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1

MEMORANDUM GY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS- ,.__.-. -'c4GY

2

COLOMBIA GUYANA VENEZUELA FR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERU CHILE ARGENTINA PARAGUAY BOLIVIA COLOMBIA GUYANA SURINAME URUGUAY VENEZUELA FR. GUIANA POPULATION DENSITY, 2000 Population density measures the number of persons per square kilometer of land area the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area Projection ´ 0 500 1,000 km

Columbia University

3

Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AgencyCompany Organization Guyana Forestry Commission, The Government of Norway Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policiesdeployment programs,...

4

Study in South Africa and Lesotho A Curriculum Development Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teachers Study in South Africa and Lesotho A Curriculum Development Project Integrating Visual Arts about the cultures and history of the Basotho people of southern Africa Participate in seminars-Hays award, graduate credit and/or CEUs Visit non-malarial and low risk areas in southern Africa and enjoy

Viola, Ronald

5

Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy AgencyCompany Organization Inter-American Development Bank, World Watch Institute (WWI) Sector...

6

NEGATION IN GUIANESE LOKONO/ARAWAK Guianese Lokono/Arawak is spoken in the lowlands of the Guianas, Guyana,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Guianas, Guyana, Suriname, the French Overseas department of Guiana, and Venezuelan Guayana. Some speakers

Boyer, Edmond

7

Loanwords in Kali'na, a Cariban language of French Guyana Odile Renault-Lescure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is constituted by the five Guianas: Venezuelan Guiana, (formerly British) Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana distributed in these countries. 11.141 live in Venezuela, 3000 in Guyana (Forte 2000), 3000 in Suriname (Boven% in Suriname; there is no precise data for French Guiana, but the rate is high). The Kali'na people speak

Boyer, Edmond

8

CHECKLIST OF THE PLANTS OF THE GUIANAS (Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHECKLIST OF THE PLANTS OF THE GUIANAS (Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana) 2nd Edition J. Boggan, V;#12;CHECKLIST OF THE PLANTS OF THE GUIANAS (Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana) 2nd Edition J. Boggan, V. Funk, C, Surinam, French Guiana) 2nd Edition 1st Edition: December 1992 2nd Edition: February 1997 Published

Mathis, Wayne N.

9

Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump to: navigation, searchGuyana's Low

10

GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

Dresden, Gregory

11

2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings p , p g , Luminaire Power, etc. for Nonresidential Buildings 4 #12;What is New for 2008? R d l B ld What is New for 2008? R d l B ldResidential BuildingsResidential Buildings Mandatory Measures2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards g gy Efficiency Standardsfficie

12

2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview #12;2008 Residential Energy Plan2008 Residential Energy Plan Review ChecklistReview Checklist Simplification ChecklistsOther Available Checklists 2005 and 2008 Residential Energy Documentation2005 and 2008 Residential

13

Guyana-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump to: navigation, searchGuyana's

14

First records of 10 bat species in Guyana and comments on diversity of bats in Iwokrama Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., Eisenberg, 1989) from mammals reported in Venezuela (e.g ., Handley, 1976) and Suriname (e.g., Husson, 1978). Two recent publications (Parker et al., 1993; Smith and Kerry, 1996) reported on separate, small single-site collections from Guyana.... In the Guianan subregion, this species was known by one specimen from Venezuela (McCarthy and Ochoa, 1991), two from Suriname (Husson, 1962; Williams et a/., 1983), and one from French Guiana (Simmons and Handley, 1998). Previously, the genus was considered...

Lim, Burton K.; Engstrom, Mark D.; Timm, Robert M.; Anderson, Robert P.; Watson, L. Cynthia

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

"Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994. pp. 240-247. 1 DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION: SOLAR OVEN USE

Noble, William Stafford

16

Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 2008 1E Roberts, Energy in US Source: www.eia.gov #12 National Academy of Science 2009 #12;Figure 8: US Production of Primary Energy by Fuel 8E Roberts, Energy Consumption and Production 13E Roberts, Energy in US EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2012 #12;Figure 14: Oil Price

Sutton, Michael

17

Shell-shocked diffusion model for the light curve of SN2006gy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a simple model for the high luminosity of SN 2006gy involving photon diffusion of shock-deposited thermal energy. The distinguishing property of the model is that the large ``stellar'' radius of 160 AU required to prevent adiabatic losses is not the true stellar radius, but rather, the radius of an opaque, unbound circumstellar envelope, created when 10 Msun was ejected in the decade before the supernova in an eruption analogous to that of eta Carinae. The supernova light is produced primarily by diffusion of thermal energy following the passage of the blast wave through this shell. This model differs from traditional models of supernova debris interacting with external CSM in that here the shell is optically thick and the escape of radiation is delayed. We show that any model attempting to account for SN2006gy's huge luminosity with radiation emitted by ongoing CSM interaction fails for the following basic reason: the CSM density required to achieve the observed luminosity makes the same circumstellar envelope opaque, forcing a thermal diffusion solution. In our model, the weaker CSM interaction giving rise to SN2006gy's characteristic Type IIn spectrum and soft X-rays is not linked to the power source of the visual continuum; instead, it arises after the blast wave breaks free of the opaque shell into the surrounding wind. While a simple diffusion model can explain the gross properties of the early light curve of SN2006gy, it predicts that the light curve must plummet rapidly at late-times, unless an additional power source is present.

Nathan Smith; Richard McCray

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.

Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide - either as a direct policy objective, or indirectly as a means to an end, such as the development of an indigenous capability in science and technology for national development. The expectation is that informed opinion from the scientific community at the institutional, national, and international levels can be used to influence the decision makers and donors who are in a position to deliver better Internet capabilities.

Barton, C.E.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; /Lab.Phys.Plasmas, Saint Maur des Fosses; Barry, B.; /Assoc.African Univ., Accra; Chukwuma; /Olabisi Onabanjo U.; Cottrell, R.L.; /SLAC; Kalim, U.; /Pakistan Natl. U.; Mebrahtu, A.; /Mekelle U.; Petitdidier, M.; /Lab. d'Atmos., Velizy; Rabiu, B.; /Federal Tech. U., Akure; Reeves, C.; /Earthworks bv, Delft; ,

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Guyana Francesa 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dense et le reste de mangroves, savanes, forêts secondaires et cultures sur la côte, entre le Surinam Maroni . Là, un bac permet de passer le fleuve Maroni, et de gagner Paramaribo, capitale du Surinam. A l particulièrement soutenue par l'immigration en provenance du Surinam. 3. Données politiques et régionales et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Set To Save *and* AB 811Set To Save and AB 811 Energy Independence Program (EIP)gy p g ( )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; download documents. 5) Strongly suggest a energy survey/audit. 6) Proactively call/e-mail to updateSet To Save *and* AB 811Set To Save and AB 811 Energy Independence Program (EIP)gy p g ( ) Lessons, Office of Energy ManagementPatrick Conlon, Director, Office of Energy Management 73-710 Fred Waring Drive

Kammen, Daniel M.

22

M(.)Ll:CULAR PluAuculAcon.c)Gy, 6, 391-401 Ligand Interaction with Hemoprotein P-450  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M(.)Ll:CULAR PluAuculAcon.c)Gy, 6, 391-401 391 Ligand Interaction with Hemoprotein P-450 Ill of High- and Low-Spin P-450 C. H. E. ,JEFCOATE, R. L. CALABRESE, AN!) J. L. GAYLOR Section of Biochemistry to octylaminie, of tine absolute amounts of inigh- arid loss--spins formsss of huemoproteini P-450 of rabbit

Calabrese, Ronald

23

Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan [Department of Physics, Mizoram University: Tanhril Campus, Aizawl-796004, Mizoram (India)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Bovine babesiosis in Guyana: a comparison of the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and complement-fixation (CF) tests in determining the prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis infections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOVINE BABESIOSIS IN GUYANA: A COMPARISON OF THE INDIREC T FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY (IFA) AND COMPLEMENT-FIXATION (CF) TESTS IN DETERMINING THE PREVALENCF. OF BABESIA BIGEMINA AND BABESIA BOVIS INFECTIONS A Thesis by LENNOX MORTIMER APPLEWHAITE... FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY (IFA) AND COMPLE1YIENT-FIXATION (CF ) TES TS IN DETERMINING THE PREVAI ENCE OF BABES IA B1GEMINA AND BABESIA BOVIS INFECTIONS A Thesis by LENNOX MORTIMER APPLErJHAITE Appro red as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

Applewhaite, Lennox Mortimer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy) [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy) [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Neurosurgery Unit, Umberto I Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Raco, Antonino [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Bozzao, Alessandro [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Lesotho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone CleanLaton,Learn

27

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips ColorLoadingTechnologiesMonitoring, Reporting

29

Guyana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump to: navigation,

30

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If this system is not installed properly, it not only wastes energy, but money as well. To prevent this, do two of the conditioned air into the attic or crawl space. Leaky ducts waste energy and make energy bills higher thanBLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY

31

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGYHERSComplianceDocumentationRegisteredonorAfterOctober1,2010 B l u e p r i n t 9 8 N o v e m b e r D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Residential Radiant Barrier

32

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the California Energy Commission recognizes for certifying the solar reflectance and thermal emittance valuesBLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY Efficiency Standards WHAT ARE COOL ROOFS? The term cool roof refers to a roofing product with high solar

33

RenGyS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge And PiedmontReminderville, Ohio:RenGen Energy

34

Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county inAl.,20454°, -74.0037505° Loading

35

Guyana-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county inAl.,20454°, -74.0037505°

36

Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net JumpStrategy | Open Energy Information

37

Diciembre 2012 Cuando el manglar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cientifica Actualité scientifique Los manglares de las Guyanas --Guyana francesa, Surinam y Guyana--, que se

38

Diversification of the Core Bromelioids with a focus on the genus Aechmea: phylogeny, morphology, and climate tolerance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, 15) Caribbean, 16)14) Venezuela, Guyane, Guyana, Suriname, 15) Caribbean, 16)

Sass, Chodon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

School of Art & Design Postgraduate International Scholarship Opportunities 2014 / 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina

Evans, Paul

40

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Postgraduate International Scholarship Opportunities 2014 / 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina

Evans, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

December 2012 When mangroves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cientifica Actualité scientifique The mangrove forests in the Guyanas (French Guiana, Surinam and Guyana

42

GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

heating and domestic hot water systems, and ice making machines and installing an energy efficient geothermal heating, cooling , and refrigeration system as building...

