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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Steve Loya

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

Moss, William C. (San Mateo, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

James C. Leslie

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Drill Pipe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

G-105 and S-135 grades of drill pipe steels have been used to study the effect of temperature and solution chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of ...

8

NETL: News Release - Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Demonstrates Resiliency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lightweight drill pipe, made of space-age carbon fiber composites rather than traditional steel, is a step closer to becoming a major government-industry R&D success story. The...

9

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 and contains the following discussions: Qualification Testing; Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; Field Test Demonstration; Development of Ultra-Short Radius Composite Drill Pipe (USR-CDP); and Development of Smart USR-CDP.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie, II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Composite drill pipe and method for forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight and durable drill pipe string capable of short radius drilling formed using a composite pipe segment formed to include tapered wall thickness ends that are each defined by opposed frustoconical surfaces conformed for self-aligning receipt and intimate bonding contact within an annular space between corresponding surfaces of a coaxially nested set of metal end pieces and a set of nonconductive sleeves. The distal peripheries of the nested end pieces and sleeves are then welded to each other and the sandwiched and bonded portions are radially pinned. The composite segment may include imbedded conductive leads and the axial end portions of the end pieces are shaped to form a threaded joint with the next pipe assembly that includes contact rings in the opposed surfaces of the pipe joint for contact together.

Leslie, James C; Leslie, II, James C; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V; Josephson, Marvin

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report discusses and illustrates all progress in the first two years of this NETL/DOE supported program. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: (1) Specifications for both 5 5/16 inch and 3 3/8 inch composite drill pipe have been finalized. (2) All basic laboratory testing has been completed and has provide sufficient data for the selection of materials for the composite tubing, adhesives, and abrasion coatings. (3) Successful demonstration of composite/metal joint interfacial connection. (4) Upgrade of facilities to provide a functional pilot plant manufacturing facility. (5) Arrangements to have the 3 3/8 inch CDP used in a drilling operation early in C.Y. 2002. (6) Arrangements to have the 5 5/16 inch CDP marketed and produced by a major drill pipe manufacturer.

James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 and contains the following discussions: (1) Direct Electrical Connection for Rotary Shoulder Tool Joints; (2) Conductors for inclusion in the pipe wall (ER/DW-CDP); (3) Qualify fibers from Zoltek; (4) Qualify resin from Bakelite; (5) First commercial order for SR-CDP from Integrated Directional Resources (SR-CDP); and (6) Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Peter Manekas

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

14

NETL: News Release - New Carbon Drill Pipe Signals Technical Achievement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 17, 2004 May 17, 2004 New Carbon Drill Pipe Signals Technical Achievement Technology May Benefit American Energy Production WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today the development of a new "composite" drill pipe that is lighter, stronger and more flexible than steel, which could significantly alter the ability to drain substantially more oil and gas from rock than traditional vertical wells. MORE INFO Read about January, 2003 field test Read about October, 2003 field test - "This is another example of the technology breakthroughs in the arena of domestic energy production being carried out by our Office of Fossil Energy," said Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham. "To reach and recover untapped domestic oil and gas reserves, we must have the ability to

15

NETL: News Release - Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Performs Flawlessly in First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 9, 2003 January 9, 2003 Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Performs Flawlessly in First Field Test Private Company to Use DOE-Sponsored Technology To Help Restore Domestic Production from Older Oil Wells TULSA COUNTY, OK - A new lightweight, flexible drill pipe engineered from space-age composites rather than steel has passed an important field test in a U.S. Department of Energy project and is now being readied for its first commercial use. - Photo - Composite Drill Pipe Being Bent - The advanced composite drill pipe could enable drillers in the future to bore sharply-curved "short radius" horizontal wells without creating fatigue stress on the drill pipe. The Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory announced that the drill pipe, made from carbon fiber resins by Advanced Composite

16

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report reiterates the presentation made to DOE/NETL in Morgantown, WV on August 1st, 2002 with the addition of accomplishments made from that time forward until the issue date. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: {sm_bullet} Specifications for both 5-1/2'' and 1-5/8'' composite drill pipe have been finalized. {sm_bullet} Full scale testing of Short Radius (SR) CDP has been conducted. {sm_bullet} Successful demonstration of metal to composite interface (MCI) connection. {sm_bullet} Preparations for full scale manufacturing of ER/DW CDP have begun. {sm_bullet} Manufacturing facility rearranged to accommodate CDP process flow through plant. {sm_bullet} Arrangements to have the 3 3/8'' CDP used in 4 separate drilling applications in Oman, Oklahoma, and Texas.

James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Biased insert for installing data transmission components in downhole drilling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for installing data transmission hardware in downhole tools includes an insert insertable into the box end or pin end of drill tool, such as a section of drill pipe. The insert typically includes a mount portion and a slide portion. A data transmission element is mounted in the slide portion of the insert. A biasing element is installed between the mount portion and the slide portion and is configured to create a bias between the slide portion and the mount portion. This biasing element is configured to compensate for varying tolerances encountered in different types of downhole tools. In selected embodiments, the biasing element is an elastomeric material, a spring, compressed gas, or a combination thereof.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael A. (Lehi, UT); Garner, Kory K. (Payson, UT); Wilde, Tyson J. (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of modifications for Coflexip flexible drilling pipe for high-temperature and -pressure geothermal service. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coflexip (France) flexible drilling pipe can provide economies in drilling geothermal wells. However, the current liner materials cannot take the high temperatures (approx.250C) and pressures (approx.69 MPa). Development was undertaken to replace the liner with higher temperature materials and, thus increase the temperature capability of the flexible pipe. DuPont Teflon PFA 350, L'Garde EPDM Y267 and L'Garde AFLAS 291 were considered but they all require backing by a closely woven stainless steel fabric to prevent extrusion. A graphite-reinforced EPDM elastomer was developed which has the potential of meeting the pressure-temperature requirements without the metal fabric reinforcement.

Friese, G.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Becker, K., Malone, M.J., et al., 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 174B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(drill-pipe measurement from rig floor, mbrf): 4457.1 Total depth (drill-pipe measurement from rig floor, mbrf): 4526.6 Distance between rig floor and sea level (m): 11.6 Water depth (drill-pipe measurement Unit II (63.5-69.5 mbsf): Aphyric basalt Principal results: Sixty-four meters of sediment and 0.58 m

20

RF transmission line and drill/pipe string switching technology for down-hole telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modulated reflectance well telemetry apparatus having an electrically conductive pipe extending from above a surface to a point below the surface inside a casing. An electrical conductor is located at a position a distance from the electrically conductive pipe and extending from above the surface to a point below the surface. Modulated reflectance apparatus is located below the surface for modulating well data into a RF carrier transmitted from the surface and reflecting the modulated carrier back to the surface. A RF transceiver is located at the surface and is connected between the electrically conductive pipe and the electrical conductor for transmitting a RF signal that is confined between the electrically conductive well pipe and the electrical conductor to the modulated reflectance apparatus, and for receiving reflected data on the well from the modulated reflectance apparatus.

Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SHAM: High-level seismic tests of piping at the HDR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the second phase of vibrational/earthquake investigations at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, high-level simulated seismic tests (SHAM) were performed during April--May 1988 on the VKL (Versuchskreislauf) in-plant piping system with two servohydraulic actuators, each capable of generating 40 tons of force. The purpose of these experiments was to study the behavior of piping subjected to seismic excitation levels that exceed design levels manifold and may result in failure/plastification of pipe supports and pipe elements, and to establish seismic margins for piping and pipe supports. The performance of six different dynamic pipe support systems was compared in these tests and the response, operability, and fragility of dynamic supports and of a typical US gate valve were investigated. Data obtained in the tests are used to validate analysis methods. Very preliminary evaluations lead to the observation that, in general, failures of dynamic supports (in particular snubbers) occur only at load levels that substantially exceed the design capacity. Pipe strains at load levels exceeding the design level threefold are quite small, and even when exceeding the design level eightfold are quite tolerable. Hence, under seismic loading, even at extreme levels and in spite of multiple support failures, pipe failure is unlikely. 5 refs., 16 figs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D.; Steinhilber, H.; Costello, J.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

High-level seismic tests of piping at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the second-phase testing at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), high-level seismic experiments, designated SHAM, were performed on an in-plant piping system during the period of 19 April to 27 May 1988. The objectives of the SHAM experiments were to (1) study the response of piping subjected to seismic excitation levels that exceed design levels manifold and which may result in failure/plastification of pipe supports and pipe elements; (2) provide data for the validation of linear and nonlinear pipe response analyses; (3) compare and evaluate, under identical loading conditions, the performance of various dynamic support system, ranging from very flexible to very stiff support configurations; (4) establish seismic margins for piping, dynamic pipe supports, and pipe anchorages; and (5) investigate the response, operability, and fragility of dynamic supports and of a typical US gate valve under extreme levels of seismic excitation. A brief description of the SHAM tests is provided, followed by highlights of the test results that are given primarily in the form of maximum response values. Also presented are very limited comparisons of experimental data and pretest analytical predictions. 6 refs., 8 figs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Costello, J.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

Chanson, Gary J. (Weston, MA); Nicolson, Alexander M. (Concord, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Alpine, UT); Hall, Jr., Tracy H. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Lehi, UT); Pixton, David S. (Provo, UT)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Turnkey drilling  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge in the popularity of turnkey drilling has produced a number of questions about turnkey operations from both operators and contractors. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has no approved turnkey contract (although several of the member districts have printed one), leaving the parties participating in a turnkey well unsure of their responsibilities and obligations. Additionally, operators are finding liens filed against turnkey wells they thought were paid for. The term turnkey itself is often misunderstood and applied to a variety of guaranteed well commitments. Some turnkeys require the contractor to provide everything from location preparation to final production pipe or plugs. Others allow contingencies for stuck pipe, lost circulation, kicks and bad storms.

Pierce, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improved Bottomhole Pressure Control for Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maintaining underbalanced conditions from the beginning to the end of the drilling process is necessary to guarantee the success of jointed-pipe underbalanced drilling (UBD) operations… (more)

Perez-Tellez, Carlos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Conformable apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation  

SciTech Connect

A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Drilling Practices That Minimize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Practices Drilling Practices Fact Sheet - Drilling Practices That Minimize Generation of Drilling Wastes How Are Wells Typically Drilled? The conventional process of drilling oil and gas wells uses a rotary drill bit that is lubricated by drilling fluids or muds. As the drill bit grinds downward through the rock layers, it generates large amounts of ground-up rock known as drill cuttings. This section of the Drilling Waste Management Information System website discusses several alternative drilling practices that result in a lower volume of waste being generated. Oil and gas wells are constructed with multiple layers of pipe known as casing. Traditional wells are not drilled from top to bottom at the same diameter but rather in a series of progressively smaller-diameter intervals. The top interval is drilled starting at the surface and has the largest diameter hole. Drill bits are available in many sizes to drill different diameter holes. The hole diameter can be 20" or larger for the uppermost sections of the well, followed by different combinations of progressively smaller diameters. Some of the common hole diameters are: 17.5", 14.75", 12.25", 8.5", 7.875", and 6.5".

31

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Horizontal drilling method and apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for drilling a highly deviated well into a petroleum formation the apparatus comprising a drill pipe extending from a surface location to a down-hole drilling assembly through a curved wellbore. It comprises a down-hole motor attached to a bit at a first end, the down-hole motor having a bent housing; a bent sub in the down-hole drilling assembly located above the motor; and a pony collar located between the motor and the bent sub, the pony collar having sufficient mass to substantially hold the motor against a wellbore wall during drilling operations.

Rehm, W.A.; Trunk, T.D.; Baseflug, T.D.; Cromwell, S.L.; Hickman, G.A.; Nickel, R.D.; Lyons, M.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

NETL: News Release - Intelligent Pipe Technology Communicates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 4, 2005 Intelligent Pipe Technology Communicates Faster than Internet Technology on Verge of Commercialization Provides Fast, Reliable Communication During Downhole Drilling...

34

Materials to Support High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HPHT drilling and the drill pipe materials currently available on the market. ... Computational Phase Studies in the (La,Sr)(Ga,Mg)O3-d System for IT-SOFC ...

35

HydroPulse Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

J.J. Kolle

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Designing BHAs for better drilling jar performance  

SciTech Connect

Jars are a major component in drill string design, but considerations for proper placement often are neglected. The main purpose of running drilling jars is to provide an immediate jarring action when pipe becomes stuck. This report considers some of the mechanics of pipe sticking and why it must be considered in jar placement. It also focuses on their placement in the bottomhole assembly and the advantages of certain types of jars.

Schmid, J.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

Normann, Randy A. (Edgewood, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Drill report  

SciTech Connect

North Slope drilling activity is described. As of November 14, 1984, four rigs were actively drilling in the Kuparuk River field with another two doing workovers. Only one rig was drilling in the Prudhoe Bay field, with another doing workovers and one on standby.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly efficient tool that both delivers high level of force for the pressure available and inherently increases downhole reliability because parts are less subject to contamination. The On-Off feature is essential to drilling to allow the Driller to turn off the tractor and pull back while circulating in cleanout runs that keep the hole clean of drilling debris. The gripping elements have wide contact surfaces to the formation to allow high loads without damage to the formation. As part of the development materials evaluations were conducted to verify compatibility with anticipated drilling and well bore fluids. Experiments demonstrated that the materials of the tractor are essentially undamaged by exposure to typical drilling fluids used for horizontal coiled tubing drilling. The design for the MDT was completed, qualified vendors identified, parts procured, received, inspected, and a prototype was assembled. As part of the assembly process, WWT prepared Manufacturing instructions (MI) that detail the assembly process and identify quality assurance inspection points. Subsequent to assembly, functional tests were performed. Functional tests consisted of placing the MDT on jack stands, connecting a high pressure source to the tractor, and verifying On-Off functions, walking motion, and operation over a range of pressures. Next, the Shop Demonstration Test was performed. An existing WWT test fixture was modified to accommodate operation of the 3.38 inch diameter MDT. The fixture simulated the tension applied to a tractor while walking (pulling) inside 4.0 inch diameter pipe. The MDT demonstrated: (1) On-off function, (2) Pulling forces proportional to available differential pressure up to 4000 lbs, (3) Walking speeds to 1100 ft/hour. A field Demonstration of the MDT was arranged with a major oil company operating in Alaska. A demonstration well with a Measured Depth of approximately 15,000 ft was selected; however because of problems with the well drilling was stopped before the planned MDT usage. Alternatively, functional and operational tests were run with the MDT insi

Western Well Tool

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Unstable heat pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat pipes are an important feature of models of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. Numerical experiments reveal that a vapor-dominated heat pipe is unstable if pressure is controlled at shallow levels. This instability is discussed in physical terms, and some implications for geothermal reservoirs are considered. 9 refs., 10 figs.

McGuinness, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Acoustical properties of drill strings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Pipe support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems. A section of the pipe to be supported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe.

Pollono, Louis P. (Hempfield Township, Hempfield County, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Installation Of Service Connections For Sensors Or Transmitters In Buried Water Pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for installing warning units in a buried pipeline. A small hole is drilled in the ground to the pipeline. A collar is affixed to one of the pipes of the pipeline. A valve with an internal passage is connected to the collar. A hole is drilled in the pipe. A warning unit is installed in the pipe by moving the warning unit through the internal passage, the collar, and the hole in the pipe.

Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Packer weighted and pressure differential method and apparatus for big hole drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A packer and pressure differential drilling tool and method of controlled pressure balanced drilling in Big Hole well bores and shafts, characterized by a large diameter packer slideably engaged with the well bore over a drill bit and through which a dual drill pipe operates and isolates drilling fluid from a hydrostatic head of fluid standing in the well bore surrounding the dual drill pipe, the packer functioning as a non-rotatable ram slideable down the well bore and supporting said hydrostatic head and applying the weight thereof to the drill bit through anti-friction bearings, cuttings being flushed through the dual drill pipe by means of aerated drilling fluid or by an upwardly disposed jet pump, or both, so as to establish a reduced and/or underbalanced condition at the bit-to-bore bottom interface and operating the drill bit at an increased rate of penetration while maintaining a higher pressure condition in the well bore above the packer, the packer being weight set or hydraulic set, and the jet pump being centered in the dual drill pipe or disposed in the annulus of the dual drill pipe.

Hooper, D. W.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Heat pipe technology issues  

SciTech Connect

Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coiled tubing drilling requires economic and technical analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field experience has proven that coiled tubing drilling is a technical and economic option on some wells; however, coiled tubing drilling is not the solution to every drilling prospect or production-enhancement job. To determine if coiled tubing drilling is viable, the geographic, technical, and economic aspects of each project must be considered in detail. Generally, with some limitations, coiled tubing drilling is feasible primarily when jointed pipe cannot be used effectively. Also, coiled tubing drilling may be more appropriate because of some special well site requirements, such as environmental regulations requiring less surface disturbance. The paper discusses technical considerations which need to be considered, economic feasibility, limitations of well types (new shallow wells, conventional reentry, through-tubing reentry, and underbalanced drilling), and outlook for further growth in the coiled tubing drilling industry.

Gary, S.C. (Schlumberger Dowell, Sugar Land, TX (United States))

1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Guided Horizontal Drilling: A Primer for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be an introduction to guided horizontal drilling, also termed horizontal directional drilling (HDD), as an alternative construction method to open trenching for the installation of underground power cables, pipes, ducts, or conduits. It is written for an audience that includes electric power engineers, designers, operations and procurement personnel. The document introduces guided horizontal drilling technology, the equipment, and several critical aspects of operating the equ...

