords: suspension bridge, continuation, bifurcation, stability

  8. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability Sean P. Ng* , Kate S of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with in- creased mechanical stability. Our results) The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experi- ence significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both

  9. Liquid-glass Transition in Charge-stabilized Colloidal Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid-glass Transition in Charge-stabilized Colloidal Dispersions S.K. Lai, G.F. Wang and W Abstract. We model the inter-colloidal interactions in a charge-stabilized col- loidal dispersion by a hard the loci of the liquid-glass transition phase boundary for a salt-free suspension of charged colloids

  10. Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;Real Time PMU for the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) research project titled "Real Time PMU-based Stability

  11. Real-Time Security Assessment of Angle Stability Using Synchrophasors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -time operations, be it angle stability or voltage stability. PMU deployment is becoming a common practice across of ap- plications to make use of PMU data has not been at the same pace. This project also analyzes how PMU data can be used to

  12. P MATRIX PROPERTIES, INJECTIVITY AND STABILITY IN CHEMICAL REACTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    P MATRIX PROPERTIES, INJECTIVITY AND STABILITY IN CHEMICAL REACTION SYSTEMS MURAD BANAJI§, PETE. Chemical reactions; P matrices; Injectivity; Stability; Mass action AMS subject classifications. 80A30; 15A48; 34D30 1. Introduction. In this paper we will study chemical reaction systems, and systems derived

  13. Structural design of pavements with stabilized layers Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Structural design of pavements with stabilized layers Animesh Das Associate Professor, Department@iitk.ac.in The talk will primarily be divided in three parts, namely analysis of pavement structure, empirical design on structural design of pavements with stabilized layer(s) using mechanistic-empirical design will be identified

  14. Evaluation of Condor SS as a soil stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shamim

    1995-01-01

    chemicals such as lime, cement and fly-ash. Condor SS, an electrochemical, has been used in our research to evaluate its stabilization capabilities on Burleson clay as well as its overall effectiveness as a soil stabilizer. Tukey and Duncan comparison...

  15. Stability of bifluid jets in microchannels Thierry Colin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Stability of bifluid jets in microchannels Thierry Colin1 , Sandra Tancogne University Bordeaux I In this paper, a numerical tool is provided in order to study the stability of a confined coflowing jet, surface tension are the adjustable parameters, the length on which a jet is stable is computed. At low

  16. A New Environmentally Friendly AL/ZR-Based Clay Stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Monier, Ilham Abdallah

    2013-01-18

    tests showed that this new chemical was effective, and unlike previous Al-based and Zr-based stabilizers (hydroxy aluminum and zirconium oxychloride solutions), it did not dissolve in acids and worked very well up to 300oF. Stabilizer A proved...

  17. Stability of distributed congestion control with heterogeneous feedback delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massoulié, Laurent

    . To this end, we consider a fluid flow model of network behaviour. We study the stability of the system essentially reduces the question to studying stability of ordinary differential equations. These results. The same issue has been studied in [13], where the authors propose a conjecture according to which local

  18. Initial assessment of the MHD stability of TMX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexsen, W.E.

    1983-08-04

    In its operation to date TMX-U has reached values of beta which, for all except the hot electron beta, are close to the proposal values and has not encountered MHD stability problems. The hot electron beta values are presently limited by gyrotron output power and pulse length as well as ion confinement time. Further exploration of stability awaits full thermal barrier operation.

  19. Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale modelling in short-term prediction Jake Nielsen, Henrik Madsen, John Tøfting Title: Report on the use of stability parameters and mesoscale. Mesoscale modelling has been carried out using KAMM at this location. The characteristics of the measured

  20. Neuroprotection at Drosophila Synapses Conferred by Prior Shanker Karunanithi,1 Jeffrey W. Barclay,2 R. Meldrum Robertson,2 Ian R. Brown,3 and Harold L. Atwood1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Meldrum

    ; heat shock proteins; quanta; thermal stress; presynaptic; postsynaptic; neuromuscular Prior exposure such as synaptic function from subse- quent stress. The neurophysiological consequences of heat shock have not been is down-regulated during ther- mal stress, but the predominant heat shock protein hsp70 is rapidly induced

  1. Fiberglass Duct Cleaning Safe Work Practices Duct Cleaning -Prior to reaching a decision to clean a duct, an investigation of possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    ­ Locations should be noted prior to conducting work. Lockers, Showers, and Hand Wash Sinks ­ Should to be sure that there are no hazardous containing materials in the duct system such as Asbestos. Asbestos into particulate collection equipment. 3. All equipment located outside should be placed downwind and away from

  2. Guidelines for assessment PhD dissertation and public defence The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question. Prior to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 of 5 Guidelines for assessment ­ PhD dissertation and public defence The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question. Prior to the submission that the PhD process has been satisfactory and that all formal requirements have been met

  3. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  4. Influence of discharge gap on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, L.; Zhang, G. L.; Jin, D. Z.; Dai, J. Y.; Yang, L.

    2012-02-15

    The influence of the discharge gap between cathode and anode on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc (SVA) ion source is presented in this paper. Planar cathode and cylindrical hollow anode made of titanium are investigated. There is a great need in present accelerator injection research for SVA source to produce the small deviation of the ion current beam. Current research shows that increasing the short discharge gap can reduce the level of ion current deviation and ion charge deviation from 29% and 31% to 15% and 17%, respectively. A microplasma plume generation mechanism in SVA and scanning electron microscopic results can be used to explain this interesting phenomenon.

  5. Research Library Service Level Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Research Library Service Level Agreement 2015-2016 Contents THE SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY PURPOSE.................................................................................................3 DESCRIPTION OF SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY COLLECTIONS AND SERVICES......4 Electronic Resources Access.......................................................................................9 APPENDIX: SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY RULES...................................................10 #12

  6. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low...

  7. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  8. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  9. EQUILIBRIUM AND STABILITY FOR THE ARIES COMPACT STELLERATOR REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TURNBULL AD; LAO LL; COOPER WA; FU GY; GARABEDIAN P; KU LP; ZARNSTORFF MC

    2004-06-01

    Equilibrium and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability studies are reported for Compact Stellarator (ARIES-CS) reactor design equilibria based on a scaled three-period NCSX configuration and a two-period quasi-axisymmetric variant, the MHH2 stellarator. With a stabilizing shell at about twice the minor radius, robustly stable equilibria up to {beta}=6% are achievable. Recent experiments raise questions as to the applicability of linear MHD stability in stellarators since the predicted stability limits appear to be significantly exceeded. A context for interpreting this question, consistent with tokamak experience, is discussed; both the equilibria and nonlinear consequences need to be more carefully considered. Nonlinear stability is analyzed by computing solutions with highly resolved discontinuities to effectively simulate current sheets and islands. This yields {beta} limits in better agreement with measured values.