43

Lesotho-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012Lee County

44

Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in French Guyana, Suriname, in the Essequibo River Basin (areas (coastal Guyana and Suriname, Magdalena River basin,

de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SE, HVILKE PRISZONER DE FORSKELLIGE LANDE HRER UNDER Frankrig (Monaco, Fransk Guyana,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tanzania Tchad Timor ?st Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunesien Turkmenistan Uruguay Usbekistan Venezuela Yemen

46

Some modifications to the design of a parabolic solar concentrator for construction in Lesotho and their effects on power production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to test the effectiveness of design modifications terms of efficiency and power production in an existing parabolic solar concentrator. The proposed modifications included limiting the ...

Ferreira, Toni (Toni Jolene)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

hot water systems, installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator efficiency and appliance efficiency ratings, development of energy-efficient manufacturing or...

48

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO GY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental impact · GeoEnvironmental Water · Water quality · Sediment erosion · Water decision support . Urban Development Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (NOTE: Projected · Environmental Engineering · Math · Mechanical Engineering · Mechanical System Design · Mining Engineering

Wang, Yuhang

49

Scientific and Engineering Challenges and New Strategy for Development of gy p  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclei ( f f )(the opposite of nuclear fission). Fusion powers the Sun and Stars. E = mc2 80% of energy80 accident No long-lived radioactive waste Fusion energy can be used to produce electricity and hydrogen Energy Mohamed Abdou Keynote Lecture at the 2nd GCOE International Symposium Kyoto University Global

Abdou, Mohamed

50

Autumn 2014 YoRK'S neW ReSeARCH StRAteGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Environmental Sustainability and Resilience; Health and Wellbeing; Justice and Equality; Risk, Evidence College ­ 4 a new student community Transforming the treatment 5 of cancer patients Pigs' unhappy balloon

51

U.S. DEPARTI'vIENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work (SOW) and are therefore categorically excluded from NEPA: - Activity 1 Expanded Energy Efficiency Retrofit Program (former Activity 1 Energy Efficiency Retrofit Program) -...

52

U.S. DEPARTIlIENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RECIPIENT: Hi-Q Geophysical Inc Page I of2 STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE: Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems .' unding Opportunity...

53

Inn vati ns at EECS: Techn l gy f r a gl bal future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Society Invention Lab 141/143 Sutardja Dai Hall Center for Research in Energy Systems Transformation 406 - Peter Bailis, AMPLab (Algorithms, Machines, and People Laboratory) · Raven: An Energy Wireless Research Center) & E3S (Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science) · Occupant Detection

California at Irvine, University of

54

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

demand stUdies), A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations 83.14 Small-scale educational facilities Rational for determ ination: and Information dissemination...

55

En-er-gy (a noun) Webster's Dictionary defines"energy"as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

__________________ 4 Dance and Movement _____________ 8 Film and Digital Studies ___________ 10 Music Partners Agricultural and Life Sciences ______ 25 Business _______________________ 25 Center for Patient

Sheridan, Jennifer

56

Absorbed Dose (Gy) 10-4 10-3 10-2 10-1 100  

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of Ionizing Radiationat Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation V. A. Semenenko and R. D. Stewart Purdue University, School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 Research supported by the Low Dose Radiation transformation is reversed, the model predicts that the response to low doses of low-LET radiation becomes supra

Stewart, Robert D.

57

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

dissemination Informabon gathenng (indudlng, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, site VISits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not IImiled 10, computer...

58

P,OU)JI U.S. DEPARTIIIEN T OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

59

ENE-.R:GY ORNL/Sub/80-61601/2 Research and Development of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~Supermarket Refrigeration Systems .~~~~E ~Volume 2 -- &i Supplementary Laboratory Testing William M. Toscano ENERGY-EFFICIENT SUPERMARKET REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS VOLUME 2 SUPPLEMENTAL LABORATORY TESTING JUNE, 1983 and development of a new, highly energy-efficient, supermarket refrigeration system: a. Investigate

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

60

The Sugar-Coated Path to Economic Inequality. A Comparative Study of Guyana and Suriname, ca. 1600-present.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In terms of economic development, since at least the second half of the twentieth century Suriname (former Dutch Guiana) is doing significantly and persistently better (more)

Slagter, Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ore mined largely in Suriname, Guyana and Jamaica for muchtwentieth century. Suriname, in the Netherlands Antilles,the United States with Suriname, Guyana and Jamaica, and

Sheller, Mimi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - amapa brazil aplicacao Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Avery recent account of land conflict garnering much... COLUMBIA VENEZUELA GUYANA SURINAME FRENCH GUYANA Amapa Amazonas Par Mato Grasso Tocantins Bahia ... Source: Simmons,...

63

The Big Trees Were Kings: Challenges for Global Response to Climate Change and Tropical Forests Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brazil Guyana Mexico Suriname India Vietnam Gabon ThailandMalaysia France Laos Guyana Suriname Thailand MadagascarLeone, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Uruguay, Uganda,

Irland, Lloyd C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

data: Improving the use of information from museum specimens: Using Google Earth to georeference Guiana Shield specimens in the US National Herbarium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We used Gazetteers for Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana andby Maguire to Tafelberg, Suriname, in 1944. Tafel- berg isFrench Guiana Guyana Suriname Amazonas Bolivar Venezuela

Garcia-Milagros, Eduardo; Funk, Vicki A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Parallel worlds: empirical region and place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western) Guyana. - Suriname. - Brazil. - Bolivia. - Chile.intelligible except those of Suriname. Holm cites EdwardGuyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago,

Ford, Of The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

1. Background What is the fate of the Amazon under climate change?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ $ $$$ $ $ $ JAV K34 K77 RJA FNS K67 K83 CAX Colombia Venezuela Guyana Surinam French Guyana Brasil Peru Ecuador 1

Saleska, Scott

67

The More Things Stay the Same the More They Change : : Measuring Changing Levels of Human Rights Using Computational Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRAQ SYRIA MAURITIUS SURINAME MALI GUYANA GERMAN FEDERALBRAZZAVILLE) DOMINICAN REP SURINAME TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Fariss, Christopher J.

68

Journal of species lists and distribution ISSN 1809-127X (online edition)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, French Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. In Brazil, Amazon includes Tropical Rain Forest areas

Ribera, Ignacio

69

Florida Arbovirus Surveillance Week 23: June 3-9, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ecuador, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti (4), Jamaica, Mexico, Suriname, and Turks & Caicos. Counties reporting cases

Watson, Craig A.

70

165 150 135 120 105 90 75 60 45 30 15 0 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135 150 165 180  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ZIMBABWE BOTSWANA UGANDA URUGUAY PARAGUAY GUYANA SURINAME PERU VENEZUELA ECUADOR HONDURAS CUBA BELIZE

Tomforde, Mark

71

in die Forschung Mitteilungen der Universitt Bayreuth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venezuela Paraguay Ecuador Uruguay Guyana Suriname ragua #12;Blick in die Forschung Mitteilungen der

Ullmann, G. Matthias

72

8, 1190911965, 2008 Reactive Trace Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Habitat Specialization by Birds in Western Amazonian White-sand Forests Jose Alvarez Alonso1,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1990). In northern Amazonia, WSFs are known from Venezuela, Suriname, Guyana, Brazil, and Colombia

Fine, Paul V.A.

74

C. L. Staines. 2011. Catalog of the hispines of the World (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae). http:// entomology.si.edu/Collections_Coleoptera-Hispines.html 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

); Papp 1953: 51 (catalog). Distribution. Bolivia, Brazil (Amazonas), French Guyana, Suriname. Food plants

Mathis, Wayne N.

75

A Statistical Approach Towards The Recognition of Hindi Language Words  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several other countries like Nepal, Mauritius, Singapore, Fiji, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad, UAE, etc. can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Studies on Neotropical Fauna und Environment Vol. 43, No. 3, December 2008, 177-180  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crashes". We here report on two populations of Atelopus hoogmoedi from Suriname and Guyana which show

Hödl, Walter

77

The Big Trees Were Kings: Challenges for Global Response to Climate Change and Tropical Forests Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POPULATION PRESSURES ON FOREST 2008 Rank United States France Malaysia Brazil Guyana Mexico Suriname

Irland, Lloyd C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

382 Florida Entomologist 92(2) June 2009 DETECTION SURVEYS AND POPULATION MONITORING FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Venezuela and French Guyana (Humeres et al. 2009). Pseudacysta perseae was detected for the first time

Hoddle, Mark S.

79

California Reach StandardsCalifornia Reach Standards for Building Energy Efficiencyfor Building Energy Efficiencyo u d g e gy c e cyo u d g e gy c e cy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fraction or 95% water heater efficiencyor 95% water heater efficiency Tier I · 95% of Energy Budget ­ Tier td Li hti· High Efficacy Outdoor Lighting · Service Water Heating in Large Restaurants ­ 15% Solar, Part 11 - Residential Changes since May 2012 Proposal · Removal of Maximum Hot Water Pipe Volume from

80

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering GE O RGIA IN S TITU TE O F TE CHN O LO GY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring, pollution control and modeling · Environmental sciences · Industrial ecology ENVE #12;CEE @ GT (CEE) deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built AFFINITY GROUPS CEE @ GT RESEARCH + Construction Engineering + Environmental Engineering + Environmental

Jacobs, Laurence J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

u.s. DEPARThIENT OF F NER GY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM EN T CEN  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A9 Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (induding computer modeling). document preparation (such as...