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

55

An evaluation of flowmeters for the detection of kicks and lost circulation during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An independent evaluation of current industry standard and state-of-the-art drilling fluid inflow and outflow meters was conducted during the drilling of a geothermal exploratory well. Four different types of fluid inflow meters and three different types of fluid outflow meters were tested and evaluated during actual drilling operations. The tested drilling fluid inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flow meters, and a Doppler ultrasonic flow meter. On the return flow line, a standard paddle meter, an acoustic level meter, and a prototype rolling float meter were evaluated to measure drilling fluid outflow rates. The prototype outflow meter utilizes a rolling float which rides on the surface of the flow thereby measuring the fluid height in the pipe. Both the prototype meter and the conventional paddle meter were also extensively tested under a variety of drilling conditions in a full-scale laboratory test facility. The meters were evaluated and compared on the basis of reliability and accuracy, and the results are presented in the paper.

Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, K.E. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling operations management will face hurdles to reduce costs and increase performance, and to do this with less experience and organizational drilling capacity. A technology called Drilling Simulators Software has shown an extraordinary potential to improve the drilling performance and reduce risk and cost. Different approaches have been made to develop drilling-simulator software. The Virtual Experience Simulator, geological drilling logs, and reconstructed lithology are some of the most successful. The drilling simulations can run multiple scenarios quickly and then update plans with new data to improve the results. Its storage capacity for retaining field drilling experience and knowledge add value to the program. This research shows the results of using drilling simulator software called Drilling Optimization Simulator (DROPS®) in the evaluation of the Aloctono block, in the Pirital field, eastern Venezuela. This formation is characterized by very complex geology, containing faulted restructures, large dips, and hard and abrasive rocks. The drilling performance in this section has a strong impact in the profitability of the field. A number of simulations using geological drilling logs and the concept of the learning curve defined the optimum drilling parameters for the block. The result shows that DROPS® has the capability to simulate the drilling performance of the area with reasonable accuracy. Thus, it is possible to predict the drilling performance using different bits and the learning-curve concept to obtain optimum drilling parameters. All of these allow a comprehensive and effective cost and drilling optimization.

Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Heat pipe applications workshop report  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the Heat Pipe Applications Workshop, held at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory October 20-21, 1977, are reported. This workshop, which brought together representatives of the Department of Energy and of a dozen industrial organizations actively engaged in the development and marketing of heat pipe equipment, was convened for the purpose of defining ways of accelerating the development and application of heat pipe technology. Recommendations from the three study groups formed by the participants are presented. These deal with such subjects as: (1) the problem encountered in obtaining support for the development of broadly applicable technologies, (2) the need for applications studies, (3) the establishment of a heat pipe technology center of excellence, (4) the role the Department of Energy might take with regard to heat pipe development and application, and (5) coordination of heat pipe industry efforts to raise the general level of understanding and acceptance of heat pipe solutions to heat control and transfer problems.

Ranken, W.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

Dareing, D.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Pipe connector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

Sullivan, Thomas E. (Evergreen Park, IL); Pardini, John A. (Brookfield, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, Douglas K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kuhns, Douglass J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wiersholm, Otto (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

Underbalanced drilling benefits now available offshore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore underbalanced drilling (UBD) is a reality. Applications in older, partially depleted fields and new fields are being considered. However, low productivity reservoirs and fields with sub normal pressures causing drilling problems are currently the main targets for offshore UBD. With proper planning and the correct technique, both jointed pipe and coiled tubing UBD drilling operations have been carried out offshore with success. The main concerns for offshore UBD have been altered drilling practices and surface production system operation. These issues have been examined and equipment has been designed and tested to address them. Environmental, safety and health issues are paramount and have been studied carefully. Detailed well planning, engineering, and flow modeling have proven critical for successful offshore UBD operations. Examples are given from oil and gas fields.

Vozniak, J.P.; Cuthbertson, B.; Nessa, D.O.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optimum Piping Design on Offshore Platform Based on Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solving the problems of low efficiency and high cost in piping design process on offshore drilling platform, the design of manifold optimum piping was taken as research objective, a mathematical model was established with the controlled objects of ... Keywords: offshore platform, manifold piping, genetic algorithm, encouraging function

Yi Peng; Liu Yancong; Shi Yongjun; Lun Guande

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

New surface equipment for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perhaps the single most exciting development in the area of new drilling technology in this decade is underbalanced drilling (UBD). This category includes both jointed pipe and coiled tubing applications. Each has advantages and disadvantages in UBD operations. Regardless of the method selected for a particular UBD application, equipment similarities exist. The surface control and production equipment must be correctly sized and designed for the overall total UBD engineering solution. This article describes the various types, applications and purposes of special surface equipment needed in underbalanced operations. This is the second in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development is this field.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.; Kinder, J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

Judzis, Arnis (Salt Lake City, UT); Black, Alan D. (Coral Springs, FL); Green, Sidney J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Robertson, Homer A. (West Jordan, UT); Bland, Ronald G. (Houston, TX); Curry, David Alexander (The Woodlands, TX); Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W. (Cypress, TX)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional drilling costs; and downhole weight-on-bit and drilling torque for diagnosing drill bit performance. In general, any measurement that could shed light on the downhole environment would give us a better understanding of the drilling process and reduce drilling costs.

FINGER,JOHN T.; GLOWKA,DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY,BILLY JOE; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a drill string enclosure which consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Investigation of the potential for using electrochemical technology to reduce drill bit wear  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent work has shown that an important drill bit wear mechanism in aqueous environments is electrochemical in nature. The synergistic effects of corrosion and abrasion are responsible for a large percentage of bit wear in laboratory studies. It has been shown that measured wear rates can be reduced by factors of two to five with the application of a voltage potential which opposes and exceeds the galvanic potential generated by the corrosion cells existing downhole. The present study investigates the potential for applying this technique in the downhole environment. The results demonstrate that a downhole generator sub powered by drilling fluid is a possible electrical power source. Graphite is chosen as the optimal nonsacrificial anode material for this application. Steel is also shown to be a possible anode material, but the anode would be sacrificial in this case, requiring periodic replacement. The electrical power required to achieve the desired effect for 4-1/2 inch drill bit is determined to be on the order of one milliwatt. Additionally, up to 250 feet of 4 inch drill pipe could be protected from corrosion with power levels on the order of 150 milliwatts. These relatively low power levels suggest that dry cell batteries could alternatively be employed as the power source; however, the temperature limitations of commercially available batteries would have to be overcome for geothermal applications.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Drilling for energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Navigation drilling technology progresses  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that navigation drilling - an approach that combines advanced drill bit, downhole motor, measurement-while-drilling, and well planning technology into an integrated, steerable drilling system - has reduced drilling time for operating companies worldwide. A major operating advantage of navigation drilling is the ability to drill both straight and directional intervals with a single assembly. In conventional directional drilling, a bent sub and downhole motor (or a bent housing motor) are used to initiate kick-offs and make course corrections. The bent sub is made-up above the motor, tilting the motor's axis 1 to 3 degrees compared to the axis of the drill string. The assembly toolface can be aligned in the desired direction with a single-shot, a steering tool or an MWD system.

Bayne, R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Embedded Pipe Dose Calculation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plants contain thousands of feet of process piping embedded in walls, ceilings, and floors, many of which have radioactive contamination on internal surfaces. Decommissioning of these plants requires determining the level and character of contamination and removing the activity to levels commensurate with requirements for disposal or release. This report investigates and evaluates some measurement techniques for determining activities on internal surfaces of embedded piping through a series of co...

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies to obtain thermal energy (and other benefits) from a large body of water #12;Microgrid Customer ENERGY : Underground Technologies #12;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water

77

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

78

Hydromechanical drilling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

April 25, 1997: Yucca Mountain exploratory drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

April 25, 1997Workers complete drilling of the five-mile long, horseshoe-shaped exploratory tunnel through Yucca Mountain at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada.

82

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pioneering work, economic factors provide insights into Russian drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Russia and America, individual ingenuity and economic forces have produced a variety of drilling technologies, resulting in the development of disparate drilling systems. Endeavors by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Sandia Laboratories, and private industry have promoted exchanges of knowledge since the 1980s, and now that the barriers to technology transfer are being lifted, engineers from both countries have the opportunity to exchange knowledge and incorporate the best of both. The Russian drilling industry, like the Russian space program, has achieved tremendous success in implementing product and process innovations including the first directional (1940s), horizontal (1950s), and multilateral (1950s) wells. In addition, Russian engineers built the first turbodrills, electrodrills, novel drills (lasers, explosives), aluminum drill pipe, downhole electric submersible pumps, and mud hammers. This first part of a two-part series describes the achievements of Russian engineers in horizontal and multilateral drilling technologies followed by a discussion of the economic differences that led Russian and American drillers to develop dissimilar drilling systems. The second part describes a variety of innovative Russian technologies and provides details on the technical advantages they offer for the drilling process.

Gaddy, D.E.

1998-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

84

Remote drill bit loader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. In typical remote drilling operations, whether in hot cells or water pits, drill bits have been held using a collet or end mill type holder with set screws. In either case, to load or change a drill bit required the use master-slave manipulators to position the bits and tighten the collet or set screws. This requirement eliminated many otherwise useful work areas because they were not equipped with slaves, particularly in water pits.

Dokos, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

Drilling in the Rockies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rugged drilling conditions and high drilling costs, rig employment and drilling operations in the Rocky Mountain region of the Overthrust Belt have increased significantly since 1979. Rate of rig employment, well depths, and number of operating companies and contractors in the area are reported. By October 1980, more than 500 active rigs were working in the region, 30% more than were working during the entirety of 1979. (3 photos)

Peacock, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Drill Press Speed Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 116" - 316" 14" - 38" 716"- 58" 11...

88

Drilling motor deviation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension for a down hole drilling motor is described, which adapts the motor for selective configuration for straight hole drilling or directional drilling, selectively. It consists of: an elongated generally tubular body, adapted at a first end to rigidly attach to the lower end of a down hole drilling motor housing, the body having an opening extending along the general centerline of the body; fluid channel means situated in the opening to conduct drilling fluid from the motor fluid output means to a downwardly continuing drill string element; output shaft means situated in the body and extending from a second end of the body, the output shaft adapted at the extended extreme for attachment to a downwardly continuing drill string element; selector valve means situated in the body, operatively associated with drilling fluid channels in the body, responsive to drilling fluid flow to produce a first output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a first characteristic and to produce a second output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a second characteristic; and driveshaft connector means in the opening, operatively associated with the output shaft of the motor and the output shaft means to connect the two for sympathetic rotation.

Falgout, T.E.; Schoeffler, W.N.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Challenges with jointed-pipe underbalanced operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful underbalanced operations demand a systematic approach with integration of engineering, operations, production, reservoir, and geology. There are significant advantages to underbalanced drilling (UD). Formation damage can be minimized if proper circulating fluids and operating parameters are chosen; there is an opportunity for reservoir evaluation and characterization while drilling; lost circulation and differential sticking can be avoided, combined with improvements in drilling rate of penetration (ROP); and it also provides an alternative method of well control. This paper discusses engineering challenges and considerations for underbalanced operations using multiphase flow as well as advances made during UD with rotary jointed pipe. Excluding air, mist, and foam, underbalanced techniques with multiphase fluids are reviewed. Much of the discussion and concepts also apply to coiled-tubing underbalanced operations.

Saponja, J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A SMALL-ANGLE DRILL-HOLE WHIPSTOCK  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small angle whipstock is described for accurately correcting or deviating a drill hole by a very small angle. The whipstock is primarily utilized when drilling extremely accurate, line-of-slight test holes as required for diagnostic studies related to underground nuclear test shots. The invention is constructed of a length of cylindrical pipe or casing, with a whipstock seating spike extending from the lower end. A wedge-shaped segment is secured to the outer circumference of the upper end of the cylinder at a position diametrically opposite the circumferential position of the spike. Pin means are provided for affixing the whipstock to a directional drill bit and stem to alloy orienting and setting the whipstock properly in the drill hole. (AEC)

Nielsen, D.E.; Olsen, J.L.; Bennett, W.P.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Indonesian drilling maintains steady pace  

SciTech Connect

Offshore drilling activity in Indonesia increased nominally the first quarter of 1985 to an average 29 rigs. Barring any further problems with oil prices and markets, operators are expected to maintain essentially the current general level of appraisal/development work for the rest of this year. There are still a number of prospective regions to be explored in Southeast Asia. Regional developments are described for the South China Sea area, the Java Sea, South Sumatra, Kalimantan, Irian Jaya and the Malacca Strait.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Computers aid drilling planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that computers are rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the drilling engineer both in town and at the wellsite. Two factors have contributed to the sudden increase in their use. The first is the need to cut drilling costs. Engineers have been forced to take a more critical look at plans and past experience. The second is the falling price (and increased portability) of hardware and software. Several major operators have demonstrated that careful planning of drilling operations based on local knowledge and data from offset wells can reduce the drilling learning curve substantially. Computers make it possible to retrieve and process offset well data rapidly and efficiently. They also offer powerful mathematical models which describe complicated aspects of drilling.

Burgess, T.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Drill drive mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

Dressel, Michael O. (Englewood, CO)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Noble Drilling DRILLING, COMPLETION AND STIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friendly Drilling Systems" Environmental issues are a significant part of every energy industry endeavor challenges facing the energy industry but also the considerable resources of the University and industry Petroleum and other industry sponsors from the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI) to identify

99

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

100

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Switchable heat pipe assembly  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe assembly is formed into an H-shape or a Y-shape. The H-shaped configuration comprises two heat pipes, each having condenser and evaporator sections with wicking therein coupled by a tube with wick at their evaporator sections. The Y-shaped configuration utilizes a common evaporator section in place of the two evaporator sections of the H-shaped configuration. In both configurations, the connection between the vapor spaces of the two heat pipes equalizes vapor pressure within the heat pipes. Although both heat pipes have wicks, they have sufficient fluid only to saturate a single pipe. If heat is applied to the condenser section of one of the pipes, this heat pipe becomes inoperative since all the fluid is transferred to the second pipe which can operate with a lower thermal load.

Sun, T.H.; Basiulis, A.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Insulated pipe clamp design  

SciTech Connect

Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized.

Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Update on slimhole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.

Finger, J.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heat pipe fabrication  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe is disclosed which is fabricated with an artery arranged so that the warp and weave of the wire mesh are at about a 45/sup 0/ angle with respect to the axis of the heat pipe.

Leinoff, S.; Edelstein, F.; Combs, W.

1977-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Common Types of Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Reseamed and drifted pipe is similar to casing, but is manufactured and inspected in a manner that assures the well driller that the pipe string will have a predetermined minimum diameter sufficient to permit unrestricted passage of pumps or

108

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection - March 29, 2012 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection - March 29, 2012 March 29, 2012 Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection Criteria, Approach and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-52, Rev. 0) For the purpose of this criteria review and approach, this Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) includes piping and pipe supports and attachments of the pipe supports to structures (concrete, structural steel, or embed plates). Pipe supports include rigid restraints, welded attachments to piping, struts, snubbers, spring cans, and constant supports. Inspection of pipe whip restraints are also included in this CRAD. Selection of nuclear facility piping systems for inspection should be

109

VERY HIGH-SPEED DRILL STRING COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing of recent upgrades to the drill pipe telemetry system in a 1000-ft vertical well has shown that the new system can achieve at least 1,000 ft passive transmission distance with sufficient bandwidth to accommodate a digital transmission rate of 2 Mbit/sec. Digitized data from a module at the bottom of the well has been successfully transmitted through the transmission line to the top of the well for a period of approximately one month. Manufacture of 30 prototype range 2 drill pipes has demonstrated greater simplicity of manufacturing and greater consistency of electrical characteristics from part to part, as compared to the first production run previously reported. Further work is needed to improve the high pressure capability of the system and to improve the robustness of the system in a high-vibration environment.

David S. Pixton

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Addthis Project Level Medium Energy Savings $8-$12 annually Time to Complete 3 hours for a small house Overall Cost $10-$15 Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating your hot water pipes reduces heat loss and can raise water temperature 2°F-4°F hotter than uninsulated pipes can deliver, allowing for a lower water temperature setting. You also won't have to wait as long for hot water when you turn on a faucet or showerhead, which helps conserve water. Paying for someone to insulate your pipes-as a project on its own-may

111

Heat pipe dehumidification for supermarket energy savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the possibility of using a heat pipe installed in the air conditioning unit of a supermarket to increase the level of dehumidification of the inside air. This dehumidification is expected to reduce the ...

Oliver, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

114

Proper planning improves flow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced operations reduce formation damage, especially in horizontal wells where zones are exposed to mud for longer time periods. Benefits, risks, well control concerns, equipment and issues associated with these operations are addressed in this paper. Flow drilling raises many concerns, but little has been published on horizontal well control and flow drilling operations. This article covers planning considerations for flow drilling, but does not address horizontal ''overbalanced'' drilling because considerations and equipment are the same as in vertical overbalanced drilling and many references address that subject. The difference in well control between vertical and horizontal overbalanced drilling is fluid influx behavior and how that behavior affects kill operations.

