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1

Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is predicted under the ledge that forms the lower lobe in the cavern. The remaining caverns have no significant issues regarding cavern stability and may be safely enlarged during subsequent oil drawdowns. Predicted well strains and subsidence are significant and consequently future remedial actions may be necessary. These predicted well strains certainly suggest appropriate monitoring through a well-logging program. Subsidence is currently being monitored.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

4

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

Not Available

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two baseline models are developed for single and multiple caverns, respectively. Different parameters that affect damage propagation and deformation of salt cavern, such as cavern pressure, operating conditions, cavern height/diameter ratio, overburden stiffness and roof thickness are analyzed and the respective results summarized. For multiple horizontal caverns numerical models are developed to determine the cavern interaction and the minimum safe center to center distance. A step by step methodology for operators to assess critical cavern design parameters for thin bedded salt formations is also presented.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J. A.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Criticality safety considerations for low-level-waste facilities  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear criticality safety for handling and burial of certain special nuclear materials (SNM) at low-level-waste (LLW) facilities is licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Recently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff assisted the NRC Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, Low-Level-Waste and Decommissioning Projects Branch, in developing technical specifications for the nuclear criticality safety of {sup 235}U and {sup 235}Pu in LLW facilities. This assistance resulted in a set of nuclear criticality safety criteria that can be uniformly applied to the review of LLW package burial facility license applications. These criteria were developed through the coupling of the historic surface-density criterion with current computational technique to establish safety criteria considering SNM material form and reflector influences. This paper presents a summary of the approach used to establish and to apply the criteria to the licensing review process.

Hopper, C.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

15

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

16

FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES: SYSTEM-LEVEL AND CRITICALITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to identify and document the screening analyses for the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that do not easily fit into the existing Process Model Report (PMR) structure. These FEPs include the 3 1 FEPs designated as System-Level Primary FEPs and the 22 FEPs designated as Criticality Primary FEPs. A list of these FEPs is provided in Section 1.1. This AMR (AN-WIS-MD-000019) documents the Screening Decision and Regulatory Basis, Screening Argument, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Disposition for each of the subject Primary FEPs. This AMR provides screening information and decisions for the TSPA-SR report and provides the same information for incorporation into a project-specific FEPs database. This AMR may also assist reviewers during the licensing-review process.

D.L. McGregor

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Tensile Effective Stresses in Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycling in compressed air and natural gas storage in salt: Tracking stress states and cavern closure using.L., 2006.Geomechanical evaluation of two gulf coast natural gas storage caverns: Proceedings of the. (2011). More recently, Lux and Dresen (2012) analyzed high-frequency, cycled storage gas and noted

18

Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, "cave" means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and includes or is synonymous with cavern, pit, pothole, well, sinkhole, and grotto. No person may excavate, remove, destroy, injure, alter in any significant manner, or deface any part of a cave owned by the State of Texas, unless the person

22

Gaines Cavern Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cavern Wind Project Cavern Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Gaines Cavern Wind Project Facility Gaines Cavern Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner General Compression Developer Texas Dispatchable Wind 1 LLC Location Gaines County TX Coordinates 32.688556°, -103.062464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.688556,"lon":-103.062464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Critically Evaluated Energy Levels and Spectral Lines of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... not included in the level optimization procedure because they were found to possess significant systematic and statistical errors and do not improve ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Disposal in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Caverns Salt Caverns Fact Sheet - Disposal in Salt Caverns Introduction to Salt Caverns Underground salt deposits are found in the continental United States and worldwide. Salt domes are large, fingerlike projections of nearly pure salt that have risen to near the surface. Bedded salt formations typically contain multiple layers of salt separated by layers of other rocks. Salt beds occur at depths of 500 to more than 6,000 feet below the surface. Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Domal Salt Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Bedded Salt Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created by a process called solution mining. Well drilling equipment is used to drill a hole

25

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wave Exchange between the Ground Surface and a Boundary-Layer Critical Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity waves induced by two- and three-dimensional terrain features are examined theoretically in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using a linear wave model that includes reabsorption at a critical level. The PBL structure is characterized by ...

Carmen J. Nappo; George Chimonas

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Critical Level Reflection and the Resonant Growth of Nonlinear Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the evolution of a field of internal waves launched by stratified flow over symmetric topography in mean flows which reverse direction at some height above the surface. With the gradient Richardson number at this critical level in ...

T. L. Clark; W. R. Peltier

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Propagation of GravityInertia Waves and Lee Waves under a Critical Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is well known, the linear dynamic equations for gravity-inertia waves are characterized by three singular levels, one being the critical level at which flow speed and wave speed are equal, and the other two at which the flow speed is equal to ...

M. G. Wurtele; A. Datta; R. D. Sharman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue for the Hanford site high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the approach used to resolve the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue for the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Although operational controls have been in place at the Hanford Site throughout its operating life to minimize the amount of fissile material discarded as waste, estimates of the total amount of plutonium that entered the waste tanks range from 500 to 1,000 kg. Nuclear criticality safety concerns were heightened in 1991 based on a review of waste analysis results and a subsequent U.S. Department of Energy 1399 review of the nuclear criticality program. Although the DOE review team concluded that there was no imminent risk of a criticality at the Hanford Site tank farms, the team also stated its concern regarding the lack of definitive knowledge of the fissile material inventory and distribution within the waste tanks and the lack of sufficient management support for the overall criticality safety program. An in-depth technical review of the nuclear criticality safety of the waste tanks was conducted to develop a defensible technical basis to ensure that waste tanks are subcritical. The review covered all relevant aspects of nuclear criticality safety including neutronics and chemical and physical phenomena of the waste form under aging waste conditions as well as during routine waste management operations. This paper provides a review of the technical basis to support the conclusion that given current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality is incredible. The DOE has been requested to close the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board is currently reviewing the technicalbasis.

Bratzel, D.R.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Study of Two-Dimensional Dry Convective Plume Modes with Variable Critical Level Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of wind speed and critical level height on dry convection above a prescribed heat source. This is done using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model in its two-dimensional form with an imposed 400-K ...

Michael T. Kiefer; Yuh-Lang Lin; Joseph J. Charney

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's:

35

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

Munson, Darrell E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Underground hydrogen storage. Final report. [Salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers and depleted fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of storing hydrogen in underground storage reservoirs is evaluated. The past and present technology of storing gases, primarily natural gas is reviewed. Four types of reservoirs are examined: salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields. A technical investigation of hydrogen properties reveals that only hydrogen embrittlement places a limit on the underground storage by hydrogen. This constraint will limit reservoir pressures to 1200 psi or less. A model was developed to determine economic feasibility. After making reasonable assumptions that a utility might make in determining whether to proceed with a new storage operation, the model was tested and verified on natural gas storage. A parameteric analysis was made on some of the input parameters of the model to determine the sensitivity of the cost of service to them. Once the model was verified it was used to compute the cost of service of storing hydrogen in the four reservoir types. The costs of service for hydrogen storage ranged from 26 to 150% of the cost of the gas stored. The study concludes that it is now both safe and economic to store hydrogen in underground reservoirs.

Foh, S.; Novil, M.; Rockar, E.; Randolph, P.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J. A.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1996-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.  

SciTech Connect

The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

SciTech Connect

To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Caustic leaching of high-level radioactive tank sludge: A critical literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) must treat and safely dispose of its radioactive tank contents, which can be separated into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. Since the unit costs of treatment and disposal are much higher for HLW than for LLW, technologies to reduce the amount of HLW are being developed. A key process currently being studied to reduce the volume of HLW sludges is called enhanced sludge washing (ESW). This process removes, by water washes, soluble constituents such as sodium salts, and the washed sludge is then leached with 2--3 M NaOH at 60--100 C to remove nonradioactive metals such as aluminum. The remaining solids are considered to be HLW while the solutions are LLW after radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs have been removed. Results of bench-scale tests have shown that the ESW will probably remove the required amounts of inert constituents. While both experimental and theoretical results have shown that leaching efficiency increases as the time and temperature of the leach are increased, increases in the caustic concentration above 2--3 M will only marginally improve the leach factors. However, these tests were not designed to validate the assumption that the caustic used in the ESW process will generate only a small increase (10 Mkg) in the amount of LLW; instead the test conditions were selected to maximize leaching in a short period and used more water and caustic than is planned during full-scale operations. Even though calculations indicate that the estimate for the amount of LLW generated by the ESW process appears to be reasonable, a detailed study of the amount of LLW from the ESW process is still required. If the LLW analysis indicates that sodium management is critical, then a more comprehensive evaluation of the clean salt process or caustic recycle would be needed. Finally, experimental and theoretical studies have clearly demonstrated the need for the control of solids formation during and after leaching.

McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Hunt, R.D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities can be concentrated by hydrogeochemical processes to permit nuclear criticality. A team of experts in hydrology, geology, geochemistry, soil chemistry, and criticality safety was formed to develop achievable scenarios for hydrogeochemical increases in concentration of special nuclear material (SNM), and to use these scenarios to aid in evaluating the potential for nuclear criticality. The team`s approach was to perform simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies to (1) identify some achievable scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration increase via sorption or precipitation of uranium, and (3) evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality resulting from potential increases in uranium concentration over disposal limits. The analysis of SNM was restricted to {sup 235}U in the present scope of work. The outcome of the work indicates that criticality is possible given established regulatory limits on SNM disposal. However, a review based on actual disposal records of an existing site operation indicates that the potential for criticality is not a concern under current burial practices.

Toran, L.E.; Hopper, C.M.; Naney, M.T. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Long-term sealing analyses for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is inevitable that sealing and abandonment will someday occur in a SPR cavern or caverns. To gain insight into the long-term behavior of a typical SPR cavern following sealing and abandonment, a suite of mechanical finite-element calculations was performed. The initial analyses predict how quickly and to what extent a cavern pressurizes after it is plugged. The analyses also examine the stability of the cavern as it changes shape due to the excessive pressures generated as the salt creeps and the brine in the cavern thermally expands. These large-scale analyses do not include the details of the plug but assume a good seal is established in the cavern wells. In another series of analyses, the potential for forming a leak at the plug is evaluated. A cement plug, emplaced in the casing seat of a cavern well, is loaded using the predicted brine pressures from the cavern analyses. The plugged casing analyses examine the potential for forming a leak path in and along the interfaces of salt, casing, and cement plug. In the last set of analysis, the dimensional scale of the problem is further reduced to examine a preexisting crack along a casing/salt interface. The cracked interface is assumed to be fluid filled and fully pressurized by the cavern fluids. The analyses address the potential for the fluid path to extend upwards along a plugged casing should an open microannulus surround the casing after it is plugged.

Ehgartner, B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Two Symptomatic Giant Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver  

SciTech Connect

Cavernous hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic; however, a small percentage may cause symptoms. This case report discusses palliation by transcatheter arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles.

Althaus, Sandra; Ashdown, Boyd [Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Coldwell, Douglas [Department of Radiology, Denver General Hospital, 303 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204-4507 (United States); Helton, W. Scott [Department of General Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Freeny, Patrick C. [Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Salt caverns account for 23% of U.S. underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. has three primary types of underground natural gas storage facilities: depleted fields, aquifers, and salt caverns. Depleted natural gas fields provide by ...

54

Preliminary long-term stability criteria for compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air storage caverns, which are an essential and integral component of a CAES plant, should be designed and operated so as to perform satisfactorily over the intended life of the overall facility. It follows that the long-term ''stability'' of air storage caverns must be considered as a primary concern in projecting the satisfactory operation of CAES facilities. As used in the report, ''stability'' of a storage cavern implies the extent to which an acceptable amount of cavern storage volume can be utilized with routine maintenance for a specified time interval, e.g., 35 years. In this context, cavern stability is relative to both planned utilization and time interval of operation. The objective of the study was to review the existing literature and consult knowledgeable workers in the storage industry, and then report state-of-the-art findings relative to long-term stability of compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes. Further, preliminary cavern stability criteria were to be presented in a form consistent with the amount of information available on cavern performance in salt domes. Another objective of the study was to outline a methodology for determining the long-term stability of site-specific CAES cavern systems in salt domes.

Thoms, R.L.; Martinez, J.D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Stability and support issues in the construction of large span caverns for physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New physics experiments, proposed to study neutrinos and protons, call for the use of large underground particle detectors. In the United States, such detectors would be housed in the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), sited within the footprint of the defunct Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Although the experimental proposals differ in detail, all rely heavily upon the ability of the mined and reinforced rock mass to serve as a stable host for the detector facilities. Experimental proposals, based on the use of Water Cherenkov detector technology, specify rock caverns with excavated volumes in excess of half a million cubic meters, spans of at least 50 m, sited at depths of approximately one to 1.5 kilometers. Although perhaps sited at shallower depth, proposals based on the use of Liquid Argon (LAr) detector technology are no less challenging. LAr proposals not only call for the excavation of large span caverns, but have an additional need for the safe management of large quantities (kilo-tonnes) of cryogenic liquid, including critical provisions for the fail-safe egress of underground personnel and the reliable exhaust of Argon gas in the event of a catastrophic release. These multi-year, high value physics experiments will provide the key experimental data needed to support the research of a new generation of physicists as they probe the behavior of basic particles and the fundamental laws of nature. The rock engineer must deliver caverns that will reliably meet operational requirements and remain stable for periods conservatively estimated to be in excess of twenty years. This paper provides an overview of the DUSEL site conditions and discusses key end-user requirements and design criteria likely to dominate in determining the viability of experimental options. The paper stresses the paramount importance of collecting adequate site-specific data to inform early siting, dimensioning and layout decisions. Given the large-scale of the excavation and likely timeline to construction, the paper also strongly suggests that there are exciting opportunities for the rock mechanics and engineering community to identify and efficiently integrate research components into the design and construction process.

Laughton, C.; /Fermilab

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Potential for and consequences of criticality resulting from hydrogeochemically concentrated fissile uranium blended with soil in low-level waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations were done to determine conditions that could permit nuclear criticality with fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities and to estimate potential radiation exposures to personnel if there were such an accident. Simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies were done (1) to identify some realistic scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) to model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration via sorption or precipitation of uranium, (3) to evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality resulting from potential increases in uranium concentration over disposal limits, and (4) to estimate potential radiation exposures to personnel resulting from criticality consequences. The scope of the referenced work was restricted to uranium at an assumed 100 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment. Three outcomes of uranium concentration are possible: uranium concentration is increased to levels that do pose a criticality safety concern; uranium concentration is increased, but levels do not pose a criticality safety concern; or uranium concentration does not increase.

Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. Operating costs of a salt cavern terminal are lower than tank based terminals because ''boil off'' is eliminated and maintenance costs of caverns are lower than LNG tanks. Phase II included the development of offshore mooring designs, wave tank tests, high pressure LNG pump field tests, heat exchanger field tests, and development of a model offshore LNG facility and cavern design. Engineers designed a model facility, prepared equipment lists, and confirmed capital and operating costs. In addition, vendors quoted fabrication and installation costs, confirming that an offshore salt cavern based LNG terminal would have lower capital and operating costs than a similarly sized offshore tank based terminal. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or purposeful damage, and much more acceptable to the community. More than thirty industry participants provided cost sharing, technical expertise, and guidance in the conduct and evaluation of the field tests, facility design and operating and cost estimates. Their close participation has accelerated the industry's acceptance of the conclusions of this research. The industry participants also developed and submitted several alternative designs for offshore mooring and for high pressure LNG heat exchangers in addition to those that were field tested in this project. HNG Storage, a developer, owner, and operator of natural gas storage facilities, and a participant in the DOE research has announced they will lead the development of the first offshore salt cavern based LNG import facility. Which will be called the Freedom LNG Terminal. It will be located offshore Louisiana, and is expected to be jointly developed with other members of the research group yet to be named. An offshore port license application is scheduled to be filed by fourth quarter 2005 and the terminal could be operational by 2009. This terminal allows the large volume importa

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

63

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

64

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

65

Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

Munson, Darrell Eugene

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste contaminated by NORM''.

Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment,caverns involved in CAES include stability, air tightness, acceptable surface subsidence, and (later on) an environmentally safe decommissioning and abandonment [

Kim, H.-M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

72

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

73

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Petroleum Technology Office National Petroleum Technology Office under Contract W -31-109- under Contract W -31-109- Eng Eng -38 -38 Prepared by: Prepared by: John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David Tomasko Tomasko , , Deborah Deborah Elcock Elcock , Deborah L. Blunt, and , Deborah L. Blunt, and Gustavious Gustavious P. W illiams P. W illiams Argonne National Laboratory August 1998 August 1998 Disposal of NORM - Disposal of NORM - Contam inated O il Contam inated O il Field Wastes in Salt Field Wastes in Salt Caverns Caverns Disposal of NORM in Salt Caverns Page i Table of Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Plan for certification and related activities for the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage caverns  

SciTech Connect

In order to comply with state laws, protect the environment, and protect the national investment in oil stored, it is necessary to periodically verify the integrity of the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (DOE/SPR) oil storage caverns. The task of developing plans for cavern certification was a responsibility in Sandia's role of geotechnical support for the SPR program. As an implementation of this task, this report includes a plan and procedures for tests and related activities to evaluate the integrity of the DOE/SPR oil storage caverns. 2 references.

Goin, K.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

Hinkebein, Thomas E.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in design of natural gas storage in unlined caverns;associated with natural gas storage in Sweden, includingIn the case of natural gas storage, a steel lining provides

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)  

SciTech Connect

The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States) and Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

An Investigation of the Integrity of Cemented Casing Seals with Application to Salt Cavern Sealing and Abandonment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project was pursued in three key areas. (1) Salt permeability testing under complex stress states; (2) Hydraulic and mechanical integrity investigations of the well casing shoe through benchscale testing; and (3) Geomechanical modeling of the fluid/salt hydraulic and mechanical interaction of a sealed cavern.

Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Skaug, N.T.; Bruno, M.S.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Criticality Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of YBa2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC.H/ data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC.H/. The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

Sinclair, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Varanasi, C. V. [University of Dayton Research Institute; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

A critical policy analysis: the impact of zero tolerance on out-of-school suspensions and expulsions of students of color in the state of Texas by gender and school level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focused on the disciplining actions given to students of color after the implementation of the zero tolerance (ZT) policy in Texas schools. Out-of-school suspension and expulsion data were analyzed to depict trends and/or patterns across school levels as well as gender and race/ethnicity. More specifically, the disciplinary action of 34,047 elementary, middle and high school students of color suspended out-of-school and expelled in Texas public schools during the1999-2000 and 2002-2003 academic school years were statistically analyzed then evaluated via specific tenets of critical race theory (CRT). A critical policy analysis, as defined by the researcher, was discussed using the results of the data analysis. In addition, the predictive power of the variables school level, gender and race/ethnicity on the disciplinary action given to students of color were analyzed during the school terms under study. The most statistically significant finding of the study was the influence of ethnicity on out-of-school suspension and expulsion rates of students of color in the State of Texas after the implementation of the policy known as ZT during the selected school terms. Furthermore, of the students enrolled in public schools in Texas during the 1999-2000 and 2002-2003 school years, African-American students comprised 14.3 and 14.4 percent of the population; yet, they received more than one-third of all disciplining actions, second to European Americans who comprised 43 and 40 percent of the enrolled population. When compared to other students of color, African-American students received 53.6 and 53.9 percent of the out-of-school suspensions and 64.3 and 65.1 of the expulsions. Even though the data presented were aligned with previous research studies, the view of disciplinary actions for students of color from a critical race theory (CRT) lens highlights the deficiencies outlined via a critical policy analysis of the ZT policy as it is used to fortify the safety of schools.

Sullivan, Earnestyne LaShonne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide 2010 For use with DOE-STD 1173-2009, CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD September 9, 2010 Page 2 of 47 PURPOSE....................................................................................................................... 5 SCOPE............................................................................................................................ 5 1. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the fission process. .......................................................................................................... 6 2. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the

91

Critical Skills Master's Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

92

Analysis of the Black-Capped Vireo habitat at Kickapoo Caverns State Park, Texas using a Geographic Information System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Geographic Information System (GIS) database was developed for Y,-ickapoo Cavern State Park, Tx. The digital database was used to characterize the Black-Capped Vireo ( Vireo Attricapillus Woodhouse) breeding habitat, and to produce a potential habitat map for the area. Relationships between Black-Capped Vireo (BCV) locations and topographic variables (slope and aspect) were investigated. When a chi-square test led to the rejection of a hypothesis inferring that a set of observations (territories) do not follow an expected occurrence pattern, a Bonferroni statistic test was used to evaluate preference or avoidance of a given slope or aspect category. In the park, BCV habitat is located on gentle slopes (012%); however, the analysis did not reveal a strong association between BCV location and slope exposure (aspect). For six-sub-landscapes, with different percentages of BCV suitable habitat, a modified fractal dimension was computed inside the GIS. This fractal dimension calculation describes diversity of a landscape, accounting for shape, patch juxtaposition, and eveness. GIS analysis helped in the proposition of camping sites and hiking trails to minimize the impact on BCV habitat and others preserved areas in the park.

Castiaux, Nathalie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect

Criticality occurs when a sufficient quantity of fissionable material is accumulated, and it results in the liberation of nuclear energy. All process accidents have involved plutonium or highly enriched uranium, as have most of the critical experiment accidents. Slightly enriched uranium systems require much larger quantities of material to achieve criticality. An appreciation of criticality accidents should be based on an understanding of factors that influence criticality, which are discussed in this article. 11 references.

Smith, D.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (Unites States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Rethinking regulations for disposal criticality  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the basis for the position that the current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criticality regulation is in need of revision to address problems in implementing it for the postclosure period in a geologic high-level waste repository. The authors believe that the applicant for such a facility should be able to demonstrate that postulated postclosure criticality events will not cause unacceptable risk of deleterious effects on public health and safety. In addition, the applicant should be expected to take practical and feasible measures to reduce the probability of a criticality occurring, even if (as expected) the consequences of such a criticality for repository performance and public health and safety would be negligible. This approach, while recognizing the probabilistic nature of analyses of events and conditions in the distant future, is also arguably consistent with the defense in depth concept that has been successfully applied to nuclear reactor regulation. The authors believe regulations for postclosure criticality control should support this dual approach, rather than require a deterministic prohibition of criticality as does the current rule. The existing rule seems appropriate for the preclosure period, as long as it is clearly specified to apply only to that period.

Scott, M. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Doering, T. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE CS.1 The LANL criticality safety program provides the required technical guidance and oversight capabilities to ensure a comprehensive criticality safety program for the storage of nuclear materials in SSTs. (Core Requirements 3, 4, 8) Criteria * The Criticality Safety Program is an administrative TSR and meets the General and * Specific Requirements of DOE O 420.1A, Section 4.3 Nuclear Criticality Safety. * All processes and operations involving significant quantities of fissile materials are * described in current procedures approved by line management. * Procedures contain approved criticality controls and limits, based on HSR-6 evaluations and recommendations. * Supervisors, operations personnel, and criticality safety officers have received

99

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective CS.1 - A criticality safety program is established, sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure criticality safety support services are adequate for safe operations. (Core Requirements 1, 2, and 6) Criteria * Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented. * Operations support personnel for the criticality safety area are adequately staffed and trained. Approach Record Review: Review the documentation that establishes the Criticality Safety Requirements (CSRs) for appropriateness and completeness. Review for adequacy and completion the criticality safety personnel training records that indicate training on facility procedures and systems under

100

Nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Important facts of the nuclear criticality safety field are covered in this volume. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject are included, based on insights provided by criticality experts and published information from many sources. An overview of nuclear criticality safety theory and a variety of practical in-plant operation applications are presented. Underlying principles of nuclear criticality safety are introduced and the state of the art of this technical discipline is reviewed. Criticality safety theoretical concepts, accident experience, standards, experiments computer calculations, integration of safety methods into individual practices, and overall facility operations are all included.

Knief, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project  

SciTech Connect

Most safety concerns associated with operations at nuclear facilities are very similar to the safety concerns associated with operations at non-nuclear facilities. The potential for a nuclear criticality accident is one concern that is unique to the nuclear industry. However, if managed properly, the risk of a criticality accident can be reduced to an acceptable level. In fact, the risk of a criticality accident can generally be reduced to a level that is much lower than the risk associated with non-nuclear activities that have similar consequences.

Briggs, Joseph Blair; Dean, V. F.; Presic, M.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Criticality Model Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

J.M. Scaglione

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality  

SciTech Connect

The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

104

Defending Critical Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply new bilevel and trilevel optimization models to make critical infrastructure more resilient against terrorist attacks. Each model features an intelligent attacker (terrorists) and a defender (us), information transparency, and sequential actions ... Keywords: bilevel program, critical infrastructure protection, homeland defense, homeland security, mixed-integer program, trilevel program

Gerald Brown; Matthew Carlyle; Javier Salmern; Kevin Wood

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Improvement Program  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses questions raised by criticality safety violation at several DOE plants. Two charts are included that define the severity and reporting requirements for the six levels of accidents. A summary is given of all reported criticality incident at the DOE plants involved. The report concludes with Martin Marietta's Nuclear Criticality Safety Policy Statement. (JDH)

Speas, I.G.

1987-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Mission Critical Networking  

SciTech Connect

Mission-Critical Networking (MCN) refers to networking for application domains where life or livelihood may be at risk. Typical application domains for MCN include critical infrastructure protection and operation, emergency and crisis intervention, healthcare services, and military operations. Such networking is essential for safety, security and economic vitality in our complex world characterized by uncertainty, heterogeneity, emergent behaviors, and the need for reliable and timely response. MCN comprise networking technology, infrastructures and services that may alleviate the risk and directly enable and enhance connectivity for mission-critical information exchange among diverse, widely dispersed, mobile users.

Eltoweissy, Mohamed Y.; Du, David H.C.; Gerla, Mario; Giordano, Silvia; Gouda, Mohamed; Schulzrinne, Henning; Youssef, Moustafa

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluating Rail Transit Criticism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates criticism of rail transit systems. It examines claims that rail transit is ineffective at increasing public transit ridership and improving transportation system performance, that rail transit investments are not cost effective, and that transit is an outdated form of transportation. It finds that critics often misrepresent issues and use biased and inaccurate analysis. This is a companion to the report Rail Transit in

Todd Litman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

C.E. Sanders

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nuclear criticality information system  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nuclear multifragmentation critical exponents  

SciTech Connect

In a recent Letter, cited in a reference, the EoS collaboration presented data of fragmentation of 1 A GeV gold nuclei incident on carbon. By analyzing moments of the fragment charge distribution, the authors claim to determine the values of the critical exponents {gamma}, {beta}, and {tau} for finite nuclei. These data represent a crucial step forward in the understanding of the physics of nuclear fragmentation. However, as shown in this paper, the analysis presented in the cited reference is not sufficient to support the claim that the critical exponents for nuclear fragmentation have been unambiguously determined.

Bauer, W. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States); Friedman, W.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Quantifying the severity of criticality limit violations  

SciTech Connect

Since August of 1994, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix for determining the need for and level of reporting criticality safety limit violations. The LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix is DOE approved, and is cited in a DOE approved SAR for the LANL Plutonium Facility as the method used to determine whether a criticality limit violation is reportable to DOE via 5000.3B ``Occurrence Categorization, notification and Reporting Requirements`` (replaced by DOE O 232.1). The use of the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix provides a framework that allows criticality limit violations to be objectively reviewed in terms of what were the consequences of the criticality safety limit violation. Using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix helps the criticality safety engineer and line supervision explain to others, in a quantifiable manner, the significance of the criticality limit violation, the levels of margin of safety built into operations, and demonstrate the difference between evaluated conditions and working conditions.

Vessard, S.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Steele, C.M. [Dept. of Energy, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Los Alamos Area Office

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Glossary of nuclear criticality terms  

SciTech Connect

This is a glossary of terms generally encountered in the literature of nuclear criticality and criticality safety. Terms sometimes misused are emphasized. 7 refs.

Paxton, H.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Processes for Software in Safety Critical Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two complementary standards are compared, both of which are concerned with the production of quality software. One, IEC 61508, is concerned with the safety of software intensive systems and the other, ISO/IEC TR 15504, takes a process view of software capability assessment. The standards are independent, though both standards build on ISO/IEC 12207. The paper proposes a correspondence between the safety integrity levels (SILs) of 61508 and the capability levels (CLs) of 15504, and considers the appropriateness of the 15504 reference model as a framework for assessing safety critical software processes. Empirical work from the SPICE trials and COCOMO II is used to support the arguments of the paper as well as to investigate their consequences. The development of a 15504 compatible assessment model for software in safety critical systems is proposed. Keywords Process assessment, safety critical software, international standards 1

Benediktsson Hunter And; O Benediktsson; R B Hunter; A D Mcgettrick

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CRITICAL FOUNDATIONS PROTECTING AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURES The Report of the President's Commission ...

115

Only critical information was scanned  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Only critical information was scanned. Entire document is available upon request - Click here to email a...

116

Critical dynamics and decoherence  

SciTech Connect

We study dynamics of decoherence in a generic model where the environment is driven and undergoes a quantum phase transition. We model the environment by the Ising chain in the transverse field, and assume that the decohering system is a central spin-1/2. We found that when the environment is quenched slowly through the critical point, the decoherence factor of the central spin undergoes rapid decay that encodes the critical exponents of the environment. We also found that decoherence in a non-equilibrated, kink-contaminated, environment can be stronger than in a vacuum one. We derived a remarkably simple analytical expression that describes post-transition decoherence and predicts periodicities involving all system parameters. This research connects the fields of decoherence, quantum phase transitions, and Kibble-Zurek non-equilibrium dynamics.

Damski, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quan, Haitao T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres.118.009 1. Introduction Ag II, like the isoelectronic neutral palladium, has the ground term 4d10 1S0. ...

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Criticality and language - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2003 ... For our purposes, these processes can be described as mechanical, chemical and nuclear, each operating at increasingly fundamental levels.

120

Plant critical concept  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers: interior dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study small-amplitude steady water waves with multiple critical layers. Those are rotational two-dimensional gravity-waves propagating over a perfect fluid of finite depth. It is found that arbitrarily many critical layers with cat's-eye vortices are possible, with different structure at different levels within the fluid. The corresponding vorticity depends linearly on the stream function.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Gabriele Villari

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Critical infrastructure security curriculum modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructures have succumbed to the demands of greater connectivity. Although the scheme of connecting these critical equipment and devices to cyberspace has brought us tremendous convenience, it also enabled certain unimaginable risks and ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, course modules, critical infrastructures, cybersecurity, programmable logic controllers, security, vulnerability

Guillermo A. Francia, III

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Critical gradient for internal erosion in earthen d ams : a comparative analysis of two predictive methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing the uncertainty in predicting the critical gradient of a dam (i.e. the critical reservoir pool level) is important during the risk analysis of dams. Uncertainty leads to inexact relative risk in portfolio ...

Donohue, Catherine, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other...

125

Total Risk Approach in Applying PRA to Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

As nuclear industry continues marching from an expert-base support to more procedure-base support, it is important to revisit the total risk concept to criticality safety. A key objective of criticality safety is to minimize total criticality accident risk. The purpose of this paper is to assess key constituents of total risk concept pertaining to criticality safety from an operations support perspective and to suggest a risk-informed means of utilizing criticality safety resources for minimizing total risk. A PRA methodology was used to assist this assessment. The criticality accident history was assessed to provide a framework for our evaluation. In supporting operations, the work of criticality safety engineers ranges from knowing the scope and configurations of a proposed operation, performing criticality hazards assessment to derive effective controls, assisting in training operators, response to floor questions, surveillance to ensure implementation of criticality controls, and response to criticality mishaps. In a compliance environment, the resource of criticality safety engineers is increasingly being directed towards tedious documentation effort to meet some regulatory requirements to the effect of weakening the floor support for criticality safety. By applying a fault tree model to identify the major contributors of criticality accidents, a total risk picture is obtained to address relative merits of various actions. Overall, human failure is the key culprit in causing criticality accidents. Factors such as failure to follow procedures, lacks of training, lack of expert support at the floor level etc. are main contributors. Other causes may include lack of effective criticality controls such as inadequate criticality safety evaluation. Not all of the causes are equally important in contributing to criticality mishaps. Applying the limited resources to strengthen the weak links would reduce risk more than continuing emphasis on the strong links of criticality safety support. For example, some compliance failures such as lack of detailed documentation may not be as relevant as the lack of floor support in answering operator's questions during operations. Misuse of resources in reducing lesser causes rather than on major causes of criticality accidents is not risk free without severe consequences. A regulatory mandate without due consideration of total risk may have its opposite effect of increasing the total risk of an accident. A lesson is to be learned here. For regulatory standard/guide development, use of ANS/ANSI standard process, which provides the pedigree of consensus participation, is recommended.

Huang, S T

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

MCNP/KENO criticality benchmarks  

SciTech Connect

In the past, criticality safety analyses related to the handling and storage of fissile materials were obtained from critical experiments, nuclear safety guides, and handbooks. As a result of rising costs and time delays associated with critical experiments, most experimental facilities have been closed, triggering an increased reliance on computational methods. With this reliance comes the need and requirement for redundant validation by independent criticality codes. Currently, the KENO Monte Carlo transport code is the most widely used tool for criticality safety calculations. For other transport codes, such as MCNP, to be accepted by the criticality safety community as a redundant validation tool they must be able to reproduce experimental results at least as well as KENO. The Monte Carlo neutron, photon, and electron transport code MCNP, has an extensive list of attractive features, including continuous energy cross sections, generalized 3-D geometry, time dependent transport, criticality k{sub eff} calculations, and comprehensive source and tally capabilities. It is widely used for nuclear criticality analysis, nuclear reactor shielding, oil well logging, and medical dosimetry calculations. This report specifically addresses criticality and benchmarks the KENO 25 problem test set. These sample problems constitute the KENO standard benchmark set and represent a relatively wide variety of criticality problems. The KENO Monte Carlo code was chosen because of its extensive benchmarking against analytical and experimental criticality results. Whereas the uncertainty in experimental parameters generally prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}, the value of k{sub eff} for criticality is considered unacceptable if it deviates more than a few percent from measurements.

McKinney, G.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wagner, J.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sisolak, J.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

FAQS Reference Guide Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the April 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1173-2009, Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

128

Time-critical information services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency medical services have never been more ready for the implementation of time-critical interorganizational information services for the public good.

Thomas A. Horan; Benjamin L. Schooley

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure ur critical infrastructure--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure O ur critical infrastructure-- roads, bridges, transit-of-the-art approach to asset management of public infrastructure. ORNL's Capabilities · Simulation-based, optimization. · Innovative optimization tools to assess tradeoffs between construction, maintenance, and demolition over

130

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

131

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure...

132

Enterprise level IT risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing IT budget and over-dependence of business on IT infra-structure makes risk management a critical component of enterprise management. The creation and sustenance of an IT risk management framework is one of the crucial and challenging tasks ... Keywords: enterprise level, information technology, risk management

Nadhirah Azizi; Khairuddin Hashim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Critical Materials Research Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEMBER 2012 NOVEMBER 2012 The Critical Materials Research Alliance About the Critical Materials Research Alliance The recent surge of interest in critical materials, including rare earth elements (REEs), stems from supply shortages and escalating prices of some REEs. In 2010, the United States' sole REE supplier was China-previously responsible for 97% of global REE production-but the Chinese government curtailed their export. Because REEs and other critical elements are used in renewable energy resources, energy storage, energy efficiency technologies, and national defense, a shortage in their supply impedes development of energy technologies and hinders U.S. defense industries. To address the challenges faced in revitalizing the rare earth industry, the National Energy Technology

134

Incremental criticality and yield gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Criticality and yield gradients are two crucial diagnostic metrics obtained from Statistical Static Timing Analysis (SSTA). They provide valuable information to guide timing optimization and timing-driven physical synthesis. Existing work in the literature, ...

Jinjun Xiong; Vladimir Zolotov; Chandu Visweswariah

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Approach to criticality in sandpiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A popular theory of self-organized criticality predicts that the stationary density of the Abelian sandpile model equals the threshold density of the corresponding fixed-energy sandpile. We recently announced that this ...

Levine, Lionel

136

A Critical Point for Science?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, taboo ideas become arespectable part of science? Occult Sciences Tripos? CU Institute of Astrology? Telepathy, memory of water, cold fusion?Scientific theology, intelligent design? Mar. 5, 2008/CUPS A Critical Point for Science / Brian Josephson 32...

Josephson, B D

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Lecture notes for criticality safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

Fullwood, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions  

SciTech Connect

We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

Lue, H. [China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Pope, C. N. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

A.E. Danise

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nuclear data for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview is presented on emerging requirements for new criticality safety analyses arising from applications involving nuclear waste management, facility remediation, and the storage of nuclear weapons components. A derivation of criticality analyses from the specifications of national consensus standards is given. These analyses, both static and dynamic, define the needs for nuclear data. Integral data, used primarily for analytical validation, and differential data, used in performing the analyses, are listed, along with desirable margins of uncertainty. Examples are given of needs for additional data to address systems having intermediate neutron energy spectra and/or containing nuclides of intermediate mass number.