82

QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S.Feet) Year Weekly7 (Released July 8,1

83

afrique du sud: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guine, Guine quatoriale, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Maroc 24 Impact des traitements antirtroviraux sur le risque de transmission sexuelle du...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - african ivory nut Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cameroon... Lesotho Sierra Leone Cape Verde Liberia Somalia Central African Rep Libya South Africa Chad Source: Grant, James D.E. - Fakultt fr Mathematik, Universitt Wien...

85

CI-OFF Ex A (Rev. 0.2, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar,...

86

NCIPO Ex A (Rev. 2.1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar,...

87

Introduction Unsurprisingly, insectplant interactions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Suriname and Guyana (Mabura Hill: ter Steege et al., 1996) rarely had the oppor- tunity to generate) in the rainforests of the Guianas (French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana). Other plant resources used by insects

Basset, Yves

88

Agreements --South America 163 SOUTH AMERICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.66 Guyana 5,200 0.09 Suriname 20 0.00 Amazon River ship (left); sawmill; Amazon tributary. Photo credits; Brazil; Colombia; Ecuador; Guyana; Peru; Surinam; Venezuela Treaty for Amazonian cooperation May 22, 1944

Wolf, Aaron

89

American Journal of Botany 86(7): 907922. 1999. THE ARCHITECTURE OF MOURERA FLUVIATILIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vene- zuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, and northern Brazil (van Royen, 1953; Velasquez, 1994 in Guyana and Surinam, from July to February in northern Brazil (van Royen, 1953). Grubert (1974) observed

Zürich, Universität

90

(page intentionally blank) CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing Kaieteur National Park, Guyana for ecotourism and conservation by Carol L. Kelloff edited Institution. The use of biodiversity data in developing Kaieteur National Park, Guyana for ecotourism

Mathis, Wayne N.

91

Conservation priorities under global change : protected areas, threatened biodiversity and research trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Islands Sierra Leone Somalia Suriname Slovakia EU SA AF AFGuiana Guyana Peru Paraguay Suriname Venezuela TTO Trinidad

Lee, Tien Ming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SIT Workshops 1995 2011 Page 1 of 17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guyana Haiti Jamaica Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Suriname Trinidad & Tobago 12. US-India Workshop

93

Amrique latine et Carabes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P?ROU ?QUATEUR COLOMBIE VENEZUELA GUYANA SURINAME GUYANE FRAN?AISE MEXIQUE MARTINIQUE GUADELOUPE SAINT

94

730 | 146 | 20% 102 | 16 | 16%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

| 12 | 21% Guyana 4 | 0 | 0% Suriname 2 | 0 | 0% Brazil 109 | 25 | 23% Ecuador 45 | 11 | 24% Peru 50

Yener, Aylin

95

Extreme polymorphism in a Y-linked sexually selected trait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-chromosome. Field surveys from 1999 to 2002 of nine populations in Guyana and Suriname, South America, indicate

96

PAESE ESTERO Personale docente e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTERI D Suriname D Trinidad e Tobago D Venezuela D Brasile D Guyana D Lussemburgo D Belgio D Laos D

Genova, Università degli Studi di

97

International Student and Scholar Enrollment & Statistical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suriname 1 Ghana 18 Swaziland 1 Greece 19 Sweden 8 Grenada 1 Switzerland 8 Guatemala 21 Syria 4 Guyana 2

Ginzel, Matthew

98

2013, Latin American Public Opinion Project www.AmericasBarometer.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suriname Guatemala Guyana 0 10 20 30 40 50 Trust in Iranian Government 95% Confidence Interval (Design

Bordenstein, Seth

99

BIBLIOGRAPHIE 243 Bibliographie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mass, and E.W.F. De Roever. Igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Guyana Shield in Surinam. Geologie

Sailhac, Pascal

100

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 106, NO. 12, PAGES 30,82130,835, DECEMBER 10, 2001 Upper-mantle S-velocity structure of central and western South  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AmericanPrecambrianshieldsarefoundinBrazil, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam and French Guiana, with edges in Bolivia and Colombia. The shield regions

van der Lee, Suzan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Isotope Biogeochemistry of Diagenesis caused by a Black  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the coasts of Surinam and French Guyana #12;µ Black shales in Leg 207 sediments and pore water response depth

102

J. Bot. Res. Inst.Texas 3(2): 799 814. 2009 CHECKLIST OF THE PLANTS OF THE GUIANA SHIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= French Guiana; GU = Guyana; SU = Surinam). Names of species in italics are to be edited or deleted

Mathis, Wayne N.

103

Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

publicaci Country Aruba, Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, South...

104

Marine Fisheries On the cover: Recreational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guiana, Surinam, and Guyana, 1978-79 Alexander Dragovich and Essie M. Coleman 1 Moving Out the Learning

105

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

106

REVIEW Open Access Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France (French Guiana), Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The subregion in the Americas [3]. The three Guyanas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) have the highest annual parasite index (Bolivia, Ecuador, French Guiana and Suriname) in this subregion have seen malaria incidence rates re

Boyer, Edmond

107

PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF NCSX1 D.A. Monticello, G.Y. Fu, R. Goldston, L.P. Ku, H. Mynick, R. Nazikian, G. Neilson,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state operation without the need for current drive (with its large recirculating power requirement fixed and the optimizer is requested to find an solution whose surface transform is different from this procedure. The optimizer strategy that produced this configuration asked for 40% of the transform to c

108

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.B. Mikkelsen, Ionizing radiation-induced, mitochondria-W.K. Rorrer, P.B. Chen, Radiation-induced proliferation ofresponse genes to ionizing radiation in human lymphoblastoid

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

2. Klausur Kontinuumsmechanik -WS11/12, Prof. Dr. rer. nat. V. Popov Losungshinweise Seite 1 (a) p(y) = W gy (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W gbR2 (8) N = Fy + G = 1 + 2 W gbR2 (9) Der Grenzfall tritt ein, wenn beide Seiten gleich gro? - sinh l cosh l (37) Resonanz tritt auf wenn cos l = 0, z.B. l = 2 R = EI A 2l 2 (38) Aufgabe 4 (a) QD

Berlin,Technische Universität

110

E3NE3R'GY ORNL/Sub/80-13817/1&20 RD&D Opportunities for Large Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by TRW Energy Engineering Division 800 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 under Subcontract 62X-13817C, Letter Release 62X-20 JN -sf2;~~~~~~~~~for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge by TRW Energy Engineering Division 800 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Subcontract 62

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

111

Simon FraSer UniverSity, vancoUver, canada GRCNEWSthe newSletter oF the GerontoloGy reSearch centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volUme 30 no.1 2011 Tips: Technolology for injury prevenTion in seniors Why global Warming should: exploring the interface Between Population aging and Global Warming ­ May 25-26, 2011. Please see our deaths and 86% of all injury related hospitalizations. Unlike other external causes of death (e

Zhang, Richard "Hao"

112

U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial Co-Chairs' Summary from Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Republic of the Gambia, the Republic of Ghana, the Republic of Guinea, the Republic of Kenya, the Kingdom of Lesotho, the Republic of Liberia, Libya, the Republic of Malawi, the...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - algeria cuba indonesia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guinea Guinea Bissau Guyana Haiti Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Romania Russia Rwanda Samoa... Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Angola Antigua Argentina...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - algeria bangladesh egypt Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guinea Guinea Bissau Guyana Haiti Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Romania Russia Rwanda Samoa... Sinapore Slovakia Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakstan Kenya Bangladesh...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - algeria bangladesh cuba Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guinea Guinea Bissau Guyana Haiti Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Romania Russia Rwanda Samoa... Sinapore Slovakia Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakstan Kenya Bangladesh...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - algeria australia austria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guinea Guinea Bissau Guyana Haiti Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Romania Russia Rwanda Samoa Source: Alechina, Natasha - School of Computer Science, University of...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon central brazil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and distribution ISSN 1809-127X (online edition) Summary: , French Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. In Brazil, Amazon includes Tropical Rain Forest areas... stictoides...

118

"Calling the Magician": The Metamorphic Indo-Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

group in Guyana and Suriname and about half the populationGuiana became postcolonial Suriname in 1975; French Guiananeighboring country of Suriname (Dutch Guiana). People have

Khan, Aliyah Ryhaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - acari eriophyidae em Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

along the southern border between Guyana and Suri... - name), to the interior of Suriname and French Guiana, southto near Manaus, Brazil and south- em Amapl... near the mouth...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - acari em turdus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

along the southern border between Guyana and Suri... - name), to the interior of Suriname and French Guiana, southto near Manaus, Brazil and south- em Amapl... near the mouth...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Accepted by S. Carranza: 29 Sept. 2013; published: 23 Oct. 2013 ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) previously masquerading as C. lemniscatus from southeastern Venezuela, Amazonian Brazil, Suriname, and French. Markezich et al. (1997) assigned specimens from Guyana, Suriname, and Bolivar, Venezuela, to C. l

Hedges, Blair

122

733 | 165 | 23% 97 | 13 | 13%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

51 | 7 | 14% Guyana 4 | 0 | 0% Suriname 2 | 0 | 0% Brazil 99 | 13 | 13% Ecuador 38 | 5 | 13% Peru 49

123

639 | 162 | 25% 84 | 11 | 13%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

| 15% Guyana 6 | 2 | 33% Suriname 2 | 0 | 0% Brazil 82 | 11 | 13% Ecuador 29 | 3 | 10% Peru 44 | 4 | 9

Lee, Dongwon

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - acari tenuipalpidae em Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

along the southern border between Guyana and Suri... - name), to the interior of Suriname and French Guiana, southto near Manaus, Brazil and south- em Amapl... near the mouth...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon parrots amazona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is used in this work based in Mittermeier et al. (2003... , French Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. In Brazil, Amazon includes ... Source: Ribera, Ignacio - Institut de...