Collins, G.J. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Mechanical drill string jar  

SciTech Connect

An improved mechanical drill string jar is described that allows uninhibited telescoping movement to the normal drilling condition. The drill string jar consists of: (a) an elongated, generally cylindrical, body usable as a drill string element; (b) axial motion resistance means situated in the annular opening; (c) bias means operatively associated with at least one element of the splined pair to rotate the pair out of alignment when the splined pair is rotationally disengaged; (d) opposed cooperating surfaces on at least two of the spline teeth situated such that forced axial relative motion of the splined pair will produce opposed radial forces on the teeth; (e) means intrinsic to at least one element of the splined pair to permit resisted radial displacement of the spline teeth when forced axial relative motion occurs, to permit one element to move axially through the other; (f) cam surfaces on at least one of the teeth situated to force rotational alignment of the splined pair when telescoping movement is from a jarring condition toward the normal drilling condition; (g) relative rotation resistance means situated in the annular opening, structurally engaged with the pair of telescoping members such that relative rotation therebetween will be resisted; (h) striker and anvil means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of elements, such that axial relative movement therebetween will be solidly stopped at the axial extreme condition; (i) a flow-through fluid channel means extending between the means to attach to the continuing drill string; and (j) seal means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of members, to provide fluid tightness therebetween.

Buck, D.A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Critique of Drilling Research  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years the Department of Energy has been funding research to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Generally that research has been effective and helped to make geothermal energy economically attractive to developers. With the increased competition for the electrical market, geothermal energy needs every advantage it can acquire to allow it to continue as a viable force in the marketplace. In drilling related research, there is essentially continuous dialogue between industry and the national laboratories. Therefore, the projects presented in the Program Review are focused on subjects that were previously recommended or approved by industry.

Hamblin, Jerry

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Deepwater drilling riser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal focus of this paper is to discuss and summarize, from the manufacturer's perspective, the primary milestones in the development of the marine riser system used to drill in record water depths off the U.S. east coast. This riser system is unique in that it used advanced designs, material technology, and quality control to enable safe operation in water depths beyond the capability of conventional drilling riser systems. Experience and research have led to design improvements that are now being incorporated in new riser systems that have the potential of expanding the frontiers to increasingly deeper water.

Chastain, T.; Stone, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the use of compressible drilling fluids is experiencing growth, the flow behavior and stability properties of drilling foams are more complicated than those of conventional fluids. In contrast with conventional mud, the physical properties of foam change along the wellbore. Foam physical and thermal properties are strongly affected by pressure and temperature. Many problems associated with field applications still exist, and a precise characterization of the rheological properties of these complex systems needs to be performed. The accurate determination of the foam properties in circulating wells helps to achieve better estimation of foam rheology and pressure. A computer code is developed to process the data and closely simulate the pressure during drilling a well. The model also offers a detailed discussion of many aspects of foam drilling operations and enables the user to generate many comparative graphs and tables. The effects of some important parameters such as: back-pressure, rate of penetration, cuttings concentration, cuttings size, and formation water influx on pressure, injection rate, and velocity are presented in tabular and graphical form. A discretized heat transfer model is formulated with an energy balance on a control volume in the flowing fluid. The finite difference model (FDM) is used to write the governing heat transfer equations in discretized form. A detailed discussion on the determination of heat transfer coefficients and the solution approach is presented. Additional research is required to analyze the foam heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity.

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dehumidifying Heat Pipes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dehumidifying Heat Pipes Dehumidifying Heat Pipes Dehumidifying Heat Pipes June 24, 2012 - 4:32pm Addthis In order to make a room comfortable in hot, humid climates, an air conditioner must lower the indoor humidity level as well as the air temperature. If an air conditioner fails to lower the humidity adequately, the air will be cool, but will feel uncomfortably damp. Inappropriately sized air conditioners are prone to this problem; large units quickly cool the air, but cycle off before they can properly dehumidify it. In extremely humid climates, even correctly sized air conditioning equipment could fail to maintain a home at a comfortable humidity level. One technology that addresses this problem is the dehumidifying heat pipe, a device that enables an air conditioner to dehumidify better and still

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, D.M.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

126

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

127

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heat pipe system  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe diode device for transferring heat from a heat source component to a heat sink wall is described. It contains a heat pipe body member attached to the best source; the heat source having a wall forming at least a portion of the normal evaporator section of the heat pipe diode; a working fluid within the body member; a cover for the heat pipe diode forming at least a portion of the heat sink wall; the cover forming the normal condenser for the heat pipe diode; a wick connected between the condenser and the evaporator of the heat pipe diode; means for retaining the wick adjacent the heat pipe wall; a wick support plate adjacent to the cover; the wick being attached to the support plate; means for holding the wick in contact with the cover; and means, responsive to excessive temperatures at the heat sink wall, for moving the support plate and a portion of the wick away from the cover to thereby substantially reduce heat flow in the reverse direction through said heat pipe diode device.

Kroebig, H.L.; Riha, F.J. III

1974-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat pipe development status  

SciTech Connect

Test heat pipes have been operated in the 1400 K to 1700 K range for periods in excess of 20,000 hours with the objective of understanding and controlling corrosion and failure mechanisms. The results of a post test analysis of one of these heat pipes that was operated for 25,216 hours at 1700 K are reviewed and the implications for heat pipe lifetime discussed. An in-process report of an investigation of transient heat pipe behavior is presented. This investigation is being conducted as a result of restart problems encountered during life test of a 2 m. radiation cooled heat pipe. The results of a series of shut-down tests from power and temperature are given and probable causes of the restart problem discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Extendable pipe crawler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

Hapstack, M.

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Extendable pipe crawler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radically outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm''-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figs.

Hapstack, M.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Great Plaines installs directionally drilled crossings in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on installing a five- line wide, one-line long products system for ARCO Pipe Line Co. (APLC) in a crowded utility right of way required Great Plains Pipeline Construction Co. to complete three directionally drilled crossings and over 50 conventional bored crossings in the Channelview, Texas area. The pipe line route closely parallels a 4-mi ROW section of Houston Power and Light Co. (HP and L) and about 4 mi of Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Due to overhead towers carrying high-voltage electric transmission lines, Great Plains bored under the existing towers in HP and L's easement to preserve the right of way for future tower expansion. Laney, Inc., subcontracted the conventional bores underneath towers and minor roads. Laney Directional Drilling Co. was the prime contractor for two horizontal directionally drilled crossings of the Houston Ship Channel and Carpenter's Bayou. Great Plains, with its own crew, completed three roadway crossings in high-traffic areas. Engineering and material procurement was handled by APLC.

Thiede, K.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) development for air drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When downhole contact between the BHA and formation was optimum, as it was during rotation, high signal levels were experienced. Survey data acquired at the connections, when the BHA was totally at rest, is excellent. GEC intends modifying the system to optimize operations consistent with these disparate factors. A Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) of 89.9 hours appears reasonable from the data. It is not possible to infer an MTBF figure from this test. It is quite obvious, however, that the system reliability performance has been significantly improved since FT {number_sign}5 was performed almost two years earlier. Based on the above results, GEC concludes that it is certainly feasible to attain 100 hours MTBF, for the Model 27, in any and all situations, and hence to provide a reliable MWD for air-drilling.

Harrison, W.A.; Rubin, L.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

Glowka, David A. (Austin, TX); Raymond, David W. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling… (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

Youngquist, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Pad drilling allows producers to target a significant area of underground resources while minimizing impact on the surface.

140

Drilling and general petroleum engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-nine papers are included in the Drilling and General Petroleum Engineering Volume of the SPE Annual Conference and Exhibition proceedings. The conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 25-28, 1994. The papers cover such topics as: extended reach well drilling, development of marginal satellite fields, slim hole drilling, pressure loss predictions, models for cuttings transport, ester-based drilling fluid systems, borehole stability, cementing, operations, bit failures, roller core bits, well tracking techniques, nitrogen drilling systems, plug failures, drill bit and drillstring dynamics, slim hole vibrations, reserve estimates, enhanced recovery methods, waste disposal, and engineering salary trends. A separate abstract and indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High speed drilling research advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that the Amoco Production Company's Tulsa Research Center is developing a High Speed Drilling System (HSDS) to improve drilling economics for both exploration and development wells. The system is targeted for areas where historically the drilling rate is less than 25 ft/hr over a large section of hole. Designed as a five-year development program, work began on the system in late 1984. A major service company is participating in the project. The objective of the HSDS project is to improve drilling efficiency by developing improvements in the basic mechanical drilling system. The HSDS approach to improved drilling economics is via the traditional routes of increasing penetration rate (ROP) and bit life, increasing hole stability and reducing trouble time.

Warren, T.M.; Canson, B.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Piping stress handbook. Second edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

Helguero, V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Drill string gas data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

Siciliano, E.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

An innovative drilling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal project objectives were the following: To demonstrate the capability of the Ultrashort Radius Radial System to drill and complete multiple horizontal radials in a heavy oil formation which had a production history of thermal operations. To study the effects that horizontal radials have on steam placement at specific elevations and on reducing gravity override. To demonstrate that horizontal radials could be utilized for cyclic production, i.e. for purposes of oil production as well as for steam injection. Each of these objectives was successfully achieved in the project. Early production results indicate that radials positively influenced cyclic performance. This report documents those results. 15 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Nees, J.; Dickinson, E.; Dickinson, W.; Dykstra, H.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

147

Managing pressure during underbalanced drilling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? AbstractUnderbalanced drilling has received more and more attention in recent years. The reason for that may be because many oil fields, especially on the… (more)

Rĺen, Jostein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Freezable heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA); Sanzi, James L. (Lancaster, PA)

1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Underbalanced drilling solves difficult drilling problems and enhances production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternate approach to drilling, completing and working over new and existing wells has dramatically improved the efficiency of these operations. This method is called underbalanced drilling (UBD). Improvements in both the equipment and technique during the past 5 years have made this process economical and necessary to solve many difficult drilling problems. Additionally, by reducing drilling or workover damage, dramatic improvements in oil and gas production rates and ultimate reserves are realized, resulting in extra profits for today`s operators. This article will detail the advantages of UBD and give specific examples of its applications, A series of related articles will follow, including: new UBD equipment, land and off-shore case histories, coiled tubing drilling, underbalanced workovers, software technology and subsea applications to examine the reality and future of this technology.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heat Pipe Integrated Microsystems  

SciTech Connect

The trend in commercial electronics packaging to deliver ever smaller component packaging has enabled the development of new highly integrated modules meeting the demands of the next generation nano satellites. At under ten kilograms, these nano satellites will require both a greater density electronics and a melding of satellite structure and function. Better techniques must be developed to remove the subsequent heat generated by the active components required to-meet future computing requirements. Integration of commercially available electronics must be achieved without the increased costs normally associated with current generation multi chip modules. In this paper we present a method of component integration that uses silicon heat pipe technology and advanced flexible laminate circuit board technology to achieve thermal control and satellite structure. The' electronics/heat pipe stack then becomes an integral component of the spacecraft structure. Thermal management on satellites has always been a problem. The shrinking size of electronics and voltage requirements and the accompanying reduction in power dissipation has helped the situation somewhat. Nevertheless, the demands for increased onboard processing power have resulted in an ever increasing power density within the satellite body. With the introduction of nano satellites, small satellites under ten kilograms and under 1000 cubic inches, the area available on which to place hot components for proper heat dissipation has dwindled dramatically. The resulting satellite has become nearly a solid mass of electronics with nowhere to dissipate heat to space. The silicon heat pipe is attached to an aluminum frame using a thermally conductive epoxy or solder preform. The frame serves three purposes. First, the aluminum frame provides a heat conduction path from the edge of the heat pipe to radiators on the surface of the satellite. Secondly, it serves as an attachment point for extended structures attached to the satellite such as solar panels, radiators, antenna and.telescopes (for communications or sensors). Finally, the packages make thermal contact to the surface of the silicon heat pipe through soft thermal pads. Electronic components can be placed on both sides of the flexible circuit interconnect. Silicon heat pipes have a number of advantages over heat pipe constructed from other materials. Silicon heat pipes offer the ability to put the heat pipe structure beneath the active components of a processed silicon wafer. This would be one way of efficiently cooling the heat generated by wafer scale integrated systems. Using this technique, all the functions of a satellite could be reduced to a few silicon wafers. The integration of the heat pipe and the electronics would further reduce the size and weight of the satellite.

Gass, K.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.; Tigges, C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Electric drill-string telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics ... Keywords: drill string, low frequency, simulation, transmission line, voltage

José M. Carcione; Flavio Poletto

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

155

Apparatus for screwing pipes together  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A power tongs for threadedly connecting together pipes which are to constitute casings for boreholes has a platform for a reciprocable slide which supports a power-driven threading clamp and a counter device. The clamp and the counter device are connected to each other by several level compensating hydraulic cylinders each of which is movable horizontally within limits relative to the slide against the opposition of resilient support elements. The upper end portions of the cylinders are connected to a holding plate for the clamp.

Reinholdt, B.; Bock, H. -Ch.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hydraulic Pulse Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE 0 4/13/2004 Final Report Author: J. Kolle Hunter/Theimer 4/13/2004 Document No.: TR- 053 HydroPulse(tm) Drilling Final Report Prepared by J.J. Kolle April 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Development Agreement No. DE-FC26-FT34367 Tempress Technologies, Inc. 18858 - 72 ND Ave S. Kent, WA 98032 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

157

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a section of drill-in casing connected to a free-fall reentry cone. This hole was drilled to 95

158

Feasibility study of a hybrid erosion drilling concept, PIFR-984. [ERODRILL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of a preliminary design for a hybrid ERODRILL system indicates that the system is practicable for both fabrication and operation in the field. The system as designed is compatible with standard 3-inch i.d., 4/sup 1///sub 2/-inch o.d. drilling pipe and rotary drill bits. Very little additional wellhead equipment will be required in field use. Dynamic loading on the downhole system with this concept is negligible; the upward thrust on the drill stem is only about 6,000 pounds per pulse while the downward force on the drill stem during drilling is 30,000 pounds. Both safety and reliability analyses have been performed which show the hybrid ERODRILL concept to be at least equivalently safe and reliable as standard drilling methods. Preliminary economic analysis shows that with current assumptions, ERODRILL is extremely attractive for offshore drilling operations, and possibly within competitive reach for deep (20,000 feet) land wells. The hybrid concept does not at first blush appear economical for shallow (10,000 feet) land wells. These conclusions are based upon assumptions about system performance, which, while they were based on the best available evidence, may be incorrect by as much as /sup +/- a factor of 2.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Margins for an in-plant piping system under dynamic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to verify that piping designed according to current practice does indeed have a large margin against failure and to quantify the excess capacity for piping and dynamic pipe supports on the basis of data obtained in a series of high-level seismic experiments (designated SHAM) on an in-plant piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Germany. 4 refs., 6 tabs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Establishing nuclear facility drill programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Drainhole drilling projects under way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that many operators are taking advantage of continued developments in drainhole drilling technology to increase productivity in certain fields. Previously untapped prospects are under renewed scrutiny to determine if drainhole and horizontal drilling can make them more attractive. Producing properties are being reevaluated as well. Drainhole drilling typically involves reentering an existing well and cutting through the casing to drill a relatively short length of horizontal wellbore. Although separating drainhole and horizonal or extended-reach drilling is somewhat of a gray area, one difference is that a drainhole well turns to the horizontal much quicker. The radius of turn to 90/sup 0/ can be as little as 30 to 50 ft. Additionally, the length of horizontal kick in a drainhole well is typically in the 300- to 500-ft range compared to 1000 ft or more in extended-reach drilling. A final separating characteristic is that drainhole drilling can be associated with several horizontal lengths of wellbore coming off a single vertical hole.

Burton, B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Lewis, G.W.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) exists in connate waters and, under the right conditions during oil drilling, can plate out on the interior surfaces of oil and gas industry equipment. Once deposited, this material is commonly referred to as ??scale.?? This thesis is concerned with the presence of 226Ra in scale deposited on the inner surfaces of oil drilling pipes and the internal dose consequences of inhalation of that scale once released. In the process of normal operation, barium sulfate scale with a radium component adheres to the inside of downhole tubulars in oil fields. When crude flow is diminished below acceptable operational requirements, the pipe is sent to a descaling operation to be cleaned, most likely by a method known as rattling. The rattling process generates dust. This research investigated the chemical composition of that aerosol and measured the solubility of pipe scale from three oilfield formations. Using standard in-vitro dissolution experimental equipment and methods, pipe scale is introduced into simulated lung fluid over a two-week period. These samples are analyzed using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS), known for very low detection limits. Analysis reveals virtually no 226Ra present in the lung fluid exposed to pipe scale. Sample measurements were compared against background measurements using Student??s t test, which revealed that nearly all the samples were statistically insignificant in comparison to the lung fluid blanks. This statistical test proves within a 95% confidence interval that there is no 226Ra present in the lung fluid samples. These results indicate that inhaled NORM pipe scale should be classified as Class S and serve to further confirm the extreme insolubility of petroleum pipe scale. For dose calculations, the S classification means that the lung is the main organ of concern. Radium-226 from petroleum pipe scale does not solubilize in the interstitial lung fluid, and does not, therefore, enter the bloodstream via respiratory pathways. Since there is no removal by dissolution, the 500 day biological half-life implied by the S classification is based solely on the mechanical transport of 226Ra out of the lungs by phagocytosis or the mucociliary escalator.

Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

168

Underbalanced drilling in remedial operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators are finding additional applications for underbalanced drilling (UBD) technology that deliver benefits besides faster, more trouble-free drilling and improved well productivity. Underbalanced workovers, completions and re-drills are being performed with impressive results. This article will describe some of the jobs and applications, and detail the special surface equipment being used to make this a success. This is the fifth in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development in this field. The paper discusses deep gas wells in the Texas Panhandle, gas and condensate wells near Mobile, Alabama, and the Austin Chalk wells in Texas and Louisiana.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

170

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

Piping inspection instrument carriage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, an instrument carriage for inspection of piping, comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including, an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360[degrees] about its axis.

Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Piping inspection instrument carriage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, an instrument carriage for inspection of piping, comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including, an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360{degrees} about its axis.

Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing Drilling Test  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Casing Drilling Test Casing Drilling Test Date: 5-17-201 1 DOE Code: 6730-020-72000 Contractor Code: 8067-806 Project Lead: Marl< Duletsky Project Overview 1, Brief project description ~nclude The existing 13-1-SX-23 location and entry road will be reworldrilling rig (SST anything that could impact the rig #3). The two existing wells on the location will be capped at ground level, and a new well will be drilled environment] using water based mud. The existing rat I mouse hole on the site will be backfilled. A new 6700 ft3 reserve pit [80' long by 30' wide by 4' deep allowing for 2' of freeboard] will be constructed on location. and a 12 mm 2. Legal location liner will be installed. 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used

174

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Details Activities (20) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: In 2005, Idaho National Laboratory was conducting a study of historical exploration practices and success rates for geothermal resources identification. Geo Hills Associates (GHA) was contracted to review and accumulate copies of published literature, Internet information, and unpublished geothermal exploration data to determine the level of exploration and drilling activities that occurred for all of the currently

175

Field application of lightweight, hollow-glass-sphere drilling fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new class of underbalanced drilling fluids being developed under US Dept. of Energy (US DOE) sponsorship was recently successfully field tested. The fluid uses hollow glass spheres (HGS`s) to decrease the fluid density to less than that of the base mud while maintaining incompressibility. Concentrations of up to 20 vol% were used to decrease the fluid density to 0.8 lbm/gal less than normally used in the field. Potential benefits of using these fluids include higher penetration rates, decreased formation damage, and lost-circulation mitigation. When used in place of aerated fluid, they can eliminate compressor usage and allow the use of mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling tools. These and other recent advances in technology have spurred interest in underbalanced drilling to the highest level in 30 years. Industry-wide surveys indicate that more than 12% of wells drilled in the US in 1997 will intentionally use underbalanced techniques.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Variable conductance heat pipe enhancement  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a heat pipe. It comprises a tubular hollow heat pipe having an evaporator end and an opposite condenser end, the heat pipe having a cross-sectional area and having a condenser length extending from the condenser end the condenser length including an active length where evaporated fluid condenses; an evaporatable and condensable fluid in the heat pipe for evaporating when receiving heat near the evaporation end and for condensing when giving up heat in the active length; a noncondensable gas near the condenser end and in the condenser length of the heat pipe; a restriction member fixed in the heat pipe near the condenser end, the restriction member extending only along a portion of the condenser length and being spaced away from the evaporation end of the heat pipe, the restriction member having a varied cross-sectional area along the length of the restriction member which is less than the cross-sectional area of the heat pipe for confining the gas and a portion of the fluid in the active condenser length, to an area around the restriction member and in the heat pipe; and a fixed ligament connected between the restriction member and the heat pipe for fixing the restriction member in the heat pipe, the ligament being fixed between the condenser end of the heat pipe end and an end of the restriction member which is closest to the condenser end.

Kneidel, K.E.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Infill drilling enhances waterflood recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of west Texas carbonate reservoir and waterflood data were studied to evaluate the impact of infill drilling on waterflood recovery. Results show that infill drilling enhanced the current and projected waterflood recovery from most of the reservoirs. The estimated ultimate and incremental infill-drilling waterflood recovery was correlated with well spacing and other reservoir and process parameters. Results of the correlation indicate that reducing well spacing from 40 to 20 acres (16 to 8 ha) per well would increase the oil recovery by 8 to 9% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Because of the limited data base and regressional nature of the correlation models, the infill-drilling recovery estimate must be used with caution.

Wu, C.H.; Jardon, M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Laughlin, B.A. (Union Pacific Research Co. (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Performance correlations for high temperature potassium heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Potassium heat pipes designed for operation at a nominal temperature of 775K have been developed for use in a heat pipe cooled reactor design. The heat pipes operate in a gravity assist mode with a maximum required power throughput of approximately 16 kW per heat pipe. Based on a series of sub-scale experiments with 2.12 and 3.2 cm diameter heat pipes the prototypic heat pipe diameter was set at 5.7 cm with a simple knurled wall wick used in the interests of mechanical simplicity. The performance levels required for this design had been demonstrated in prior work with gutter assisted wicks and emphasis in the present work was on the attainment of similar performance with a simplified wick structure. The wick structure used in the experiment consisted of a pattern of knurled grooves in the internal wall of the heat pipe. The knurl depth required for the planned heat pipe performance was determined by scaling of wick characteristic data from the sub-scale tests. These tests indicated that the maximum performance limits of the test heat pipes did not follow normal entrainment limit predictions for textured wall gravity assist heat pipes. Test data was therefore scaled to the prototype design based on the assumption that the performance was controlled by an entrainment parameter based on the liquid flow depth in the groove structure. This correlation provided a reasonable fit to the sub-scale test data and was used in scale up of the design from the 8.0 cm/sup 2/ cross section of the largest sub-scale heat pipe to the 25.5 cm/sup 2/ cross section prototype. Correlation of the model predictions with test data from the prototype is discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

182

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

183

PAO lubricant inhibits bit balling, speeds drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For drilling operations, a new polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant improves penetration rates by reducing bit balling tendencies in water-based mud. The additive also reduces drillstring drag. This enables the effective transmission of weight to the bit and thereby increases drilling efficiency in such applications as directional and horizontal drilling. The paper describes drilling advances, bit balling, laboratory testing, and test analysis.

Mensa-Wilmot, G. [GeoDiamond, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, R.L. [Garrett Fluid Technology, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Stokes, R.S. [Coastal Superior Solutions Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

Turner, William E. (Durham, CT); Perry, Carl A. (Middletown, CT); Wassell, Mark E. (Kingwood, TX); Barbely, Jason R. (Middletown, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Cobern, Martin E. (Cheshire, CT)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis - Nuclear Engineering Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Engineering Analysis Multimedia Bookmark and Share EA Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to the Engineering Analysis Department Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Quicktime video Quicktime Format - High Bandwidth | Size: 12 MB | Bit Rate:

190

Newberry Exploratory Slimhole: Drilling And Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5360' exploratory slimhole (3.895" diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia's program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling we performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well's data set includes: over 4000' of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for ...

John Finger Ronald; Ronald D. Jacobson; Charles E. Hickox

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pipe Insulation Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer program written in IBM basic to simplify the economic insulation thickness for an insulated pipe. Many articles have been written on this subject, from simple nomographs to a small book written in 1976 by the Federal Energy Administration, called "Economic Thickness for Industrial Insulation (ETI)." This paper is meant to fall somewhere between these extremes without sacrificing the accuracy necessary for economic considerations. Within this text, insulation is dealt with not as a material but as a method to slow heat transfer. To simplify the various mechanisms by which heat is transferred, the variable "thermal conductivity" is used. This is modeled for average insulation temperature. Another variable which has caused problems in the past is the ambient air film coefficient, or surface resistance. This program deals with this coefficient by making an initial assumption, then using an iterative process to refine the actual values before making the economic calculations. The program will use the input data to determine first of all the heat loss in BTU per hr/ft. of pipe. Using this result the lowest annual cost, therefore the most economical insulation thickness, is determined.

Schilling, R. E.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Niobium 1% zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium-1% Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life-test matrix has been developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity-assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an rf coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-03NT15401 Final Report Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling Submitted by: TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company 1935 Fremont Drive Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 February 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Feasibility of Ultra-High Speed Diamond Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15401 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

195

RECIPIENT:Potter Drilling Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potter Drilling Inc Potter Drilling Inc u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERG¥ EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DEIERl\IINATION PROJECr TITLE: Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Page 1 0[2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announ<:ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE·PS36-09G099016 OE· EE0002746 ~FO . 10 - [r,,~ G02746 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA ComplianC:f Offkrr (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

196

Assembly for directional drilling of boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a drilling assembly for directional drilling of boreholes in subsurface formations. The assembly comprising a downhole drilling motor. The motor having an output shaft which is suitable to drive a rotary drill bit and a motor housing which is suitable to be arranged at the lower end of a drill string; stabilizing means for stabilizing the assembly; means in the assembly for permanently tilting the central axis of the output shaft with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string in the borehole. It is characterized in that the stabilizing means include a lower-most stabilizer which is secured to and rotates with the output shaft.

Steiginga, A.; Worrall, R.N.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Environmental Measurement While Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of subsurface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. Real-time information on environmental conditions, drill bit location and temperature during drilling is valuable in many environmental restoration operations. This type of information can be used to provide field screening data and improved efficiency of site characterization activities. The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) System represents an innovative blending of new and existing technology in order to obtain real-time data during drilling. The system consists of two subsystems. The down-hole subsystem (at the drill bit) consists of sensors, a power supply, a signal conditioning and transmitter board, and a radio-frequency (RF) coaxial cable. The up-hole subsystem consists of a battery pack/coil, pickup coil, receiver, and personal computer. The system is compatible with fluid miser drill pipe, a directional drilling technique that uses minimal drilling fluids and generates little to no secondary waste. In EMWD, downhole sensors are located behind the drill bit and linked by a high-speed data transmission system to a computer at the surface. Sandia-developed Windows{trademark}-based software is used for data display and storage. As drilling is conducted, data is collected on the nature and extent of contamination, enabling on-the-spot decisions regarding drilling and sampling strategies. Initially, the downhole sensor consisted of a simple gamma radiation detector, a Geiger-Mueller tube (GMT). The design includes data assurance techniques to increase safety by reducing the probability of giving a safe indication when an unsafe condition exists. The EMWD system has been improved by the integration of a Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) in place of the GMT. The GRS consists of a sodium iodide-thallium activated crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The output of the PMT goes to a multichannel analyzer (MCA).The MCA data is transmitted to the surface via a signal conditioning and transmitter board similar to that used with the GMT. The EMWD system is described and the results of the GRS field tests and field demonstration are presented.

Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Williams, C.V.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

Eggington, W.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES'  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

6 1 6 1 7 1 1 SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES' Chi-Wen Lin Consultant, Martinez, CA George Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC Kamal Bandyopadhyay Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY ABSTRACT This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic- foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly

200

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Heat pipe thermal control of slender optics probes  

SciTech Connect

The thermal design for a stereographic viewing system is presented. The design incorporates an annular heat pipe and thermal isolation techniques. Test results are compared with design predictions for a prototype configuration. Test data obtained during heat pipe startup showing temperature gradients along the evaporator wall are presented. Correlations relating maximum wall temperature differences to a liquid Reynolds number were obtained at low power levels. These results are compared with Nusselt's Falling Film theory.

Prenger, F.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

203

Acoustic data transmission through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Underbalanced drilling: Praises and perils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling (UBD) has been used with increasing frequency to minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduce the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, particularly in openhole horizontal well applications. UBD, when properly designed and executed, minimizes or eliminates problems associated with the invasion of particulate matter into the formation as well as a multitude of other problems such as adverse clay reactions, phase trapping, precipitation, and emulsification, which can be caused by the invasion of incompatible mud filtrates in an overbalanced condition. In many UBD operations, additional benefits are seen because of a reduction in drilling time, greater rates of penetration, increased bit life, a rapid indication of productive reservoir zones, and the potential for dynamic flow testing while drilling. Potential downsides and damage mechanisms associated with UBD will be discussed. These include the following: (1) Increased cost and safety concerns; (2) Difficulty in maintaining a continuously underbalanced condition; (3) Spontaneous inhibition and countercurrent inhibition effects; (4) Glazing, mashing, and mechanically induced wellbore damage; (5) Macroporosity gravity-induced invasion; (6) Difficulty of application in zones of extreme pressure and permeability; and (7) Political/career risk associated with championing a new and potentially risky technology. The authors discuss reservoir parameters required to design an effective underbalanced or overbalanced drilling program, laboratory screening procedures to ascertain the effectiveness of UBD in a specific application and review the types of reservoirs that often present good applications for UBD technology.

Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.W. [Hycal Energy Research Labs., Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

208

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

209

Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

Hall; David R. (Provo, UT), Fox; Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

211

Potential impacts of artificial intelligence expert systems on geothermal well drilling costs:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal research Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as one of its goals to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by 25 percent. To attain this goal, DOE continuously evaluates new technologies to determine their potential in contributing to the Program. One such technology is artifical intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that, in recent years, has begun to impact the marketplace in a number of fields. Expert systems techniques can (and in some cases, already have) been applied to develop computer-based ''advisors'' to assist drilling personnel in areas such as designing mud systems, casing plans, and cement programs, optimizing drill bit selection and bottom hole asssembly (BHA) design, and alleviating lost circulation, stuck pipe, fishing, and cement problems. Intelligent machines with sensor and/or robotic directly linked to AI systems, have potential applications in areas of bit control, rig hydraulics, pipe handling, and pipe inspection. Using a well costing spreadsheet, the potential savings that could be attributed to each of these systems was calculated for three base cases: a dry steam well at The Geysers, a medium-depth Imerial Valley well, and a deep Imperial Valley well. Based on the average potential savings to be realized, expert systems for handling lost circulations problems and for BHA design are the most likely to produce significant results. Automated bit control and rig hydraulics also exhibit high potential savings, but these savings are extremely sensitive to the assumptions of improved drilling efficiency and the cost of these sytems at the rig. 50 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

Satrape, J.V.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Downhole replaceable drill bit: progress report and program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The significant progress in the development of the downhole replaceable drill bit which had been completed by the end of January 1976 is reviewed. A long-range program plan is included to indicate the level of effort required to bring this system to commercial production.

Newsom, M.M.; St. Clair, J.A.; Ashmore, R.F.; Dodd, H.M. Jr.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

214

Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler is described having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibility to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in ''inch worm'' fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting. 5 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal district piping - A primer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission and distribution piping constitutes approximately 40 -60% of the capital costs of typical geothermal district heating systems. Selections of economical piping suitable for the fluid chemistry is critical. Presently, most piping (56%) in geothermal systems is of asbestos cement construction. Some fiberglass (19%) and steel (19%) is also in use. Identification of an economical material to replace asbestos cement is important to future project development. By providing information on relative costs, purchase considerations, existing material performance and new products, this report seeks to provide a background of information to the potential pipe purchaser. A brief discussion of the use of uninsulated piping in geothermal district heating systems is also provided. 5 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Rafferty, K.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of radiant heat to electricity by a heat pipe-turbogenerator combination is described. The heat pipe-tubogenerator assembly is suitably externally insulated, as by a vacuum shield, to prevent heat losses and heat is recovered from the condenser portion of the heat pipe and returned to the evaporator portions. An application of the generic invention is discussed which it is employed on wall or roof portions of a building and serves as at least a partial supporting structure for these. In another application the solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator may be incorporated in or used with reflective means, such as reflective sheet material of large area positioned to direct solar radiation onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe. The reflective means may be changed in position to follow the sun to produce maximum power during operation.

Decker, B.J.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Functional capability of piping systems  

SciTech Connect

General Design Criterion I of Appendix A to Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations requires, in part, that structures, systems, and components important to safety be designed to withstand the effects of earthquakes without a loss of capability to perform their safety function. ne function of a piping system is to convey fluids from one location to another. The functional capability of a piping system might be lost if, for example, the cross-sectional flow area of the pipe were deformed to such an extent that the required flow through the pipe would be restricted. The objective of this report is to examine the present rules in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, and potential changes to these rules, to determine if they are adequate for ensuring the functional capability of safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants.

Terao, D.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Pressure vessel and piping codes  

SciTech Connect

Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code contains simplified design formulas for placing bounds on the plastic deformations in nuclear power plant piping systems. For Class 1 piping a simple equation is given in terms of primary load stress indices (B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/) and nominal pressure and bending stresses. The B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/ stress indices reflect the capacities of various piping products to carry load without gross plastic deformation. In this paper, the significance of the indices, nominal stresses, and limits given in the Code for Class 1 piping and corresponding requirements for Class 2 and Class 3 piping are discussed. Motivation behind recent (1978-1981) changes in the indices and in the associated stress limits is presented.

Moore, S.E.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Heat pipe technology quarterly literature review. Volume 1, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 110 citations is presented. The citations are arranged in five sections on general information on heat pipes, heat pipe applications, heat pipe theory, heat pipe design, development, and fabrication, and heat pipe testing and operation.