Westfall, R.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety SHARE Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety ORNL is the lead national laboratory responsible for supporting the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in managing the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. NCSP is chartered to maintain the technical infrastructure (integral experiments, computational tools, training, data, etc.) needed to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations. ORNL has extensive expertise in the area of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) based upon years of experience in the following areas: Operations Support: providing fissionable material operations support for enrichment, fabrication, production, and research; Critical Experiments: performing experiments at the Y-12 Critical Experiment Facility;

142

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide APRIL 2011 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1 PREFACE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................................................................... 2

143

Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course  

SciTech Connect

This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

145

FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design calculation is to perform a criticality evaluation of the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) and the operations and processes performed therein. The current intent of the FHF is to receive transportation casks whose contents will be unloaded and transferred to waste packages (WP) or MGR Specific Casks (MSC) in the fuel transfer bays. Further, the WPs will also be prepared in the FHF for transfer to the sub-surface facility (for disposal). The MSCs will be transferred to the Aging Facility for storage. The criticality evaluation of the FHF features the following: (I) Consider the types of waste to be received in the FHF as specified below: (1) Uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF); (2) Canistered CSNF (with the exception of horizontal dual-purpose canister (DPC) and/or multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)); (3) Navy canistered SNF (long and short); (4) Department of Energy (DOE) canistered high-level waste (HLW); and (5) DOE canistered SNF (with the exception of MCOs). (II) Evaluate the criticality analyses previously performed for the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified transportation casks (under 10 CFR 71) to be received in the FHF to ensure that these analyses address all FHF conditions including normal operations, and Category 1 and 2 event sequences. (III) Evaluate FHF criticality conditions resulting from various Category 1 and 2 event sequences. Note that there are currently no Category 1 and 2 event sequences identified for FHF. Consequently, potential hazards from a criticality point of view will be considered as identified in the ''Internal Hazards Analysis for License Application'' document (BSC 2004c, Section 6.6.4). (IV) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the fuel transfer bay for defense in depth. The SNF/HLW waste transfer activity (i.e., assembly and canister transfer) that is being carried out in the FHF has been classified as safety category in the ''Q-list'' (BSC 2003, p. A-6). Therefore, this design calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004), even though the FHF itself has not yet been classified in the Q-list. Performance of the work scope as described and development of the associated technical product conform to the procedure AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''.

C.E. Sanders

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Critical History of Renormalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history of renormalization is reviewed with a critical eye, starting with Lorentz's theory of radiation damping, through perturbative QED with Dyson, Gell-Mann & Low, and others, to Wilson's formulation and Polchinski's functional equation, and applications to "triviality", and dark energy in cosmology.

Huang, Kerson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear criticality safety analysis summary report: The S-area defense waste processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) can process all of the high level radioactive wastes currently stored at the Savannah River Site with negligible risk of nuclear criticality. The characteristics which make the DWPF critically safe are: (1) abundance of neutron absorbers in the waste feeds; (2) and low concentration of fissionable material. This report documents the criticality safety arguments for the S-Area DWPF process as required by DOE orders to characterize and to justify the low potential for criticality. It documents that the nature of the waste feeds and the nature of the DWPF process chemistry preclude criticality.

Ha, B.C.

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RMStandards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RM2- 13; GAO. ?Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multiple

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Critical Operating Constraint Forecasting (COCF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents the progress report and Task 1 letter report of the California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) contract funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC), Critical Operating Constraint Forecasting (COCF) for California Independent System Operator (CAISO) Planning Phase. Task 1 was to accomplish the following items: Collect data from CAISO to set up the WECC power flow base case representing the CAISO system in the summer of 2006 Run TRACE for maximizing California Impo...

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOEs coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Disposal criticality analysis methodology for fissile waste forms  

SciTech Connect

A general methodology has been developed to evaluate the criticality potential of the wide range of waste forms planned for geologic disposal. The range of waste forms include commercial spent fuel, high level waste, DOE spent fuel (including highly enriched), MOX using weapons grade plutonium, and immobilized plutonium. The disposal of these waste forms will be in a container with sufficiently thick corrosion resistant barriers to prevent water penetration for up to 10,000 years. The criticality control for DOE spent fuel is primarily provided by neutron absorber material incorporated into the basket holding the individual assemblies. For the immobilized plutonium, the neutron absorber material is incorporated into the waste form itself. The disposal criticality analysis methodology includes the analysis of geochemical and physical processes that can breach the waste package and affect the waste forms within. The basic purpose of the methodology is to guide the criticality control features of the waste package design, and to demonstrate that the final design meets the criticality control licensing requirements. The methodology can also be extended to the analysis of criticality consequences (primarily increased radionuclide inventory), which will support the total performance assessment for the respository.

Davis, J.W. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Gottlieb, P. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fusion algebra of critical percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Program for documenting the criticality safety basis for operations in a research and development facility consistent with new regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect

A program was developed and implemented at LLNL to provide more detailed, documented Criticality Safety Evaluations of operations in an R&D facility. The new Criticality Safety evaluations were consistent with regulatory requirements of the then new DOE Order 5480.24, Nuclear Criticality Safety. The evaluations provide a criticality safety basis for each operation in the facility in support of the facility Safety Analysis Report. This implementation program provided a transition from one method of conducting and documenting Criticality Safety Evaluations to a new method consistent with new regulatory requirements. The program also allowed continued safe operation of the facility while the new implementation level Criticality Safety Evaluations were developed.

Pearson, J.S.; Evarts, R.B.; Huang, S.T.; Goebel, G.

1997-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Manhattan Project: CP-1 Going Critical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Painting of CP-1 Going Critical Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > CP-1 Goes Critical, Met Lab, December 2,...

155

Formalization and Validation of Safety-Critical Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The validation of requirements is a fundamental step in the development process of safety-critical systems. In safety critical applications such as aerospace, avionics and railways, the use of formal methods is of paramount importance both for requirements and for design validation. Nevertheless, while for the verification of the design, many formal techniques have been conceived and applied, the research on formal methods for requirements validation is not yet mature. The main obstacles are that, on the one hand, the correctness of requirements is not formally defined; on the other hand that the formalization and the validation of the requirements usually demands a strong involvement of domain experts. We report on a methodology and a series of techniques that we developed for the formalization and validation of high-level requirements for safety-critical applications. The main ingredients are a very expressive formal language and automatic satisfiability procedures. The language combines first-order, tempor...

Cimatti, Alessandro; Susi, Angelo; Tonetta, Stefano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

157

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

158

Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

Criticality control in shipments of fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for finite-array criticality analysis to ensure criticality safety of shipments of fissile materials in US DOE-certified packages. After the procedure has been performed, one can obtain the minimum transport index and determine the maximum number of fissile packages allowable in a shipment that meets the 10 CFR 71 criticality safety requirements.

Liaw, J. R.; Liu, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Critical Point Symmetries in Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Point Symmetries (CPS) appear in regions of the nuclear chart where a rapid change from one symmetry to another is observed. The first CPSs, introduced by F. Iachello, were E(5), which corresponds to the transition from vibrational [U(5)] to gamma-unstable [O(6)] behaviour, and X(5), which represents the change from vibrational [U(5)] to prolate axially deformed [SU(3)] shapes. These CPSs have been obtained as special solutions of the Bohr collective Hamiltonian. More recent special solutions of the same Hamiltonian, to be described here, include Z(5) and Z(4), which correspond to maximally triaxial shapes (the latter with ``frozen'' gamma=30 degrees), as well as X(3), which corresponds to prolate shapes with ``frozen'' gamma=0. CPSs have the advantage of providing predictions which are parameter free (up to overall scale factors) and compare well to experiment. However, their mathematical structure [with the exception of E(5)] needs to be clarified.

Bonatsos, D; Petrellis, D; Terziev, P A; Yigitoglu, I; Bonatsos, Dennis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Influence of Rotations on the Critical State of Soil Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of grains to rotate can play a crucial role on the collective behavior of granular media. It has been observed in computer simulations that imposing a torque at the contacts modifies the force chains, making support chains less important. In this work we investigate the effect of a gradual hindering of the grains rotations on the so-called critical state of soil mechanics. The critical state is an asymptotic state independent of the initial solid fraction where deformations occur at a constant shear strength and compactness. We quantify the difficulty to rotate by a friction coefficient at the level of particles, acting like a threshold. We explore the effect of this particle-level friction coefficient on the critical state by means of molecular dynamics simulations of a simple shear test on a poly-disperse sphere packing. We found that the larger the difficulty to rotate, the larger the final shear strength of the sample. Other micro-mechanical variables, like the structural anisotropy and the distribution of forces, are also influenced by the threshold. These results reveal the key role of rotations on the critical behavior of soils and suggest the inclusion of rotational variables into their constitutive equations.

W. F. Oquendo; J. D. Muoz; A. Lizcano

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Energy asset owners are facing a monumental challenge as they address compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and their introduction into control center networks and field devices compound this challenge, as ambiguity exists regarding the applicability of the CIP requirements to wireless networking technologies. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards More Documents & Publications

165

Criticality safety and facility design considerations  

SciTech Connect

Operations with fissile material introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel. In addition, concerns over criticality safety can result in substantial delays and shutdown of facility operations. For these reasons, it is clear that the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The emphasis of this report will be placed on engineering design considerations in the prevention of criticality. The discussion will not include other important aspects, such as the physics of calculating limits nor criticality alarm systems.

Waltz, W.R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Criticality safety basics, a study guide  

SciTech Connect

This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

V. L. Putman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Criticality safety basics, a study guide  

SciTech Connect

This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

V. L. Putman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Progra

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements Implementation Matrix for Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed matrix of specific Tank Farms nuclear criticality safety program elements indexed to primary requirements documents. These requirements are collected at a higher level in HNF-SO-MP-SRID-001, ''Tank Waste Remediation System Standards/Requirements Identification Document.'' The intended use of this document is to provide a roadmap for implementing procedures and assessments.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Range of Neutronic Parameters for Repository Criticality Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The ''Range of Neutronic Parameters for Repository Criticality Analyses'' technical report contains a summary of the benchmark criticality analyses (including the laboratory critical experiment [LCEs] and the commercial reactor criticals [CRCs]) used to support the validation of the criticality evaluation methods. This report also documents the development of the Critical Limits (CLs) for the repository criticality analyses.

W.J. Anderson

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Critical Casimir forces in cellular membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments suggest that membranes of living cells are tuned close to a miscibility critical point in the 2D Ising universality class. We propose that one role for this proximity to criticality in live cells is to provide a conduit for relatively long-ranged critical Casimir forces. Using techniques from conformal field theory we calculate potentials of mean force between membrane bound inclusions mediated by their local interactions with the composition order parameter. We verify these calculations using Monte-Carlo where we also compare critical and off-critical results. Our findings suggest that membrane bound proteins experience weak yet long range forces mediated by critical composition fluctuations in the plasma membranes of living cells.

Benjamin B. Machta; Sarah L. Veatch; James P. Sethna

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety...

175

Critical Operating Constraints Forecast-- Functional Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical operating constraints that could result in curtailments of load may occur in a transmission grid with areas of potential generation deficit and limited transmission import capacities. In such situations, it is crucial that the grid operators have a tool to predict when and where critical operating constraints would occur. This report describes the functional specification of such a decision support tool, called the COCF (Critical Operating Constraint Forecast).

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

176

Computing criticality of lines in power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We propose a computationally efficient method based on nonlinear optimization to identify critical lines, failure of which can cause severe blackouts. Our method computes criticality measure for all lines at a time, as opposed to detecting a single vulnerability, providing a global view of the system. This information on criticality of lines can be used to identify multiple contingencies by selectively exploring multiple combinations of broken lines. The effectiveness of our method is demonstrated on the IEEE 30 and 118 bus systems, where we can very quickly detect the most critical lines in the system and identify severe multiple contingencies. I.

Ali P?nar; Adam Reichert; Bernard Lesieutre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

THE LONG TERM CALIBRATION STABILITY OF CRITICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... through nf flow tubes with circular cross section, ... Real Gas Eflects in Critical Flow through Nozzles ... of the Effects of Heat Transfer and Compressible ...

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Critical Minerals Policy Act (S. 1113)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 23, 2012 ... surveys and production to research and recycling and, in particular, to see that additional critical mineral supplies can ... Exploration. Strategic...

179

July 1995, Department's Criticality Safety Assessment Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company at the Lynchburg Research Center; and two-and-a-half years as a Criticality Safety Analyst for General Electric Company at the Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility....

180

FAQS Reference Guide Criticality Safety (NNSA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in DOE-STD-1173-2009, Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

Mew-Bing Wan

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Critical infrastructure protection: The vulnerability conundrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) refer to a broad array of assets which are essential to the everyday functionality of social, economic, political and cultural systems in the United States. The interruption of CIKR poses significant threats ... Keywords: Critical infrastructure, Fortification, Interdiction, Policy, Protection, Strategies, Vulnerability

Alan T. Murray; Tony H. Grubesic

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)  

SciTech Connect

A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Language choice for safety critical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The programming languages currently most popular among software engineers for writing safety critical applications are C and, more recently, C++. The Ada language has been designed with software safety in mind. Although Ada is not perfect concerning ... Keywords: safety, safety-critical

James S. Rogers

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Critical Materials Strategy 1 Critical Materials Strategy 2011 Critical Materials Strategy This report examines the role that rare earth metals and other key materials play in clean energy technologies such as wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. The report found that several clean energy technologies use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term, with risks generally decreasing in the medium and long terms. Supply challenges for five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium) may affect clean energy technology deployment in the years ahead. DOE_CMS2011_FINAL_Full.pdf DOE_CMS_2011_Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 Critical Materials Strategy ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials

187

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) DOE has set expectations for implementing criticality safety controls that are selected to provide preventive and/or mitigative functions for specific potential accident scenarios. There are additional expectations for criticality safety controls that are also designated as Specific Administrative Controls (SACs) (see HSS CRAD 64-32). Also, in instances when the review addresses functionality and operability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear facilities specifically required

188

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

TRIGA FUEL PHASE I AND II CRITICALITY CALCULATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to characterize the criticality aspect of the codisposal of TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomic) reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW). The TRIGA SNF is loaded into a Department of Energy (DOE) standardized SNF canister which is centrally positioned inside a five-canister defense SRS HLW waste package (WP). The objective of the calculation is to investigate the criticality issues for the WP containing the five SRS HLW and DOE SNF canisters in various stages of degradation. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the viability of the codisposal concept for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR).

L. Angers

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Criticality benchmark comparisons leading to cross-section upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several years criticality benchmark calculations with COG. COG is a point-wise Monte Carlo code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It solves the Boltzmann equation for the transport of neutrons and photons. The principle consideration in developing COG was that the resulting calculation would be as accurate as the point-wise cross-sectional data, since no physics computational approximations were used. The objective of this paper is to report on COG results for criticality benchmark experiments in concert with MCNP comparisons which are resulting in corrections an upgrades to the point-wise ENDL cross-section data libraries. Benchmarking discrepancies reported here indicated difficulties in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Livermore (ENDL) cross-sections for U-238 at thermal neutron energy levels. This led to a re-evaluation and selection of the appropriate cross-section values from several cross-section sets available (ENDL, ENDF/B-V). Further cross-section upgrades anticipated.

Alesso, H.P.; Annese, C.E.; Heinrichs, D.P.; Lloyd, W.R.; Lent, E.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Characterization strategy report for the criticality safety issue  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste from nuclear fuels processing is stored in underground waste storage tanks located in the tank farms on the Hanford Site. Waste in tank storage contains low concentrations of fissile isotopes, primarily U-235 and Pu-239. The composition and the distribution of the waste components within the storage environment is highly complex and not subject to easy investigation. An important safety concern is the preclusion of a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction, also known as a nuclear criticality. A thorough technical evaluation of processes, phenomena, and conditions is required to make sure that subcriticality will be ensured for both current and future tank operations. Subcriticality limits must be based on considerations of tank processes and take into account all chemical and geometrical phenomena that are occurring in the tanks. The important chemical and physical phenomena are those capable of influencing the mixing of fissile material and neutron absorbers such that the degree of subcriticality could be adversely impacted. This report describes a logical approach to resolving the criticality safety issues in the Hanford waste tanks. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to identify the characterization needed to quantify risk. The scope of this section of the report is limited to those branches of logic needed to quantify the risk associated with a criticality event occurring. The process is linked to a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure which are linked to the SLD. Data that are needed include adequate knowledge of the chemical and geometric form of the materials of interest. This information is used to determine how much energy the waste would release in the various domains of the tank, the toxicity of the region associated with a criticality event, and the probability of the initiating criticality event.

Doherty, A.L.; Doctor, P.G.; Felmy, A.R.; Prichard, A.W.; Serne, R.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SAFETY INSTRUMENTED FUNCTIONS AS CRITICALITY DEFENSES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to share the SRS methodology for identifying the reliability requirements and documenting the expected performance of Safety Instrumented Functions (SIFs) used as criticality defenses. Nuclear Criticality SIFs are comprised of sensors, logic solvers, and final control elements, which may be either automatic or manual, to detect a process hazard and respond to prevent a criticality. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has invoked the chemical process industry safety standard (ANSI/ISA 84.00.01) for the design of safety significant instrumented systems. The ISA standard provides a graded approach to design based on the amount of risk reduction that is required of an SIF. SRS is embarking on application of this standard to nuclear criticality defenses, thus integrating criticality safety requirements with verifiable design methodology. Per the DOE G 421.1-1 discussion of the double contingency principle, guidance for a single contingency barrier includes, ''The estimated probability that the control will fail (when called upon for protection) is not greater than 1 in 100 demands''. The application of this standard to nuclear criticality SIFs will provide clear requirements in terms of safety availability and testing to assure that the instrumented criticality system as designed, installed, and maintained will meet is performance requirements. The paper identifies the numerous challenges presented by this initiative and the benefits of this approach.