126

International Student and Scholar Enrollment & Statistical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURINAME 1 GUATEMALA AND36 SWAZIL 1 GUYANA 1 SWEDEN 16 HAITI 2 SWITZERLAND 2 HONDURAS 9 SYRIA 1 HONG KONG

Ginzel, Matthew

127

QUELQUES ASPECTS DE LA NGATION DANS TROIS LANGUES ARAWAK DU NORD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

statut de langue minoritaire dans les pays où il est parlé : le Guyana, le Surinam et le département de

Boyer, Edmond

128

Herv Thveniaut BRGM, Service Gologie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» Guyanes coloniales que sont le Guyana (britannique), le Suriname (néerlandais) et la Guyane française. Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

129

4, 35653606, 2004 Spatial and temporal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The MBL aerosol size distribution some 50­100 km of the coast of French Guyana and Suriname showed a bi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Langues amrindiennes : localisation des familles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bolivie Pérou Colombie Venezuela Brésil Suriname Guyana Guyane française caribe tupi-guarani arawak océan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

8, 11591190, 2008 Halocarbons over the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rainforest in Suriname and French Guyana (3­6 N, 51­59 W) in October 2005. In the boundary layer (0­1.4 km

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

132

International Student and Scholar Enrollment & Statistical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURINAM 1 GHANA 12 SWAZILAND 2 GREECE 21 SWEDEN 14 GUATEMALA ND22 SWITZERLA 6 GUYANA 1 SYRIA 1 HAITI 2

Ginzel, Matthew

133

BIBLIOGRAPHIE 243 Bibliographie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Guyana Shield in Surinam. Geologie en Mijnbouw, 62:241--54, 1983. [Bla95] R. J. Blakely. Potential Theory

Sailhac, Pascal

134

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 31853197, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/3185/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tropical rainforest in Suriname and French Guyana (3­6 N, 51­59 W) in October 2005. In the boundary layer

Meskhidze, Nicholas

135

Profits Over People: Tobacco Industry Activities to Market Cigarettes and Undermine Public Health in Latin America and the Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tobacco Co. Ltd. Suriname [Re: Regional initiatives].to Keith Dunt Subject: Suriname. British- American TobaccoMarket Colombia Panama Suriname Guyana Ecuador Peru Bolivia

Aguinaga Bialous, Stella MPH; Shatenstein, Stan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - american caesalpiniaceae vi Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 Terry W Henkel Summary: associated with Dicymbe (Caesalpiniaceae) in Guyana. Advisor: Rytas Vilgalys. 1988 MS (Botany), University... to Armillaria (Physalacriaceae,...

137

International reserves management and the current account  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guyana Indonesia Jordan Kazakhstan Kyrgyz Republic Laoof Iraq Jamaica Jordan Kazakhstan Macedonia, FYR MaldivesJamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Kuwait Kyrgyz

Aizenman, Joshua

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - agroforest sulawesi indonesia Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Aceh, Papua, Central Sulawesi, Maluku Kenya Kuwait Liberia Myanmar (former Burma) Nepal Nigeria... Former USSR - Azerbaijan Kyrgystan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Guatemala Guyana...

139

Overleven in een grensgebied. Veranderingsprocessen bij de Wayana in Suriname en Frans-Guayana.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Wayana, who belong to the group of Caribbean speaking peoples, live dispersed over three countries: Brazil, French Guyana and Suriname. Wayana is in fact (more)

Boven, K.M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Bioecology of Stenoma catenifer (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Venezuela (Bosca´n de Martõ´nez and Godoy 1984), Guyana (Cervantes Peredo et al. 1999), Peru (Wysoki et al

Hoddle, Mark S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION Contributions from the United States National Herbarium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Guiana Shield (VENEZUELA: Amazonas, Bolivar, Delta Amacuro; GUYANA, SURINAM, FRENCH GUIANA) by V. Funk, DeltaAmacuro; Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana). Contributions from the United States National Herbarium and Surinam, French Guiana (a part of France) and the Venezuelan states of Amazonas, Bolivar, and Delta

Mathis, Wayne N.

142

Foreign Fishery Developments New Latin American  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be delivered. Libya has announced the formation of several joint fishery ventures with Af- rican countries/58.) Taiwan and Libya have both recently forn1ed joint venture fishing companies in Latin America. Taiwan Trawling Venture Libya and Guyana have agreed to set up a $5 million joint fishing company in which Guyana

143

International Bibliography of Vegetation Maps 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French Guyana . W. Kiichler 224 Guyana . M. Hoare and A. W. Kiichler 225 Netherlands Antilles A. W. Kiichler 230 Paraguay Juan Alberto Lpez and A. W. Kiichler 233 Peru Elmo Montenegro and A. W. Kiichler 241 South Georgia A. W. Kiichler 272 Suriname...

Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

PROJECT INFORMATION Project Number: S61268-583  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS Narrative summary Expected results Performance measurement Assumptions and level of risk Goal and decision-makers with tools for developing IWRM policies in three DC's (Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica) by Year 6, Grenada and Guyana are committed to achieving and sustaining project results. Level of Risk: Low 2

Barthelat, Francois

145

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that plan be built under the 2005 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, even though the build- out of the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings is January 1 with the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. Separate Permits for Siting and Building Construction

146

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMISSION Residential Indoor Air Quality under the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards ASHRAE 62. Requirements The ASHRAE Standard requires a minimum level of ventilation in two areas: (1) whole-building for Residential Low- Rise Buildings (ASHRAE Standard) and various ways to meet this standard are described

147

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Definitions as used in the Standards: · A lamp, commonly referred to as a "light bulb," is the part are recessed downlights with GU24 sockets not allowed to be rated for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs)? Aren

148

Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, M. C. Zarnstorff, A. Brooks, G.-Y. Fu, R. J. Goldston, L.-P. Ku,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, C. Nuehrenberg Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald, Germany High-beta, low and are insensitive to changes in beta. Coil configurations have been calculated that reconstruct these plasma

149

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Navigation 18 Multi-Subject 13 Floors 12 Title 24 Code Comparison 12 Lighting, Sign 11 Documentation 9 Not recorded 6 Total 1966 Topic Calls Forms 288 HVAC 274 HVAC Changeout 70 Title 24, General 230 Lighting, Indoor 217 Roofs 204 Software Modeling 79 HERS Rating/Raters 63 Fenestration/Skylights 57 Lighting

150

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Supporting Documents · Terms Used in the Standards · HVAC Updates for the 2008 Standards · Energy Education

151

E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the builder or homeowner withacopytotheenforcementagencytoreturnto correct refrigerant charge and airflow

152

ARAWAK VS. LOKONO. WHAT'S IN A NAME ? Denomination of one of the largest and geographically most extensive family of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Columbian era to a specific Amerindian group living in the Guianese coastal area in Guyana, Suriname, French,000; in Suriname, the 1980 census gives the figures of 700 speakers out of 2,051 individuals; in the French

Boyer, Edmond

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting northeastern brazil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Guy- ana, known as the Guianas-Brazil... of northeastern Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana (1975-77). In A. C. Jones and L. Villegas (Editors... working group met in...

154

Malaria resurgence: a systematic review and assessment of its causes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the; 2002. 134. PAHO: Suriname. Cartagena, Colombia: The1996 [131] Costa Rica Belize Suriname Ecuador Panama PacificNi Nicaragua P Peru Suriname P Panama Mexico Haiti Guyana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 207 recently cored sediments on the Demerara Rise at ~9N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rise,north of Suriname and French Guyana, South America,is an ideal drilling target because expanded of Suriname,and is ~220 km wide from the shelf break to the northeastern escarpment. Most of the plateau lies

Bice, Karen L.

156

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Highlighting the genetic and epidemiologic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Grena- dines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Cai- cos. Analysis of "de-identified" patient and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname where there is a large population of East Indians brought during

Boyer, Edmond

157

Visa Students by Country of Citizenship -November 2013 Region Undergraduate Graduate Total  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Malvinas) 0 0 0 Guinea (French) 0 0 0 Guyana 11 0 11 Paraguay 0 0 0 Peru 3 3 6 Suriname 1 0 1 Uruguay 0 0 0

158

MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY (2008) 9(5), 577588 DOI: 10.1111/J.1364-3703.2008.00496.X 2008 BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD 577  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. PEREIRA2 1 Sustainable Perennial Crops Laboratory, USDA­ARS, 10300 Baltimore Ave., Bldg. 001, Beltsville subsequently arrived in Surinam in 1895. WBD moved rapidly, spreading to Guyana in 1906, Ecuador in 1918

Griffith, Gareth

159

Pteronotus personatus (Chiroptera: Mormoopidae) J. ANTONIO DE LA TORRE AND RODRIGO A. MEDELLIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

northern Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana and through northwestern Colombia, and in a band a species of ``Least Concern,'' but the status of many populations is uncertain. DOI: 10.1644/869.1. Key

Hayssen, Virginia

160

Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ports of Paramaribo (Surinam), Cayenne and St. Laurent (both French Guiana), Georgetown (Guyana), Port, sponsored by the Caribbean Commission, Surinam Government, and U.S. Government, located large aggregations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A preliminary analysis of geographic variation in the neotropical teiid lizard, Cnemidophorus lemniscatus (Sauria: Teiidae), from Mainland Central and South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Puerto Cortes, Honduras; g4 = Surinam; T";5 = i~laturin, Venezuela; 66 Falcon, Venezuela; g7 = Bolivar, Venezuela; g8 = Camatagua, Venezuela; P9 = Guyana; $1G Baranquilla, Colombia; $11 = Yaviza, Panama; 514 = Apure, Venezuela; f16 = Villavicencio... from all others. This grouping differs from the UPG:IA where the sexes were lumped because samples 4 and 9, from Guyana and Surinam, respectively, are coupled together. These are subgrouped with sample 16, and then with sample 18. The s cond split...