Srinivasan, R.; Gonzales, R.W. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

An investigation of corrosion in liquid-metal heat pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is underway to develop a 75-kW heat pipe to transfer solar energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. The high flux levels and high total power level encountered in this application have made it necessary to use a high-performance wick structure with fibers on the order of 4 to 8 microns in diameter. This fine wick structure is highly susceptible to corrosion damage and plugging, as dissolved contaminants plate out on the evaporator surface. Normal operation of the heat pipe also tends to concentrate contaminants in localized areas of the evaporator surface where heat fluxes are the highest. Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a systematic study to identify procedures that reduce corrosion and contamination problems in liquid-metal heat pipes. A series of heat pipes are being tested to explore different options for cleaning heat-pipe systems. Models are being developed to help understand the overall importance of operating parameters on the life of heat-pipe systems. In this paper, the authors present their efforts to reduce corrosion damage.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Andraka, C.E.; Showalter, S.K.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Cordiero, P.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

225

High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Downhole mud properties complicate drilling hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains that wellsite parameters such as penetration rate, hole cleaning, hole erosion and overall wellbore stability are directly related to the hydraulic conditions occurring while drilling. Drilling hydraulics, in turn, are largely a function of the drilling mud's properties, primarily viscosity and density. Accurate pressure loss calculations are necessary to maximize bit horse-power and penetration rates. Also, annular pressure loss measurements are important to record equivalent circulating densities, particularly when drilling near balanced formation pressures or when approaching formation fracture pressures. Determination of the laminar, transitional or turbulent flow regimes will help ensure the mud will remove drill cuttings from the wellbore and minimize hole erosion.

Leyendecker, E.A.; Bruton, J.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Innovative techniques cut costs in wetlands drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an approach to drilling oil and gas wells in sensitive wetlands areas contributed to a savings of over $1.2 million on a three-well, $3 million drilling project in south Louisiana. ARCO Oil and Gas Co. drilled a three-well project in the Bayou Sale field with a truck-mounted workover rig and a modified solids-control system. This smaller equipment eliminated the need to build a large location in the marsh. Traditional drilling techniques require a large drillsite to accommodate all the equipment of a modern drilling complex. However, recently imposed environmental regulations substantially limit, and in some cases prohibit, the use of these conventional techniques for drilling wells in wetlands areas. Based on the potentially huge economic and operational impact on the drilling industry because of these stricter regulations, alternatives to these traditional practices are essential.

Navarro, A.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Lafayette, LA (US))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Underbalanced drilling with air offers many pluses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure overbalance during conventional drilling can cause significant fluid filtrate invasion and lost circulation. Fluid invasion into the formation can lead to formation damage, high mud costs, a need for expensive completions, and well productivity impairment. Because underbalanced drilling creates a natural tendency for fluid and gas to flow from the formation to the borehole, successful underbalanced drilling depends upon the appropriate selection of circulating fluid. The use of a compressible fluid in the circulating system, referred to as air drilling, lowers the downhole pressure, allowing drilling into and beyond these sensitive formations. The paper discusses the equipment needed; well control; downhole air requirements; air drilling techniques using dry air, air-mist, stable foam, stiff foam, and aerated-fluid; downhole fires; directional air drilling; and well completions.

Shale, L. [Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

Taguchi, Takeyoshi [X-ray Research Laboratory, RIGAKU Corporation, 3-9-12 Matsubara-cho, Akishima-shi, Tokyo 196-8666 (Japan); Yoshii, Mitsuru [Mud Technical Center, Telnite Co., Ltd., 1-2-14 Ohama, Sakata-shi, Yamagata 998-0064 (Japan); Shinoda, Kohzo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

230

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

231

Filter for a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filter for a drill string comprises a perforated receptacle having an open end and a perforated end and first and second mounting surfaces are adjacent the open end. A transmission element is disposed within each of the first and second mounting surfaces. A capacitor may modify electrical characteristics of an LC circuit that comprises the transmission elements. The respective transmission elements are in communication with each other and with a transmission network integrated into the drill string. The transmission elements may be inductive couplers, direct electrical contacts, or optical couplers. In some embodiments of the present invention, the filter comprises an electronic component. The electronic component may be selected from the group consisting of a sensor, a router, a power source, a clock source, a repeater, and an amplifier.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); McPherson, James (Sandy, UT)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Micro-Columnated Loop Heat Pipe: The Future of Electronic Substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loop Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of operation of a heat pipe [13]. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology.

Smith, J. (George E. Failing Co., Enid, OK (US)); Edwards, B. (Sierra Drilling Co., Calgary (CA))

1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heat pipe transient response approximation.  

SciTech Connect

A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

Reid, R. S. (Robert Stowers)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Light pipe - design for efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high cost and availability of materials which are clear enough to transmit light without absorption has limited the idea of piping large-scale quantities of light. The light pipe uses the principle of Total Internal Reflection, with the light guided by very accurate prisms. The transmission of light directed into the end of a Light Pipe at an angle of less than 27.6 degrees is theoretically 100% efficient. The author describes its uses and advantages for lighting offices, cold storage areas, difficult access and hazardous areas, and for solar lighting. Future directions will be to improve the economics and accuracy of the technology. 4 references, 2 figures.

Hockey, S.N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Leachate storage transport tanker loadout piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report shows the modifications to the W-025 Trench No. 31 leachate loadout discharge piping, and also the steps involved in installing the discharge piping, including dimensions and welding information. The installation of the discharge pipe should be done in accordance to current pipe installation standards. Trench No. 31 is a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility.

Whitlock, R.W.

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Seismic design evaluation guidelines for buried piping for the DOE HLW Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic-foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly in contact with the soil or contained in a jacket. A standard analysis procedure is described along with the discussion of factors deemed to be significant for the design of the underground piping. The following key considerations are addressed: the design feature and safety requirements for the inner (core) pipe and the outer pipe; the effect of soil strain and wave passage; assimilation of the necessary seismic and soil data; inertial response calculation for the inner pipe; determination of support anchor movement loads; combination of design loads; and code comparison. Specifications and justifications of the key parameters used, stress components to be calculated and the allowable stress and strain limits for code evaluation are presented.

Lin, Chi-Wen [Consultant, Martinez, CA (United States); Antaki, G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bush, S.H. [Review & Synthesis Association, Richland, WA (United States); Costantino, C. [City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kennedy, R. [RPK Structural Mechanics, Yorba Linda, CA (United States). Consultant

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Underbalanced drilling guidelines improve safety, efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In underbalanced drilling, the primary means of well control, the hydrostatic head of the drilling fluid, is lost either unavoidably because of hole problems (such as abnormally high pressure or lost circulation) or intentionally because of economics or to prevent formation damage. Because of complications with underbalanced drilling, however, several rigs have been destroyed by fire. Operational guidelines are being developed in close cooperation with industry. The final guidelines will be consistent with the existing standards of well control practices in Alberta, yet applicable for underbalanced drilling operations world-wide. Until formal guidelines are completed in Alberta, operators interested in underbalanced drilling should work closely with the Energy Resources Conservation Board in preparing site-specific programs. Although underbalanced drilling is often associated with horizontal wells, the majority of underbalanced drilling operations in Alberta are conducted on vertical wells. The paper describes underbalanced drilling, blowout prevention, surface BOP equipment (stripper, annular pack off, rotating head, rotating BOP, coiled tubing), subsurface BOP, drilling fluids, nitrified drilling fluids, surface equipment, well-site supervision, well control equipment, and the surface handling of fluids.

Eresman, D. (Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal laminarization of a stratified pipe flow  

SciTech Connect

The present work constitutes a new program that grew out of a scoping assessment by ANL to determine the propensity for pipe stratification to occur in the reactor outlet nozzles and hot-leg piping of a generic LMFBR during events producing reverse pipe flow. This paper focuses on the role that thermal buoyancy plays relative to being able to laminarize a turbulent stratified shear zone in a horizontal pipe. The preceeding can influence the behavior of a pipe stratified-backflow-recirculation zone (cold plenum water down into the hot pipe flow) which developes as the result of a temperature difference between the pipe flow and the plenum.

Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Compilation of EPRI High Energy Piping Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for highenergy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utilitys inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, many major failures of fossil highenergy piping have been associated with flowaccelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seamwelded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these welldocumented failures, most utilities experience failures of supp...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

Howden, G.F.

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

Shirey, R.A.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat pipe exchangers, an industrial case history is presented. The case history involves a retrofit project which added heat pipes to five natural draft process heaters with a combined heat duty of 150 M Btu/hr. A heat recovery of 15 M Btu/hr has resulted from the flue gas/combustion air interchange. The paper will include design considerations, and operating and maintenance history since early 1980. A second application for heat pipes with a 12 M Btu/hr duty installed in 1983 will also be discussed.

Murray, F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

Shirey, Ray A. (North Grafton, MA)

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reservoir screening criteria for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly designed and executed underbalanced drilling operations can eliminate or significantly reduce formation damage, mud or drill solids invasion, lost circulation, fluid entrainment and trapping effects, and potential adverse reactions of drilling fluids with the reservoir matrix or in-situ reservoir fluids. The key to selecting appropriate reservoir candidates is achieving a balance of technical, safety and economic factors. Not every reservoir is an ideal candidate for an underbalanced drilling operation and in some cases distinct disadvantages may exist in trying to execute an underbalanced drilling operation in comparison to a simpler more conventional overbalanced application. Extensive field experience has played an important role in determining the following key criteria and design considerations that should be examined when evaluating a well. Screening criteria are also provided to help operators ascertain if a given formation is, in fact, a viable underbalanced drilling candidate.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pipe weld crown removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Piping inspection round robin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

255

Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

SciTech Connect

During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alloy Development for Measurement While Drilling Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, For oil and gas drilling applications, one of the giant technical ... of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in Synthetic Seawater and Hydraulic Fluids.

258

Quantifying Edge Defects in Drilled FRP Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling of Aramid and Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites”,the Exit Defects in Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Plateswith a High Modulus CFRP (Carbon- Fiber Reinforced Polymer)

Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David; Dharan, C. K. Hari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes

Z. Xu; C. B. Reed; G. Konercki; R. A. Parker; B. C. Gahan; S. Batarseh; R. M. Graves; H. Figueroa; N. Skinner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Data Series: Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Strong growth projected for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of underbalanced drilling technology should grow steadily during the next decade. The projected growth is primarily driven by increased concern about formation damage, the potential for higher penetration rates, and the ability to reduce lost circulation in depleted reservoirs. The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center manages a portfolio of drilling-related research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) projects designed to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. The Department of Energy sponsored Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) to develop a user-friendly foam drilling model that can accurately predict pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocities, foam quality, and other foam drilling variables. A second objective of the project was to develop a light-weight drilling fluid that would allow underbalanced drilling in low-pressure reservoirs without the limitations commonly associated with existing light-weight fluids. Maurer performed a study to gauge the potential for light-weight drilling fluids and the extent of underbalanced drilling activity in the US. Data from many industry sources, including recent publications on the potential for air drilling, were evaluated and incorporated into this study. This paper discusses the findings from this survey.

Duda, J.R. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Medley, G.H. Jr.; Deskins, W.G. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

263

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 °F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Lab’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Slim-hole Measurement While Drilling (MWD) system for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to make commercially available, wireless Measurement-while-drilling tools to reliably operate in air, air-mist, air-foam, and other unbalanced drilling environments during oil and gas directional drilling operations in conjunction with down-hole motors or other assemblies. Progress is described.

Harrison, W.H.; Harrison, J.D.; Rubin, L.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Petrologic studies of drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep geologic site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. This report characterizes tuff retrieved in core from two drill holes, USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, at the Yucca Mountain block. The USW-G2 drill core is from the northernmost extent of the block, whereas UE25b-1H is adjacent to an earlier drill hole, UE25a-1. The drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H bottomed at 6000 and 4200 ft, respectively. Petrographic and x-ray diffraction studies of the two drill cores are presented in this report and indicate that tuffs (composed primarily of variably welded ash flows) are partially recrystallized to secondary minerals. Correlations of stratigraphy are also made with previous drill cores from Yucca Mountain.

Caporuscio, F.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Arney, B.; Heiken, G.; Byers, F.; Gooley, R.; Semarge, E.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Proceedings of IADC Middle East Drilling Conference, Dubai, November 1998. 1 IADC Middle East Drilling Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

campaign against stuck pipes involving handbooks, short courses involving field engineers, emphasising Abstract Stuck pipe seems to be an unavoidable problem. Based on historical data every third well will experience stuck pipe, and various estimates indicates that associated costs exceeds 250 mill $ per year

Aamodt, Agnar

268

Methods for Cleaning and Evaluating Pipe-Type Cable Pipes for Retrofit with Extruded Dielectric Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes studies of pipe cleaning, "pigging," inspecting, and testing pipe-type cable pipes for re-conditioning as conduits compatible with extruded dielectric cables.

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and side tracking applications. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report has been prepared in two parts and each part may be treated as a stand-alone document. Part 1 (High Energy Laser Drilling) includes the general description of the concept and focuses on results from experiments under the ambient lab conditions. Part 2 (High Energy Laser Perforation and Completion Techniques) discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser compares with other lasers used in past experimental work, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. Variables investigated include laser power, beam intensity, external purging of cut materials, sample orientation, beam duration, beam shape, and beam frequency. The investigation also studied the thermal effects on the two sample rock types and their methods of destruction: spallation for sandstone, and thermal dissociation for limestone. Optimal operating conditions were identified for each rock type and condition. As a result of this experimental work, the HPFL has demonstrated a better capability of cutting and drilling limestone and sandstone when compared with other military and industrial lasers previously tested. Consideration should be given to the HPFL as the leading candidate for near term remote high power laser applications for well construction and completion.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Impact of Drill and Blast Excavation on Repository Performance Confirmation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable work accomplished internationally examining the effects of drill and blast excavation on rock masses surrounding emplacement openings of proposed nuclear waste repositories. However, there has been limited discussion tying the previous work to performance confirmation models such as those proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This paper addresses a possible approach to joining the available information on drill and blast excavation and performance confirmation. The method for coupling rock damage data from drill and blast models to performance assessment models for fracture flow requires a correlation representing the functional relationship between the peak particle velocity (PPV) vibration levels and the potential properties that govern water flow rates in the host rock. Fracture aperture and frequency are the rock properties which may be most influenced by drill and blast induced vibration. If it can be shown (using an appropriate blasting model simulation) that the effect of blasting is far removed from the waste package in an emplacement drift, then disturbance to the host rock induced in the process of drill and blast excavation may be reasonably ignored in performance assessment calculations. This paper proposes that the CANMET (Canada Center for Mineral and Energy Technology) Criterion, based on properties that determine rock strength, may be used to define a minimum PPV. This PPV can be used to delineate the extent of blast induced damage. Initial applications have demonstrated that blasting models can successfully be coupled with this criterion to predict blast damage surrounding underground openings. The Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain has used a blasting model to generate meaningful estimates of near-field vibration levels and damage envelopes correlating to data collected from pre-existing studies conducted. Further work is underway to expand this application over a statistical distribution of geologic parameters, encompassing all the rock types that will be encountered for the proposed repository site at Yucca Mountain. This paper suggests that, based on predicted and verified vibration levels from blasting a distance equal to four standard deviations is unlikely to affect properties that govern water flow in the host rock. The authors propose this predicted distance and verification of vibration levels may be applied to the excavation of repository subsurface openings that may be most efficiently excavated by drill and blast methods with a reasonable assurance of safety.

R. Keller; N. Francis; J. Houseworth; N. Kramer

2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Heat pipe device and heat pipe fabricating process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy saving liquid to liquid heat exchanger for a dishwasher or like device discharging hot waste water comprising a hot water tank for holding the waste water from the dishwasher and having inlet and outlet pipes, a cold water tank for holding the fresh water going to a water heater and having inlet and outlet pipes, the cold water tank disposed on top of the hot water tank, a bundle of heat pipes containing low boiling refrigerant disposed inside of the two tanks so as to extract heat from the hot water tank and give it up to the cold water tank, whereby the temperature of the fresh water leaving the heat exchanger is higher than its entering temperature.

Busch, C.H.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, J.A.; Prenger, F.C. Jr.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe of pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, Jr., F. Coyne (Madison, WI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pipe crawler with extendable legs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing. between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair laying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

Zollinger, W.T.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Multi-gradient drilling method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-gradient system for drilling a well bore from a surface location into a seabed includes an injector for injecting buoyant substantially incompressible articles into a column of drilling fluid associated with the well bore. Preferably, the substantially incompressible articles comprises hollow substantially spherical bodies.

Maurer, William C. (Houston, TX); Medley, Jr., George H. (Spring, TX); McDonald, William J. (Houston, TX)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electro jet drilling using hybrid NNGA approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a hybrid neural network and genetic algorithm (NNGA) approach for the multi-response optimization of the electro jet drilling (EJD) process. The approach first uses a neural network model to predict the response parameters of the ... Keywords: Electro jet drilling, Electrochemical machining, Genetic algorithm, Multi-response, Neural network, Optimization

Mohan Sen; H. S. Shan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 153 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international of the National Science Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M

280

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 138 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Scientific drilling technologies for hostile environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews the current United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program for Thermal Regimes and the related technologies being developed for geothermal drilling. Plans for penetrating into a molten magma body at temperatures from 800 to 1000{degree}C are also reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Interpretation of drill cuttings from geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems in interpreting drill cuttings, as opposed to drill cores, and methods to solve these problems are outlined. The following are covered: identification of lithology; recognition of faults and fractures; interpretation of hydrothermal alteration; geochemistry; sample collection; sample preparple examination; and sample storage. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.; Sibbett, B.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Containment canister for capturing hazardous waste debris during piping modifications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a containment canister for capturing hazardous waste debris during modifications to gloveboxes, or other radiological or biochemical hoods (generally termed gloveboxes therein), that require drilling and welding operations. Examples of such modifications include penetrations for pipe, thermowells, etc. In particular, the present invention relates to an improved containment canister that eliminates the need for costly containment huts and additional man power while at the same time reducing the risk of radiation exposure or other biohazard exposure to workers during glovebox modifications. The present invention also provides an improved hole saw which enables a driller to remove metal shavings and replace the hole saw if there is tooth wear present on the hole saw prior to actually penetrating a glovebox during modifications.