Suttinger, L; William Hearn, W

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessment of criticality safety in DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to assess nuclear criticality safety in DOE Facilities and to assess the effects of various types of possible improvements. The accident statistics in DOE operations show that the fatalities caused by Nuclear Criticality accidents are small compared to other accident categories. The data show the safety performance after 1965, compared to prior years, was considerably improved indicating that overall safety programs have been effective. Data on criticality safety violations were collected from eight major facilities. These data were categorized by severity indexes and causes were assigned. A total of 421 violations were used in the data base for analysis in a fault tree model. Calculations were made using the fault tree methodology to show expected improvement in safety (reduction in probability of a criticality accident) for a fixed reduction in the number of criticality violations. Based on this analysis, about equal emphasis should be placed on reducing mechanical failures and operator errors as efforts in these two areas will likely produce the most significant improvements in safety. A criticality safety infraction form was prepared to facilitate uniformity in recording data on infractions for subsequent analysis. Discussions with Nuclear Safety Specialists working in the field instilled confidence that criticality safety is being handled by concerned, capable, and knowledgable persons.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.; Converse, W.E.; Kottwitz, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Systematics of Reconstructed Process Facility Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of the characteristics of twenty-one criticality accidents occurring in nuclear processing facilities of the Russian Federation, the United States, and the United Kingdom are examined. By systematics the authors mean the degree of consistency or agreement between the factual parameters reported for the accidents and the experimentally known conditions for criticality. The twenty-one reported process criticality accidents are not sufficiently well described to justify attempting detailed neutronic modeling. However, results of classic hand calculations confirm the credibility of the reported accident conditions.

Pruvost, N.L.; McLaughlin, T.P.; Monahan, S.P.

1999-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

Statistical Uncertainty Analysis Applied to Criticality Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an uncertainty methodology based on a statistical approach, for assessing uncertainties in criticality prediction using monte carlo method due to uncertainties in the isotopic composition of the fuel. The methodology has been applied to criticality calculations with MCNP5 with additional stochastic input of the isotopic fuel composition. The stochastic input were generated using the latin hypercube sampling method based one the probability density function of each nuclide composition. The automatic passing of the stochastic input to the MCNP and the repeated criticality calculation is made possible by using a python script to link the MCNP and our latin hypercube sampling code.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Susmikanti, Mike; Nursinta, A. W. [Centre for Nuclear Informatics Development, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

199

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Secuirty  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Mission Support Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security Development of an Army Energy Security Assessment Model FUPWG Mr. Chuck Tremel, CTC 21 October 2010 2 2 Purpose * Provide an overview of the Army Energy Security Assessment (ESA) methodology - Being developed by Concurrent Technologies Corporation - Monitored by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineering Research and Development-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) * Engage Utility and Government Stakeholders 3 3 Overall Program Objectives * Develop/enhance the draft ESA methodology demonstrated under the Army Power and Energy Initiative (APEI) - Leverage existing processes (e.g., Anti-terrorism/Force Protection) - Critical Mission focused * Validate the methodology at an Army installation

200

Analysis of criticality alarm system response to an accidental criticality outside the cascade process buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Neutron dose rates at detector positions within the X-326, X-330, and X-333 buildings were evaluated for an accidental criticality outside of each building. As fissile material bearing equipment and containers are moved to and from each building, the possibility exists for a criticality accident to occur. This analysis demonstrates that a criticality accident which occurs at any position on the access roads alongside a process building can be detected. The detectable area includes all points within the access road boundary along each face of each building. This analysis also demonstrates that the criticality alarm systems of the process buildings will respond to criticality events occurring within the tie lines connecting the process buildings. This analysis was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo neutron-proton transport code. The radiation source is the neutron leakage spectrum of a critical solution of 4.95 percent enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a power level corresponding to the ANSI ANS 8.3. Standard minimum accident of concern. The evaluated neutron fluxes were converted to neutron dose rates by use of the Henderson free-in-air response functions. Critical source positions correspond to the farthest source to detector distances on the access roads along each face of the three buildings, and the centerpoint of the building tie lines. This report contains the methodology used for this study, a background on the data used, and a section about the assumptions and limits to all conclusions.

Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Power Plant Risk Analysis and Management for Critical Asset Protection (RAMCAP) Trial Applications Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power plant risk analysis and management for critical asset protection (NPP RAMCAP ) methodology provides a common, high-level framework for evaluating NPP risk from terrorist attacks that plant owners/operators can use. Development of this method has been coordinated with other U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) efforts in order to enable a consistent risk characterization among all critical infrastructure sectors. This effort culminated in a generic RAMCAP methodology potentially ap...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this Quality Assurance for Capital Project Critical Decision Review Module (QARM) is to identify, integrate, and clarify the QA performance objectives, criteria, and guidance needed...

203

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing Speaker(s): Naoya Motegi Date: June 9, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 California utilities have been exploring the use of...

204

Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document.

Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

A critical programmer searches for professionalism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phrase "critical programmer" in this article's title is meant to be thought of as the programmer who carefully, respectfully, questions conventional wisdom. The particular conventional wisdom under consideration here (held mainly by those who do ...

Robert Schaefer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

ENRICO FERMI FAST REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CRITICALLY CALCULATIONS: INTACT MODE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to perform intact mode and partially degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Enrico Fermi (EF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) co-disposed in a 5 Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The criticality evaluations estimate the values of the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, a measure of nuclear criticality potential, for the 5-DHLW/DOE SNF WP with intact or partially degraded internal configurations. These evaluations contribute to the WP design.

A.S. Mobasheran

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technical information resources for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss some basic technical information resources that would be helpful to the novice nuclear criticality safety specialist. These include bibliographic and benchmark compilations, handbooks, and online resources. The specialist should also be familiar with benchmark quality experimental data needed for code validation. This paper will also discuss the critical experiment data obtained in the 1950s and 1960s at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Heinrichs, D.P.; Koponen, B.L.

1997-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Seminar in Critical Inquiry Twenty-first Century Nuclear Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical Inquiry, has not only been successful in increasing university student retention rate but also in improving student academic performance beyond the initial year of transition into the University. The seminar course herein reviewed is a balanced combination of student personal and academic skill development combined with a solid background in modern nuclear systems. It is a valid premise to assume that entering students as well as stakeholders of the general public demonstrate equal levels of capability. Nuclear systems is designed to give a broad and basic knowledge of nuclear power, medical, industrial, research, and military systems (nuclear systems) in 20-25 hours.

LeMone, D. V.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency. This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel. For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ). INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Baroclinic Adjustment in a Two-Level Model with Barotropic Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic instability in two-level models is characterized by a critical vertical shear, for values above which the flow is unstable. Existing studies of nonlinear baroclinic equilibration in two-level models suggest that, while equilibration ...

Gerard H. Roe; Richard S. Lindzen

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP  

SciTech Connect

With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

Kessler, S

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

New enhancements to SCALE for criticality safety analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the speed, available memory, and reliability of computer hardware increases and the cost decreases, the complexity and usability of computer software will increase, taking advantage of the new hardware capabilities. Computer programs today must be more flexible and user friendly than those of the past. Within available resources, the SCALE staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is committed to upgrading its computer codes to keep pace with the current level of technology. This paper examines recent additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis sections of the SCALE code package. These recent additions and enhancements made to SCALE can be divided into nine categories: (1) new analytical computer codes, (2) new cross-section libraries, (3) new criticality search sequences, (4) enhanced graphical capabilities, (5) additional KENO enhancements, (6) enhanced resonance processing capabilities, (7) enhanced material information processing capabilities, (8) portability of the SCALE code package, and (9) other minor enhancements, modifications, and corrections to SCALE. Each of these additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis capabilities of the SCALE code system are discussed below.

Hollenbach, D.F.; Bowman, S.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nuclear criticality safety training: guidelines for DOE contractors  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. This guide has been developed as an aid to implementing the Chapter V requirements pertaining to nuclear criticality safety training. The guide outlines relevant conceptual knowledge and demonstrated good practices in job performance. It addresses training program operations requirements in the areas of employee evaluations, employee training records, training program evaluations, and training program records. It also suggests appropriate feedback mechanisms for criticality safety training program improvement. The emphasis is on academic rather than hands-on training. This allows a decoupling of these guidelines from specific facilities. It would be unrealistic to dictate a universal program of training because of the wide variation of operations, levels of experience, and work environments among DOE contractors and facilities. Hence, these guidelines do not address the actual implementation of a nuclear criticality safety training program, but rather they outline the general characteristics that should be included.

Crowell, M.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Critical reflection in a digital media artwork - Playas: homeland mirage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of digital media into the working practice of artists has produced challenges previously unknown to the field of art. This inquiry follows an atypical model of artist-driven research derived from disciplines such as social science and education. Here, an artwork functions as a model that is self-reflective, integrating methodologies in a form that benefits art and science. Using Naturalistic Inquiry, including semi-structured interviews of fifteen participants, the work illustrates a process of creation, analysis and evaluation that places the values of the artist on equal footing with the needs of science. Recently, artists have begun using video game engines as a tool to produce 3D navigable spaces. Using the hybrid video game/installation Playas: Homeland Mirage as a case study, this research examines the impact of technology on the artwork and identifies a number of key issues related to the function of critical reflection in this environment. Rules-of-play were a fundamental pre-requisite to the stimulation of critically reflective experience. The human interface with software and hardware was also a primary factor in reflective experience. Based on participant evaluation and observation, the interface was altered in response to its effect on critical reflection, illustrating how choices in this area impact aesthetic experience. Those with experience in visual art were more likely to engage the work in a critically reflective manner than seasoned video game players who tended to be more interested in scoring and winning. These findings and others inform our understanding of the stimulation of critical reflection in immersive environments and show how we can sensitively integrate technology with meaningful evaluative methods. By repurposing a video game in this manner, we learn about the nature of the video game and the nature of art. This research enables artists to gain a better understanding of the medium to more fully integrate technology within a meaningful practice. Conversely, other fields will benefit from a better understanding of the stimulation of meaning in immersive spaces and gain a comprehensive view of a work that strives to contribute to our culture on a deeper level than as simple entertainment. Ultimately, more fully understanding critical reflection in virtual environments will enable us to create enriched experiences that transcend space to create real or virtual place.

Stenner, Jack Eric

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DOE/EM Criticality Safety Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The issue of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) in Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE/EM) fissionable material operations presents challenges because of the large quantities of material present in the facilities and equipment that are committed to storage and/or material conditioning and dispositioning processes. Given the uncertainty associated with the material and conditions for many DOE/EM fissionable material operations, ensuring safety while maintaining operational efficiency requires the application of the most-effective criticality safety practices. In turn, more-efficient implementation of these practices can be achieved if the best NCS technologies are utilized. In 2002, DOE/EM-1 commissioned a survey of criticality safety technical needs at the major EM sites. These needs were documented in the report Analysis of Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Supporting the Environmental Management Program, issued May 2002. Subsequent to this study, EM safety management personnel made a commitment to applying the best and latest criticality safety technology, as described by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). Over the past 7 years, this commitment has enabled the transfer of several new technologies to EM operations. In 2008, it was decided to broaden the basis of the EM NCS needs assessment to include not only current needs for technologies but also NCS operational areas with potential for improvements in controls, analysis, and regulations. A series of NCS workshops has been conducted over the past years, and needs have been identified and addressed by EM staff and contractor personnel. These workshops were organized and conducted by the EM Criticality Safety Program Manager with administrative and technical support by staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report records the progress made in identifying the needs, determining the approaches for addressing these needs, and assimilating new NCS technologies into EM fissionable material operations. In addition, the report includes projections of future EM needs and associted recommendations.

Westfall, Robert Michael [ORNL; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Collective operations in application-level fault-tolerant MPI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fault-tolerance is becoming a critical issue on high-performance platforms. Checkpointing techniques make programs fault-tolerant by saving their state periodically and restoring this state after failure. System-level checkpointing saves the state ... Keywords: MPI, application-level checkpointing, collective communication, fault-tolerance, non-FIFO communication, scientific computing

Greg Bronevetsky; Daniel Marques; Keshav Pingali; Paul Stodghill

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Line tensions, correlation lengths, and critical exponents in lipid membranes near critical points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membranes containing a wide variety of ternary mixtures of high chain-melting temperature lipids, low chain-melting temperature lipids, and cholesterol undergo lateral phase separartion into coexisting liquid phases at a miscibility transition. When membranes are prepared from a ternary lipid mixture at a critical composition, they pass through a miscibility critical point at the transition temperature. Since the critical temperature is typically on the order of room temperature, membranes provide an unusual opportunity in which to perform a quantitative study of biophysical systems that exhibit critical phenomena in the two-dimensional Ising universality class. As a critical point is approached from either high or low temperature, the scale of fluctuations in lipid composition, set by the correlation length, diverges. In addition, as a critical point is approached from low temperature, the line tension between coexisting phases decreases to zero. Here we quantitatively evaluate the temperature dependence of line tension between liquid domains and of fluctuation correlation lengths in lipid membranes in order to extract a critical exponent, nu. We obtain nu=1.2 plus or minus 0.2, consistent with the Ising model prediction nu=1. We also evaluate the probability distributions of pixel intensities in fluoresence images of membranes. From the temperature dependence of these distributions above the critical temperature, we extract an independent critical exponent beta=0.124 plus or minus 0.03 which is consistent with the Ising prediction of beta=1/8.

Aurelia R. Honerkamp-Smith; Pietro Cicuta; Marcus D. Collins; Sarah L. Veatch; Marcel den Nijs; M. Schick; Sarah L. Keller

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)  

SciTech Connect

Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

Heinrichs, D P

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Critical Evaluation of Data on Atomic Energy Levels, Wavelengths, and Transition Probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Processes in Fusion, September 4-7, 2012, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

Alexander Kramida

222

Effects of Diabatic Cooling in a Shear Flow with a Critical Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a two-dimensional, stably stratified shear flow to diabatic cooling, which represents the evaporative cooling of falling precipitation in the subcloud layer, is examined using both a linear analytical theory and a nonlinear ...

Yuh-Lang Lin; Hye-Yeong Chun

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Critical Zinc Deficiency Levels in Indian Soils and Cereal Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, N.K. 1986 Field Crops Res. 13: 55-61. 9. Singh,Singh, Kuldeep 1984 Field Crops Res, 9: 143-149. 7. Singh,than any other group of crops, suffer from Zn deficiency,

Kuldeep, Singh - -

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

Budhiraja, Amarjit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

226

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

227

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 16,150 2008-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 2012-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 0 2012-2012 Indiana 0 2012-2012 Kansas 375 375 375 375 375 2008-2012 Kentucky 0 2012-2012 Louisiana 57,630 84,487 100,320 111,849 200,702 2008-2012 Maryland 0 2012-2012 Michigan 2,154 2,150 2,159 2,159 2,159 2008-2012 Mississippi 43,292 43,758 56,928 62,932 100,443 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 Nebraska 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 1,450 1,450 1,450 1,450 0 2008-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 0 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 0 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 109,655 123,664 130,621 152,102 164,439 2008-2012 Utah 0 2012-2012 Virginia

228

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 2008-2011 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 2008-2011 Arkansas 0 2011-2011 California 0 2011-2011 Colorado 0 2011-2011 Illinois 0 2011-2011...

229

Definition: Critical Peak Pricing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pricing Pricing Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Pricing When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during a specified time period (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. on a hot summer weekday), the price for electricity during these time periods is substantially raised. Two variants of this type of rate design exist: one where the time and duration of the price increase are predetermined when events are called and another where the time and duration of the price increase may vary based on the electric grid's need to have loads reduced;[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_pricing Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike

230

Definition: Critical Peak Rebates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Rebates Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Rebates When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during pre-specified time periods (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. summer weekday afternoons), the price for electricity during these time periods remains the same but the customer is refunded at a single, predetermined value for any reduction in consumption relative to what the utility deemed the customer was expected to consume.[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_rebates [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]]

231

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

CRITICALITY EXCURSION OF NOVEMBER 10, 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A criticality excursion occurred at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Laboratory on November l0, l961 as enriched uranium metal, neutron reflected and moderated by hydrogen, was being assembled. It is estimated that the energy yield was between 10/sup 15/ and 10/sup 16/ fissions. There was no personnel exposure or property damage. Fission product contamination, both airborne and contained in the metal, decayed sufficiently overnight to allow unhindered continuation of the experiment. The excursion was caused by a too rapid approach of the two sections of uranium constituting the experiment. (auth)

Callihan, D.

1962-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

HANFORD NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAM DATABASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Database is a useful information retrieval tool for a criticality safety practitioner. The database contains nuclear criticality literature screened for parameter studies. The entries, characterized with a value index, are segregated into 16 major and six minor categories. A majority of the screened entries have abstracts and a limited number are connected to the Office of Scientific and Technology Information (OSTI) database of full-size documents. Simple and complex searches of the data can be accomplished very rapidly and the end-product of the searches could be a full-size document. The paper contains a description of the database, user instructions, and a number of examples.

TOFFER, H.

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Basic criticality relations for gas core design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes.

Tanner, J.E.

1992-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Probaability of Criticality for MOX SNF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to provide a conservative (upper bound) estimate of the probability of criticality for mixed oxide (MOX) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR) design that has been proposed for use. with the Plutonium Disposition Program (Ref. 1, p. 2). This calculation uses a Monte Carlo technique similar to that used for ordinary commercial SNF (Ref. 2, Sections 2 and 5.2). Several scenarios, covering a range of parameters, are evaluated for criticality. Parameters specifying the loss of fission products and iron oxide from the waste package are particularly important. This calculation is associated with disposal of MOX SNF.

P. Gottlieb

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that effective programs have been developed and implemented to protect the public and DOE's workers from unplanned criticality. The programs should minimize the potential for inadvertent criticality, provide appropriate training for personnel on criticality hazards and procedures for preventing inadvertent criticality, and provide appropriate systems to detect such criticalities and warn workers. The surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of policies, programs, and procedures and for reviewing compliance with specific DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.24, Nuclear Criticality Safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Independent Oversight Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety CEF Criticality Experiments Facility CRAD Criteria and Review Approach Documents CSP Criticality Safety Plan DAF Device Assembly Facility DOE Department of Energy DSA...

242

CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION MEASURES, IG-0545 CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION MEASURES, IG-0545 In...

243

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and more efficient use to significantly lower global demand for critical materials. In 2011 DOE updated its criticality assessments and provided in-depth market and technology...

244

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key...

245

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key...

246

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 -...

247

Company Level Imports Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Company Level Imports Company Level Imports Archives 2013 Imports by Month January XLS February XLS March XLS April XLS May XLS June XLS July XLS August XLS September XLS...

248

Analysis of Godiva-IV delayed-critical and static super-prompt-critical conditions  

SciTech Connect

Super-prompt-critical burst experiments were conducted on the Godiva-IV assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory from the 1960s through 2005. Detailed and simplified benchmark models have been constructed for four delayed-critical experiments and for the static phase of a super-prompt-critical burst experiment. In addition, a two-dimensional cylindrical model has been developed for the super-prompt-critical condition. Criticality calculations have been performed for all of those models with four modern nuclear data libraries: ENDFIB-VI, ENDF/8-VII.0, JEFF-3.1 , and JENDL-3.3. Overall, JENDL-3.3 produces the best agreement with the reference values for k{sub eff}.