McCrystal, Hugh Kreyer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

BY CLASSES, SEPTEMBER 2011 Graduate Students 56. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uganda 4 United Arab Emirates 3 United Kingdom 7 Uzbekistan 2 Venezuela 1 Viet Nam 6 Yemen 1 Zimbabwe 6 Switzerland 2 Syrian Arab Republic 1 Taiwan 3 Tajikistan 1 United Republic of Tanzania 2 Thailand 4 Turkey 3's Democratic Republic 2 Lesotho 1 Liberia 1 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 1 Madagascar 1 Malawi 1 Malaysia 1 Mauritius

Aalberts, Daniel P.

163

2nd Edition Nov. 2011 CampusFrance South Africa Newsletter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2nd Edition Nov. 2011 CampusFrance South Africa Newsletter Table of contents : o Current Bursary offered by the French Embassy aim to respond to South Africa and Lesotho's need to train and equip French per country) for Honours and Masters students from South Korea, Mexico, India, USA, South Africa

Wagner, Stephan

164

ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AFRICA http://www.royalsocietysa.org.za ACADEMY OF SCIENCE OF SOUTH AFRICA and distribution of butterflies in the atlas region (South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland), thereby providing-ordinator of Africa's first butterfly atlas, entitled `The metamorphosis of the butterfly atlas' The Southern African

de Villiers, Marienne

165

Parton energy loss limits and shadowing in DrellYan dimuon production M.A. Vasiliev i \\Lambda , M.E. Beddo g , C.N. Brown c , T.A. Carey f , T.H. Chang gy , W.E. Cooper c , C.A. Gagliardi i ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parton energy loss limits and shadowing in Drell­Yan dimuon production M.A. Vasiliev i \\Lambda , M Ridge, TN 37831 i Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843 j Valparaiso University, Valparaiso­parton momentum fraction set tight limits on the energy loss of quarks passing through a cold nucleus. 24.85.+p

166

L'identit gomtrie variable des jeunes hommes Kali'na de Mana (Guyane franaise) : sur quelle mesure ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disperse au Brésil, au Surinam, jusqu'au Guyana et au Venezuela (Ethnies 1985 :14). En 1958, la population, conséquence de la guerre civile du Surinam. Aujourd'hui, les Kali'na sont entre de 2800 et 4000 individus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

MFR PAPER 1087 Trap Fishing Explorations for Snapper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lying south , southeast, and southwest of Jamaica ; north of Hispaniola; in the northern Leeward Islands, north of Hispaniola , and off Venezuela , Guyana, and Surinam. Higher catch rates of about 40 pounds per the Jamaica Banks were grunts , triggerfish, squirrelfish , and porgies taken as a group. North of Hispaniola

168

For Immediate Release --Thursday, March 7, 2013 University of Lethbridge technology aboard Herschel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research device on a 1.5 million kilometre trip into deep space aboard the end of the project for the research team. Dr. David Naylor (Physics Guyana, very quickly began to shed new light on stars and galaxies by measuring

Morris, Joy

169

Characters and phylogenetic relationships of nectar-feeding bats, with descriptions of new Lonchophylla from western South America (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: Lonchophyllini)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. thomasi, we carried out principal compo- nents analyses (PCA) using 115 individu- als from Bolivia (n 5 3), Brazil (19), Colombia (5), Ecuador (4), French Gui- ana (5), Guyana (9), Panama (11), Peru (36), Suriname (10), and Venezuela (13). We then plotted...

Woodman, Neal; Timm, Robert M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Drought and Precipitation Monitoring for Enhanced Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought and Precipitation Monitoring for Enhanced Integrated Water Resources Management for water resource management in Jamaica, Grenada and Guyana. A key element to ensuring the success for Water Resources Management, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21111 Lakeshore Rd., Ste. Anne de

Barthelat, Francois

171

THE UNITED STATES SHRIMP FISHERY OFF NORTHEASTERN SOUTH AMERICA (1972-74)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; pink shrimp, P. notialis; and white shrimp, P. schmitti. The areas offGuyana, Surinam, and western sustainable yield to be 28.7 million pounds and a linear model estimated the maximum sustainable yield Brazil and Barbados, Surinam, and Trinidad and Tobago. SOURCES OF DATA AND METHODS Catch data for U

172

Mondialisation et territoires religieux dans les espaces tropicaux Effets et enjeux de la mondialisation sur la gographie mondiale de l'hindouisme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'émigration hindoue peuvent être classés en cinq phases: les mouvements de population antiques et précoloniaux ; les'abolition de l'esclavage4 (vers l'Ile Maurice, La Réunion, Guyana, le Surinam, la Guyane, la Martinique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

URBAN EXTENTS P a c i f i c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URBAN EXTENTS Argentina Bolivia Chile Colombia Guyana Peru Paraguay Suriname Uruguay Venezuela Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP), Population Density Boundaries Note: National boundaries are derived from the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Urban

Columbia University

174

MFR PAPER 1082 Exploratory Fishing Activities of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the coastal shelves of eastern Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana . Experiments were conducted South America, and is concentrated off Surinam. A seasonal increase in availability of skipjack tuna . A small resource of tilefish was found in deep water off the edge of the Surinam continental shelf

175

Tropical Timber Market Report since 1990 Volume 14 Number 12, 16-30 June 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 2009. Bolivia's forest products exports also declined over 10% by value during the same period/West Africa 2 Ghana 2 Malaysia 4 Indonesia 5 Myanmar 6 India 7 Brazil 8 Peru 9 Bolivia 10 Guyana 10 Japan 12's wood products exports 8 Argentina restricts imports of Brazilian furniture 8 Bolivia reports decline

176

Department of Geological Sciences Indiana University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jackson Njau 3 856-3170 GY 513 jknjau Greg Olyphant 2 855-1351 GY 429 olyphant Gary Pavlis 1 855-5141 GY aschimme EMERITUS FACULTY Robert Blakely blakely David Dilcher 856-0618 GY S209 dilcher J. Robert Dodd GY

Polly, David

177

ICTP Public Information Office Page 1 12/05/2011 Country Total visitors Female visitors Person-months*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.05 United Arab Emirates 2 1 2.50 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland 154 24 92.15 United.71 Kazakhstan 2 0 0.99 Kenya 31 4 53.88 Kuwait 3 0 0.49 Lebanon 8 2 15.32 Lesotho 2 0 0.46 Libyan Arab Person-months* Sudan 27 10 80.28 Swaziland 1 0 0.46 Sweden 29 6 8.38 Switzerland 77 15 16.70 Syrian Arab

178

ICTP Public Information Office Page 1 26/03/2014 Country Total visitors Female visitors Person-months*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.19 Ukraine 55 25 33.24 United Arab Emirates 1 0 0.13 United Kingdom 279 47 125.13 United Republic of Tanzania.50 Kenya 36 12 43.07 Kuwait 3 1 0.66 Kyrgyzstan 1 0 0.46 Lebanon 9 3 4.24 Lesotho 1 0 0.46 Libyan Arab.94 Syrian Arab Republic 6 0 9.63 Thailand 14 6 4.77 the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 8 3 15.88 Togo

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption-biological reduction integrated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UOW Environment ManagementUOW Environment Management Summary: responses)gy g ( p ) Energy consumption reduction (205) RenewableAlternative energy Carbon (135)gy... ( ) -...

180

RPARTITION GOGRAPHIQUE En Guyane dans la rgion ctire, commune  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amérindiennes à être parlée sur le territoire de cinq ?tats différents : Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, Guyane % de locuteurs; et 3000 au Suriname, dont 50% de locuteurs (J. Forte, 2000). Une trentaine de locuteurs de l'Est du Suriname se désignent ainsi par opposition aux Kali'na du Centre et de l'Ouest du

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Revision of the cleptoparasitic bee genus Cleptommation (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. chibchani n. sp. Distribution: Presently, individuals of the various species are recorded from Cos- ta Rica and Panama in Central America, from Andean Ecuador and Bolivia, across Amazonian Peru and Brazil, and in French Guiana, Guyana, and Suriname along...32. Photomicrographs of female of Cleptommation minutum (Friese), new combina- tion, from Suriname. 30. Lateral habitus. 31. Dorsal habitus. 32. Facial view. ish brown (yellow areas more reddish brown in much older, faded specimens), basal quarter to third...

Engel, Michael S.

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

Deal, C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Latin American vertebrate systematic collections: status and management procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the Neotropical areas where Spanish and Portuguese are the official languages (Pefaur, 1987) . In this case, the concept was followed, but Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad, in spite of their different languages, were also considered as part as this survey because.... 0 100. 0 Paraguay Peru Puerto Rico Surinam Trinidad Uruguay Venezuela 10 50. 0 100. 0 50. 0 50. 0 TOTAL 94 50 53. 2 14 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Responses were received from 50 institutions (127 collections), which represent a 53. 2...

Arrizabalaga, M. Begona

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Department of Geological Sciences Indiana University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

jknjau Gary Pavlis 1 855-5141 GY 409 pavlis David Polly 1 855-7994 GY 524A pdpolly Lisa Pratt, Chair 1 aschimme EMERITUS FACULTY Robert Blakely blakely David Dilcher 856-0618 GY S209 dilcher J. Robert Dodd GY

Polly, David

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - ac quantum transport Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2009 PHotonics nAnotEcHnoLoGY Summary: AnotEcHnoLoGY Heterojunction Photovoltaics Using Printed colloidal Quantum Dots as the Photosensitive Layer A....