Dozier, Stanley B.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drilling Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Name Alpine Geothermal Drilling Address PO Box 141 Place Kittredge, Colorado Zip 80457 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal drilling solutions, subsidiary of Rocky Mountain GeoExploration Inc Website http://www.alpinegeothermal.co Coordinates 39.64888°, -105.2984842° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.64888,"lon":-105.2984842,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

287

Definition: Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploration Drilling Exploratory drilling is the Initial phase of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal Exploration is the exploration of the subsurface in search of viable active geothermal regions with the goal of building a geothermal power plant, where hot fluids drive turbines to create electricity. Exploration methods include a broad range of disciplines including geology, geophysics, geochemistry and engineering. Geothermal regions with adequate heat flow to fuel power plants are found in rift zones, subduction zones and mantle plumes. Hot spots are characterized by four geothermal elements. An active region will have: Heat Source - Shallow

288

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogen permeation resistant heat pipe for bi-modal reactors. Final report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of this program was to demonstrate technology that will make a sodium heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation for a bimodal space reactor application. Special focus was placed on techniques which enhance the permeation of hydrogen out of the heat pipe. Specific objectives include: define the detailed requirements for the bimodal reactor application; design and fabricate a prototype heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation; and test the prototype heat pipe and demonstrate that hydrogen which permeates into the heat pipe is removed or reduced to acceptable levels. The results of the program were fully successful. Analyses were performed on two different heat pipe designs and an experimental heat pipe was fabricated and tested. A model of the experimental heat pipe was developed to predict the enhancement in the hydrogen permeation rate out of the heat pipe. A significant improvement in the rate at which hydrogen permeates out of a heat pipe was predicted for the use of the special condenser geometry developed here. Agreement between the model and the experimental results was qualitatively good. Inclusion of the additional effects of fluid flow in the heat pipe are recommended for future work.

North, M.T.; Anderson, W.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optimization of Mud Hammer Drilling Performance--A Program to Benchmark the Viability of Advanced Mud Hammer Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators continue to look for ways to improve hard rock drilling performance through emerging technologies. A consortium of Department of Energy, operator and industry participants put together an effort to test and optimize mud driven fluid hammers as one emerging technology that has shown promise to increase penetration rates in hard rock. The thrust of this program has been to test and record the performance of fluid hammers in full scale test conditions including, hard formations at simulated depth, high density/high solids drilling muds, and realistic fluid power levels. This paper details the testing and results of testing two 7 3/4 inch diameter mud hammers with 8 1/2 inch hammer bits. A Novatek MHN5 and an SDS Digger FH185 mud hammer were tested with several bit types, with performance being compared to a conventional (IADC Code 537) tricone bit. These tools functionally operated in all of the simulated downhole environments. The performance was in the range of the baseline ticone or better at lower borehole pressures, but at higher borehole pressures the performance was in the lower range or below that of the baseline tricone bit. A new drilling mode was observed, while operating the MHN5 mud hammer. This mode was noticed as the weight on bit (WOB) was in transition from low to high applied load. During this new ''transition drilling mode'', performance was substantially improved and in some cases outperformed the tricone bit. Improvements were noted for the SDS tool while drilling with a more aggressive bit design. Future work includes the optimization of these or the next generation tools for operating in higher density and higher borehole pressure conditions and improving bit design and technology based on the knowledge gained from this test program.

Arnis Judzis

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Heat pipe thermal control of irradiation capsules  

SciTech Connect

From 1st international heat pipe conference; Stuttgart, F.R. Germany (15 Oct 1973). The use of heat pipes to control the temperature of irradiation capsules containing fast breeder reactor structural materials is discussed. (TFD)

Deverall, J.E.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Flat heat pipe design, construction, and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper details the design, construction and partial analysis of a low temperature flat heat pipe in order to determine the feasibility of implementing flat heat pipes into thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems.

Voegler, G.; Boughey, B.; Cerza, M.; Lindler, K.W.

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a computer program that calculates the crack-opening area, the critical (stable) crack length and the two-phase flow rate through cracks in ductile stainless steel pipes and steam generator tubes. The program is useful in performing leak-before-break calculations in order to demonstrate detectable leak rates prior to a through-wall flaw reaching critical size. Necessary input to the code includes a definition of material properties, loads, thermal-hydraulic conditions, pipe geometry, and crack orientation. User information is provided in the report.

Norris, D.; Okamoto, A.; Chexal, B.; Griesbach, T.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heat pipe effects in nuclear waste isolation: a review  

SciTech Connect

The existence of fractures favors heat pipe development in a geologic repository as does a partially saturated medium. A number of geologic media are being considered as potential repository sites. Tuff is partially saturated and fractured, basalt and granite are saturated and fractured, salt is unfractured and saturated. Thus the most likely conditions for heat pipe formation occur in tuff while the least likely occur in salt. The relative permeability and capillary pressure dependences on saturation are of critical importance for predicting thermohydraulic behavior around a repository. Mineral redistribution in heat pipe systems near high-level waste packages emplaced in partially saturated formations may significantly affect fluid flow and heat transfer processes, and the chemical environment of the packages. We believe that a combined laboratory, field, and theoretical effort will be needed to identify the relevant physical and chemical processes, and the specific parameters applicable to a particular site. 25 refs., 1 fig.

Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Records This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas...

297

State-of-the-art of drilling thrusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several different concepts for applying force or thrust to drill bits are identified. Recommendations for further studies of drilling thrusters are made.

Dareing, D.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Eligibility...

299

Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail September 22, 2010...

300

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand Citation SonicSampDrill. Geotechnical...

302

Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial...

303

NETL: News Release - DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2002 DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling System Into Lightning Fast Computer Network Energy Department Cites Remarkable Advance In 'Smart' Oil, Gas Drilling SAN ANTONIO,...

304

Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than that of slim holes. As a result, the research team decided to complete the project, document the tested designs and seek further support for the concept outside of the DOE.

Kent Perry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geographic Resource Map of Frozen Pipe Probabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slide details a resource map showing the probability of frozen pipes in the geographic United States.

306

Guide for Piping Stress Analysis and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives recommendations for piping analysis methods and integration with inspection and operating data to give estimates of risk and remaining life. The scope of the document is as follows: Objectives of piping assessment Selected literature review of assessment practices for piping and other relevant components Failure modes Inspection and operating data Piping analysis: methods and data Risk assessment Integration of analysis, inspection, and operating data for assessments and recommendations...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geology of the USW SD-7 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-1474 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed September 1996 Geology of the USW SD-7 Drill Hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Abstract The USW SD-7 drill hole is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the Systematic Drilling Program, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Yucca Mountain site has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-7 drill hole is located near the southern end of the potential repository area and immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The hole is not far from the junction of the Main Test Level drift and the proposed South Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-7...

Rautman And Engstrom; C. A. Rautman; D. A. Engstrom; Christopher A. Rautman; Dale A. Engstrom

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)

Norman, R.M. Sr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Structural Assessment of Small Bore Feeder Piping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frasheri MIE491 - Capstone Team 9 March 2012 Client: W. Reinhardt Industry Partner: Candu Energy Inc. Supervisor: A. N. Sinclair CASE ONE CANDU REACTORS HAVE 380+ SMALL BORE FEEDER PIPES. THE PIPES PIPES AND VALIDATE COMPUTATIONAL METHODS COMPARED TO FULL SCALE TESTS TO FAILURE. THE CLIENT CANDU

311

Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective of this project is to develop a user-friendly, PC, foam drilling computer model, FOAM, which will accurately predict frictional pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocity, foam quality, and other drilling variables. The model will allow operating and service companies to accurately predict pressures and flow rates required at the surface and downhole to efficiently drill oil and gas wells with foam systems. The second objective of this project is to develop a lightweight drilling fluid that utilizes hollow glass spheres to reduce the density of the fluid and allow drilling underbalanced in low-pressure reservoirs. Since the resulting fluid will be incompressible, hydraulics calculations are greatly simplified, and expensive air compressors and booster pumps are eliminated. This lightweight fluid will also eliminate corrosion and downhole fire problems encountered with aerated fluids. Many tight-gas reservoirs in the US are attractive targets for underbalanced drilling because they are located in hard-rock country where tight, low-permeability formations compound the effect of formation damage encountered with conventional drilling fluids.

Maurer, W.; Medley, G. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Drilling operations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Operations Office (NV) is responsible for supporting the nuclear test programs of the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. This support includes the drilling of test holes for nuclear device testing a the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of Energy's management of test hole inventories at the NTS. Our audit disclosed that NV accumulated a large inventory of unused test holes and approved drilling additional holes for which neither laboratory (Los Alamos nor Livermore) had identified a need. The overdrilling of test holes occurred because NV did not comply with good inventory practices that would have had NV's approving official question the need for, and the timing of, the laboratories' drilling requests. Instead, NV gave perfunctory approval to the laboratories' work orders for drilling test holes, and emphasized keeping two drill rig crews busy and satisfying the laboratories' demands for dedicated drilling personnel. Although NV did not agree that overdrilling had occurred, it has cut back its drilling activities and estimated that this will save abut $7.6 million annually. NV agreed with the recommendations in the report and has taken corrective actions.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Page 5-22- Water Heating Requirements – Glossary/Reference Figure 5-2 – Point of Use Distribution System Pipe Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit is available for insulation of hot water pipes in addition to insulation required by the mandatory requirements. For systems serving a single dwelling unit, this credit applies only to non-circulating systems. For systems serving multiple dwelling units, there is a pipe insulation credit for recirculating piping external to dwelling units if pipes are insulated to a higher R-value than the mandatory minimum. Installation Criteria (Single Dwelling Unit): Insulation must meet the level required in the mandatory requirements. Note that pipes buried under ceiling insulation can meet the mandatory requirements. Note: Heat tape – electric resistance heating tape wrapped around hot water pipes – may be used only for freeze protection and cannot be used instead of mandatory pipe insulation (see Section §150(j)) or pipe insulation receiving

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Analysis of Cracked Pipe Weldments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI estimation formulas for predicting loads necessary for crack initiation and instability can facilitate leak-before-break analysis of cracked nuclear piping. Finite-element calculations carried out in this study verified the accuracy of these formulas for analyzing through-the-wall cracks in bimetallic weldments.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

To drill or not to drill: a synthesis of experts' judgments  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum exploration is a costly venture that always involves much uncertainty and many unknown factors. A decision to drill could result in a giant discovery, a modest discovery, or a dry hole. Using experts' judgments and the available information on a geologic formation, the authors estimate the volume of recoverable oil in a given reservoir by a method called the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). AHP is a mathematically based modeling tool that allows an analyst to derive priorities for a set of alternatives by simple pairwise comparisons. The setting of priorities involves the solution of an eigenvalue problem in the inverse matrix of pairwise comparisons. The factors are grouped on different levels, forming a chain or hierarchy, whereby the lower level elements can be compared in pairwise matrices with respect to the next level. A process of weighting yields the overall priorities for any level, but in particular for those in the lowest level. The factors affecting the decision are assigned numerical values using judgments of geologists and petroleum engineers. The probabilities of the outcomes are determined and the expected value of each decision is computed. The results of the study indicate that, when good judgments are used, one can obtain an excellent estimate of the volume of recoverable oil in a reservoir in a very short time and with the least amount of physical and financial resources.

Gholamnezhad, H.; Baharlou, A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Records Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly

320

In the 1970s, millions of simple pipe wells were drilled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an early supporter. Designing the Future of Transportation Launched in the fall of 2009, the Corporate and transportation technologies offer opportunities to reinvent automobiles for safer and more efficient personal Institute range from strategizing about transportation alternatives (near right) to finding ways to improve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-1368 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed November 1996 Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1324 Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Abstract Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the "Systematic Drilling Program," as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and th...

Christopher Rautman Dale; Christopher A. Rautman; Dale A. Engstrom; Dale A. Engstrom

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geology of the USW SD-9 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-2030 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed October 1996 Geology of the USW SD-9 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Abstract Drill hole USW SD-9 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the "Systematic Drilling Program," as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-9 drill hole is located in the northern part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of Exploratory Studies Facility and south of the North Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-9 is 2223.1 ft (677.57 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow t...

Dale Engstrom And; Dale A. Engstrom; Dale A. Engstrom; Christopher A. Rautman; Christopher A. Rautman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 170 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Cypionka Microbiologist Institut für Chemie und Biologie Des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität

326

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 197 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche.edu Marcel Regelous Petrologist Abteilung Geochemie Max-Planck-InstitĂĽt fĂĽr Chemie Johannes J-Becherweg 27

327

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Geochemist Institut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

328

Investigation of percussion drills for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests was conducted to provide data for an economic evaluation of percussion drilling in geothermal reservoirs. Penetration rate, operation on aqueous foam, and high temperature vulnerabilities of downhole percussion tools are described.

Finger, J.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production increases are anticipated to come from onshore enhanced oil recovery projects, shale oil plays, and deepwater drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. They also project that U.S....

330

Field results document underbalanced drilling success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used to maintain underbalanced conditions at the toolface. Whether the operator is trying to avoid drilling problems or prevent formation damage, the key to a safe, successful operation is a reliable method of sealing around the tubulars at the surface for continuous well control. Globally, underbalanced drilling (UBD) is emerging as an important technology to improve production and solve drilling problems with success in many applications with different reservoirs. Improvements in initial flow rates using UBD are being supported by longer term production. UBD techniques and processes are improving through experience and implementation. UBD is becoming a more economical means to optimize reservoir management than conventional overbalanced operations. UBD operations are proving to be safer than conventional overbalanced drilling.

Vozniak, J.; Cuthbertson, R.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Determining temperature limits of drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A capillary three tube viscometer has been designed which allows the measurement of rheological properties of time dependent non-Newtonian fluids in laminar flow at high temperture and pressure. The objective of this investigation is to determine the temperature stability of clay-water suspensions containing various drilling fluid additives. The additives studied consisted of viscosifiers, filtrate reducers, and chemical thinners. The temperature range studied is from room temperature to 550{sup 0}F. The system pressure is consistently maintained above the vapor pressure. The Bentonite and water standardized base mud used is equivalent to a 25 ppB fluid. Stabilization of the base mud is necessary to obtain steady state laminar flow conditions and to obtain reliable temperature thinning effects with each temperature interval under investigation. Generally the temperature levels are maintained for one hour until 550{sup 0}F is attained. The last interval is then maintained until system fluid degradation occurs. Rheological measurements are obtained from differential pressure transducers located in a three diameter tube test section and externally at ambient conditions from a Baroid Rotational Viscometer. The power law model for non-Newtonian fluids is used to correlate the data.

Thuren, J.B.; Chenevert, M.E.; Huang, W.T.W.; Szymanski, E.; Arkeketa, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NETL: Computer Software & Databases - Drilling Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products and downhole tools. It is designed to improve accuracy and save time and money for U.S. oil and gas operators. The Pipe Tally Sheet is designed to work on Pocket...

333

Challenges of deep drilling. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This installment delineates current deep drilling technology limitations and discusses needed advances for the future. Problem areas are identified as material and seal problems in wellhead equipment, new fluid carriers for well stimulation, quality control/inspection/testing for equipment and performance flaws, arctic environment conditions, and experienced personnel. The main factors of operating environment that challenge advanced deep drilling are identified as temperature extremes, pressure extremes, acid gases, and deep-water presence.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS AMAZON DEEP-SEA FAN Dr. Roger D. Flood Co of Canada P.O. Box 1006 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada B2Y4A2 Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg l55 Ocean and handling. D I S C L A I M E R This publication was prepared by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

335

Study on an Electric Drilling Rig with Hydraulic Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric drilling rig with hydraulic energy storage is researched. This rig can recover the potential energy of the drill stem lowered and owns remarkable energy-saving effect. The mathematical model of the new rig lifting the drill stem was deduced ... Keywords: electric drilling rig, energy-recovering, energy-saving

Zhang Lujun

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/small diameter drill collars/connections capable of surviving rotation above the seafloor without lateral support

337

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Use of Downhole Motors in Geothermal Drilling in the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of downhole motors in the Tiwi geothermal field in the Philippines, The discussion includes the application Of a Dyna-Drill with insert-type bits for drilling through surface alluvium. The economics of this type of drilling are compared to those of conventional rotary drilling. The paper also describes the use of a turbodrill that drills out scale as the well produces geothermal fluids.