Mosteller, Russell D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goda, Joetta M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) In June 2006, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced completion of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) Base Plan, a comprehensive risk management framework that defines critical infrastructure protection (CIP) roles and responsibilities for all levels of government, private industry, and other security partners. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been designated the Sector-Specific Agency (SSA) for the Energy Sector,and is tasked with coordinating preparation of

250

Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Finding critical thresholds for defining bursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burst, i.e., an unusally high frequency of an event in a time-window, is interesting in monitoring systems as it often indicates abnormality. While the detection of bursts is well addressed, the question of what "critical" thresholds, on the number ... Keywords: analytics for temporal data, massive data analytics

Bibudh Lahiri; Ioannis Akrotirianakis; Fabian Moerchen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

DRY TRANSFER FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This design calculation updates the previous criticality evaluation for the fuel handling, transfer, and staging operations to be performed in the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF) including the remediation area. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that operations performed in the DTF and RF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Dry Transfer Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173737], p. 3-8). A description of the changes is as follows: (1) Update the supporting calculations for the various Category 1 and 2 event sequences as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171429], Section 7). (2) Update the criticality safety calculations for the DTF staging racks and the remediation pool to reflect the current design. This design calculation focuses on commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) SNF. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) owned SNF is evaluated in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173284]) and is also applicable to DTF operations. Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. Also, note that the results for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Site specific Cask (MSC) calculations are limited to the specific design chosen (see Assumption 3.4). A more current design will be included in the next revision of the criticality calculations for the Aging Facility. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design as provided in Attachment III of the DTF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document.

C.E. Sanders

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Criticality safety training at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility  

SciTech Connect

HFEF comprises four hot cells and out-of-cell support facilities for the US breeder program. The HFEF criticality safety program includes training in the basic theory of criticality and in specific criticality hazard control rules that apply to HFEF. A professional staff-member oversees the implementation of the criticality prevention program. (DLC)

Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Thelen, V.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Business Continuity Project Project Summary: Develop Business Continuity Plans for all critical functional areas of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-on-going #12;Specific Activities: · Designate BC director (several)-done · Involve top level management-done o-done o Perform Business Analysis-done, Marsh 1999 · Hire consultant to help develop plan-done o for plans o Distribute data collection packages to "critical" functions-done, o Train functions on how

258

Level: National Data;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy...

259

Liquid level detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a method. It is for detecting presence of a liquid level at a first predetermined point along the depth of a borehole.

Fryer, C.D.; Stie, K.E.; Wedel, M.W.; Stamper, K.R.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

262

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

263

Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells for Critical Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power Greg Moreland SENTECH, Inc. Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy August 6, 2008 APCO Annual Conference and Expo 2 2 Fuel cells use hydrogen to create electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts Fuel Cell Overview * An individual fuel cell produces about 1 volt * Hundreds of individual cells can comprise a fuel cell stack * Fuel cells can be used to power a variety of applications -Bibliographic Database * Laptop computers (50-100 W) * Distributed energy stationary systems (5-250 kW) * Passenger vehicles (80-150 kW) * Central power generators (1-200 MW) 3 3 Stationary/ Backup Power Transportation Specialty Markets Nuclear Natural Gas (for transition period only) Coal (with carbon sequestration) Renewable

264

Approval of the Critical Decision 4.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SUBJECT: ACTION: Approval of the Critical Decision 4 for the Closeout SUBJECT: ACTION: Approval of the Critical Decision 4 for the Closeout of the General Atomics (GA) Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project, Project Baseline Summary VL-GA-0012, and the Transfer for the GA Project Files to the Office of Legacy Management (LM) ISSUE: None BACKGROUND: Activities associated with the cleanup of the GA HCF and surrounding site were completed on September 28,2003. The GA site has been remediated to negotiated cleanup standards and released by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the State of California Department of Health Services Radiological Health Branch (CAL-RHB) to unrestricted use. All project generated waste and legacy spent fuel materials have been dispositioned. GAts Special Nuclear

265

Magnetothermoelectric Response near Quantum Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following on from our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166801 (2007)] we examine the finite temperature magnetothermoelectric response in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP). We begin with general scaling considerations relevant to an arbitrary QCP, either with or without Lorentz invariance, and in arbitrary dimension. In view of the broad connections to high temperature superconductivity, and cold atomic gases, we focus on the quantum critical fluctuations of the relativistic Landau--Ginzburg theory. This paradigmatic model arises in many contexts, and describes the (particle-hole symmetric) superfluid--Mott insulator quantum phase transition in the Bose--Hubbard model. The application of a magnetic field opens up a wide range of physical observables, and we present a detailed overview of the charge and thermal transport and thermodynamic response. We combine several different approaches including the epsilon expansion and associated Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE), entropy drift, and argument...

Bhaseen, M J; Sondhi, S L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Web Site for the Nuclear Criticality Safety Professional  

SciTech Connect

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) web site is the result of the efforts of marry members of the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) community and is maintained by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the direction of the NCSP Management Team. This World Wide Web (WWW) resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The NCSP web site provides information of interest to NCS professionals and includes links to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on this web site direct the user to the original source of the referenced material in order to ensure access to the latest, most accurate version.

Lee, C.K.; Huang, S.; Morman, J.A.; Garcia, A.S.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Role of criticality models in ANSI standards for nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Two methods used in nuclear criticality safety evaluations in the area of neutron interaction among subcritical components of fissile materials are the solid angle and surface density techniques. The accuracy and use of these models are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Thomas, J.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Recent Changes to the Criticality Safety Program at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

During the 1996 audit, a corrective action program was developed and implemented to enhance the Criticality Safety Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Criticality Safety Program at LLNL has been rebuilt to combine a strong core criticality safety program with direct field support to floor operations. Field staff are integrated into the supported facility and program efforts. This method of operation effects all aspects of the criticality safety program including, as examples, development of criticality safety controls and training.

Pearson, J.S.; Burch, J.G.; Huang, S.T.

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

License Application Chapter 5 Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium or other fissile material outside of check-sources and various standards for radiological measurement calibration. As such, no criticality safety programs or procedures are maintained or implemented at the facility; however, the IIFP Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA), as documented in the ISA Summary, did evaluate the potential for a criticality accident at the IIFP Site. The only potential method of having a criticality accident at the facility involves the inadvertent receipt and processing of fissile materials, which is addressed in the ISA. Controls are established to verify that no enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is received and processed at the facility. The cylinders processed at the IIFP Facility are the large, 14-ton or 10-ton UF6 tails cylinders, not the 2 -ton enriched product cylinders. Processing equipment at the plant, namely the autoclaves, is not sized to handle these smaller cylinders, so there is no method to feed enriched material into the processing plants. Additionally, each cylinder will be scanned with a detector to verify that the incoming cylinders do not contain fissile materials. The scan does not determine the shippers assay exactness for the cylinder contents, but does provide a reasonable indication if the cylinder is depleted or enriched. Both the receipt inspection and the scan for the assay at the Facility Site are maintained as Items Relied on for Safety (IROFS) controls. Also, feed suppliers (UF6 enrichment plants) have redundant and

Uranium De-conversion; Revision B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Criticality Alarm System Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for PFP's criticality alarm system as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item. PFP's Criticality Alarm System includes the nine criticality alarm system panels and their associated hardware. This includes all parts up to the first breaker in the electrical distribution system. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-003, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Criticality Detectors and Alarms Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.''

WHITE, W.F.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing ofelectricity  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates how critical-peak pricing (CPP)affects households with different usage and income levels, with the goalof informing policy makers who are considering the implementation of CPPtariffs in the residential sector. Using a subset of data from theCalifornia Statewide Pricing Pilot of 2003-2004, average load changeduring summer events, annual percent bill change, and post-experimentsatisfaction ratings are calculated across six customer segments,categorized by historical usage and income levels. Findings show thathigh-use customers respond significantly more in kW reduction than dolow-use customers, while low-use customers save significantly more inpercentage reduction of annual electricity bills than do high-usecustomers results that challenge the strategy of targeting only high-usecustomers for CPP tariffs. Across income levels, average load and billchanges were statistically indistinguishable, as were satisfaction ratesresults that are compatible with a strategy of full-scale implementationof CPP rates in the residential sector. Finally, the high-use customersearning less than $50,000 annually were the most likely of the groups tosee bill increases about 5 percent saw bill increases of 10 percent ormore suggesting that any residential CPP implementation might considertargeting this customer group for increased energy efficiencyefforts.

Herter, Karen

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

Liquid level controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for maintaining two distinct sodium levels within the shell of a heat exchanger having a plurality of J-shaped modular tube bundles each enclosed in a separate shell which extends from a common base portion. A lower liquid level is maintained in the base portion and an upper liquid level is maintained in the shell enwrapping the long stem of the J-shaped tube bundles by utilizing standpipes with a notch at the lower end which decreases in open area the distance from the end of the stand pipe increases and a supply of inert gas fed at a constant rate to produce liquid levels, which will remain generally constant as the flow of liquid through the vessel varies. (auth)

Mangus, J.D.; Redding, A.H.

1975-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized process for cyber vulnerability assessment in compliance with the Critical Infrastructure Protection standards adopted by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation in 2006. This guide covers the planning, execution, and reporting process. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June

276

FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-CriticalitySafety.docx Description Criticality Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Criticality Safety

277

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized process for cyber vulnerability assessment in compliance with the Critical Infrastructure Protection standards adopted by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation in 2006. This guide covers the planning, execution, and reporting process. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June 2012)

278

Critical phenomena in N=4 SYM plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma at finite temperature and chemical potential for an R-symmetry charge undergoes a second order phase transition. We demonstrate that this phase transition is of the mean field theory type. We explicitly show that the model is in the dynamical universality class of 'model B' according to the classification of Hohenberg and Halperine, with dynamical critical exponent z=4. We study bulk viscosity in the mass deformed version of this theory in the vicinity of the phase transition. We point out that all available models of bulk viscosity at continuous phase transition are in conflict with our explicit holographic computations.

Alex Buchel

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-Es REACT Project, short for Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Apparatus and method for critical current measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the measurement of the critical current of a superconductive sample, e.g., a clad superconductive sample, the apparatus including a conductive coil, a means for maintaining the coil in proximity to a superconductive sample, an electrical connection means for passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, a cooling means for maintaining the superconductive sample at a preselected temperature, a means for passing a current through the superconductive sample, and, a means for monitoring reactance of the coil. The alternating current capable of generating a magnetic field sufficient to penetrate, e.g., any cladding, and to induce eddy currents in the superconductive material, passing a steadily increasing current through the superconductive material, the current characterized as having a different frequency than the alternating current, and, monitoring the reactance of the coil with a phase sensitive detector as the current passed through the superconductive material is steadily increased whereby critical current of the superconductive material can be observed as the point whereat a component of impedance deviates.

Martin, J.A.; Dye, R.C.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Challenging beliefs through multi-level participatory modelling in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical challenge for science in times of increasingly depleted natural resources is how policy and management can be improved to attain a pathway to sustainability. This paper argues that facilitating a learning experience for decision makers by ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Indonesia, Multi-level governance, Participatory modelling

Alexander Smajgl

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Array recovery and high-level transformations for DSP applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient implementation of DSP applications is critical for many embedded systems. Optimizing compilers for application programs, written in C, largely focus on code generation and scheduling, which, with their growing maturity, are providing diminishing ... Keywords: Pointer conversion, dataflow graphs, embedded processors, high-level transformations

Bjrn Franke; Michael O'boyle

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Bookmark and Share J. Morman and R. Bucher load J. Morman and R. Bucher load samples into the ZPR-6 critical assembly for material worth measurements. Click on image to view larger image. The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) is focused on maintaining fundamental infrastructure that enables retention of DOE capabilities and expertise in nuclear criticality safety necessary to support line

284

ORNL partners on critical materials hub | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL partners on critical materials hub ORNL partners on critical materials hub January 01, 2013 The Critical Materials Institute builds on the Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy report, which addresses the use of rare earths and other critical materials in clean energy components, products, and processes. December 2011. Credit: U.S. DOE. ORNL wins big as part of a team led by Ames Labora-tory, which was selected for an Energy Innovation Hub to address shortages of critical materials, including rare earth metals. The award of up to $120 million over five years for the Critical Materials Institute involves four national labs, academia, and industrial partners. ORNL will play a key role in conducting the CMI's mis-sion to eliminate materials criticality as an impediment to the commercialization of clean

285

Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (CD-4) Approval Template Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template ExampleCD-4Template02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 2 (CD-2...

286

Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (CD-2) Approval Template Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template ExampleCD-2Template02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 4 (CD-4...

287

Historical perspective of criticality safety in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The stages through which criticality safety has progressed are reviewed and speculation about present signs of maturity is made. Early history, evolution, and accident experiences are described. It is concluded that criticality safety as a discipline is mature.

Paxton, H.C. (comp.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Oil Extraction and Analysis: Critical Issues and Comparative Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers from the symposium Critical Issues, Current and Emerging Technologies for Determination of Crude Fat Content in Food, Feed, and Seeds. Oil Extraction and Analysis: Critical Issues and Comparative Studies Processing agricultura

289

Critically pressured free-gas reservoirs below gas-hydrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; importantly, no observed gas column thickness significantly exceeds the calculated critical value (Fig. 3 complete gas evacuation3,24 . A Received 16 June; accepted 5 November 2003; doi:10.1038/nature02172. 1.............................................................. Critically pressured free-gas

Holbrook, W. Steven

290

CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

CSER 94-09: Implications of the heat anomaly in Tank 106-C to criticality safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water is periodically added to Tank C-106 to cool its waste. In March 1994 addition of water was temporarily discontinued to determine if the tank could be adequately cooled at a lower water level. Following an addition of water, a temperature fluctuation was observed on one of the thermocouple trees. This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) explains why the anomalous temperature measurements could not have been caused by nuclear criticality. Waste in Tank C-106 was discharged from processing facilities under controls designed to ensure that the contents of the tank would remain well subcritical under all credible conditions. The observed temperature profile does not fit the profile expected from a criticality event. In addition, there has been no indication of any significant increase in the rate of water evaporation.

Rogers, C.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Computational Method for Improved Forewarning of Critical Events  

ORNLs computational method for analyzing nonlinear processes provides improvedforewarning of imminent critical events. This is achieved through phase ...

293

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

294

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

295

ITL Bulletin Generating Secure Cryptographic Keys: A Critical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... KEYS: A CRITICAL COMPONENT OF CRYPTOGRAPHIC ... relies upon two basic components: an algorithm (or ... and of keys for symmetric algorithms. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

NIST Issues New Call for White Papers on Critical National ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in energy research, including technologies for improved manufacturing of critical components for alternative energy production; replacement of ...

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Event-driven gate-level simulation with GP-GPUs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Logic simulation is a critical component of the design tool flow in modern hardware development efforts. It is used widely -- from high-level descriptions down to gate-level ones -- to validate several aspects of the design, particularly functional correctness. ... Keywords: gate-level simulation, general purpose graphics processing unit (GP-GPU), high-performance simulation

Debapriya Chatterjee; Andrew DeOrio; Valeria Bertacco

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluative Schemas and the Mediating Role of Critics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do critics enable producers and consumers to come to mutually agreeable terms of trade? We propose that critics offer more guidance to those who set prices when their quality assessments are structured by clearer evaluative schemas. Schema clarity ... Keywords: categories, critics, mediated markets, sociology of markets

Greta Hsu; Peter W. Roberts; Anand Swaminathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Criticality safety evaluation - an endusers's perspective  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents criticality safety evaluations from an enduser's perspective. Overall issues related to a criticality safety evaluation in an operations support setting are discussed. A work flow process is presented which shows the key steps in conducting an effective criticality evaluation. Finally, a few suggestions are given to assist newcomers to this field.

Huang, S T

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Manipulating a single adsorbed DNA for a critical endpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show the existence of a critical endpoint in the phase diagram of unzipping of an adsorbed double-stranded (ds) polymer like DNA. The competition of base pairing, adsorption and stretching by an external force leads to the critical end point. From exact results, the location of the critical end point is determined and its classical nature established.

Rajeev Kapri; Somendra M. Bhattacharjee

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Forecasting the Wind to Reach Significant Penetration Levels of Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in atmospheric science are critical to increased deployment of variable renewable energy (VRE) sources. For VRE sources, such as wind and solar, to reach high penetration levels in the nation's electric grid, electric system operators and VRE ...

Melinda Marquis; Jim Wilczak; Mark Ahlstrom; Justin Sharp; Andrew Stern; J. Charles Smith; Stan Calvert

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Asset Management of Critical.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Diane Davidson (865) 946-1475 davidsond@ornl.gov Research Brief Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies O ur critical infrastructure-roads, bridges, transit, aviation, schools, drinking water, wastewater, dams, solid waste, hazardous waste, navigable waterways, and energy-is in disrepair. The American Society of Civil Engineers gives our public infrastructure a D+ grade, and an investment of at least $1.6 trillion

303

Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1173-2009 April 2009 DOE STANDARD CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1173-2009 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1173-2009 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is responsible for reviewing and approving the qualification standard for Department-wide

304

Critical adsorption at chemically structured substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider binary liquid mixtures near their critical consolute points and exposed to geometrically flat but chemically structured substrates. The chemical contrast between the various substrate structures amounts to opposite local preferences for the two species of the binary liquid mixtures. Order parameters profiles are calculated for a chemical step, for a single chemical stripe, and for a periodic stripe pattern. The order parameter distributions exhibit frustration across the chemical steps which heals upon approaching the bulk. The corresponding spatial variation of the order parameter and its dependence on temperature are governed by universal scaling functions which we calculate within mean field theory. These scaling functions also determine the universal behavior of the excess adsorption relative to suitably chosen reference systems.

Monika Sprenger; Frank Schlesener; S. Dietrich

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tropical Cyclones as a Critical Phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proposed that the number of tropical cyclones as a function of the energy they release is a decreasing power-law function, up to a characteristic energy cutoff determined by the spatial size of the ocean basin in which the storm occurs. This means that no characteristic scale exists for the energy of tropical cyclones, except for the finite-size effects induced by the boundaries of the basins. This has important implications for the physics of tropical cyclones. We discuss up to what point tropical cyclones are related to critical phenomena (in the same way as earthquakes, rainfall, etc.), providing a consistent picture of the energy balance in the system. Moreover, this perspective allows one to visualize more clearly the effects of global warming on tropical-cyclone occurrence.