  10. The Higgs Boson at LHC and the Vacuum Stability of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, E A Reyes

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to study the conditions of absolute vacuum stability within the Standard Model (SM) by the knowledge of the behaviour of the Higgs quartic coupling up to high energy scales and using the new data on the Higgs mass given by ATLAS and CMS as an input parameter. The Higgs mass value observed by ATLAS and CMS leads to a negative value of the quartic coupling, making metastable the vacuum of the Standard Model, as it is seen by the renormalization group improved (RGI) effective potential. The stability status of SM crucially depends upon the precise values of the top and Higgs masses, a more precision determination of those masses and related uncertainties can modify drastically our conclusions about the SM stability properties. For this reason, we have computed the vacuum bubbles and the Higgs tadpole diagrams, at two-loop level of accuracy, in a renormalization scheme proposed by A. Sirlin and R. Zucchini, where the input parameters are obtained in terms of physical observables relat...

  11. Ris Energy Report 4 Flexibility, stability and security of energy supply 7 Flexibility, stability and security of energy supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 4 Flexibility, stability and security of energy supply 7 Flexibility, stability and security of energy supply POUL SøRENSEN, PETER mEIbOm, PER NøRGåRD, RISø NATIONAL LAbORATORy, DENmARK tion generation and renewable energy increases. West Denmark The West Danish power system is synchronously

  12. Electron energy-loss near-edge shape as a probe to investigate the stabilization of yttria-stabilized zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    -stabilized zirconia S. Ostanin,1,2, * A. J. Craven,1 D. W. McComb,2 D. Vlachos,1,2, A. Alavi,3 A. T. Paxton,4 and M. W-edge structure ELNES at the O K edge has been studied in yttria-stabilized zirconia YSZ . The electronic

  13. Method of increasing the phase stability and the compressive yield strength of uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert C. (Crossville, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750.degree. to 850.degree. C. and then quenched in water is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenched plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325.degree. to 375.degree. C. for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480.degree. to 500.degree. C. for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  14. Entropic Stabilization of Proteins by TMAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Samuel S; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) induced stabilization of folded protein states, we systematically investigated the action of TMAO on several model dipeptides (Leucine, L2, Serine, S2, Glutamine, Q2, Lysine, K2, and Glycine, G2) in order to elucidate the effect of residue-specific TMAO interactions on small fragments of solvent-exposed conformations of the denatured states of proteins. We find that TMAO preferentially hydrogen bonds with the exposed dipeptide backbone, but generally not with nonpolar or polar side chains. However, interactions with the positively charged Lys are substantially greater than with the backbone. The dipeptide G2, is a useful model of pure amide backbone, interacts with TMAO by forming a hydrogen bond between the amide nitrogen and the oxygen in TMAO. In contrast, TMAO is depleted from the protein backbone in the hexapeptide G6, which shows that the length of the polypeptide chain is relevant in aqueous TMAO solutions. These simulations lead to the hypot...

  15. Spin-isospin stability of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kaiser

    2006-01-31

    We calculate the density-dependent spin-isospin asymmetry energy $J(k_f)$ of nuclear matter in the three-loop approximation of chiral perturbation theory. The interaction contributions to $J(k_f)$ originate from one-pion exchange, iterated one-pion exchange, and irreducible two-pion exchange with no, single, and double virtual $\\Delta$-isobar excitation. We find that the approximation to $1\\pi$-exchange and iterated $1\\pi$-exchange terms (which leads already to a good nuclear matter equation of state by adjusting an emerging contact-term) is spin-isospin stable, since $J(k_{f0})\\simeq 24 {\\rm MeV}>0$. The inclusion of the chiral $\\pi N\\Delta$-dynamics, necessary in order to guarantee the spin-stability of nuclear matter, keeps this property intact. The corresponding spin-isospin asymmetry energy $J(k_f)$ stays positive even for extreme values of an undetermined short-distance parameter $J_5$ (whose possible range we estimate from realistic NN-potentials). The largest positive contribution to $J(k_f)$ (a term linear in density) comes from a two-body contact-term with its strength fitted to the empirical nuclear matter saturation point.

  16. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  17. Islands in the stream: The effect of plasma flow on tearing stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Brennan, D. P. [University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Reducing plasma flow clearly decreases the stability of tearing modes in multiple regimes (sawtooth, hybrid) in both high- and low-aspect-ratio tokamaks (DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], Joint European Torus [M. Keilhacker and the JET Team, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 301 (1999)], National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng, Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], each with distinct means of lessening rotation). Further, reducing flow makes pre-existing 'saturated' islands larger at the same beta (beta). Thus lower plasma flow impairs high-beta operation owing both to the destabilization and to the impact of tearing-mode islands. Experimental results suggest that flow shear (not flow) at the tearing rational surface is classically stabilizing, making the effective tearing stability index DELTA{sup '} of the total current density profile more negative (more stable). In this picture, with profiles and all else the same, the minimum metastable beta at which neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can destabilize is proportional to -DELTA{sup '} and hence lower flow and flow shear lead to possible destabilization (depending on seeding) at lower beta. Similarly, if destabilized, the saturated NTM island width is proportional to -beta/DELTA{sup '} and thus increases as flow and flow shear are reduced. A working model gives a significant level of stabilizing shear if the plasma toroidal angular flow shear -dOMEGA{sub p}hi/dr at a given rational surface is of order of the inverse of the product of the local values of the parallel magnetic shear length L{sub s} and the Alfven time tau{sub A}. Experimental data are fitted for the effect of this normalization of flow shear in a simple empirical model for both onset and saturation of tearing modes. Most theoretical literature is on the consequence of flow shear on tearing stability at zero beta; tokamaks at high beta have large magnetic Prandtl number (an issue for the sign of the flow effect) and very large Lundquist number. It is in this regime that theory will be compared with experimentally based empirical models. The consequence for future tokamaks with low rotation may be lower tearing stability than now expected.

  18. Design Guidelines for Test Level 3 (TL-3) Through Test Level 5 (TL-5) Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez Barrios, Deeyvid 1980-

    2012-12-05

    impact loads. The full-scale impact simulations were used to develop the recommendation for designing and sizing the barrier-moment slab system. In a second part, the barrier-moment slab systems defined to contain heavy vehicle impact loads were placed...