Pyle, D. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rawlinson, K. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues  

SciTech Connect

With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

V. Munne

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

345

Heat pipe theory and practice: a sourcebook  

SciTech Connect

An introduction to heat pipe operating principles, types, and applications followed by a comprehensive treatment of heat pipe theory, design, and manufacture are presented. The organization of heat pipe theory provides parallel treatment of the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and materials science during heat pipe analysis. For the problem-solving convenience of practicing engineers, design procedures are developed summarizing theoretical information. Methods of summarizing voluminous research information are presented in detail. Current practices in the manufacture of heat pipes are described. Current and potential applications of the heat pipe to energy systems discussed are: heat exchangers, heat recovery for HVAC systems, residential buildings, industrial processes, gasification plants, and thermal storage subsystems.

Chi, S.W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Buried Pipe Guided Wave Examination Reference Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear power fleet has aged, the industry has increased its focus on the integrity of buried piping assets. This is due to recent leaks resulting in unscheduled repair outages and release of tritium into the ground water. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has responded to the emergent issue by developing a buried pipe program, which many plants have implemented or are implementing, as well as projects to assess and develop inspection and repair technologies. There are many buried pipes...

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehl, UT); Johnson, Monte L. (Orem, UT); Bartholomew, David B. (Springville, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of a cryogenic heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipe operating characteristics can be used to advantage in cryogenic systems. Diode operation of the heat pipe, the ability to conduct heat in one direction only, is useful in protecting the heat load if the heat sink temperature rises above the load temperature. Because of this, the heat pipe can be made to act as a thermal switch. A screened-wick, inverted-artery, cryogenic heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested. The tests were first conducted with hydrogen and then with oxygen as the working fluid. Heat pipe performance limits were measured as a function of operating temperature, and startup from both the supercritical and the frozen state was demonstrated. The heat pipe was designed to operate as a thermal diode, and transient tests were used to determine the turndown ratio. The heat pipe test results were correlated with the Los Alamos heat pipe computer code and good agreement was obtained between the predicted and measured performance. The heat pipe was developed for spacecraft sensor cooling applications. Test results show significant performance advantages over solid conductors.

Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Runyan, J.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pipe Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leg in the system. You can also analyze hybrid systems consisting of new and existing piping and reverse-return layouts The familiar, intuitive Windows user interface will...

353

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pipe Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and closed systems using virtually any fluid with known viscosity and specific gravity. Enter coil flow rates and pressure drops along with pipe lengths -- the program will...

354

Dismantling techniques for reactor steel piping  

SciTech Connect

Two cutting techniques have been developed for dismantling the pipes connected to the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) pressure vessel. They are the rotary disk knife cutting system for dismantling relatively large pipes, such as the primary cooling system, and the shaped explosive cutting systems for cutting relatively small pipes in air or water. Basic cutting tests were performed to determine the optimum characteristics of the cutting systems and to conduct a safety evaluation by studying the effects of blasting on surrounding areas. Mock-up tests confirmed the applicability of the newly developed dismantling systems for JPDR dismantlement by successfully cutting test pipes with these systems.

Yanagihara, S.; Hiraga, F.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Aircraft Thermal Management Using Loop Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to determine the feasibility of using loop heat pipes to dissipate waste heat from power electronics to the skin… (more)

Fleming, Andrew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Experimental Investigation of Bendable Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat pipes are highly conductive heat transfer devices. They use the latent heat of the working fluid for efficient heat transfer over a very small… (more)

ODHEKAR, DHANANJAY

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Directional Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Directional Drilling Systems Directional Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Directional Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

359

Drilling in 2000 taps technology explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While major oil and gas companies all but ended research and development programs, the burden for technological advancement fell to service companies. And service companies allotted their R and D investment to activities whose return they could fairly predict. But even as cost-cutting measured devastated engineering staffs, a profit-growth strategy was forming that understood that profit could be enhanced by not just cutting the per barrel cost to producers but by producing more barrels per investment dollar. In other words, get more oil and gas from the same well through applied drilling and production technology. In the drilling industry all things technical revolve around six areas of expertise: bits, rotation systems, tripping systems, control systems, information systems and direction drilling systems. The paper discusses these six technologies.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kmichaud@umail.ucsb.edu Abstract: Offshore oil drilling hasto attitudes toward offshore oil drilling. This implies thats Forests and Parks 1 Offshore oil drilling has been a

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

362

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Proposal for an Advanced Drilling System with Real-Time Diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) and describe its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. We outline a Program Plan for DOE, university, and industry to cooperate in the development of DWD technology.

Finger, J.T.; Mansure, A.J.; Prairie, M.R.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Capacity Testing of Cured-in-Place Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of capacity testing of cured-in-place pipe (CIPP). Degradation of buried piping is a major issue facing nuclear power plant owners, and many plants will require repair or replacement of existing carbon steel piping components. Relining corroded steel pipe with cured-in-place pipe is an attractive and cost-effective alternative to replacing in-ground pipe.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Analysis of Pipe Supports with a Trunnion Welded to the Main Piping Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One configuration of pipe support that is gaining popularity, particularly on main steam and hot reheat high-energy piping, is the trunnion. In a trunnion support system, load is transferred from the main pipe to a hanger system through trunnions welded to the main pipe run. Welded trunnions are used in a variety of support configurations, and, in several cases, the support frame around the trunnion would have to be dismantled to permit inspection of the pipe-to-trunnion weld. In other ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

Hampel, V.E.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The deterioration of pipes in urban water distribution systems is of concern to water utilities throughout the world. This deterioration generally leads to pipe breaks… (more)

Yamijala, Shridhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

Adkins, Douglas Ray (Albuquerque, NM); Shen, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuck, Melanie R. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grafe, V. Gerald (Corrales, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas. 7 figs.

Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Tuck, M.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Grafe, V.G.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

Adkins, Douglas Ray (Albuquerque, NM); Shen, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuck, Melanie R. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grafe, V. Gerald (Corrales, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling [Laser Applications Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Today, a typical land-based oil or gas well costs around 400,000 to drill, while costs for an offshore well average...

377

Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Well Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not...

378

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Onsite Burial (Pits, Landfills...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management. During most U.S. onshore drilling operations, the cuttings separated by the shale shaker are sent to a pit called the reserve pit located near the drill rig. The pit is...

379

Analyzing the dynamic behavior of downhole equipment during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced geothermal drilling systems will require a bottom hole assembly (BHA) which utilizes sophisticated electronic and mechanical equipment to accomplish faster, more trouble free, smarter drilling. The bit-drill string/formation interaction during drilling imposes complex, intermittent dynamic loading on the downhole equipment. A finite element computer code, GEODYN, is being developed to allow analysis of the structural response of the downhole equipment during drilling and to simulate the drilling phenomena (i.e. penetration, direction, etc.). Phase 1 GEODYN, completed early in 1984, provides the capability to model the dynamic response of a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit interacting with a non-homogeneous formation. Succeeding development phases will allow inclusion of stabilizers and, eventually, the entire drill string in addition to facilitating drill ahead simulation.

Baird, J.A.; Caskey, B.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Monitoring downhole pressures and flow rates critical for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True underbalanced drilling, and not just flow drilling, requires thorough engineering and monitoring of downhole pressures and flow rates to ensure the formations are drilled without formation damage. Underbalanced drilling involves intentionally manipulating the bottom hole circulating pressure so that it is less than static reservoir pressure. This underbalanced pressure condition allows reservoir fluids to enter the well bore while drilling continues, preventing fluid loss and many causes of formation damage. Applied correctly, this technology can address problems of formation damage, lost circulation, and poor penetration rates. Another important benefit of drilling underbalanced is the ability to investigate the reservoir in real time. The paper discusses the reasons for under balanced drilling, creating underbalance, well site engineering, fluids handling, rotating flow divertor injection gas, survey techniques, data acquisition, operations, maintaining under-balance, routine drilling, rate of penetration, misconceptions, and economics.

Butler, S.D.; Rashid, A.U.; Teichrob, R.R. [Flow Drilling Engineering Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Canada-Chinese Taipei-Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany 68588-0340, U.S.A.; E-mail: nlg@unlinfo.unl.edu) Andreas LĂĽckge, Organic Geochemist (Institut fĂĽr Chemie

384

Practical applications of a drilling data center  

SciTech Connect

Tenneco Oil is using a real-time drilling-data acquisition, telemetry, data base, and applications-program system for Gulf of Mexico operations. The system provides for data acquisition in real time from commercially available logging units. The data are transmitted into a central office onshore via microwave or satellite telemetry links. Up to 352 drilling parameters are transmitted from each computerized logging unit and archived in the data base every 20 sec. Parameters can include measurement-while-drilling (MWD) data as well as mud-logging data. Applications programs utilizing these parameters are available in the central site data center (CSDC) and in locations throughout Tenneco's facilities in Lafayette, La. Access to the CSDC and its computing power is also available on the offshore rig. Backup surveillance of critical drilling parameters is provided through alarms and continuous monitoring of the parameters, thus providing for a safer operation. Rig efficiency has also been improved through analysis of the data and comparison of the data between various rig operations and rigs. Both tangible and intangible cost savings are discussed.

Graff, R.L.; Segrest, R.P.

1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 182 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rain has built a mound over geologic time of almost pure calcareous and siliceous sediments stretching of this northward plate motion: (1) the thickest part of the equatorial mound of biogenic sediment is displaced drilling and coring of the central Pacific equatorial mound of sediments (e.g., DSDP Legs 5, 8, 9, and 16

386

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 169 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rain has built a mound over geologic time of almost pure calcareous and siliceous sediments stretching of this northward plate motion: (1) the thickest part of the equatorial mound of biogenic sediment is displaced drilling and coring of the central Pacific equatorial mound of sediments (e.g., DSDP Legs 5, 8, 9, and 16

387

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33139 Amanda A. Palmer Staff Science Representative, Leg 101 Ocean Drilling Schlager (Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, Florida) Co-Chief Scientist Paul of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, Florida) Gregor Eberli (Geologisches Institute, ETH

388

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 119 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling sheet, including the 3000-m-high subglacial Gamburtsev Mountains. The glacier follows the line ice drainage basin is believed to be long-lived because of this structural control, and Prydz Bay

389

Forecast of geothermal-drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of geothermal wells that will be drilled to support electric power production in the United States through 2000 A.D. are forecasted. Results of the forecast are presented by 5-year periods for the five most significant geothermal resources.

Mansure, A.J.; Brown, G.L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personnel 17 1. Laboratory Officer 17 2. Technicians 17 3. Computer System Manager 17 4. Curatorial. Logging Depth Measurements 34 D. Coring and Drilling Equipment and Usage 34 1. Rotary Coring (RCB) System 34 2. Advanced Piston Coring (APC) System 36 3. Extended Core Barrel (XCB) 37 4. Motor-Driven Core

391

Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, E.K. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Applicability of petroleum horizontal drilling technology to hazardous waste site characterization and remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have the potential to become an important tool for use in characterization, remediation and monitoring operations at hazardous waste disposal, chemical manufacturing, refining and other sites where subsurface pollution may develop from operations or spills. Subsurface pollution of groundwater aquifers can occur at these sites by leakage of surface disposal ponds, surface storage tanks, underground storage tanks (UST), subsurface pipelines or leakage from surface operations. Characterization and remediation of aquifers at or near these sites requires drilling operations that are typically shallow, less than 500-feet in depth. Due to the shallow nature of polluted aquifers, waste site subsurface geologic formations frequently consist of unconsolidated materials. Fractured, jointed and/or layered high compressive strength formations or compacted caliche type formations can also be encountered. Some formations are unsaturated and have pore spaces that are only partially filled with water. Completely saturated underpressured aquifers may be encountered in areas where the static ground water levels are well below the ground surface. Each of these subsurface conditions can complicate the drilling and completion of wells needed for monitoring, characterization and remediation activities. This report describes some of the equipment that is available from petroleum drilling operations that has direct application to groundwater characterization and remediation activities. A brief discussion of petroleum directional and horizontal well drilling methodologies is given to allow the reader to gain an understanding of the equipment needed to drill and complete horizontal wells. Equipment used in river crossing drilling technology is also discussed. The final portion of this report is a description of the drilling equipment available and how it can be applied to groundwater characterization and remediation activities.

Goranson, C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piping Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few) problem areas. Related industry work: American Petroleum Institute corrosion and materials work on high temperature hydrogen attack. Overall Perspectives 3 Few problems with hydrogen piping operating at ambient to at least 800F and pressures up to at least 3000psia as long as we stay within well- defined limits H2S contamination presents many more problems, beyond the scope of this talk We will note a couple of specific vulnerabilities Refining tracks materials performance in

394

Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power  

SciTech Connect

A heat-pipe cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MW(t) to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat pipe temperature of 1675/sup 0/K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum, lithium vapor, heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO/sub 2/ pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber and a BeO reflector containing boron loaded control drums.

Koenig, D.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rotating heat pipe for air-conditioning  

SciTech Connect

A unique rotary hermetic heat pipe is disclosed for transferring heat from an external source to an external heat sink. The heat pipe has a tapered condensing surface which is curved preferably to provide uniform pumping acceleration, the heat pipe being rotated at a velocity such that the component of centrifugal acceleration in an axial direction parallel to the tapered surface is greater than lG and so that the condensing surface is kept relatively free of liquid at any attitude. The heat pipe may be incorporated in an air conditioning apparatus so that it projects through a small wall opening. In the preferred air conditioning apparatus, a hollow hermetic air impeller is provided which contains a liquefied gaseous refrigerant, such as freon, and means are provided for compressing the refrigerant in the evaporator region of the heat pipe.

Gray, V.H.

1976-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solar Heat-Pipe Receiver Wick Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stirling-cycle engines have been identified as a promising technology for the conversion of concentrated solar energy into usable electrical power. In previous experimented work, we have demonstrated that a heat pipe receiver can significantly improve system performance-over a directly-illuminated heater head. The design and operating conditions of a heat pipe receiver differ significantly from typical laboratory heat pipes. New wick structures have been developed to exploit the characteristics of the solar generation system. Typically, these wick structures allow vapor generation within the wick. Conventional heat pipe models do not handle this enhancement yet it can more than double the performance of the wick. In this study, I develop a steady-state model of a boiling-enhanced wick for a solar heat pipe receiver. The model is used for design-point calculations and is written in FORTRAN90. Some limited comparisons have been made with actual test data.

Andraka, C.E.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Laser Drilling with Gated High Power Fiber Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Drilling ...

399

Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Details...

400

Horizontal drilling boosts Pennsylvania’s natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Between 2009 and 2011, Pennsylvania's natural gas production more than quadrupled due to expanded horizontal drilling combined with hydraulic fracturing.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Progress Toward an Advanced Geothermal Deep-Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previously developed concept for an advanced geothermal drilling system (AGDS) has been extended toward a feasibility design stage. Hardware projects for two percussion, air and hydraulic, hammer drills are underway. Two drill string options and an unique nitrogen supply system are described.

Rowley, J.; Saito, S.; Long, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Intelligent System for Petroleum Well Drilling Cutting Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cutting analysis is a important and crucial task task to detect and prevent problems during the petroleum well drilling process. Several studies have been developed for drilling inspection, but none of them takes care about analysing the generated cutting ... Keywords: Cutting analysis, petroleum well drilling monitoring, optimum-path forest

Aparecido N. Marana; Giovani Chiachia; Ivan R. Guilherme; Joăo P. Papa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

Russell, Larry R. (6025 Edgemoor, Suite C, Houston, TX 77081)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Suggested drilling research tasks for the Federal Government  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary discussion of drilling, drilling research and the role of the government in drilling research is presented. Specific research and development areas recommended for federal consideration are listed. The technical nature of the identified tasks is emphasized. The Appendices present the factual basis for the discussion and recommendations. Numerous references are noted in the Appendices.

Carson, C.C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Screening criteria help select formations for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain laboratory screening procedures can help determine the effectiveness of underbalanced drilling in a specific application. These screening criteria can help in analyzing the types of reservoirs which present good applications for underbalanced drilling technology. This paper discusses the types of information that should be obtained for any reservoir prior to designing the underbalanced drilling program for optimum performance.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Finite element analysis of the electro jet drilling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electro jet drilling (EJD) process is gaining prominence in the machining of micro and macro holes in difficult-to-machine materials used in aerospace, electronics and computers, medical, and automobile industries. As the trend towards miniaturization ... Keywords: electro jet drilling, electrochemical drilling, finite element method, radial overcut

M. Sen; H. S. Shan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water to individual homes or farms. The maximum rate in gallons per minute (GPM) that a well can be pumped without lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells

Keinan, Alon

409

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The design of a water jet drill for development of geothermal resources. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water jet drilling of rock is shown to be a feasible method for potential improvement in gaining access to the earth's resources. Drilling rates of up to 280 in./min in sandstone and 40 in./min in granite have been achieved. While the addition of polymers to the jet stream is found advantageous the low (15%) level of improvement and the difficulty in maintaining concentrate negated further development. The application of confining pressure was found to reduce jet performance, but this was found to be a function more of the rock response than of the jet parameters. Field tests of water jets underground indicated the jet system could be modified to cope with this change. Water jets were found to be more effective, for drilling larger holes, where a combined water jet:roller bit system was developed and laboratory and field trials of this are described. As well as determining the controlling parameters affecting jet drilling performance, and proving that rock compressive strength is not one of them, the research examined other methods of improving jet cutting performance. At jet pressures below 10,000 psi abrasive laden jets were found most advantageous while, for drilling granite, a cavitating flow proved more effective at pressures above 10,000 psi. A reason for this is postulated. Experiments to develop a standardized cavitation resistance test for rock specimens have also been undertaken.