186

A taxonomic revision of the Liophis lineatus complex (Reptilia:Colubridae) of Central and South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t * b*dy f ~Lh' ll e t . AMttH 36121, Guyana 10. Pattern illustrations of the anterior and p* te o 6 dy f L~ih ~ 1' *t . AMNH 97711, Surinam. 11. 8 pl*s f L~*h ~d'1* 1 ~ d t* s intraspecific variation, 12. Pattern illustrations of the anterior... in the eastern portion of their range. In Surinam and the Guiana'sy the lateral stripes occupy less than one quarter of a scale row. In the past, this type of variation has led investigators (Peters and Orejas- Miranda, 1970) to place individuals at opposite...

Michaud, Edward Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

An Analysis of New World Mangrove Avifaunas Diversity, Endemism, and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, shrubs, arboreal, or aerial). Water preference: This category indicates if a species has a particular preference for an micro-aquatic environment: fresh water lakes or rivers, salt water estuaries, or areas where they mix (brackish water). 8 As a... 1998). For other localities, the authors worked for at least a year in situ (e.g., Jess Mara river, Juan Diaz, Suriname, French Guyana). If I obtained good asymptotic curves within a week of work, then it seems that their surveys are closed...

Escalona-Segura, Griselda

1999-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Les Energies Renouvelables au Service de l'Humanit, Paris, 3.11.2013 George Kariniotakis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Wind Energy: Where are we now?gy Size evolution of wind turbinesSize evolution of wind turbines systems , 3 ... #12;Wind Energy: Where are we now?gy Global Cumulative Installed Wind Capacity 1996,000 The number of people employed by wind industry in EU in 2011 #12;Wind Energy: Where are we now?gy Top 10

Canet, Lonie

189

Banach-Semikategorien III SitzUngsbcrichtco dct Ostcm:i<:hlsehen Akaderoie dcr Wiasensc:haften  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ist leicht einzusehen, daB der Teilraum aller spalten- und zeilenendliehen Matrizen [gyX] (d. h. flir in 8.1, dann be trachten wir den NormabsehluB des Teilraumes aller Matrizen [gyX], flir die gyX "" 0 nur flir endlich viele (X, Y) gilt (spater gemeinhin endliche Matrizen genannt), in [[G

Michor, Peter W.

190

Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

J.I'.oJ\\  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"G"Y , - - - - - - - - EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEIEJU..IINAIION RECIPIENT:University of Colorado STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE : Using Solid Particles as Heat Transfer...

192

Microsoft PowerPoint - Rules.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

not limited to, end-use efficiency improvements; load control or load management; thermal energy storage; or pricing strategies (IA); g ; gy g ; p g g ( ); Energy Efficiency -...

193

A Novel Unified Approach to Invariance in Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 20, 2014 ... Category 3: Applications -- Science and Engineering (Control Applications ) ... Gy?r, Hungary Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering,...

Zoltn Horvth

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

arXiv:nucl-th/0412037v110Dec2004 Transport Theories for Heavy Ion Collisions in the 1 AGeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Danielewicz8 , C. Fuchs9 , T. Gaitanos10 , C.M. Ko6 , A. Larionov5 , M. Reiter4 , Gy. Wolf11 , J. Aichelin2 1

Heger, Alexander

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - atorvastatin combination therapy Sample...  

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of Bexxar Combined with External Beam Radiation Therapy for Patients with Relapsed... of Low-dose (12 Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy (TSEBT) Combined with Vorinostat Versus...

196

PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of possible impact of passive cooling techniques for ene~gyTechniques for EvaluaUon of Solar Heating and Cooling SysU

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient temperature Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

79 ENE-.R:GY ORNLSub80-616012 Research and Development of Summary: the refrigeration system's operating characteristics during low ambient temperature conditions b....

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient temperature razrabotka Sample Search...  

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4 5 > >> 81 ENE-.R:GY ORNLSub80-616012 Research and Development of Summary: the refrigeration system's operating characteristics during low ambient temperature conditions b....

199

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China's Power Industry," Cogeneration Technolo- gy, V o l .tion Development," Cogeneration Technol- ogy, V o l . 41, NE Y NATIONAL LABORATORY Cogeneration Development and Market

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

Prokic, Vesna, E-mail: vesna.prokic@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway) [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dosimetry for quantitative analysis of low dose ionizing radiation effects on humans in radiation therapy patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have successfully developed a practical approach to predicting the location of skin surface dose at potential biopsy sites that receive 1 cGy and 10 cGy, respectively, in support of in vivo biologic dosimetry in humans. This represents a significant technical challenge as the sites lie on the patient surface out side the radiation fields. The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo simulation system was used to model radiation dose delivery and TLDs were used for validation on a phantom and confirmation during patient treatment. In the developmental studies the Monte Carlo simulations consistently underestimated the dose at the biopsy site by approximately 15% for a realistic treatment configuration, most likely due to lack of detail in the simulation of the linear accelerator outside the main beam line. Using a single, thickness-independent correction factor for the clinical calculations, the average of 36 measurements for the predicted 1 cGy point was 0.985 cGy (standard deviation: 0.110 cGy) despite patient breathing motion and other real world challenges. Since the 10 cGy point is situated in the region of high dose gradient at the edge of the field, patient motion had a greater effect and the six measured points averaged 5.90 cGy (standard deviation: 1.01 cGy), a difference that is equivalent to approximately a 6 mm shift on the patient's surface.

Lehmann, J; Stern, R L; Daly, T P; Schwieter, C W; Jones, G E; Arnold, M L; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Goldberg, Z

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY Phys. Med. Biol. 50 (2005) N281N285 doi:10.1088/0031-9155/50/20/N04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in post- irradiation optical density within the first 12 h of irradiation within the 1 Gy to 5 Gy dose285 doi:10.1088/0031-9155/50/20/N04 NOTE Post-irradiation colouration of Gafchromic EBT radiochromic for automatic darkening is an associated post-irradiation colouration whereby the film continues to darken after

Yu, K.N.

204

Annual Meeting of Energy Recovery Council, W hi DC D b 3 2011Washington DC, December 3. 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Meeting of Energy Recovery Council, W hi DC D b 3 2011Washington DC, December 3. 2011 to the recyclers (e.g. metal smelters; secondary paper mills).(e.g. metal smelters; secondary paper mills). All, recovery (called WastetoEnergy; WTE) gy, , y ( gy; ) · All countries (and communities) who rely on WTE also

Columbia University

205

Phys. Med. Biol. 43 (1998) 24072412. Printed in the UK PII: S0031-9155(98)90934-4 Effects of read-out light sources and ambient light on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laser, light emitting diode (LED) and incandescent read-out light sources produce an equivalent dose, fluorescent light and incandescent ambient light produce an equivalent dose coloration of 30 cGy h-1, 18 cGy h the optical density of Gafchromic films include, helium neon lasers, ultrabright diodes, incandescent

Yu, K.N.

206

Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

Mizota, Atsushi, E-mail: mizota-a@med.teikyo-u.ac.j [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Tanaka, Minoru [Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari [Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Chiba Medical Center, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Emiko [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: rades.dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Evers, Jasmin N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lohynska, Radka [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive planning to improve adequate IMPT dose delivery.

Kraan, Aafke C., E-mail: aafke.kraan@pi.infn.it [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

John Leslie Redpath

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Short-course radiotherapy is not optimal for spinal cord compression due to myeloma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the suitability of short-course radiotherapy (RT) for spinal cord compression (SCC) in myeloma patients. Methods and Materials: Data for 172 myeloma patients irradiated between January 1994 and December 2004 for SCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy, 5 x 4 Gy, n = 61) and long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy, 15 x 2.5 Gy, 20 x 2 Gy, n = 111) were compared for functional outcome up to 24 months after RT. In addition, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 90 patients (52%). Forty-seven percent of nonambulatory patients regained the ability to walk. Functional outcome was significantly influenced by the time of developing motor deficits before RT. Improvement of motor function was more frequent after long-course RT than after short-course RT: 59% vs. 39% (p = 0.10) at 1 month, 67% vs. 43% (p 0.043) at 6 months, 76% vs. 40% (p = 0.003) at 12 months, 78% vs. 43% (p 0.07) at 18 months, and 83% v 54% (p = 0.33) at 24 months. A subgroup analysis of the long-course RT group demonstrated a similar functional outcome for 10 x 3 Gy when compared with 15 x 2.5 Gy and 20 x 2 Gy. Conclusions: Long-course RT is preferable for SCC in myeloma patients because it resulted in better functional outcome than short-course RT. Treatment with 10 x 3 Gy can be considered appropriate.

Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, Hannover (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Hoskin, Peter J. [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schulte, Rainer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Lubeck (Germany); Poortmans, Philip [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Dahm-Daphi, Jochen [Institute of Radiobiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Obralic, Nermina [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiotherapy, Siloah Hospital, Hannover (Germany); Bahrehmand, Roja [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Georg Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Engenhart-Cabilic, Rita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bring Signal Processing to the Public IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING MAGAZINE [6] MARCH 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processing is a stealth technolo- gy." The words signal processing are not part of the popular lexicon even site may actually be rolled out before you read this message); providing open source materials (this

Moura, José

212

:' , -_ i '; f~;--~', \\'?<;'~/}{.!T~':~'~'\\~:~~{J:~':;:;,-""," ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 'gy in Europe. Ready to Power j I o ABORDARE GLOBALA ENERGO-ECOLOGICA. ~I SINTE A PROBLEMEI Energetic Stage I. sourse". ETSUR-R-99. (1997). ecasting Application". EWEA, UK Wind Energy Resourse

Baica, Malvina

213

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the energy consumed by buildings [1]. Therefore, balancing energy consumption and thermal comfort is a major environmentally conscious absorption cooling systems. Integrating building energy simulation software Ener- gy September 2011 Keywords: HVAC Optimization Neutral network Evolutionary computation Strength multi

Kusiak, Andrew

214

Radiosensitization Strategies for Enhanced E-beam Irradiation Treatment of Fresh Produce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

necessary to develop treatments that will reduce their prevalence and numbers on fresh produce. Irradiation is a penetrating nonthermal treatment that effectively eliminates bacteria. Irradiated baby spinach leaves up to 1.0 kGy showed negligible (P>0...