  19. A RECOMMENDED PASQUILL-GIFFORD STABILITY CLASSIFICATION METHOD FOR SAFETY BASIS ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION MODELING AT SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Several of the most common methods for estimating Pasquill-Gifford (PG) stability (turbulence) class were evaluated for use in modeling the radiological consequences of SRS accidental releases using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Ver. 2 (MACCS2). Evaluation criteria included: (1) the ability of the method to represent diffusion characteristics above a predominantly forested landscape at SRS, (2) suitability of the method to provide data consistent with the formulation of the MACCS2 model, and (3) the availability of onsite meteorological data to support implementation of the method The evaluation resulted in a recommendation that PG stability classification for regulatory applications at SRS should be based on measurements of the standard deviation of the vertical component of wind direction fluctuations, {sigma}{sub e}, collected from the 61-m level of the SRS meteorological towers, and processed in full accordance with EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA, 2000). This approach provides a direct measurement that is fundamental to diffusion and captures explicitly the turbulence generated by both mechanical and buoyant forces over the characteristic surface (forested) of SRS. Furthermore, due to the potentially significant enhancement of horizontal fluctuations in wind direction from the occurrence of meander at night, the use of {sigma}{sub e} will ensure a reasonably conservative estimate of PG stability class for use in dispersion models that base diffusion calculations on a single value of PG stability class. Furthermore, meteorological data bases used as input for MACCS2 calculations should contain hourly data for five consecutive annual periods from the most recent 10 years.

  20. Ballooning Stability of the Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.H. Redi; J. Canik; R.L. Dewar; J.L. Johnson; S. Klasky; W.A. Cooper; W. Kerbichler

    2001-09-19

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), expected to achieve good stability and particle confinement is examined with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Making use of fully 3D, ideal-MHD stability codes, the QAS beta is predicted to be limited above 4% by ballooning and high-n kink modes. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and theta(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, with new types of nonsymmetric, eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. The isosurfaces around the most unstable points i n parameter space (well above marginal) are topologically spherical. In such cases, attempts to use ray tracing to construct global ballooning modes lead to a k-space runaway. Introduction of a reflecting cutoff in k(perpendicular) to model numerical truncation or finite Larmor radius (FLR) yields chaotic ray paths ergodically filling the allowed phase space, indicating that the global spectrum must be described using the language of quantum chaos theory. However, the isosurface for marginal stability in the cases studied are found to have a more complex topology, making estimation of FLR stabilization more difficult.

  1. Nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for CO? EOR application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Lee, Robert; Yu, Jianjia; Li, Liangxiong; Bustamante, Elizabeth; Khalil, Munawar; Mo, Di; Jia, Bao; Wang, Sai; San, Jingshan; An, Cheng

    2015-01-31

    The purpose of this project was to develop nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for CO? -EOR application, in which nanoparticles instead of surfactants are used for stabilizing CO? foam to improve the CO? sweep efficiency and increase oil recovery. The studies included: (1) investigation of CO? foam generation nanoparticles, such as silica nanoparticles, and the effects of particle concentration and surface properties, CO?/brine ratio, brine salinity, pressure, and temperature on foam generation and foam stability; (2) coreflooding tests to understand the nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for waterflooded residual oil recovery, which include: oil-free coreflooding experiments with nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam to understand the transportation of nanoparticles through the core; measurements of foam stability and CO? sweep efficiency under reservoir conditions to investigate temperature and pressure effects on the foam performance and oil recovery as well as the sweep efficiency in different core samples with different rock properties; and (3) long-term coreflooding experiments with the nanoparticle- stabilized CO? foam for residual oil recovery. Finally, the technical and economical feasibility of this technology was evaluated.

  2. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Schweiger, H.; Do?an, Ö.N.; Hawk, J.; Widom M.

    2013-02-20

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of Cr–V binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poisson’s ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poisson’s ratio for bcc Cr–V alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  3. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  4. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  5. Quantitative cone-beam CT imaging in radiation therapy using planning CT as a prior: First patient studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu Tianye; Al-Basheer, Ahmad; Zhu Lei [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Radiation Therapy Center, Department of Radiology, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 (United States); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Quantitative cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is on increasing demand for high-performance image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the current CBCT has poor image qualities mainly due to scatter contamination. Its current clinical application is therefore limited to patient setup based on only bony structures. To improve CBCT imaging for quantitative use, we recently proposed a correction method using planning CT (pCT) as the prior knowledge. Promising phantom results have been obtained on a tabletop CBCT system, using a correction scheme with rigid registration and without iterations. More challenges arise in clinical implementations of our method, especially because patients have large organ deformation in different scans. In this paper, we propose an improved framework to extend our method from bench to bedside by including several new components. Methods: The basic principle of our correction algorithm is to estimate the primary signals of CBCT projections via forward projection on the pCT image, and then to obtain the low-frequency errors in CBCT raw projections by subtracting the estimated primary signals and low-pass filtering. We improve the algorithm by using deformable registration to minimize the geometry difference between the pCT and the CBCT images. Since the registration performance relies on the accuracy of the CBCT image, we design an optional iterative scheme to update the CBCT image used in the registration. Large correction errors result from the mismatched objects in the pCT and the CBCT scans. Another optional step of gas pocket and couch matching is added into the framework to reduce these effects. Results: The proposed method is evaluated on four prostate patients, of which two cases are presented in detail to investigate the method performance for a large variety of patient geometry in clinical practice. The first patient has small anatomical changes from the planning to the treatment room. Our algorithm works well even without the optional iterations and the gas pocket and couch matching. The image correction on the second patient is more challenging due to the effects of gas pockets and attenuating couch. The improved framework with all new components is used to fully evaluate the correction performance. The enhanced image quality has been evaluated using mean CT number and spatial nonuniformity (SNU) error as well as contrast improvement factor. If the pCT image is considered as the ground truth, on the four patients, the overall mean CT number error is reduced from over 300 HU to below 16 HU in the selected regions of interest (ROIs), and the SNU error is suppressed from over 18% to below 2%. The average soft-tissue contrast is improved by an average factor of 2.6. Conclusions: We further improve our pCT-based CBCT correction algorithm for clinical use. Superior correction performance has been demonstrated on four patient studies. By providing quantitative CBCT images, our approach significantly increases the accuracy of advanced CBCT-based clinical applications for IGRT.

  6. Aalborg Universitet Frequency Stability of Hierarchically Controlled Hybrid Photovoltaic-Battery-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Frequency Stability of Hierarchically Controlled Hybrid Photovoltaic). Frequency Stability of Hierarchically Controlled Hybrid Photovoltaic-Battery-Hydropower Microgrids, pp. 1573-1580. Frequency Stability of Hierarchically Controlled Hybrid Photovoltaic

  7. Mechanical stabilization of BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.G.; Grey, D.A.; Mantone, A.

    1996-12-31

    A system to provide mechanical stabilization to high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape by laminating 0.081 mm thick, spring hard, copper foil to both sides with lead-tin eutectic solder has been successfully optimized. This system has been applied as a method to create a strong, windable composite from pure silver BSCCO tapes with a minimum of critical current (I{sub c}) degradation. The {open_quotes}as received{close_quotes} conductor is evaluated for physical consistency of width and thickness over the 3000 meters that were later strengthened, insulated and wound into a demonstration coil. Electrical degradation in the strengthened tape as a result of lamination was found to average 24 percent with a range from 4 to 51 percent. This was less than the degradation that would have occurred in an unstrengthened tape during subsequent insulation and coil winding processes. Additional work was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the strengthened tapes. The copper can double the ultimate tensile strength of the pure silver tapes. Additionally, pure silver and dispersion strengthened silver matrix tapes are laminated with 0.025 mm thick copper and 304 stainless steel foil to investigate minimization of the cross sectional area of the strengthening component. The stainless steel can increase the UTS of the pure silver tapes sixfold. Metallography is used to examine the laminate and the conductor. Mechanical properties and critical currents of these tapes are also reported both before and after strengthening. The I{sub c} is also measured as a function of strain on the laminated tapes.