Corral, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fuzzy architecture assessment for critical infrastructure resilience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for the selection of alternative architectures in a connected infrastructure system to increase resilience of the overall infrastructure system. The paper begins with a description of resilience and critical infrastructure, then summarizes existing approaches to resilience, and presents a fuzzy-rule based method of selecting among alternative infrastructure architectures. This methodology includes considerations which are most important when deciding on an approach to resilience. The paper concludes with a proposed approach which builds on existing resilience architecting methods by integrating key system aspects using fuzzy memberships and fuzzy rule sets. This novel approach aids the systems architect in considering resilience for the evaluation of architectures for adoption into the final system architecture.

Muller, George

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

5-D Choptuik critical exponent and holography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a holographic argument was used to relate the saturation exponent, {gamma}{sub BFKL}, of 4-dimensional Yang-Mills theory in the Regge limit to the Choptuik critical scaling exponent, {gamma}{sub 5d}, in 5-dimensional black hole formation via scalar field collapse [L. Alvarez-Gaume, C. Gomez, and M. A. Vazquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.]. Remarkably, the numerical value of the former agreed quite well with previous calculations of the latter. We present new results of an improved calculation of {gamma}{sub 5d} with substantially decreased numerical error. Our current result is {gamma}{sub 5d}=0.4131{+-}0.0001, which is close to, but not in strict agreement with, the value of {gamma}{sub BFKL}=0.409 552 quoted in [L. Alvarez-Gaume, C. Gomez, and M. A. Vazquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.].

Bland, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Winnipeg Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kunstatter, G. [Department of Physics and Winnipeg Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Critical challenges for EUV resist materials  

SciTech Connect

Although Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is now well into the commercialization phase, critical challenges remain in the development of EUV resist materials. The major issue for the 22-nm half-pitch node remains simultaneously meeting resolution, line-edge roughness (LER), and sensitivity requirements. Although several materials have met the resolution requirements, LER and sensitivity remain a challenge. As we move beyond the 22-nm node, however, even resolution remains a significant challenge. Chemically amplified resists have yet to demonstrate the required resolution at any speed or LER for 16-nm half pitch and below. Going to non-chemically amplified resists, however, 16-nm resolution has been achieved with a LER of 2 nm but a sensitivity of only 70 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

Naulleau, Patrick P.; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Gideon; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Rekawa, Seno; Smith, Nathan

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Transposed critical temperature Rankine thermodynamic cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transposed critical temperature (TPCT) is shown to be an extremely important thermodynamic property in the selection of the working fluid and turbine states for optimized geothermal power plants operating on a closed organic (binary) Rankine cycle. When the optimum working fluid composition and process states are determined for given source and sink conditions (7 parameter optimization), turbine inlet states are found to be consistently adjacent to the low pressure side of the working fluids' TPCT line on pressure-enthalpy coordinates. Although the TPCT concepts herein may find numerous future applications in high temperature, advanced cycles for fossil or nuclear fired steam power plants and in supercritical organic Rankine heat recovery bottoming cycles for Diesel engines, this discussion is limited to moderate temperature (150 to 250/sup 0/C) closed simple organic Rankine cycle geothermal power plants. Conceptual design calculations pertinent to the first geothermal binary cycle Demonstration Plant are included.

Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Magnetothermoelectric Response near Quantum Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following on from our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166801 (2007)] we examine the finite temperature magnetothermoelectric response in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP). We begin with general scaling considerations relevant to an arbitrary QCP, either with or without Lorentz invariance, and in arbitrary dimension. In view of the broad connections to high temperature superconductivity, and cold atomic gases, we focus on the quantum critical fluctuations of the relativistic Landau--Ginzburg theory. This paradigmatic model arises in many contexts, and describes the (particle-hole symmetric) superfluid--Mott insulator quantum phase transition in the Bose--Hubbard model. The application of a magnetic field opens up a wide range of physical observables, and we present a detailed overview of the charge and thermal transport and thermodynamic response. We combine several different approaches including the epsilon expansion and associated Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE), entropy drift, and arguments based on Lorentz invariance. The results differ markedly from the zero field case, and we include an extended discussion of the finite thermal conductivity which emerges in the presence of a magnetic field. We derive an integral equation that governs its response and explore the crossover upon changing the magnetic field. This equation may be interpreted as a projection equation in the low field limit, and clearly highlights the important role of collision invariants (or zero modes) in the hydrodynamic regime. Using an epsilon expansion around three-dimensions, our analytic and numerical results interpolate between our previously published value and the exact limit of two-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

M. J. Bhaseen; A. G. Green; S. L. Sondhi

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 1 Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 1 Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 White Paper October 2011 #12;Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 2 DISCLAIMER The information contained in this document

Chaudhuri, Surajit

313

Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AND RESILIENCE MONTH, 2013 - - - - - - - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION Over the last few decades, our Nation has grown increasingly dependent on critical infrastructure, the backbone of our national and economic security. America's critical infrastructure is complex and diverse, combining systems in both cyberspace and the physical world -- from power plants, bridges, and interstates to Federal buildings and the massive electrical grids that power our Nation. During Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, we

314

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports a proactive and comprehensive approach to address the challenges associated with the use of rare earth elements and other critical materials in clean energy technologies. In 2010 the Department developed its first-ever Critical Materials Strategy based on three strategic pillars: 1) diversifying global supply chains to mitigate supply risk; 2) developing material and technology substitutes; and 3) promoting recycling, reuse and more efficient use to significantly lower global demand for critical materials. In 2011 DOE updated its criticality assessments and provided in-depth market and technology analyses in response to important developments during the year. DOE will

315

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Updates to Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Digg

316

National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status  

SciTech Connect

After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database  

SciTech Connect

A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst.

Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pearson, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dynamical Analysis of the Structure of Neutron Star Critical Collapses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jin et al reported that axisymmetric simulations of NS-like objects with polytropic EOS undergo critical gravitational collapse. As the critical collapse observed via fine-tuning of the adiabatic index $\\Gamma$, they conjecture that critical phenomena may occur in realistic astrophysical scenarios. To clarify the implications this numerical observation has on realistic astrophysical scenarios, here, we perform dynamical analysis on the structure of the critical collapse observed in the former work. We report the time scales and oscillation frequencies exhibited by the critical solution and compare these results with values obtained from analytic perturbative mode analysis of equilibrium TOV configurations. We also establish the universality of the critical solution with respect to a 1-parameter family of initial data as well as the phase space manifold of the critical collapse.

M. -B. Wan; K. -J. Jin; W. -M. Suen

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Appendix 3 - iManage Help Desk Priority Level  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Appendix 3- iManage Help Desk Priority Levels Priority Level Definitions Resolution Time Critical Prevents normal operational business and for which there is no known workaround. Examples: inability to produce financial statements by required deadline, the inability to pay contractors in accordance with the Prompt Pay Act, the inability to commit or obligation funds, or Total loss of production service to entire customer set, or Impacts one or more service level commitments, or Impacts the delivery schedule Note 1: Reassignment must be communicated and directly agreed upon. Note 2: The initial response time for critical priority tickets must be within 60 minutes. Resolution is around the clock support until service is restored. Closure is

320

LET and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma in irradiated Bax transgenic C57Bl/6 mice James A. Jacobus The University of Iowa Abstract Humans are exposed to sparsely ionizing (low LET) radiation from environmental sources and radiotherapy as well as densely ionizing (high LET) radiation during radiotherapy and from cosmic radiations, particularly during space travel. To test the hypothesis that defects in mitochondrial metabolism leading to increased ROS levels could alter responses to radiation, lymphoma-prone C57Bl/6 mice over expressing the mitochondrial-acting Bax protein in thymocytes (which demonstrate increased steady-state levels of superoxide; FRBM 44: 1677-1686, 2008) were irradiated with both low and high LET radiations and the onset of tumor

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321

EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, while performing extensive EUV irradiation endurance testing on Ru-capped multilayer mirrors in the presence of elevated partial pressures of water and hydrocarbons, NIST has observed that the amount of EUV-induced damage actually decreases with increasing levels of water vapor above {approx} 5 x 10{sup -7} Torr. It is thought that the admitted water vapor may interact with otherwise stable, condensed carbonaceous species in an UHV vacuum system to increase the background levels of simple gaseous carbon-containing molecules. Some support for this hypothesis was demonstrated by observing the mitigating effect of very small levels of simple hydrocarbons with the intentional introduction of methyl alcohol in addition to the water vapor. It was found that the damage rate decreased by at least an order of magnitude when the partial pressure of methyl alcohol was just one percent of the water partial pressure. These observations indicate that the hydrocarbon components of the vacuum environment under actual testing conditions must be characterized and controlled to 10{sup -11} Torr or better in order to quantify the damage caused by high levels of water vapor. The possible effects of exposure beam size and out-of-band radiation on mirror lifetime testing will also be discussed.

Hill, S B; Ermanoski, I; Grantham, S; Tarrio, C; Lucatorto, T B; Madey, T E; Bajt, S; Chandhok, M; Yan, P; Wood, O; Wurn, S; Edwards, N V

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY  

SciTech Connect

In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

PUIGH RJ

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Critical infrastructure systems of systems assessment methodology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the risk of malevolent attacks against large-scale critical infrastructures requires modifications to existing methodologies that separately consider physical security and cyber security. This research has developed a risk assessment methodology that explicitly accounts for both physical and cyber security, while preserving the traditional security paradigm of detect, delay, and respond. This methodology also accounts for the condition that a facility may be able to recover from or mitigate the impact of a successful attack before serious consequences occur. The methodology uses evidence-based techniques (which are a generalization of probability theory) to evaluate the security posture of the cyber protection systems. Cyber threats are compared against cyber security posture using a category-based approach nested within a path-based analysis to determine the most vulnerable cyber attack path. The methodology summarizes the impact of a blended cyber/physical adversary attack in a conditional risk estimate where the consequence term is scaled by a ''willingness to pay'' avoidance approach.

Sholander, Peter E.; Darby, John L.; Phelan, James M.; Smith, Bryan; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Walter, Andrew; Varnado, G. Bruce; Depoy, Jennifer Mae

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Quantum mechanical cluster calculations of critical scintillationprocesses  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of commercial quantum chemistrycodes to simu-late several critical scintillation processes. The crystalis modeled as a cluster of typically 50 atoms embedded in an array oftypically 5,000 point charges designed to reproduce the electrostaticfield of the infinite crystal. The Schrodinger equation is solved for theground, ionized, and excited states of the system to determine the energyand electron wavefunction. Computational methods for the followingcritical processes are described: (1) the formation and diffusion ofrelaxed holes, (2) the formation of excitons, (3) the trapping ofelectrons and holes by activator atoms, (4) the excitation of activatoratoms, and (5) thermal quenching. Examples include hole diffusion in CsI,the exciton in CsI, the excited state of CsI:Tl, the energy barrier forthe diffusion of relaxed holes in CaF2 and PbF2, and prompt hole trappingby activator atoms in CaF2:Eu and CdS:Te leading to an ultra-fast (<50ps) scintillation risetime.

Derenzo, Stephen E.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.; Weber, Marvin J.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

Berger, C.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A critical review of residual stress technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current technology for evaluating residual in materials has been critically reviewed from the perspective of LLNL needs. The primary technique available continues to be x-ray diffraction (XRD). Substantial analytical and experimental refinements have been made in the past decade. An especially promising development in XRD is the use of energy dispersive spectroscopy for evaluating triaxial stress. This would provide an alternative to neutron diffraction, a technique limited to a relatively small number of outside laboratories. Recent research in residual stress measurement using ultrasonics have concentrated on shear wave techniques. Substantial progress has been made in the use of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT's), surface waves, corrections for texture, and, of special interest to LLNL, the ability to characterize interfacial stress. Strain gages and related technologies continue to be actively used in field measurements of residual stress, although there is generally some destructive nature to those techniques. An increased use of multiple technique approaches to residual stress evaluation is occurring for the purposes of both verification and complementary measurements. Among a number of miscellaneous techniques found in the recent literature are several involving the use of stress-sensitive magnetic properties and an especially promising use of the thermoelastic effect for noncontact stress mapping. Recommendations for LLNL activity include energy dispersive XRD, ultrasonics characterization of anisotropy and interfacial stress, and investigation of the thermoelastic effect. 57 refs.

Shackelford, J.F.; Brown, B.D.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level Application and Reproducibility of Lc Based Methods. Author(s), Stein...

328

A Critical Review and Analysis of Experience to Date 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article explores whether and to what extent individuals are willing to voluntarily pay a premium for products that provide public environmental benefits. In particular, we critically review and analyze the status and impacts of U.S. green power marketing to date. Green power marketingthe business of selling electricity products distinguished by their environmental attributesseeks to develop a private market for renewable energy driven by consumer demand for green products. Debate has centered on the ability of such a market to provide a significant level of support for renewable energy sources. This paper examines experience to date with green power markets in the United States, providing an historical overview, reviewing product offerings, assessing customer response, and calculating overall support for renewable energy. While market research shows that a majority of the populace states a willingness to pay a premium for renewable energy, early experience with green power marketing shows that those attitudes have not yet translated into large-scale behavior change, tracking experience in other environmental product markets. While a niche market for green power does exist, the data presented in this paper indicate that the collective impact of customer-driven demand on renewable generation has been modest thus far. Several lessons on how to potentially improve the prospects of green power marketing are discussed.

Ryan Wiser; Edward Holt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dominant Middle East oil reserves critically important to world supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the location production, and transportation of the 60 million bbl of oil consumed in the world each day is of vital importance to relations between nations, as well as to their economic wellbeing. Oil has frequently been a decisive factor in the determination of foreign policy. The war in the Persian Gulf, while a dramatic example of the critical importance of oil, is just the latest of a long line of oil-influenced diplomatic/military incidents, which may be expected to continue. Assuming that the world's remaining oil was evenly distributed and demand did not grow, if exploration and development proceeded as efficiently as they have in the U.S., world oil production could be sustained at around current levels to about the middle of the next century. It then would begin a long decline in response to a depleting resource base. However, the world's remaining oil is very unevenly distributed. It is located primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere, mostly in the Persian Gulf, and much is controlled by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Scientific resource assessments indicate that about half of the world's remaining conventionally recoverable crude oil resource occurs in the Persian Gulf area. In terms of proved reserves (known recoverable oil), the Persian Gulf portion increase to almost two-thirds.

Riva, J.P. Jr. (Library of Congress, Washington, DC (United States). Congressional Research Service)

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program.  

SciTech Connect

This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

Felty, J. R. (James R.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Criticality concerns in cleaning large uranium hexafluoride cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Cleaning large cylinders used to transport low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) presents several challenges to nuclear criticality safety. This paper presents a brief overview of the cleaning process, the criticality controls typically employed and their bases. Potential shortfalls in implementing these controls are highlighted, and a simple example to illustrate the difficulties in complying with the Double Contingency Principle is discussed. Finally, a summary of recommended criticality controls for large cylinder cleaning operations is presented.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Company Level Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Company Level Imports With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 | XLS Previous Issues Month: September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go September 2013 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in September 2013 has been released and it shows that two countries exported more than 1 million barrels per day to the United States (see table below). The top five exporting countries accounted for 75 percent of United States crude oil imports in September while the top ten sources accounted for approximately 92 percent of all U.S. crude oil imports. The top five sources of US crude

335

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain GAO is making recommendations to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to develop a strategy for coordinating control systems security efforts and to enhance information sharing with relevant stakeholders. DHS officials did not agree or disagree with GAO's recommendations, but stated that they would take them under advisement. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain More Documents & Publications GAO Challenges and Efforts to Secure Control Systems (March 2004)

337

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation, May 31, 2013 (HSS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Criteria and Review Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subj ect: Criticality Safety Controls lmplementation - Criteria and...

338

Critical mass experiment using U-235 foils and lucite plates  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this experiment was to show how the multiplication of the system increases as moderated material is placed between highly enriched uranium foils. In addition, this experiment served to demonstrate the hand-stacking techniques, and approach to criticality by remote operation. This experiment was designed by Tom McLaughlin in the mid seventies as part of the criticality safety course that is taught at Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF). The W-U-235 ratio for this experiment was 215 which is where the minimum critical mass for this configuration occurs.

Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Maritime chokepoints critical to petroleum markets - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. electricity; oil/petroleum; liquid fuels; ... world oil transit chokepoints are a critical part of global energy security. ...

340

Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights in the FY 2013 budget include: 60 million to perform critical research on energy storage systems and devise new approaches for battery storage; 770 million for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ideas for Transatlantic Cooperation on Critical Materials,Chairs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Critical Materials, ChairsAnimateurs: Jeff Skeer, DOE Office of Policy and International Affairs and Renzo Tomellini, EC Directorate General for Research and Innovation...

342

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix...

343

A Web-Based Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database  

SciTech Connect

A bibliographic criticality safety database of over 13,000 records is available on the Internet as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) website. This database is easy to access via the Internet and gets substantial daily usage. This database and other criticality safety resources are available at ncsp.llnl.gov. The web database has evolved from more than thirty years of effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), beginning with compilations of critical experiment reports and American Nuclear Society Transactions.

Koponen, B L; Huang, S

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network.

Koponen, B.L.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Criticality issues with highly enriched fuels in a repository environment  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary analysis of a volcanic tuff repository containing a combination of low enrichment commercial spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and DOE-owned SNF packages. These SNFs were analyzed with respect to their criticality risks. Disposal of SNF packages containing significant fissile mass within a geologic repository must comply with current regulations relative to criticality safety during transportation and handling within operational facilities. However, once the repository is closed, the double contingency credits for criticality safety are subject to unremediable degradation, (e.g., water intrusion, continued presence of neutron absorbers in proximity to fissile material, and fissile material reconfiguration). The work presented in this paper focused on two attributes of criticality in a volcanic tuff repository for near-field and far-field scenarios: (1) scenario conditions necessary to have a criticality, and (2) consequences of a nuclear excursion that are components of risk. All criticality consequences are dependent upon eventual water intrusion into the repository and subsequent breach of the disposal package. Key criticality parameters necessary for a critical assembly are: (1) adequate thermal fissile mass, (2) adequate concentration of fissile material, (3) separation of neutron poison from fissile materials, and (4) sufficient neutron moderation (expressed in units of moderator to fissile atom ratios). Key results from this study indicated that the total energies released during a single excursion are minimal (comparable to those released in previous solution accidents), and the maximum frequency of occurrence is bounded by the saturation and temperature recycle times, thus resulting in small criticality risks.