Summers, David A.; Lehnhoff, Terry F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Potential use of hollow spheres in dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of significant deepwater discoveries has pushed the operator and service oil companies to focus their efforts on developing new technologies to drill in deeper water. Dual gradient drilling (DGD) will allow reaching deeper target depths with greater final hole size, which in turn will permit setting larger tubing strings, and hence allowing for higher production rates. DGD can be accomplished by either lifting the mud returns mechanically or diluting the mud returns at the seafloor level by injecting lightweight components. Recently, a novel concept involving the use of hollow spheres in DGD applications has been introduced. In this research, we have evaluated the technical feasibility of using hollow spheres in DGD. We found that hollow spheres have high potential for such an application. They are stable to the drilling fluid additives and components and decrease the density of the drilling mud. The effect on pressure reduction at the seafloor can be significant even when the concentration of spheres injected is smaller than that required to reduce the mud density to seawater density. If the base mud is the carrier fluid, the hollow spheres DGD systems do not require equipment at the seafloor. Additionally, the injection of spheres does not affect the wellbore hydraulics under dynamic conditions. We have identified the constraints for using hollow spheres in DGD. These include particle size of the spheres, collapse of first spheres to be injected at deeper water depths, achieving high concentrations for systems using the mud base as the carrier fluid, and lack of technology to separate the spheres from the mud. In this research, we have developed a friendly, in-house computer program to model features specific to hollow-spheres DGD systems, such as wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions and the u-tube phenomenon. The results generated by our model match those produced by a field-tested computer program that performs the same task for a similar application. Our findings can be used for further studies of the constraints on the spheres identified in this research, to field test the advantages we predict that hollow spheres will have, and to develop software to fully model hollow-spheres DGD systems.

Vera Vera, Liliana

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Stress analysis of a hybrid composite drilling riser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to thoroughly and efficiently analyze a composite riser designed for use in offshore drilling applications and subjected to various types of loading have been developed. An axisymmetric finite element model allowing nonaxisymmetric deformations has been constructed. 'the model was simplified by exploiting symmetries in the lay-up of the composite to homogenize material properties. Postprocessing techniques to recover ply level stresses and strains and determine lamina failures were also developed. The analysis is demonstrated on an industry-designed riser, and the results show that the current design is unacceptable. Even at normal operating loads, there is some failure and some very high stress levels. The analysis is used to suggest modifications to the baseline design.

Sundstrom, Keith Andrew

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

High pressure drilling system triples ROPS, stymies bit wear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent West Texas field tests of an experiental high-pressure drilling system have nearly tripled typical penetration rates in hard dolomite while putting virtually no visible wear on the bits, even those designed for much softer formations. With this drilling system, developed by FlowDril Corp. of Kent, Wash., and their joint-venture partner Grace Drilling Co., clarified drilling fluids (minimum solids) are pressurized to nearly 30,000 psi and directed to the bottom of the hole through a special nozzle attached to the drill bit. The action of this high pressure stream augments the bit's job, resulting in higher ROPs and decreased bit wear.

Killalea, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Heat pipe reactors for space power applications  

SciTech Connect

A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kW(e) and operate in the temperature range 1200 to 1700/sup 0/K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO/sub 2/. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor.

Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.; Salmi, E.W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Heat pipe testing program test plan  

SciTech Connect

A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

Bienert, W.B.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

New and Underutilized Technology: Wrap Around Heat Pipes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for wrap around heat pipes within the Federal sector.

419

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5 - Drilling Overview 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 30 USC § 1001 Triggers None specified On top of acquiring the correct drilling permits a developer needs to consider issues such as land and mineral ownership and right of way access. 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 5.1 - Review Potential Construction Permits In addition to drilling permits, the developer may require other

420

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner Drilling Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liner Drilling Date: Liner Drilling Date: 4-5-10 DOE Code: 71092 Cont ractor Code: 8067-766 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview Nothing out of the ordinary for drilling an existing location 1. What are the environmental impacts? NE SW Sec 21 , T39N, R78W (45-3-X-21 well) 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately a week 4 . What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Drilling Rig etc.)? Will Drill out of 9 5/8 caslng with liner drillng assembly. After drilling approximately 750 to 1000 ft, will test liner hanging assembly set and retrieve multiple times. The table b elow is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialis t and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level drill pipe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Integrating surface systems with downhole data improves underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated approach of using special downhole sensors and transmission capabilities in conjunction with a surface drilling optimization system has improved the management and understanding of the underbalanced drilling environment within a closed loop system. Improving the underbalanced drilling operation and obtaining quality data in real time can help eliminate damage to the formation and increase ultimate production. Recent advances in drilling technology have made it possible to drill horizontal wells underbalanced more safely and effectively. This technology has greatly reduced the potential for skin damage to the bore hole. Experience from western Canadian underbalanced horizontal drilling clearly demonstrates that a well bore`s initial productive potential is very accurately predicted from its productive behavior during drilling operations.

Comeau, L. [Sperry-Sun Drilling Services, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Horizontal flow drilling requires focus on well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells drilled underbalanced or while flowing must have surface equipment and a blow-out preventer stack specially designed for circulating operations. Functional well control methods for drilling horizontal wells have been developed in specific regions worldwide. Special safety equipment and procedures, however, are still required in most horizontal development applications. The challenge for horizontal drilling development and underbalanced drilling is to overcome the obstacles of government regulation, reduce pollution dangers, and improve personnel and equipment safety. Well control techniques tailored to the demands of each field can help overcome these challenges. Several well control elements must be addressed carefully on each horizontal well: drilling fluid requirements, well control procedures and equipment, and surface equipment and special considerations for handling hydrocarbons produced while drilling. The paper discusses each of these elements for underbalanced horizontal drilling.

Tangedahl, M.J. (RBOP Oil Tools International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Dry Pipe Sprinkler Piping Replacement Project (4588), 4/30/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipe System Sprinkler Piping Replacement Projects (4588) Pipe System Sprinkler Piping Replacement Projects (4588) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail The proposed action is to replace sections of dry pipe system sprinkler piping which include heads, hangers, fittings, and valves. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.3- Routine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of I 0 CFR Part I 021. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410(b): (See full text in regulation) [{Jrhe proposal fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A orB to 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D.

425

Handbook 1: Introduction to drilling mud systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first of the 11 handbook that make up the IADC Mud Equipment Manual. The manual is designed to provide information on all pieces of drilling rig equipment from the flow line to the mud pump section. This book focuses on drilling fluids and their properties and treatment, and thoroughly examines mud solid characteristics. Methods of controlling formation pore pressure, and cut points, as well as cuttings removal (viscosity, yield point, gel strengths, hole cleaning, etc.), are followed by a discussion of solid sizes and solid size distribution. Special features include a glossary of mud terms, a section on ''hard-to-find'' information such as gold concentration, wind forces, and AC motor current requirements, and a comprehensive index for all 11 handbooks.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

How borehole ballooning alters drilling responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From field observations of drilling and hole instability problems over a 30-year period, a new and more complete understanding of plastic well-bore behavior - under certain pressure imbalance conditions - is being developed and verified with detailed well histories. Rock mechanics theory, thus far primarily concerned with plastic behavior and borehole collapse on the underbalanced side, is in at least partial agreement with these observations. This article further elaborates on the pressure-responsive plastic behavior of shales under tremendous downhole stresses, particularly in the overbalanced, ballooning mode. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Stable operating margin; Plastic behavior region; Wellbore wall yields; Brittle sloughings; Loss of mud; Gain of mud; Shut-in pressure; Reflex gas; Charged RFT's; Preexisting balloon; Drilling rate.

Gill, J.A.

1989-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Comparison of analysis and vibration test results for a multiple supported piping system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of a nuclear power plant piping system subjected to high level vibrational excitation is investigated experimentally and analytically. The objective is to evaluate the piping analysis method employed in the SMACS computer code. Experimental data are obtained from the Large Shaker Experiments (SHAG) conducted at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, in which the dynamic behavior of an in-plant piping system with various support configurations was investigated. Comparisons of calculational results with measured data indicate that the adequacy of the prediction depends primarily on the modeling of boundary conditions and dynamic supports. Treating the latter as rigid and using building motion as input, in general, results in under prediction of piping response. On the other hand when accelerations on the pipe side of the dynamic support attachment are used as input, piping response is highly overpredicted. Also modeling wall/floor component attachments as fixed usually leads to underprediction of amplitude as well as differences in the frequency content of response. 9 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the notch in the solution at 20 C. Accumulation of the corrosion products is visible along the crack. The EDX chemical analysis near the crack tip found iron, sulfur and oxygen in the passive layer. The surface of the sample after the fatigue test in the sour environment at 85{sup o}, Fig. 2, C looks different from that fatigued surface at 20 C. The crack propagates across the passive film that covers the surface fairly uniformly. Some spallation of the passive film is observed near the notch. The EDX chemical analysis of the passive film near the crack tip identified mainly iron, carbon and oxygen. It appears that temperature plays a very important role in formation of the passive film. This may be associated with different solubility of H{sub 2}S in the solution, which will be further studied.

M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment  

SciTech Connect

The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (< 5000 m) is about to be reached, thereby pushing the oil and natural gas industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the notch in the solution at 20 C. Accumulation of the corrosion products is visible along the crack. The EDX chemical analysis near the crack tip found iron, sulfur and oxygen in the passive layer. The surface of the sample after the fatigue test in the sour environment at 85{sup o}, Fig. 2, C looks different from that fatigued surface at 20 C. The crack propagates across the passive film that covers the surface fairly uniformly. Some spallation of the passive film is observed near the notch. The EDX chemical analysis of the passive film near the crack tip identified mainly iron, carbon and oxygen. It appears that temperature plays a very important role in formation of the passive film. This may be associated with different solubility of H{sub 2}S in the solution, which will be further studied.

M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microhole Wireless Steering While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A background to Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies (CT-BHA) is given, and the development of a bi-directional communications and power module (BCPM)component is described. The successful operation of this component in both the laboratory and field environment is described. The primary conclusion of this development is that the BCPM component operates as anticipated within the CT-BHA, and significantly extends the possibility of drilling with coiled tubing in the microhole environment.

John Macpherson; Thomas Gregg

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling  

SciTech Connect

Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Self propelled drilling rig starts offshore exploration  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Drilling and Exploration Co. recently commissioned its new $12 million self-propelled, semisubmersible drilling rig, Ocean Prospector, at Mitsubishi Shipyard, Japan, where the rig was built. Initial trail runs completed adjacent to the shipyard indicated that the ship has a speed of 7 kn ahead and 3 kn astern. Steering also is reported to be excellent. The rig has a minimum turning radius of approx. 2 barge lengths and shows instant response. This rig is powered by 4 Fairbanks Morse, 10-cylinder opposed piston, model 38D8-1/8 diesel engines. Each engine is rated at 1,600 hp at 720 rpm and they drive eight 1,600 kw, traction type D-C generators and two 1,000 kw A-C generators. The rated operating depth of the unit afloat is 600 ft of water. The overall length of Ocean Prospector is just over 344 ft, with the beam measuring 263-1/2 ft. During transit, when the rig will be completely deballasted, it will have a draft of approx. 20 ft. When it reaches the drilling site, ballast water will be pumped into the 18 ballast tanks until the draft is increased to 70 ft. At this point, the underside of the main deck will be 50 ft above the mean surface of the sea. Drilling operations will be conducted while the rig is at the 70 ft draft. The mooring system will consist of eight 2-3/4 in. chains, each measuring 3,300 ft in length and connected to a 15-ton anchor.

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Corrosion of Buried Steel Pipes Used With Transmission Pipe-Type Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although pipe-type underground transmission cables were designed with a life expectancy of 40 years, many of these cables have reached this threshold and are still performing satisfactorily. The buried steel pipes that surround the cables are protected by coatings and cathodic-protection systems. These protective systems need to be routinely inspected and maintained in order to extend their own life expectancy and thereby protect the cables within the steel pipes. This report provides research results an...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

Eichelberger, J.C.

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fossil Plant High Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fossil Plant High-Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Heat pipe effect in porous medium  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis a parametric study of the thermal and hydrologic characteristics of the fractured porous tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was conducted. The effects of different fracture and matrix properties including permeability, thermal conductivity, specific heat, porosity, and tortuosity on heat pipe performance in the vicinity of the waste package were observed. Computer simulations were carried out using TOUGH code on a Cray YMP-2 supercomputer. None of the fracture parameters affected the heat pipe performance except the mobility of the liquid in the fracture. Matrix permeability and thermal conductivity were found to have significant effect on the heat pipe performance. The effect of mass injection was studied for liquid water and air injected at the fracture boundary. A high rate of mass injection was required to produce any effect on the heat pipe. The fracture-matrix equilibrium is influenced by the matrix permeability and the matrix thermal conductivity.

Joseph, M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

M-25, BUTT WELDS IN PROCESS PIPING  

SciTech Connect

Metal-arc and inert-gas shielded tungsten-arc processes were compared for circumferential butt welding of austenitic stainless steel process pipe. Inert-gas tungsten-arc welding was superior to other techniques. (C.J.G.)

Litman, A.P.

1958-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office...

445

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Develop an efficient insulation system that will adhere to housing duct work and pipe structures while conforming to complex geometries. New insulations must increase the R-value of existing materials and be easy to apply or retrofit to existing structures.

446

Dynamic simulation recalls condensate piping event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how experience gained from simulating and reconstructing a condensate piping event will be used by Consolidated Edison to analyze control system problems. A cooperative effort by Con Edison and the Chemical Engineering Department at Polytechnic University used modular modeling system to investigate the probable cause of a Con Edison condensate piping event. Con Edison commissioned the work to serve as a case study for the more general problem of control systems analysis using dynamic simulation and MMS.

Farrell, R.J.; Reneberg, K.O. (Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Moy, H.C. (Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REMOTELY NAVIGATE VERTICAL PIPE ARRAYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Situations exist around the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) complex where it is advantageous to remotely navigate vertical pipe arrays. Specific examples are waste tanks in the SRS Tank Farms, which contain horizontal cooling coils at the tank bottom, vertical cooling coils throughout and a limited number of access points or ''risers''. These factors limit accessibility to many parts of these tanks by conventional means. Pipe Traveler technology has been developed to address these issues. The Pipe Traveler addresses these issues by using the vertical cooling coils as its medium of travel. The unit operates by grabbing a pipe using dual grippers located on either side of the equipment. Once securely attached to the pipe a drive wheel is extended to come in contact with the pipe. Rotation of the drive wheel causes the unit to rotate around the pipe. This action is continued until the second set of grippers is aligned with the next pipe. Extension pistons are actuated to extend the second set of grippers in contact with a second pipe. The second set of grippers is then actuated to grasp the pipe. The first set of grippers releases the original pipe and the process is repeated until the unit reaches its desired location. Once at the tool deployment location the desired tool may be used. The current design has proven the concept of pipe-to-pipe navigation. Testing of the Pipe Traveler has proven its ability to transfer itself from one pipe to another.

Krementz, D.; Immel, D.; Vrettos, N.; Nance, T.; Marzolf, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Drilling and blasting techniques and costs for strip mines in Appalachia  

SciTech Connect

On-site investigations of blasting techniques were conducted at twenty surface coal mining operations in the steep slopes of Appalachia. The mine sites represented a range of mountain mining methods and annual coal production levels; all sites used similar techniques and equipment for the removal of fragmented waste rock. Hole loading characteristics and constraints limiting blast designs were observed at each mine site. This report summarizes technical blasting data and geological conditions which require special design considerations. Three mine sites were selected for future research in fragmentation efficiency. Detailed economic data on drilling and blasting were gathered from the three research sites and are reported herein. A great deal of fragmentation difficulties stem from tough, unpredictable geology with specific bedding characteristics and local zones of defined structural weaknesses such as jointing and vertical seams. Exceptionally hard bedrock, existing as a caprock or as the basal layer above the coal seam, persists as the cause of oversize rock breakage or, in the latter case, damage to the coal unless special precautions are taken. Federal blasting regulations strictly control the amount of explosives used as well as throw of the fragmented rock. This requires that blasting modifications be employed. The nature and extent of blast modifications were observed to be related to terrain and demographic conditions around the mine site. Drilling and blasting costs reported for the three mine sites averaged $0.21 per cubic yard of material blasted. Drilling costs varied widely, as drilling time was indicative of geologies and often, drilling costs remained the greatest percentage of total blasting and drilling costs.

Aimone, C.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Conceptual design of a heat pipe radiator  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design of a waste heat radiator has been developed for a thermoelectric space nuclear power system. The basic shape of the heat pipe radiator was a frustum of a right circular cone. The design included stringer heat pipes to carry reject heat from the thermoelectric modules to the radiator skin that was composed of small-diameter, thin-walled cross heat pipes. The stringer heat pipes were armored to resist puncture by a meteoroid. The cross heat pipes were designed to provide the necessary unpunctured radiating area at the mission end with a minimum initial system mass. Several design cases were developed in which the individual stringer survival probabilities were varied and the radiator system mass was calculated. Results are presented for system mass as a function of individual stringer survival probability for six candidate container materials, three candidate heat pipe fluids, two radiator operating temperatures, two meteoroid shield types, and two radiating surface cases. Results are also presented for radiator reject heat as a function of system mass, area, and length for three system sizes.

Bennett, G.A.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451