Gomes, Carmen

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic exposure assessment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic biota (1 rad d-1 or 10 mGy d... risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental...

216

PLANAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnerGY D C" "-.,* February 27,2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue,...

217

Microsoft PowerPoint - Project Briefing for Nuclear Energy Advisory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Next Generation Nuclear Plant . Project Briefing for . Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee uc ea e gy d so y Co ttee Greg Gibbs Director NGNP Project...

218

Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics S C R I P P S I N S T I T U T I O N O F O C E A N O G R A P H Y , U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , S A N D I E G O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the behavior of ice sheets, improved methods of ener- gy exploration, monitoring of carbon dioxide sequestration and so on. Our work spans a broad range of subject matter in geophysics and oceanography. A wide

Constable, Steve

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess fish secondary Sample Search Results  

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fish secondary Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assess fish secondary Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 (Bi*ol"o*gy) n. Gr. life + -logy:...

220

activation chemical: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state synchronized to the flow for both types of reactions. For particles of finite size an emptying transition might also occur leading to no products left in the wake. Gy....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

active chemical 4-tert-pentylphenol: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state synchronized to the flow for both types of reactions. For particles of finite size an emptying transition might also occur leading to no products left in the wake. Gy....

222

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET...

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

acute radiation rectal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70 rads). o Mild symptoms may be observed with doses as low as 0.3 Gy or 30 rads. The dose usually must be external (i.e., the source of radiation is outside of the patients...

224

NAME G RADIN G KEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(8) 7. Find the derivative of the function. G(y) = [y (1 + t2)%dt. '? 1. 1-.- jlntrz?ou + $0 (Wadi. / O can; = - 6+"5'Y'" + (1+ What. @ ea. 'G'= -(1+~a')"*+ 23 (Hwy?

225

brief communications nature methods | VOL.7 NO.12 | DECEMBER2010 | 985  

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angle were 2-24 s. The total X-ray exposure (~109 Gy) produced negligible radiation damage, as we features. Using Fourier optical theory, we calculated that our microscope design should produce a dramatic

Cai, Long

226

Alternating direction method of multipliers for sparse zero-variance ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 21, 2014 ... As before, letting the columns of N ? Rpd form a basis for Null(W) yields the ... Given problems of the form minx,y {f(x) + g(y) : Ax + By = c} the...

BrendanAmesandMingyiHong

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

EECE Department Seminar Dr. Gu is an associate professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, faculty and track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessment, biosensors, biological wastewater treatment processes and modeling, microbial ecology application of biotechnolo- gy for water and wastewater treatment, water quality monitoring and toxicity in wastewater ef- fluents demand for more reliable and better optimization of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR

Subramanian, Venkat

228

Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

Ng, Angela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Joanne L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.Hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D{sub 15%} of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D{sub 15%} was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D{sub 10%} of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes.

Haertl, Petra M., E-mail: petra.haertl@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg University Medical Center, Regensburg (Germany); Pohl, Fabian; Weidner, Karin; Groeger, Christian; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg University Medical Center, Regensburg (Germany)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

131I-Tositumomab Myeloablative Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Radiation Dose to the Testes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate radiation dose to testes delivered by radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibody and its effects on male sex hormone levels. METHODS: We evaluated dosimetry results for 67 male patients (54 11 years old) with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent myeloablative radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab. In a subset of patients, male sex hormones were measured before and one year after the therapy. RESULTS: Absorbed dose to testes showed greater variability (range = 4.4 to 70.2 Gy) than did dose to lungs (9.5 to 28.4 Gy, p < 0.0001) or liver (6.5 to 27.2 Gy, p < 0.0001). Absorbed dose to the testes per 131I administered (1.18 0.59 mGy/MBq) was not significantly different from that to the liver (1.03 0.29 mGy/MBq, p = 0.08), or to the lungs (1.19 0.50 mGy/MBq, p = 0.889). Pre-therapy levels of total testosterone were below the lower limit of the reference range, and post-therapy evaluation demonstrated further reduction (4.6 1.8 nmol/L (pre-RIT) vs. 3.8 2.9 nmol/L (post-RIT), p < 0.05). Patients receiving higher radiation doses to the testes (? 25 Gy) showed a greater reduction (4.7 1.6 nmol/L (pre RIT) vs. 3.3 2.7 nmol/L (post-RIT), p < 0.05) than did patients receiving lower doses (< 25 Gy), who showed no significant change in total testosterone levels. CONCLUSION: The testicular radiation absorbed dose varied highly among individual patients. Patients receiving higher doses to testes were more likely to show post-RIT suppression of testosterone levels. Key Words: 131I-tositumomab, follicular lymphoma, radioimmunotherapy, radiation dosimetry, male sex hormones. ?

Hattori, Naoya; Gopal, Ajay K.; Shields, Andrew T.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.; Rajendran, Joseph G.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analytical and Experimental Studies of Drag Embedment Anchors and Suction Caissons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NtHBtaHsrOMmtdeOoGBr UOFGBHhOtHuGOHAesOiGOimtdeOKoObtKAHocOsu&sfAtHHoOKoO&tysdiuObGyOimsAyOKGytHOuB&&GyiOtdhO bAdtdfAtHOtAhrOMmtdeOoGBcOUOfGBHhOdGiOmtNsOfGK&HsishOimAuOFAimOGBiOoGBrOLdhOt&&ysfAtiAGdO vGsuOiGOKoOuAaHAdvuOtdhOvytdh&tysdiuObGyOimsAyOAdisysui...

Beemer, Ryan

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Expansin de la Frontera Agropecuaria en Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Expansión de la Frontera Agropecuaria en Argentina y su Impacto Ecológico-Ambiental Editores: Ernesto F. Viglizzo, Esteban Jobbágy #12;71Expansión de la Frontera Agropecuaria en Argentina y su Impacto Ecológico-Ambiental Capítulo 12 Una mirada hacia el futuro Jobbágy EG Introducción Los cambios que

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

235

Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg (Germany); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siloah Hospital Hannover (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer reduces volume of bowel treated to high dose levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the potential for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the bowel in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: The targets (pelvic nodal and rectal volumes), bowel, and bladder were outlined in 5 patients. All had conventional, three-dimensional conformal RT and forward-planned multisegment three-field IMRT plans compared with inverse-planned simultaneous integrated boost nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans. Equally spaced seven-field and five-field and five-field, customized, segmented IMRT plans were also evaluated. Results: Ninety-five percent of the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of both planning target volumes using all but the conventional plan (mean primary and pelvic planning target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was 32.8 {+-} 13.7 Gy and 23.7 {+-} 4.87 Gy, respectively), reflecting a significant lack of coverage. The three-field forward planned IMRT plans reduced the volume of bowel irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy by 26% {+-} 16% and 42% {+-} 27% compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Additional reductions to 69 {+-} 51 cm{sup 3} to 45 Gy and 20 {+-} 21 cm{sup 3} to 50 Gy were obtained with the nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans-64% {+-} 11% and 64% {+-} 20% reductions compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Reducing the number of beams and customizing the angles for the five-field equally spaced IMRT plan did not significantly reduce bowel sparing. Conclusion: The bowel volume irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy was significantly reduced with IMRT, which could potentially lead to less bowel toxicity. Reducing the number of beams did not reduce bowel sparing and the five-field customized segmented IMRT plan is a reasonable technique to be tested in clinical trials.

Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Henrys, Anthony J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Adams, Elisabeth J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bedford, James L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Tait, Diana M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jenny.pearson@rmh.nthames.nhs.uk

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have reviewed the published data regarding radiotherapy (RT)-induced brain injury. Radiation necrosis appears a median of 1-2 years after RT; however, cognitive decline develops over many years. The incidence and severity is dose and volume dependent and can also be increased by chemotherapy, age, diabetes, and spatial factors. For fractionated RT with a fraction size of <2.5 Gy, an incidence of radiation necrosis of 5% and 10% is predicted to occur at a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy (range, 100-140) and 150 Gy (range, 140-170), respectively. For twice-daily fractionation, a steep increase in toxicity appears to occur when the biologically effective dose is >80 Gy. For large fraction sizes (>=2.5 Gy), the incidence and severity of toxicity is unpredictable. For single fraction radiosurgery, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between the target size and the risk of adverse events. Substantial variation among different centers' reported outcomes have prevented us from making toxicity-risk predictions. Cognitive dysfunction in children is largely seen for whole brain doses of >=18 Gy. No substantial evidence has shown that RT induces irreversible cognitive decline in adults within 4 years of RT.

Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: richard.lawrence@jefferson.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Variations of the hypoxic fraction in the SCC VII tumors after single dose and during fractionated radiation therapy: Assessment without anesthesia or physical restraint of mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variations of the hypoxic fraction (HF) after single dose (13 Gy or 4 Gy) and during fractionated (5 fractions of 4 Gy, 1 or 2 fractions per day) radiation therapy were studied in SCC VII tumors implanted subcutaneously in the hind legs of C3H/He/Jms mice using the paired survival curve method. Whole-body irradiation was delivered to tumor-bearing mice without anesthesia or physical restraint, because both are known to increase the HF artificially. The HF decreased after a single 13 Gy dose in a biphasic fashion: extremely rapidly within 1 hr and comparatively slowly during the following 12-72 hr. On the other hand, nearly no fall of HF was observed in 24 hr following a single 4 Gy dose. Also, reoxygenation was found to occur more rapidly in the interfraction period as the number of fractions of 4 Gy increased irrespective of differences of interfraction time. However, the HF just before each radiation fraction was significantly higher than the pretreatment level for both fractionated regimens. Thus, the reoxygenation patterns observed after single low and high doses of irradiation were different from each other, and reoxygenation in each interfraction period did not always proceed in a similar manner to that after single low dose irradiation. Reoxygenation was facilitated as fractionated radiation therapy proceeded, but it was not sufficient for the HF to remain at a level comparable to that before irradiation.