Taylor, L.L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sanchez, L.C.; Rath, J.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of most of the papers presented at the 1995 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 16 and 17 at San Diego, Ca. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Criticality Safety of Project Sapphire; (2) Relevant Experiments For Criticality Safety; (3) Interactions with the Former Soviet Union; (4) Misapplications and Limitations of Monte Carlo Methods Directed Toward Criticality Safety Analyses; (5) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Execution and Interpretation; (6) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Representation; and (7) Benchmark Comparisons.

Rene G. Sanchez

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility  

SciTech Connect

Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

SiO2 - polyethylene reflected critical assembly  

SciTech Connect

The Planet universal critical assembly machine was used to perform a series of three critical experiments. This experiment used HEU foils reflected by polyethylene and interleaved with plates of SiO{sub 2} glass and polyethylene. Only the experiment performed using the SiO{sub 2} matrix material is evaluated in this report. The assembly was delayed critical with 33 HEU foils or 17 units (sets of HEU foils). The critical assembly has an intermediate neutron spectrum, with 51.2% of the fissions occurring between 0.625 eV and 100 keV. The calculational results show good agreement with the experimental results.

Brewer, R. W. (Roger W.); Sanchez, R. G. (Rene G.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

New Measurement Technique to Fill Critical Need for Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In consumer-driven industries, it is critically important to provide customers what they ... Some 19 million miles of optical fiber were installed in the US ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Forklift Storage Tank R&D: Timely, Critical, Exemplary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forklift Storage Tank R&D: Timely, Critical, Exemplary August 14, 2012 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar Daniel E. Dedrick and Chris San Marchi Sandia National...

351

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at, FERC. ?Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. ? FERC. Docket RM06-22. 43977; FERC. ?FinalRule. ? FERC. Mandatory Reliability Standards for Critical

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Predicting the Critical Temperatures in Power Plant Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Predicting the Critical Temperatures in Power Plant Steels. Author(s), Lun Wang, ... Failure Analysis of Welded Backup Rolls Failure Mode of...

353

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Activity Report for Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Dates of Activity : May 14, 2012 Report Preparer: Ivon Fergus...

354

Complexity of the Critical Node Problem over trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2010 ... Citation: [1] Arulselvan A., Commander C.W., Elefteriadou L., Pardalos P.M., Detecting critical nodes in sparse graphs, Computers & Operations...

355

Review of the Nevada National Security Site Criticality Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Manager CSRC Criticality Safety Review Committee DAF Device Assembly Facility DOE U.S. Department of Energy IA Independent Assessment LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory...

356

Evolution of Gold Gravity Recovery in Grinding Circuits - A Critical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Evolution of Gold Gravity Recovery in Grinding Circuits - A Critical .... Selective Separations of Gold and Contaminants from Various Gold and...

357

At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission to integrate experimental and computational resources for innovations that support the U.S....

358

Using High Pressure to Reveal Quantum Criticality in an Elemental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Using High Pressure to Reveal Quantum Criticality in an Elemental Antiferromagnet MAY 21, 2009 Bookmark and Share...

359

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Review of the Nevada National Security Site Criticality Safety...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCSP Nuclear Criticality Safety Program NFO Nevada Field Office NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada National Security Site NP Noteworthy Practice NSO Nevada...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Critical Component Identification Process Licensee Examples: Scoping and Identification of Critical Components in Support of INPO AP913  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When implementing INPO AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description, one of the key "entry points" is accurate "Scoping and Identification of Critical Components"; this activity facilitates appropriate targeting of plant resources to those components that truly affect safety, reliability, and production. While AP-913 discusses a limited number of categories for components (Critical, Non-Critical, and Run-to-Failure), some utilities have implemented programs that result in further subdivision and hav...

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

Kitano, A.; Nishi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1 1, Shiraki, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 919-1279 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S. [Univ. of Aizu, Tsuruga, Ikki-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu-shi, Fukushima-ken, 965-8580 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

364

EIA provides new breakout of natural gas storage inventories ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting with the March 22, 2012 edition of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report, EIA will provide new breakouts of inventory levels at salt cavern ...

365

EIA provides new breakout of natural gas storage inventories in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting with the March 22, 2012 edition of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report, EIA will provide new breakouts of inventory levels at salt cavern and nonsalt ...

366

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

367

Life Extension of Aging High-Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) play a critical role in the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex, and therefore activities are underway to protect and better understand these tanks. The DST Life Extension Program is focused on both tank life extension and on evaluation of tank integrity. Tank life extension activities focus on understanding tank failure modes and have produced key chemistry and operations controls to minimize tank corrosion and extend useful tank life. Tank integrity program activities have developed and applied key technologies to evaluate the condition of the tank structure and predict useful tank life. Program results to date indicate that DST useful life can be extended well beyond the original design life and allow the existing tanks to fill a critical function within the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex. In addition the tank life may now be more reliably predicted, facilitating improved planning for the use and possible future replacement of these tanks.

Bryson, D.; Callahan, V.; Ostrom, M.; Bryan, W.; Berman, H.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND IMPLEMENTATION II. Techniques and Equipment for Making TCL Tests ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field-deployable instrument has been developed that isolates from an ambient aerosol population only those particles that have critical supersaturations, Sc, within a narrow, user-specified, range. This Differential Critical Supersaturation Separator (DScS) is designed to supply one or more particle size and/or composition analyzers to permit the direct examination of the factors that influence the activation properties of ambient aerosols. The DScS consists of two coupled parallel plate continuous flow thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers housed within a single enclosure. Descriptions of instrument operation, construction and calibration data collected, when pure ammonium sulfate aerosols were injected into the DScS for operation at 0.15%aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity of DScS separated aerosol. The dry diameter (Dp*) of particles sampled in the TDMA system as well as the known Sc prescribed in the DScS were combined in a modified version of K?¶hler Theory to make predictions of particle hygroscopicity. These predictions frequently overestimated the measurements. Further analysis of DScS separated aerosols compares the known particle Sc to a predicted particle Sc, providing insight into particle activation efficiency. Overall, the sampled aerosol exhibited properties that indicate they were more efficient at activation than K?¶hler Theory would predict.

Osborn, Robert John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Better safe than sorry: collaboration in safety-critical environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collaboration in safety-critical environment introduces special challenges for the tools in use, as the tools need to reliably support work tasks conducted in challenging and verifying situations. Examples of these types of environments include industrial ... Keywords: design methods, ethnographic studies, hci, safety-critical systems

Elina Vartiainen; Kristoffer Husy; Clint Heyer

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The critical success factors of business process management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although business process management ('BPM') is a popular concept, it has not yet been properly theoretically grounded. This leads to problems in identifying both generic and case-specific critical success factors of BPM programs. The paper proposes ... Keywords: Business process management, Contingency theory, Critical success factors, Dynamic capabilities, Task-technology fit

Peter Trkman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

COG - Special Features of Interest to Criticality Safety Practitioners  

SciTech Connect

COG is a modern, general-purpose, high fidelity, multi-particle transport code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory specifically for use in deep penetration (shielding) and criticality safety calculations. This paper describes some features in COG of special interest to criticality safety practitioners.

Buck, R M; Heinrichs, D P; Krass, A W; Lent, E M

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Criticality accident alarm system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to give a description of the Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) presently installed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) for monitoring areas requiring criticality controls, and some of the concerns associated with the operation of this system. The system at the FEMP is known as the Radiation Detection Alarm (RDA) System.

Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.; Wooldridge, J.C.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

Salvatores, Massimo [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-Dir, Bat. 101, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Protecting critical infrastructures while preserving each organization's autonomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In critical infrastructures (CIs), different organizations must cooperate, while being mutually suspicious since they have different interests and can be in competition on some markets. Moreover, in most cases, there is no recognized authority that can ... Keywords: access control policies and models, collaboration, critical infrastructure protection, interoperability, security

Yves Deswarte

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Cyber Threat to National Critical Infrastructures: Beyond Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adversary threats to critical infrastructures have always existed during times of conflict, but threat scenarios now include peacetime attacks from anonymous computer hackers. Current events, including examples from Israel and Estonia, prove that a certain ... Keywords: Estonia, business continuity and disaster recover planning, critical, cyber, infrastructure, security architecture and design, telecommunications and network security threat

Kenneth Geers

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P o l i c y m a k e r G u i d e #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

McGaughey, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research on water level optimal control of boiler drum based on dual heuristic dynamic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler drum system is an important component of a thermal power plant or industrial production, and the water level is a critical parameter of boiler drum control system. Because of non-linear, strong coupling and large disturbance, it is difficult to ... Keywords: BP neural network, boiler drum level, dual heuristic dynamic programming, optimal control

Qingbao Huang; Shaojian Song; Xiaofeng Lin; Kui Peng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Influence of climatic changes on pollution levels in the Balkan Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the paper is to study the influence of future climatic changes on some high pollution levels that can cause damages on plants, animals and human beings. The particular area of interest is the Balkan Peninsula. Four important quantities have ... Keywords: Climatic changes, Critical levels, Environmental models, Long-term calculations, Ozone concentrations, Scenarios

Z. Zlatev; K. Georgiev; I. Dimov

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

385

Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy January 9, 2013 - 12:30pm Addthis Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Who will be partners?

386

Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future October 19, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the next five years. Earlier this month, United States, Japanese and European Union officials, along with a number of industry stakeholders, met for a "Trilateral Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future." I had the opportunity to give a keynote address and discuss the role of critical materials in clean energy technologies with a wide range of experts.

387

Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy January 9, 2013 - 12:30pm Addthis Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Who will be partners?

388

Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research May 31, 2012 - 5:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced plans to invest up to $120 million over five years to launch a new Energy Innovation Hub, establishing a multidisciplinary and sustained effort to identify problems and develop solutions across the lifecycle of critical materials. Rare earth elements and other critical materials have unique chemical and physical characteristics, including magnetic, catalytic and luminescent properties, that are important for a growing number of energy technologies. These critical materials are also at risk for supply disruptions. The

389

Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary Report final 20111129  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRILATERAL EU-JAPAN-U.S. CONFERENCE ON TRILATERAL EU-JAPAN-U.S. CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE Washington DC, 4-5 October 2011 Summary Report Introduction The conference convened officials and experts from the European Union, Japan and the United States, as well as guests from Australia and Canada, to discuss how best to ensure an adequate supply of critical materials for a clean energy future and how best to cooperate toward this end. A plenary seminar focused on strategic approaches to assuring critical materials supply. Two parallel technical workshops then examined opportunities for technology cooperation. Seminar on the Strategic Implications of Global Shortages in Critical Materials The seminar focused on a variety of strategic challenges that we face with respect to critical

390

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

391

Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research May 31, 2012 - 5:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced plans to invest up to $120 million over five years to launch a new Energy Innovation Hub, establishing a multidisciplinary and sustained effort to identify problems and develop solutions across the lifecycle of critical materials. Rare earth elements and other critical materials have unique chemical and physical characteristics, including magnetic, catalytic and luminescent properties, that are important for a growing number of energy technologies. These critical materials are also at risk for supply disruptions. The

392

Criticality and safeguards at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing of high enriched irradiated reactor fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) presents significant potential problems to the Criticality Safety (CS) and Safeguards and Security (S and S) Sections. Two major interactions between these sections occurs when irradiated fuel is stored and fuel is dissolved. S and S is assigned the responsibility of maintaining a centralized records and reporting system which provides detailed, timely knowledge of the location, quantity and measurement uncertainties associated with accountable nuclear material, including uranium and plutonium. The Criticality Safety Section uses this information in providing criticality safety evaluations with support analyses, inspection, field surveillance and audits to ensure criticality safety implementation. The interactions of these sections has minimized operational constraints and maximized criticality safeguards controls.

Kodman, G.P.; Wilson, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers  

SciTech Connect

For non-reactor nuclear facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not require that nuclear criticality safety engineers demonstrate qualification for their job. It is likely, however, that more formalism will be required in the future. Current DOE requirements for those positions which do have to demonstrate qualification indicate that qualification should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis is incompletely developed in some areas.

Taylor, R.G.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

394

Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility June 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

396

Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future October 19, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the next five years. Earlier this month, United States, Japanese and European Union officials, along with a number of industry stakeholders, met for a "Trilateral Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future." I had the opportunity to give a keynote address and discuss the role of critical materials in clean energy technologies with a wide range of experts.

397

A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY  

SciTech Connect

In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

PUIGH RJ

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Customer Choice and Green Power Marketing: A Critical Review and Analysis of Experience to Date  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Customer Choice and Green Power Marketing: A Critical Review and Analysis of Experience to Date Ryan Wiser, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mark Bolinger, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Edward Holt, Ed Holt & Associates, Inc. ABSTRACT This article explores whether and to what extent individuals are willing to voluntarily pay a premium for products that provide public environmental benefits. In particular, we critically review and analyze the status and impacts of U.S. green power marketing to date. Green power marketing-the business of selling electricity products distinguished by their environmental attributes-seeks to develop a private market for renewable energy driven by consumer demand for green products. Debate has centered on the ability of such a market to provide a significant level of support for renewable energy sources. This paper examines

399

Critical currents of YBCO tapes and Bi-2212 wires at different temperatures and magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design studies for the cooling channel of a Muon Collider call for straight and helical solenoids generating field well in excess of the critical fields of state of the art Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn or NbTi. Therefore, High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) will need to be used for the manufacturing of all or certain sections of such magnets to be able to generate and withstand the field levels at the cryogenic temperatures required by the new machine. In this work, two major High Temperature Superconductors - Bi2212 round wires and YBCO coated conductor tapes - are investigated to understand how critical current density of such conductors scales as a function of external field and operating temperature. This is vital information to make conductor choices depending on the application and to proceed with the design of such magnets.

Lombardo, V.; Barzi, e.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The critical Ising model on trees, concave recursions and nonlinear capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the Ising model on a general tree under various boundary conditions: all plus, free and spin-glass. In each case, we determine when the root is influenced by the boundary values in the limit as the boundary recedes to infinity. We obtain exact capacity criteria that govern behavior at critical temperatures. For plus boundary conditions, an $L^3$ capacity arises. In particular, on a spherically symmetric tree that has $n^{\\alpha}b^n$ vertices at level $n$ (up to bounded factors), we prove that there is a unique Gibbs measure for the ferromagnetic Ising model at the relevant critical temperature if and only if $\\alpha\\le1/2$. Our proofs are based on a new link between nonlinear recursions on trees and $L^p$ capacities.

Robin Pemantle; Yuval Peres

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enrico Fermi Fast Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Criticality Calculations: Degraded Mode  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to characterize the nuclear criticality safety concerns associated with the codisposal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Enrico Fermi (EF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP) and placed in a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal WP. The results of this calculation and those of Ref. 8 will be used to evaluate criticality issues and support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the viability of the codisposal concept for the Monitored Geologic Repository.

D.R. Moscalu; L. Angers; J. Monroe-Rammsey; H.R. Radulesca

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use of a Web Site to Enhance Criticality Safety Training  

SciTech Connect

Currently, a website dedicated to enhancing communication and dissemination of criticality safety information is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). This website was developed as part of the DOE response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The website is the focal point for DOE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) activities, resources and references, including hyperlinks to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. The website is maintained by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under auspices of the NCSP management. One area of the website contains a series of Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training (NCSET) modules. During the past few years, many users worldwide have accessed the NCSET section of the NCSP website and have downloaded the training modules as an aid for their training programs. This trend was remarkable in that it points out a continuing need of the criticality safety community across the globe. It has long been recognized that training of criticality safety professionals is a continuing process involving both knowledge-based training and experience-based operations floor training. As more of the experienced criticality safety professionals reach retirement age, the opportunities for mentoring programs are reduced. It is essential that some method be provided to assist the training of young criticality safety professionals to replenish this limited human expert resource to support on-going and future nuclear operations. The main objective of this paper is to present the features of the NCSP website, including its mission, contents, and most importantly its use for the dissemination of training modules to the criticality safety community. We will discuss lessons learned and several ideas for future development in the area of web-based training for criticality safety professionals. Our effort is intended to stimulate a discussion of ideas and solicit participation in the development of the next generation of a web-based criticality training site that can be used to assist the training of newcomers to this important safety discipline.

Huang, S T; Morman, J

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Critical review of glass performance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

TRIPOLI-4 criticality calculations for MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A prototype Generation IV fast neutron reactor is under design and development in France. The MOX fuel will be introduced into this self-generating core in order to demonstrate low net plutonium production. To support the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code in criticality calculations of fast reactors, the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff estimation and the Probability Tables (PT) option to treat the unresolved resonance region of cross-sections are two essentials. In this study, TRIPOLI-4 calculations have been made using current nuclear data libraries JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 to benchmark the reactor physics parameters of the MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies. TRIPOLI-4 calculated K{sub eff} and {beta}eff of the homogeneous R-Z models and the 3D multi-cell models have been validated against the measured ones. The impact of the PT option on K{sub eff} is 340 {+-} 10 pcm for SNEAK 7A core and 410 {+-} 12 pcm for 7B. Four-group spectra and energy spectral indices, f8/f5, f9/f5, and c8/f5 in the two SNEAK cores have also been calculated with the TRIPOLI-4 mesh tally. Calculated spectrum-hardening index f8/f5 is 0.0418 for SNEAK 7A and 0.0315 for 7B. From this study the SNEAK 3D models have been verified for the next revision of IRPhE (International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments). (authors)

Lee, Y. K. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The CI-FLOW Project: A System for Total Water Level Prediction from the Summit to the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project is to prototype new hydrometeorologic techniques to address a critical NOAA service gap: routine total water level predictions for tidally influenced watersheds. ...

Suzanne Van Cooten; Kevin E. Kelleher; Kenneth Howard; Jian Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; John S. Kain; Kodi Nemunaitis-Monroe; Zac Flamig; Heather Moser; Ami Arthur; Carrie Langston; Randall Kolar; Yang Hong; Kendra Dresback; Evan Tromble; Humberto Vergara; Richard A Luettich Jr.; Brian Blanton; Howard Lander; Ken Galluppi; Jessica Proud Losego; Cheryl Ann Blain; Jack Thigpen; Katie Mosher; Darin Figurskey; Michael Moneypenny; Jonathan Blaes; Jeff Orrock; Rich Bandy; Carin Goodall; John G. W. Kelley; Jason Greenlaw; Micah Wengren; Dave Eslinger; Jeff Payne; Geno Olmi; John Feldt; John Schmidt; Todd Hamill; Robert Bacon; Robert Stickney; Lundie Spence

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

V. L. Putman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nested cycles in large triangulations and crossing-critical graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that every sufficiently large plane triangulation has a large collection of nested cycles that either are pairwise disjoint, or pairwise intersect in exactly one vertex, or pairwise intersect in exactly two vertices. We apply this result to show that for each fixed positive integer $k$, there are only finitely many $k$-crossing-critical simple graphs of average degree at least six. Combined with the recent constructions of crossing-critical graphs given by Bokal, this settles the question of for which numbers $q>0$ there is an infinite family of $k$-crossing-critical simple graphs of average degree $q$.