  8. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of configurations without nested flux surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Newton, S. L. [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Existing numerical tools for calculating the MHD stability of magnetically confined plasmas generally assume the existence of nested flux surfaces. These tools are therefore not immediately applicable to configurations with magnetic islands or regions with an ergodic magnetic field. However, in practice, these islands or ergodic regions are often small, and their effect on MHD stability can then be evaluated using a perturbation theory developed in the present paper. This procedure allows the effect of the broken magnetic topology on the stability of each eigenmode to be calculated without requiring any knowledge about the perturbed eigenfunctions.

  9. The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of interior Alaska in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    .1088/1748-9326/8/3/035030 The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of the organic layer in the black spruce forest ecosystems of interior Alaska. Fire that burns the organic layer determine post-fire ground temperature dynamics in lowland and upland black spruce forests? (2) What levels

  10. Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

  11. ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4, Von Haast Building ECE Labs Electrical & Computer Engineering #12;ELEC Electronics Lab & Randy Hampton Control Lab Machines Lab & Ken Smart Mech. Workshop & Dave Healy Power Building Student Workshop The Shed Café Kim Rutter 441 & Philipp Hof Yonghe Liu Seminar Room 457 Von Haast

  12. Strategies for Voltage Control and Transient Stability Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    2013-09-25

    As wind generation grows, its influence on power system performance will becoming increasingly noticeable. Wind generation di#11;ffers from traditional forms of generation in numerous ways though, motivating the need to reconsider the usual approaches to power system assessment and performance enhancement. The project has investigated the impact of wind generation on transient stability and voltage control, identifying and addressing issues at three distinct levels of the power system: 1) at the device level, the physical characteristics of wind turbine generators (WTGs) are quite unlike those of synchronous machines, 2) at the wind-farm level, the provision of reactive support is achieved through coordination of numerous dissimilar devices, rather than straightforward generator control, and 3) from a systems perspective, the location of wind-farms on the sub-transmission network, coupled with the variability inherent in their power output, can cause complex voltage control issues. The project has sought to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic behaviour of type-3 WTGs, and in particular the WECC generic model. The behaviour of such models is governed by interactions between the continuous dynamics of state variables and discrete events associated with limits. It was shown that these interactions can be quite complex, and may lead to switching deadlock that prevents continuation of the trajectory. Switching hysteresis was proposed for eliminating deadlock situations. Various type-3 WTG models include control blocks that duplicate integrators. It was shown that this leads to non-uniqueness in the conditions governing steady-state, and may result in pre- and post-disturbance equilibria not coinciding. It also gives rise to a zero eigenvalue in the linearized WTG model. In order to eliminate the anomalous behaviour revealed through this investigation, WECC has now released a new generic model for type-3 WTGs. Wind-farms typically incorporate a variety of voltage control equipment including tapchanging transformers, switched capacitors, SVCs, STATCOMs and the WTGs themselves. The project has considered the coordinated control of this equipment, and has addressed a range of issues that arise in wind-farm operation. The #12;first concerns the ability of WTGs to meet reactive power requirements when voltage saturation in the collector network restricts the reactive power availability of individual generators. Secondly, dynamic interactions between voltage regulating devices have been investigated. It was found that under certain realistic conditions, tap-changing transformers may exhibit instability. In order to meet cost, maintenance, fault tolerance and other requirements, it is desirable for voltage control equipment to be treated as an integrated system rather than as independent devices. The resulting high-level scheduling of wind-farm reactive support has been investigated. In addressing this control problem, several forms of future information were considered, including exact future knowledge and stochastic predictions. Deterministic and Stochastic Dynamic Programming techniques were used in the development of control algorithms. The results demonstrated that while exact future knowledge is very useful, simple prediction methods yield little bene#12;fit. The integration of inherently variable wind generation into weak grids, particularly subtransmission networks that are characterized by low X=R ratios, aff#11;ects bus voltages, regulating devices and line flows. The meshed structure of these networks adds to the complexity, especially when wind generation is distributed across multiple nodes. A range of techniques have been considered for analyzing the impact of wind variability on weak grids. Sensitivity analysis, based on the power-flow Jacobian, was used to highlight sections of a system that are most severely a#11;ffected by wind-power variations. A continuation power flow was used to determine parameter changes that reduce the impact of wind-power variability. It was also used to explore interactions betw

  13. Comparison of the structures and stabilities of coiled-coil proteins...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comparison of the structures and stabilities of coiled-coil proteins containing hexafluoroleucine and t-butylalanine provides insight into the stabilizing effects of highly...

  14. A LOCAL PROJECTION STABILIZATION FINITE ELEMENT METHOD WITH NONLINEAR CROSSWIND DIFFUSION FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Volker

    A LOCAL PROJECTION STABILIZATION FINITE ELEMENT METHOD WITH NONLINEAR CROSSWIND DIFFUSION and phrases. finite element method; local projection stabilization; crosswind diffusion; convection

  15. Synthesis and Stability of a Nanoparticle-Infiltrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sholklapper, Tal Z.; Radmilovic, Velimir; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-01-01

    a stable scandia-stabilized zirconia (SSZ) cathode electrodeSSZ (scandia- stabilized zirconia) electrodes proved, forin isopropanol, using zirconia balls as the milling medium.

  16. June, 2003 Journal of Vector Ecology 31 Nuisance chironomids in waste water stabilization ponds: monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inbar, Moshe

    June, 2003 Journal of Vector Ecology 31 Nuisance chironomids in waste water stabilization ponds from waste water stabilization ponds in central Israel created severe nuisance to nearby residents

  17. 2011!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. S.!Massoud!Amin,!D.Sc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    !"magic!bullets" but!there!are!many! innovative!bullets,!including:! 1) Green!the!power!supply, 2)!Energy!Demand!and!the!Global!Macro"Environment Context! Energy!&!Smart!Grid Options/Costs/Benefits ConclusionsNational!Infrastructure #12;© 2011!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. The!Energy!Crises!Taught!Us!Interdependency System!of!Systems:! No

  18. Performance and Stability Analysis of a Shrouded-Fan UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Divitiis, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of the performance and stability for a shrouded-fan unmanned rotorcraft whose mission profile also prescribes the flight in ground effect. The not so simple estimation of the aerodynamic coefficients and of the thrust in the various situations makes the performance calculation and the stability analysis difficult tasks. This is due to the strong interaction between the fan flow and shroud that causes quite different flow structures about the airframe depending on flight conditions. A further difficulty is related to the ground effect which produces substantial modifications in the rotor thrust and aerodynamic coefficients. To evaluate performance and stability, two models have been developed. One determines the aerodynamic coefficients of the shroud, whereas the other one calculates thrust and moment of the rotors system. Both models take into account the mutual interference between fan flow and fuselage and ground effect. Performance and stability are then discussed with ...

  19. ASYMPTOTIC STABILITY FOR KDV SOLITONS IN WEIGHTED SPACES VIA ITERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raynor, Sarah G.

    Fellow at Wake Forest University and would like to thank the Department of Mathematics at Wake Forest(x - x0(t)) remains small. The study of orbital stability in the energy space H1 began with Benjamin [1

  20. Process for preparing a stabilized coal-water slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A process for preparing a stabilized coal particle suspension which includes the steps of providing an aqueous media substantially free of coal oxidizing constituents, reducing, in a nonoxidizing atmosphere, the particle size of the coal to be suspended to a size sufficiently small to permit suspension thereof in the aqueous media and admixing the coal of reduced particle size with the aqueous media to release into the aqueous media coal stabilizing constituents indigenous to and carried by the reduced coal particles in order to form a stabilized coal particle suspension. The coal stabilizing constituents are effective in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to maintain the coal particle suspension at essentially a neutral or alkaline pH. The coal is ground in a nonoxidizing atmosphere such as an inert gaseous atmosphere to reduce the coal to a sufficient particle size and is admixed with an aqueous media that has been purged of oxygen and acid-forming gases.

  1. Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2013-09-15

    Stability conditions of magnetized plasma flows are obtained by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations and, in particular, by using three kinds of energy principles. First, the Lagrangian variable energy principle is described and sufficient stability conditions are presented. Next, plasma flows are described in terms of Eulerian variables and the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of MHD is exploited. For symmetric equilibria, the energy-Casimir principle is expanded to second order and sufficient conditions for stability to symmetric perturbation are obtained. Then, dynamically accessible variations, i.e., variations that explicitly preserve invariants of the system, are introduced and the respective energy principle is considered. General criteria for stability are obtained, along with comparisons between the three different approaches.

  2. High-pressure stability relations, crystal structures, and physical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-pressure stability relations, crystal structures, and physical properties of perovskite and post-perovskite of NaNiFsub 3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  3. Cohesion and Stability of Metal Nanowires: A Quantum Chaos Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stafford, Charles

    Cohesion and Stability of Metal Nanowires: A Quantum Chaos Approach C. A. Sta#11;ord 1 , F classical pe- riodic orbits gave birth to the #12;eld of quantum chaos. In the subsequent decades, the trace

  4. Investigating step-pool sequence stability Kevin A. Waters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Investigating step-pool sequence stability Kevin A. Waters1 and Joanna Crowe Curran1 Received 22 during a flow event. Citation: Waters, K. A., and J. C. Curran (2012), Investigating step-pool sequence

  5. Increasing Stability Reduces Conformational Heterogeneity in a Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing Stability Reduces Conformational Heterogeneity in a Protein Folding Intermediate, the results show that protein folding intermediates are ensembles of different structural forms direct experi- mental evidence in support of a basic tenet of energy landscape theory for protein folding

  6. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel 1985-

    2012-09-28

    Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various fields demands a thorough investigation of their stability under irradiation. Open structure, ability to reorganize and heal defects, and large surface-to-volume ratio of carbon nanotubes affect...

  7. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  8. Quantifying the cost uncertainty of climate stabilization policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck, Travis Read

    2005-01-01

    Climate change researchers are often asked to evaluate potential economic effects of climate stabilization policies. Policy costs are particularly important because policymakers use a cost/benefit framework to analyze ...

  9. Characterizations of tropospheric turbulence and stability layers from aircraft observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    of stratification at a wide range of vertical scales. At large scales the stratification, as measured by the mean by thermal diffusion. [3] Layers of static stability have important consequences for trace constituent

  10. Power System Online Stability Assessment using Synchrophasor Data Mining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Ce

    2013-04-30

    Traditional power system stability assessment based on full model computation shows its drawbacks in real-time applications where fast variations are present at both demand side and supply side. This work presents the use of data mining techniques...

  11. Stabilization of the resistive shell mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Aydemir, A.

    1995-02-01

    The stability of current-driven external-kink modes is investigated in a tokamak plasma surrounded by an external shell of finite electrical conductivity. According to conventional theory, the ideal mode can be stabilized by placing the shell sufficiently close to the plasma, but the non-rotating ``resistive shell mode,`` which grows on the characteristic L/R time of the shell, always persists. It is demonstrated, using both analytic and numerical techniques, that a combination of strong edge plasma rotation and dissipation somewhere inside the plasma is capable of stabilizing the resistive shell mode. This stabilization mechanism does not necessarily depend on toroidicity or presence of resonant surfaces inside the plasma.

  12. Text-Alternative Version: LED Color Stability Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michael Royer: All right, welcome ladies and gentleman. I'm Michael Royer of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and I'd like to welcome you to today's webinar on LED Color Stability, Ten...

  13. Demonstration Projects Using Wick Drains to Stabilize Landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to stabilize slopes and landslides using driven, geotextile wick drains rather than drilled polyvinyl chloride, geotextile (polypropylene) wick drains rather than drilled polyvinyl chloride or steel drains (Santi, 1999

  14. Uncertainty in Greenhouse Emissions and Costs of Atmospheric Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We explore the uncertainty in projections of emissions, and costs of atmospheric stabilization applying the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis model, a computable general equilibrium model of the global economy. ...

  15. AC system stability analysis and assessment for Shipboard Power Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Li

    2006-04-12

    due to reconfiguration might cause voltage instability, such as progressive voltage decreases or voltage oscillations. SPS stability thus should be assessed to ensure the stable operation of a system during reconfiguration. In this dissertation, time...

  16. Improved Assessment of Orbital Stability of Rhythmic Motion with Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Jooeun

    Mathematical techniques have provided tools to quantify the stability of rhythmic movements of humans and machines as well as mathematical models. One archetypal example is the use of Floquet multipliers: assuming periodic ...

  17. Experimental and Computational Studies on Protein Folding, Misfolding and Stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yun

    2010-07-14

    Proteins need fold to perform their biological function. Thus, understanding how proteins fold could be the key to understanding life. In the first study, the stability and structure of several !-hairpin peptide variants derived from the C...

  18. Process for preparing a stabilized coal-water slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, E.N.; Kang, D.