Hernandez-Velez, Cesar; Thomas, Robin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

SCALE Graphical Developments for Improved Criticality Safety Aalyses  

SciTech Connect

New computer graphic developments at Oak Ridge National Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are being used to provide visualization of criticality safety models and calculational results as well as tools for criticality safety analysis input preparation. The purpose of this paper is to present the status of current development efforts to continue to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system. Applications for criticality safety analysis in the areas of 3-D model visualization, input preparation and execution via a graphical user interface (GUI), and two-dimensional (2-D) plotting of results are discussed.

Barnett, D.L.; Bowman, S.M.; Horwedel, J.E.; Petrie, L.M.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Web-based nuclear criticality safety bibliographic database  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has prepared a Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database that is now available via the Internet. This database is a component of the U.S. DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) Web site. This WWW resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on the Web pages direct the user to original source of the reference material in order to ensure accuracy and access to the latest versions. A master index is in place for simple navigation through the site. A search capability is available to assist in locating the on-line reference materials. Among the features included are: A user-friendly site map for ease of use; A personnel registry; Links to all major laboratories and organizations involved in the many aspects of criticality safety; General help for new criticality safety practitioners, including basic technical references and training modules; A discussion of computational methods; An interactive question and answer forum for the criticality safety community; and Collections of bibliographic references mdvahdation experiments. This paper will focus on the bibliographic database. This database evolved from earlier work done by the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) maintained at LLNL during the 1980s. The bibliographic database at the time of the termination of NCIS were composed principally of three parts: (1) A critical experiment bibliography of 1067 citations (reported in UCRL-52769); (2) A compilation of criticality safety papers from Volumes 1 through 41 of the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society (reported in UCRL-53369); and (3) A general criticality bibliography of several thousand citations (unpublished). When the NCIS project was terminated the database was nearly lost but, fortunately, several years later most of the data were restored from backup tapes that had been archived by LLNL's ICNC conferences and American Nuclear Society publications, Nuclear Science and Engineering and Nuclear Technology. Since the Rocky Flats facility is heading for closure maintenance of the database was again threatened. This has now been avoided since LLNL was selected in 1999 to fulfill part of the ''Information Preservation and Dissemination'' task of the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Five-Year Plan. This effort will ''collect, preserve and make readily available criticality safety information'' and make the information available via the Internet.

Koponen, B L; Huang, S T

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Computational methods for criticality safety analysis within the scale system  

SciTech Connect

The criticality safety analysis capabilities within the SCALE system are centered around the Monte Carlo codes KENO IV and KENO V.a, which are both included in SCALE as functional modules. The XSDRNPM-S module is also an important tool within SCALE for obtaining multiplication factors for one-dimensional system models. This paper reviews the features and modeling capabilities of these codes along with their implementation within the Criticality Safety Analysis Sequences (CSAS) of SCALE. The CSAS modules provide automated cross-section processing and user-friendly input that allow criticality safety analyses to be done in an efficient and accurate manner. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bucholz, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Critical temperature of antikaon condensation in nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of $K^-$ mesons in neutron star matter. This is studied within the framework of relativistic field theoretical models at finite temperature where nucleon-nucleon and (anti)kaon-nucleon interactions are mediated by the exchange of mesons. The melting of the antikaon condensate is studied for different values of antikaon optical potential depths. We find that the critical temperature of antikaon condensation increases with baryon number density. Further it is noted that the critical temperature is lowered as antikaon optical potential becomes less attractive. We also construct the phase diagram of neutron star matter with $K^-$ condensate.

Sarmistha Banik; Walter Greiner; Debades Bandyopadhyay

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mixing Layer Formation near the Tropopause Due to Gravity WaveCritical Level Interactions in a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plausible mechanism for the formation of mixing layers in the lower stratosphere above regions of tropical convection is demonstrated numerically using high-resolution, two-dimensional (2D), anelastic, nonlinear, cloud-resolving simulations. ...

Mohamed Moustaoui; Binson Joseph; Hector Teitelbaum

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Critical assessment of seismic and geomechanics literature related to a high-level nuclear waste underground repository  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive literature assessment has been conducted to determine the nature and scope of technical information available to characterize the seismic performance of an underground repository and associated facilities. Significant deficiencies were identified in current practices for prediction of seismic response of underground excavations in jointed rock. Conventional analytical methods are based on a continuum representation of the host rock mass. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that, in jointed rock, the behavior of the joints controls the overall performance of underground excavations. Further, under repetitive seismic loading, shear displacement develops progressively at block boundaries. Field observations correlating seismicity and groundwater conditions have provided significant information on hydrological response to seismic events. However, lack of a comprehensive model of geohydrological response to seismicity has limited the transportability conclusions from field observations. Based on the literature study, matters requiring further research in relation to the Yucca Mountain repository are identified. The report focuses on understanding seismic processes in fractured tuff, and provides a basis for work on the geohydrologic response of a seismically disturbed rock mass. 220 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

Kana, D.D.; Vanzant, B.W.; Nair, P.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Brady, B.H.G. [ITASCA Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (USA)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in Innovation, Clean Energy, and National Security Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in Innovation, Clean Energy, and National Security February 13, 2012 - 12:06pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today detailed President Barack Obama's $27.2 billion Fiscal Year 2013 budget request for the Department of Energy, emphasizing the President's commitment to an all-of-the-above energy strategy that includes critical investments in innovation, in the job-creating clean energy technologies, and in our national security strategy. The budget request for the Department is part of the President's blueprint for an American economy that is built

416

Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy December 22, 2011 - 12:33pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2011 Critical Materials Strategy. The report examines the role that rare earth metals and other key materials play in clean energy technologies such as wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. The report found that several clean energy technologies use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term, with risks generally decreasing in the medium and long terms. Supply challenges for five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium) may affect clean energy technology deployment in the years ahead.

417

Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Presentations from Track B, Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Ventilation Strategies in High Performance Homes; Combustion Safety in Tight Houses; Implementation Program Case Studies; Field Testing from Start to Finish; and Humidity Control and Analysis. why_we_ventilate.pdf formaldehyde_new_homes.pdf whole_bldg_ventilation.pdf combustion_safety_codes.pdf combustion_diagnostics.pdf test_protocols_results.pdf utility_incentive_programs.pdf

418

The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Department of Energy today released its Critical Materials Strategy. The strategy examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy, based on extensive research by the Department during the past year. The report focuses on materials used in four technologies - wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. "Each day, researchers and entrepreneurs across the United States are working to develop and deploy clean energy technologies that will enhance our security, reduce carbon pollution and promote economic prosperity. This

419

Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power April 9, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Customers of AT&T Wireless and Pacific Gas & Electric Company will enjoy service that's both cleaner and more reliable, thanks to backup power provided by about 200 hydrogen fuel cells. The two companies are becoming early adopters of hydrogen fuel cells as backups for the main power grid. Both projects are funded by an $8.5 million Recovery Act grant to ReliOn, Inc. of Spokane, Wash., which specializes in hydrogen fuel-cell backups for businesses that need to stay functional during power failures. For utilities like PG&E, which serves about 15 million people in California, backup power is critical because it helps them locate problems at

420

Secretary Chu Announces Completion of Critical Energy Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completion of Critical Energy Conservation Completion of Critical Energy Conservation Appliance Standards Secretary Chu Announces Completion of Critical Energy Conservation Appliance Standards September 1, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department of Energy has completed energy efficiency standards for a critical group of appliances that will together save up to 1.1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide once in effect. In February 2009, President Obama visited the Department of Energy to emphasize the importance of quickening the pace of energy conservation standards for appliances, while continuing to meet legal and statutory deadlines. Yesterday, the minimum energy efficiency standards for beverage vending machines - the last of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Materials Strategy Critical Materials Strategy Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy December 15, 2010 - 1:30pm Addthis | Department of Energy Illustration | | Department of Energy Illustration | David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs The Department of Energy released a strategy on critical materials at an event this morning at the Center for Strategic & International Studies. The report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials used in four clean energy technologies: wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. You can download the full 171-page report and a 4-page executive summary here. The strategy analyzes 14 elements and identifies five specific rare earth

422

ARM - Evaluation Product - Critical soil quantities for describing land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land properties Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Critical soil quantities for describing land properties 1994.01.01 - 2012.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The ARMBELAND is a subset of the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) products for supporting community land-atmospheric research and land model developments. It contains several critical soil quantities that ARM has been measuring for many years for describing land properties. The quantities in ARMBE-Land are averaged over one hour time interval, consistent with other ARMBE datasets. It is recommended to use with other ARMBE data products such as ARMBECLDRAD (cloud and radiative fluxes) and ARMBEATM (surface

423

CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 May 31, 2013 Criticality Safety Controls Implementation with DOE activities and sites (HSS CRAD 45-18) Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Overs ight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations' (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health and emergency management systems and practices used by line and contractor organ izations in implementing Integrated Safety Management; and to provide clear, concise,and independent evaluations of performance in protecting our workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE)

424

Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Trapping colloids near chemical stripes via critical Casimir forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study theoretically and experimentally the solvent-mediated critical Casimir force acting on colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine and close to substrates which are chemically patterned with periodically alternating stripes of antagonistic adsorption preferences. These patterns are experimentally realized via microcontact printing. Upon approaching the critical demixing point of the solvent, normal and lateral critical Casimir forces generate laterally confining effective potentials for the colloids. We analyze in detail the rich behavior of the spherical colloids close to such substrates. For all patterned substrates we investigated, our measurements of these effective potentials agree with the corresponding theoretical predictions. Since both the directions and the strengths of the critical Casimir forces can be tuned by minute temperature changes, this provides a new mechanism for controlling colloids as model systems, opening encouraging perspectives for applications.

Matthias Trndle; Olga Zvyagolskaya; Andrea Gambassi; Dominik Vogt; Ludger Harnau; Clemens Bechinger; Siegfried Dietrich

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

High temperature vapor pressure and the critical point of potassium  

SciTech Connect

The vapor pressure of potassium was experimentally determined from 2100 deg F up to-its critical temperature. An empirical equation of the form ln P = A + B/T + C ln T + DT/sup 1.5/ was found to best fit the data. A critical pressure of 2378.2 plus or minus 4.0 psia (161.79 plus or minus 0.27 ata) was measured. The corresponding critical temperature, extrapolated from the pressure-- temperature curve, is 4105.4 plus or minus 5 deg R (2280.8 plus or minus 3 deg K). The technique employed was tae pressure tube method developed earlier in this laboratory and used for determining the vapor pressure of rubidium and cesium. This method measures tae critical pressure directly, as well as the vapor pressure st lower temperatures. (4 tables, 6 figures, 26 references) (auth)

Jerez, W.R.; Bhise, V.S.; Das Gupta, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NETL: News Release -Nine Universities Begin Critical Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2011 Nine Universities Begin Critical Turbine Systems Research Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of ten projects at nine universities...

428

State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it can compete against other renewable resource options.Critical Support for Renewable Electricity Galen Barbose,July 15, 2008 Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Critical Anisotropies of a Geometrically-Frustrated Triangular-Lattice  

SciTech Connect

This work examines the critical anisotropy required for the local stability of the collinear ground states of a geometrically-frustrated triangular-lattice antiferromagnet (TLA). Using a Holstein-Primakoff expansion, we calculate the spin-wave frequencies for the 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8-sublattice (SL) ground states of a TLA with up to third neighbor interactions. Local stability requires that all spin-wave frequencies are real and positive. The 2, 4, and 8-SL phases break up into several regions where the critical anisotropy is a different function of the exchange parameters. We find that the critical anisotropy is a continuous function everywhere except across the 2-SL/3-SL and 3-SL/4-SL phase boundaries, where the 3-SL phase has the higher critical anisotropy.

Swanson, Mason R [ORNL; Haraldsen, Jason T [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Office of Science Approves Critical Decision 1 for APS Upgrade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Office of Science Approves Critical Decision 1 for APS Upgrade Project SEPTEMBER 15, 2011...

431

CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-192009; 1 Sandia National Laboratories CNG, H 2 , CNG-H 2 Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Jay Keller, Sandia National Laboratories Keynote Lecture presented at:...

432

Validating analysis methodologies used in burnup credit criticality calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the depleted (or burned) state of pressurized water reactor fuel in the licensing of spent fuel facilities introduces a new challenge to members of the nuclear criticality community. The primary difference in this analysis approach is the technical ability to calculate spent fuel compositions (or inventories) and to predict their effect on the system multiplication factor. Isotopic prediction codes are used routinely for in-core physics calculations and the prediction of radiation source terms for both thermal and shielding analyses, but represent an innovation for criticality specialists. This paper discusses two methodologies currently being developed to specifically evaluate isotopic composition and reactivity for the burnup credit concept. A comprehensive approach to benchmarking and validating the methods is also presented. This approach involves the analysis of commercial reactor critical data, fuel storage critical experiments, chemical assay isotopic data, and numerical benchmark calculations.

Brady, M.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

attraction of newton method to critical lagrange multipliers: fully ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tiplier starting from a dense set around the given critical multiplier. ... this is precisely the reason for the lack of superlinear convergence rate, which is typical for ..... for the base parameter value ? it follows that (?(), ?()) is analytic in some ...

434

A Critical Review of the Australian Experience in Cloud Seeding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1947 to 1994 a number of cloud-seeding experiments were done in Australia based on the static cloud-seeding hypothesis. A critical analysis of these successive cloud-seeding experiments, coupled with microphysical observations of the clouds, ...

Brian F. Ryan; Warren D. King

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Residential Response to Critical Peak Pricing of Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Response to Critical Peak Pricing of Electricity Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: June 30, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 A recent California study collected detailed...

436

Generalized Conditions for Hydraulic Criticality of Oceanic Overflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods for assessing the hydraulic criticality of an observed or modeled overflow are discussed. The methods are valid for single-layer deep flows with arbitrary potential vorticity and cross section. The first method is based on a purely ...

Larry Pratt; Karl Helfrich

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Strongly coupled plasmas and the QCD critical point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we begin by studying selected fluctuation observables in order to locate the QCD critical point in heavy-ion collision experiments. In particular, we look at the non-monotonic behavior as a function of the ...

Athanasiou, Christiana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Principles of safety. Safety in general, criticality risk in perspective  

SciTech Connect

The role of management in the responsibility for training personnel in the fundamentals of safety and accident prevention is discussed. Program for radiation protection, with emphasis on criticality safety, are discussed briefly. (CH)

Reider, R.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Criticality safety evaluation for K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are currently being made to remove sludge from the Disassembly Basin in all reactor areas. Because this sludge contains fissile isotopes, it is necessary to perform a criticality safety evaluation for the planned activities. A previous evaluation examined the criticality safety aspects of the sludge removal process for L Area. This document addresses the criticality safety aspects of the K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup work. The K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup will involve, as a first step, pumping the basin sludge into the Monitor Basin portion of the Disassembly Basin. From the Monitor Basin, the sludge will be pumped into tanks or containers for permanent disposition. The criticality safety evaluation discussed in this document covers the transfer of the sludge to the Monitor Basin.

Rosser, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Parallel Fission Bank Algorithms in Monte Carlo Criticality Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we describe a new method for parallelizing the source iterations in a Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Instead of having one global fission bank that needs to be synchronized, as is traditionally done, our ...

Romano, Paul Kollath

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "level critical cavern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Interaction walkthrough: evaluation of safety critical interactive systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usability evaluation methods are a battery of techniques for assessing the usability of interactive systems or of proposed interactive systems. This paper describes a new evaluation method, particularly appropriate for evaluating safety critical and ...

Harold Thimbleby

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Optimizing investments in cyber-security for critical infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investments in the cyber-security of critical infrastructure must balance preventing intrusion, detecting a cyber-attack, and mitigating the attacker's physical effects on computer controlled equipment. For this purpose, we outline a method for making ...

Ike Patterson; James Nutaro; Glenn Allgood; Teja Kuruganti; David Fugate

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

INL Stand-Off Experiment Range will support critical national...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Stand-Off Experiment Range will support critical national security missions Idaho Falls, ID - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact...

444

Simulation and test: Instruments for Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and evaluation of critical infrastructures for analysis and planning of processes and procedures increasing the robustness and fault tolerance of the overall infrastructure while limiting the overall cost are essential in an environment in ...

W. Schmitz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Getting It Right: Accurate Testing and Assessments Critical to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuels Getting It Right: Accurate Testing and Assessments Critical to Deploying the Next Generation of Auto Fuels May 16, 2012 - 9:20am Addthis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle...

446

Fifty Years of Breakthrough Discoveries in Fluid Criticality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifty years ago two scientists, who celebrate their 80th birthdays in 2011, Alexander V. Voronel and Johannes V. Sengers performed breakthrough experiments that challenged the commonly accepted views on critical phenomena in fluids. Voronel discovered that the isochoric heat capacity of argon becomes infinite at the vapor-liquid critical point. Almost simultaneously, Sengers observed a similar anomaly for the thermal conductivity of near-critical carbon dioxide. The existence of these singularities was later proved to be universal for all fluids. These experiments had a profound effect on the development of the modern (scaling) theory of phase transitions, which is based on the diverging fluctuations of the order parameter. In particular, the discovery of the heat-capacity divergence at the critical point was a keystone for the formulation of static scaling theory, while the discovery of the divergence of the thermal conductivity played an important role in the formulation of dynamic scaling and mode-coupling...

Anisimov, Mikhail A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

New Computer Software Enables Rapid Response to Time-critical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Computer Software Enables Rapid Response to Time-critical Emergencies November 3, 2006 Tweet EmailPrint The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and...

448

Manhattan Project: Data Printout of CP-1 Going Critical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Data printout of CP-1 going critical for the first time. It shows neutron intensity in the pile, as recorded by a galvanometer. Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 >...

449

Zero Energy Buildings: A Critical Look at the Definition; Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Energy Buildings: A Critical Look at the Definition Preprint P. Torcellini, S. Pless, and M. Deru National Renewable Energy Laboratory D. Crawley U.S. Department of Energy To...

450

A Chemical Detour to Quantum Criticality | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Chemical Detour to Quantum Criticality JULY 7, 2011 Bookmark and Share View inside the 11-BM-B beamline...