    1987-06-23

    A process is described for preparing a stabilized coal particle suspension which includes the steps of providing an aqueous media substantially free of coal oxidizing constituents, reducing, in a nonoxidizing atmosphere, the particle size of the coal to be suspended to a size sufficiently small to permit suspension thereof in the aqueous media and admixing the coal of reduced particle size with the aqueous media to release into the aqueous media coal stabilizing constituents indigenous to and carried by the reduced coal particles in order to form a stabilized coal particle suspension. The coal stabilizing constituents are effective in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to maintain the coal particle suspension at essentially a neutral or alkaline pH. The coal is ground in a nonoxidizing atmosphere such as an inert gaseous atmosphere to reduce the coal to a sufficient particle size and is admixed with an aqueous media that has been purged of oxygen and acid-forming gases. 2 figs.

  19. Evaluation of an alternative bituminous material as a soil stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Rak

    1999-01-01

    . Consequently, development of a new stabilization material, which is environmentally safe and non-flammable, is desired for replacing cutback asphalts. In this study a petroleum-resin-based (PRB) material was tested to investigate its physical and mechanical...

  20. Chemical stabilization of three Texas Vertisols with sulfonated naphthalene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquart, Darren Keith

    1995-01-01

    by the shrinking and swelling of Vertisols due to the addition of sulfonated naphthalene to the soil. It also indicates that laboratory testing is essential before adding the stabilizer to the soil because of differences in soil properties....

  1. Stability and quench protection of high-temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang, Ing Chea

    2006-01-01

    In the design and operation of a superconducting magnet, stability and protection are two key issues that determine the magnet's reliability and safe operation. Although the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) is considered ...

  2. On the stability of thermonuclear shell sources in stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -C. Yoon; N. Langer; M. van der Sluys

    2004-06-07

    We present a quantitative criterion for the thermal stability of thermonuclear shell sources. We find the thermal stability of shell sources to depend on exactly three factors: they are more stable when they are geometrically thicker, less degenerate and hotter. This confirms and unifies previously obtained results in terms of the geometry, temperature and density of the shell source, by a simplified but quantitative approach to the physics of shell nuclear burning. We present instability diagrams in the temperature-density plane for hydrogen and helium shell burning, which allow a simple evaluation of the stability conditions of such shell sources in stellar models. The performance of our stability criterion is demonstrated in various numerical models: in a 3 Msun AGB star, in helium accreting CO white dwarfs, in a helium white dwarf which is covered by a thin hydrogen envelope, and in a 1.0 Msun giant.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Wind-Forced Drop Stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmucker, Jason

    2012-10-19

    of measuring full 3D drop profiles was implemented to investigate the drops' evolution toward runback. The measurement requires the comparison of the speckle pattern captured by an overhead drop image with a corresponding image of the dry surface. Stability...

  4. The prospects for magnetohydrodynamic stability in advanced tokamak regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickam, J.; Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Monticello, D.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Wang, C.; Zakharov, L.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Stability analysis of advanced regime tokamaks is presented. Here advanced regimes are defined to include configurations where the ratio of the bootstrap current, [ital I][sub BS], to the total plasma current, [ital I][sub [ital p

  5. Stability of the holographic description of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Huang; Yong-chang Huang

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the stability of the holographic description of the universe. By treating the perturbation globally, we discover that this description is stable, which is support for the holographic description of the universe.

  6. A Review of Student Difficulties in Upper-Level Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01

    Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students' problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multi-university investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties...

  7. EPIC: A New and Advanced Nonlinear Parabolized Stability Equation Solver 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliviero, Nick B

    2015-05-14

    value method (IVM), a shooting method by way of Runge-Kutta integration, Malik employed a boundary value method (BVM) in 1990 [31]. The BVM reduces the ordinary differential equations into a linear algebraic system and yields a solution without any prior...

  8. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, Randall S. (Morgantown, WV); Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV); Cully, Scott R. (Morgantown, WV); Addis, Richard E. (Smithfield, PA)

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  9. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  10. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system s described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

  11. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

  12. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  13. Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-03-01

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

  14. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, Douglas R.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  15. Enhanced fault-tolerant quantum computing in $d$-level systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earl T. Campbell

    2014-06-11

    Error correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transverse non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for $d$-level, qudit, systems with prime $d$. The codes use $n=d-1$ qudits and can detect upto $\\sim d/3$ errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation, known as magic state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing $d$.

  16. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe next generationEffect of Sea Level

  17. Iron-stabilized nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2} solid solutions: Synthesis by combustion and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legorreta Garcia, Felipe; Resende, Valdirene Gonzaga de; De Grave, Eddy; Peigney, Alain; Barnabe, Antoine; Laurent, Christophe

    2009-06-03

    The synthesis of Fe{sup 3+}-stabilized zirconia by the nitrate/urea combustion route was investigated. Using several characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction, field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy and notably Moessbauer spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the appropriate amount of urea that allows to obtain a totally stabilized Zr{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} solid solution. The nanocrystalline zirconia solid solution is mostly tetragonal, but the presence of the cubic phase could not be ruled out. An in-depth study of the thermal stability in air showed that the Fe{sup 3+} solubility in the stabilized solid solution starts to decrease at about 875 deg. C which results in the formation of hematite (possibly containing some Zr{sup 4+}) at the surface of the zirconia grains and further provokes the progressive transformation into the monoclinic zirconia phase.

  18. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis in a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.; Batlle, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > A quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis method was proposed. > The proposed method is a good engineering tool for 3D slope stability analysis. > Factor of safety from 3D analysis is higher than from 2D analysis. > 3D analysis results are more sensitive to cohesion than 2D analysis. - Abstract: Limited space for accommodating the ever increasing mounds of municipal solid waste (MSW) demands the capacity of MSW landfill be maximized by building landfills to greater heights with steeper slopes. This situation has raised concerns regarding the stability of high MSW landfills. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis based on the finite element stress analysis was applied in a case study at a MSW landfill in north-east Spain. Potential slides can be assumed to be located within the waste mass due to the lack of weak foundation soils and geosynthetic membranes at the landfill base. The only triggering factor of deep-seated slope failure is the higher leachate level and the relatively high and steep slope in the front. The valley-shaped geometry and layered construction procedure at the site make three-dimensional slope stability analyses necessary for this landfill. In the finite element stress analysis, variations of leachate level during construction and continuous settlement of the landfill were taken into account. The 'equivalent' three-dimensional factor of safety (FoS) was computed from the individual result of the two-dimensional analysis for a series of evenly spaced cross sections within the potential sliding body. Results indicate that the hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis adopted in this paper is capable of locating roughly the spatial position of the potential sliding mass. This easy to manipulate method can serve as an engineering tool in the preliminary estimate of the FoS as well as the approximate position and extent of the potential sliding mass. The result that FoS obtained from three-dimensional analysis increases as much as 50% compared to that from two-dimensional analysis implies the significance of the three-dimensional effect for this study-case. Influences of shear parameters, time elapse after landfill closure, leachate level as well as unit weight of waste on FoS were also investigated in this paper. These sensitivity analyses serve as the guidelines of construction practices and operating procedures for the MSW landfill under study.

  19. Continuing GE pattern for students who began SF State prior to Fall 2014 (revised June 2, 2014) 1 General Education and Other Graduation Requirements for students enrolled at SF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuing GE pattern for students who began SF State prior to Fall 2014 for students enrolled at SF State prior to Fall of 2014 A new GE pattern, the following lists of courses include courses from both the old GE as well

  20. Experiences in seeking stabilizers for zirconia having hot corrosion-resistance and high temperature tetragonal (t`) stability. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-04-16

    This report summarizes the results of a research effort aimed at identifying hot corrosion-resistant stabilizers for zirconia (ZrO2) which could be used in zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for engines operating on marine fuel under sea-going conditions. Among the oxides investigated were TiO2, CeO2, Y2O3, MgO, Sc2O3, In2O3, and SnO2. A brief overview of the hot corrosion of zirconia TBCs is given to illustrate the rationale used in evaluating the hot corrosion performance of the candidate oxides. The most promising stabilizer found for hot corrosion resistance was Sc2O3, or perhaps mixtures of Sc2O3 and small amounts of Y2O3. It was also discovered that Sc2Os, Y2O3- stabilized ZrO2 (SYSZ), of approx. 7 mol% of total stabilizer of which 5-20% is Y2O3, shows improved 1400 deg C stability of the tetragonal (t`) phase as compared to present-day Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 TBC compositions. This new material may have potential for TBC use in future high temperature, high efficiency gas turbine engines.

  1. Cyclic fatigue mechanisms in partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.J.; Wakayama, Shuichi; Kawahara, Masanori; Mai, Y.W.; Kishi, Teruo

    1995-12-31

    Cyclic fatigue crack growth rate and crack resistance curve testing were undertaken on 6 different grades of Mg-PSZ. The width of the transformation zone at the flanks of the cracks was determined using Raman spectroscopy and, combined with R-curve toughening values, used to ascertain the level of crack-tip shielding during cyclic fatigue crack growth and hence the crack-tip stress intensity factor amplitude. By normalizing the crack-tip stress intensity factor amplitude with the intrinsic toughness of the material, it was found that the cyclic fatigue threshold stress intensity factor was independent of the extent of crack-tip shielding and a function of the stress intensity factor at the crack tip. In situ SEM observations of cyclic fatigue revealed crack bridging by uncracked ligaments and the precipitate phase. Under cyclic loading the precipitate bridges were postulated to undergo frictional degradation at the precipitate/matrix interface with the degree of degradation determined by the cyclic amplitude. Acoustic emission testing revealed acoustic emissions at three distinct levels during the loading cycle: firstly, near the maximum applied stress intensity factor caused by crack propagation; secondly, at the mid-range of the applied stress intensity factor attributed to crack closure near the crack tip, presumably as a result of transformation induced dilation; and thirdly, intermittently near the base of the loading cycle as a result of fracture surface contact due to surface roughness at a significant distance behind the crack tip. Crack closure near the crack tip due to dilation is proposed to significantly reduce the crack tip stress intensity factor amplitude and hence the degree of cyclic fatigue.

  2. Intelligent Low-level RF System by Non-destructive Beam Monitoring Device for Cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malafeh, M S Sharifi Asadi; Afarideh, H; Chai, J S

    2015-01-01

    The project of a10MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF suitable for Most of the AVF cyclotron accelerators was designed by the beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, for the RF phase detection does not need to signal processing by microcontroller

  3. Prior experience with national leaders purported to be of the "greenest" variety, including Tony Blair and Angela Merkel, revealed their greenness to be greenwash1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    . We need one nation to stand tall, to speak truth to world leaders. Could that nation be Norway? If Norway foreswore the tar sands, it might be a catalyst to global action to stabilize climate. Norway near zero via a focus on reducing positive (warming) forcings such as black soot and tropospheric ozone

  4. Total ionizing dose effect of ?-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (?-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ?5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy ?-ray exposure.

  5. Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

  6. FRIC0 Stability Testing on VnUC and VdetCom Control Lines Rebecca Coles,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of cryorefrigeration and SNAP stability testing software. Variable and constant temperature stability tests measured and SNAP stability testing software every five seconds for the entire length of the testing #12;period and SNAP stability testing software every five seconds of the three hour testing period. The ability

  7. Core Microturbulence and Edge MHD Interplay and Stabilization by Fast Ions in Tokamak Confined Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Core Microturbulence and Edge MHD Interplay and Stabilization by Fast Ions in Tokamak Confined Plasmas

  8. Verification of the Equilibrium and MHD Stability Codes within the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verification of the Equilibrium and MHD Stability Codes within the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force

  9. Runtime deadlock analysis for system level design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Eric; Chen, Xi; Hsieh, Harry; Davare, Abhijit; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto; Watanabe, Yosinori

    2009-01-01

    workshop on high level design validation and test, Nov. 2001Metropolis, and two real world design examples, which aredetection · System-level design · SystemC · Metropolis E.

  10. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3A: Low Levels of Synchronous Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Nicholas W.; Leonardi, Bruno; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara

    2015-11-17

    The stability of the North American electric power grids under conditions of high penetrations of wind and solar is a significant concern and possible impediment to reaching renewable energy goals. The 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration considered in this study results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system. This includes different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior from wind and solar generation. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, is one of the largest regional solar and wind integration studies to date. In multiple phases, it has explored different aspects of the question: Can we integrate large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West? The work reported here focused on the impact of low levels of synchronous generation on the transient stability performance in one part of the region in which wind generation has displaced synchronous thermal generation under highly stressed, weak system conditions. It is essentially an extension of WWSIS-3. Transient stability, the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism among all elements following disturbances, is a major constraint on operations in many grids, including the western U.S. and Texas systems. These constraints primarily concern the performance of the large-scale bulk power system. But grid-wide stability concerns with high penetrations of wind and solar are still not thoroughly understood. This work focuses on 'traditional' fundamental frequency stability issues, such as maintaining synchronism, frequency, and voltage. The objectives of this study are to better understand the implications of low levels of synchronous generation and a weak grid on overall system performance by: 1) Investigating the Western Interconnection under conditions of both high renewable generation (e.g., wind and solar) and low synchronous generation (e.g., significant coal power plant decommitment or retirement); and 2) Analyzing both the large-scale stability of the Western Interconnection and regional stability issues driven by more geographically dispersed renewable generation interacting with a transmission grid that evolved with large, central station plants at key nodes. As noted above, the work reported here is an extension of the research performed in WWSIS-3.

  11. Nanoemulsion stability: experimental evaluation of the flocculation rate from turbidity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem Rahn-Chique; Antonio M. Puertas; Manuel S. Romero-Cano; Clara Rojas; German Urbina-Villalba

    2012-05-21

    The coalescence of liquid drops induces a higher level of complexity compared to the classical studies about the aggregation of solid spheres. Yet, it is commonly believed that most findings on solid dispersions are directly applicable to liquid mixtures. Here, the state of the art in the evaluation of the flocculation rate of these two systems is reviewed. Special emphasis is made on the differences between suspensions and emulsions. In the case of suspensions, the stability ratio is commonly evaluated from the initial slope of the absorbance as a function of time under diffusive and reactive conditions. Puertas and de las Nieves (1997) developed a theoretical approach that allows the determination of the flocculation rate from the variation of the turbidity of a sample as a function of time. Here, suitable modifications of the experimental procedure and the referred theoretical approach are implemented in order to calculate the values of the stability ratio and the flocculation rate corresponding to a dodecane-in-water nanoemulsion stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Four analytical expressions of the turbidity are tested, basically differing in the optical cross section of the aggregates formed. The first two models consider the processes of: a) aggregation (as described by Smoluchowski) and b) the instantaneous coalescence upon flocculation. The other two models account for the simultaneous occurrence of flocculation and coalescence. The latter reproduce the temporal variation of the turbidity in all cases studied (380 \\leq [NaCl] \\leq 600 mM), providing a method of appraisal of the flocculation rate in nanoemulsions.

  12. Chemical potential as a source of stability for gravitating Skyrmions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Loewe; S. Mendizabal; J. C. Rojas

    2006-09-13

    A discussion of the stability of self gravitating Skyrmions, with a large winding number N, in a Schwarzschild type of metric, is presented for the case where an isospin chemical potential is introduced. It turns out that the chemical potential stabilizes the behavior of the Skyrmion discussed previously in the literature. This analysis is carried on in the framework of a variational approach using different ansaetze for the radial profile of the Skyrmion. We found a divergent behavior for the size of the Skyrmion, associated to a certain critical value $\\mu_c$ of the chemical potential. At this point, the mass of the Skyrmion vanishes. $\\mu_c$ is essentialy independent of gravitating effects. The stability of a large N skyrmion against decays into single particles is also discussed.

  13. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  14. Soil stabilization using oil-shale solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Archeological Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Oil-shale solid wastes are evaluated for use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in durability and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern oil shale appears to be feasible for soil stabilization only if limestone is added during combustion. Testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented and the mechanisms of spent-shale cementation are discussed.

  15. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Yu, E-mail: yu.pan@anu.edu.au, E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Miao, Zibo, E-mail: yu.pan@anu.edu.au, E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au [Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Amini, Hadis, E-mail: nhamini@stanford.edu [Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Gough, John, E-mail: jug@aber.ac.uk [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, SY23 3BZ Wales (United Kingdom); Ugrinovskii, Valery, E-mail: v.ugrinovskii@gmail.com [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); James, Matthew R., E-mail: matthew.james@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  16. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  17. Proton stability in grand unified theories, in strings, and in branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pran Nath; Pavel Fileviez Perez

    2007-04-23

    A broad overview of the current status of proton stability in unified models of particle interactions is given which includes non - supersymmetric unification, SUSY and SUGRA unified models, unification based on extra dimensions, and string-M-theory models. The extra dimensional unification includes 5D and 6D and universal extra dimensional (UED) models, and models based on warped geometry. Proton stability in a wide array of string theory and M theory models is reviewed. These include Calabi-Yau models, grand unified models with Kac-Moody levels $k>1$, a new class of heterotic string models, models based on intersecting D branes, and string landscape models. The destabilizing effect of quantum gravity on the proton is discussed. The possibility of testing grand unified models, models based on extra dimensions and string-M-theory models via their distinctive modes is investigated. The proposed next generation proton decay experiments, HyperK, UNO, MEMPHYS, ICARUS, LANNDD (DUSEL), and LENA would shed significant light on the nature of unification complementary to the physics at the LHC. Mathematical tools for the computation of proton lifetime are given in the appendices. Prospects for the future are discussed.

  18. Electroweak vacuum stability and inflation via non-minimal derivative couplings to gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Di Vita; Cristiano Germani

    2015-08-19

    We show that the Standard Model vacuum can be stabilized if all particle propagators are non-minimally coupled to gravity. This is due to a Higgs-background dependent redefinition of the Standard Model fields: in terms of canonical variables and in the large Higgs field limit, the quantum fluctuations of the redefined fields are suppressed by the Higgs background. Thus, in this regime, quantum corrections to the tree-level electroweak potential are negligible. Finally, we show that in this framework the Higgs boson can be responsible for inflation. Due to a numerical coincidence that originates from the CMB data, inflation can happen if the Higgs boson mass, the top mass, and the QCD coupling lie in a region of the parameter space approximately equivalent than the one allowing for electroweak vacuum stability in the Standard Model. We find some (small) regions in the Standard Model parameter space in which the new interaction "rescues" the electroweak vacuum, which would not be stable in the Standard Model.

  19. F-term uplifting and moduli stabilization consistent with Kahler invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Achucarro; Kepa Sousa

    2007-12-20

    An important ingredient in the construction of phenomenologically viable superstring models is the uplifting of Anti-de Sitter supersymmetric critical points in the moduli sector to metastable Minkowski or de Sitter vacua with broken supersymmetry. In all cases described so far, uplifting results in a displacement of the potential minimum away from the critical point and, if the uplifting is large, can lead to the disappearance of the minimum altogether. We propose a variant of F-term uplifting which exactly preserves supersymmetric critical points and shift symmetries at tree level. In spite of a direct coupling, the moduli do not contribute to supersymmetry breaking. We analyse the stability of the critical points in a toy one-modulus sector before and after uplifting, and find a simple stability condition depending solely on the amount of uplifting and not on the details of the uplifting sector. There is a region of parameter space, corresponding to the uplifting of local AdS {\\em maxima} --or, more importantly, local minima of the Kahler function-- where the critical points are stable for any amount of uplifting. On the other hand, uplifting to (non- supersymmetric) Minkowski space is special in that all SUSY critical points, that is, for all possible compactifications, become stable or neutrally stable.

  20. Voltage multi-stability in distribution grids with power flow reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung D. Nguyen; Konstantin Turitsyn

    2014-07-08

    High levels of penetration of distributed generation and aggressive reactive power compensation with modern power electronics may result in the reversal of active and reactive power flows in future distribution grids. The voltage stability of these operating conditions may be very different from the more traditional power consumption regime. We study the stability characteristics of distribution networks with reversed power flow. After introducing a universal algebraic approach to characterize all the solutions of the power flow equations, we show that new solutions appear in the reversed power flow regime even in the simplest three bus systems. We show that the some of these solutions are stable and the system may exhibit a phenomenon of multistability, where multiple stable equilibria co-exist at the given set of parameters, and the system may converge to an undesirable equilibrium after a disturbance. These predictions are validated with dynamic simulations of two different systems. Under certain conditions the new states are viable and may be characterized by relatively high voltages. Possible approaches towards reactive power/voltage regulation as well as permissible distributed generation capacity in future power systems are proposed and discussed in the end of the paper.