Kitakabu, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Sasai, K.; Ono, K.; Abe, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Latif, Naeem [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

Hill, R.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the development of retinopathy.

Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S. [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott, E-mail: stafford.scott@mayo.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small percentage of organ volumes (heart or ventricle) receiving high dose levels, supporting the notion that the heart behaves as a serial organ.

D'Errico, Maria P., E-mail: patderrico@libero.it [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Grimaldi, Luca [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Petruzzelli, Maria F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Gianicolo, Emilio A.L. [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Tramacere, Francesco [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Pili, Giorgio [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Portaluri, Maurizio [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy)] [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparison of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy resulting from the use of a tungsten alloy MLC or a brass collimator system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To apply the dual ionization chamber method for mixed radiation fields to an accurate comparison of the secondary neutron dose arising from the use of a tungsten alloy multileaf collimator (MLC) as opposed to a brass collimator system for defining the shape of a therapeutic proton field. Methods: Hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous ionization chambers were constructed with large volumes to enable measurements of absorbed doses below 10{sup -4} Gy in mixed radiation fields using the dual ionization chamber method for mixed-field dosimetry. Neutron dose measurements were made with a nominal 230 MeV proton beam incident on a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a solid brass block. The chambers were cross-calibrated against a {sup 60}Co-calibrated Farmer chamber in water using a 6 MV x-ray beam and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to account for variations in ionization chamber response due to differences in secondary neutron energy spectra. Results: The neutron and combined proton plus {gamma}-ray absorbed doses are shown to be nearly equivalent downstream from either a closed tungsten alloy MLC or a solid brass block. At 10 cm downstream from the distal edge of the collimating material the neutron dose from the closed MLC was (5.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. The neutron dose with brass was (6.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. Further from the secondary neutron source, at 50 cm, the neutron doses remain close for both the MLC and brass block at (6.9 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy and (6.3 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The dual ionization chamber method is suitable for measuring secondary neutron doses resulting from proton irradiation. The results of measurements downstream from a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a brass block indicate that, even in an overly pessimistic worst-case scenario, secondary neutron production in a tungsten alloy MLC leads to absorbed doses that are nearly equivalent to those seen from brass collimators. Therefore, the choice of tungsten alloy in constructing the leaves of a proton MLC is appropriate, and does not lead to a substantial increase in the secondary neutron dose to the patient compared to that generated in a brass collimator.

Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Kirk, Maura L.; McDonough, James E.; Maughan, Richard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Possible Detection of a Pair Instability Supernova in the Modern Universe, and Implications for the First Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SN 2006gy radiated far more energy in visual light than any other supernova so far, and potential explanations for its energy demands have implications for galactic chemical evolution and the deaths of the first stars. It remained bright for over 200 days, longer than any normal supernova, and it radiated more than 1e51 ergs of luminous energy at visual wavelengths. I argue that this Type IIn supernova was probably the explosion of an extremely massive star like Eta Carinae that retained its hydrogen envelope when it exploded, having suffered relatively little mass loss during its lifetime. That this occurred at roughly Solar metallicity challenges current paradigms for mass loss in massive-star evolution. I explore a few potential explanations for SN2006gy's power source, involving either circumstellar interaction, or instead, the decay of 56Ni. If SN 2006gy was powered by the conversion of shock energy into light, then the conditions must be truly extraordinary and traditional interaction models don't work. If SN 2006gy was powered by radioactive decay, then the uncomfortably huge 56Ni mass requires that the star exploded as a pair instability supernova. The mere possibility of this makes SN 2006gy interesting, especially at this meeting, because it is the first good candidate for a genuine pair instability supernova.

Nathan Smith

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

A phase I trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A multicenter Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three liver metastases, tumor diameter <6 cm, and adequate liver function. The first cohort received 36 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions (F). Subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to a chosen maximum of 60 Gy/3F. At least 700 mL of normal liver had to receive a total dose <15 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 liver or intestinal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2/6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (10 male, 8 female): median age, 55 years (range, 26-83 years); most common primary site, colorectal (6 patients); median aggregate gross tumor volume, 18 ml (range, 3-98 ml). Four patients had multiple tumors. No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3F without reaching MTD. Conclusions: Biologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated in patients with limited liver metastases. Results of this study form the basis for an ongoing Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy over three fractions for liver metastases.

Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States); Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Baron, Anna [Department of Biostatics, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

How We Achieved a 41% Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this pape~. Abbott Labo~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide health ca~e company with 1984 sales in excess of $3.1 billion. Abbott employs some 34,000 people in 28 domestic and 44 inte~ational locations. ou~ ene~gy conse~vation p~og~am was sta~ted in 1973 du...~ing the A~ab oil emba~go, but the ene~gy conse~vation depa~tment was not fo~ed until 1977. This depa~tment consists of myself, 2 enginee~s, and a sec~eta~y, and we a~e the only people in the company devoting full time to ene~gy conse~vation. Each plant...

Maze, M. E.

250

Fixed point theorems in ultrametric spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for each d(g(xn), g(yn)) = d(g(x), g(y)) n & m. Hence, d(g(x), g(y)) = d(g(? ), g(y )) d(f(x ), f(y )) &d(x, y) d(x, y) and g is contractive. ~ Combining Theorems 2. 2 and 2. 12 we have the following result. ~e 2. 13. Let (X, d) be an ultrametric... pages follow the style of h ~fdi f th A ' M h ' t ~d CHAPTER I PRELIMINARIES A metric ~s ace is a pair (X, d) where X is a nonempty set, and d is a non-negative function from X Xf X into R (the real numbers) such that for x, y, z c X the following...

Fullbright, Steven Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Radiation Dose-Volume Effects and the Penile Bulb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dose, volume, and clinical outcome data for penile bulb are reviewed for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. Most, but not all, studies find an association between impotence and dosimetric parameters (e.g., threshold doses) and clinical factors (e.g., age, comorbid diseases). According to the data available, it is prudent to keep the mean dose to 95% of the penile bulb volume to <50 Gy. It may also be prudent to limit the D70 and D90 to 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively, but coverage of the planning target volume should not be compromised. It is acknowledged that the penile bulb may not be the critical component of the erectile apparatus, but it seems to be a surrogate for yet to be determined structure(s) critical for erectile function for at least some techniques.

Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nam, Jiho [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gagliardi, Giovanna [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); El Naqa, Issam; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Influence of X-ray Irradiation on the Properties of the Hamamatsu Silicon Photomultiplier S10362-11-050C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the effects of X-ray irradiation to doses of 0, 200 Gy, 20 kGy, 2 MGy, and 20 MGy on the Hamamatsu silicon-photomultiplier (SiPM) S10362-11-050C. The SiPMs were irradiated without applied bias voltage. From current-voltage, capacitance/conductance-voltage, -frequency, pulse-shape, and pulse-area measurements, the SiPM characteristics below and above breakdown voltage were determined. Significant changes of some SiPM parameters are observed. Up to a dose of 20 kGy the performance of the SiPMs is hardly affected by X-ray radiation damage. For doses of 2 and 20 MGy the SiPMs operate with hardly any change in gain, but with a significant increase in dark-count rate and cross-talk probability.

Chen Xu; Robert Klanner; Erika Garutti; Wolf-Lukas Hellweg

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 ({+-}SD) was 2.02 {+-} 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 ({+-}SD) was 7.0 {+-} 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 ({+-}SD) was 8.7 {+-} 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated.

Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States)]. E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Zeidan, Omar A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Meeks, Sanford L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Willoughby, Twyla R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Wagner, Thomas H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Jeswani, Sam [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Ruchala, Kenneth J. [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Haimerl, Jason [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Olivera, Gustavo H. [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstede, Theresa M. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lindberg, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patients radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were {sup 60}Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower doses.

Lamart, Stephanie, E-mail: stephanie.lamart@nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Curtis, Rochelle E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Travis, Lois [Rubin Center for Cancer Survivorship and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Rubin Center for Cancer Survivorship and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Kwon, Deukwoo [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Morton, Lindsay M. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Optimization of Collimator Trajectory in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: Development and Evaluation for Paraspinal SBRT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a collimator trajectory optimization paradigm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and evaluate this technique in paraspinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Method and Materials: We propose a novel VMAT paradigm, Coll-VMAT, which integrates collimator rotation with synchronized gantry rotation, multileaf collimator (MLC) motion, and dose-rate modulation. At each gantry angle a principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to calculate the primary cord orientation. The collimator angle is then aligned so that MLC travel is parallel to the PCA-derived direction. An in-house VMAT optimization follows the geometry-based collimator trajectory optimization to obtain the optimal MLC position and monitor units (MU) at each gantry angle. A treatment planning study of five paraspinal SBRT patients compared Coll-VMAT to standard VMAT (fixed collimator angle) and static field IMRT plans. Plan evaluation statistics included planning target volume (PTV) V95%, PTV-D95%, cord-D05%, and total beam-on time. Results: Variation of collimator angle in Coll-VMAT plans ranges from 26 deg. to 54 deg., with a median of 40 deg. Patient-averaged PTV V95% (94.6% Coll-VMAT vs. 92.1% VMAT and 93.3% IMRT) and D95% (22.5 Gy vs. 21.4 Gy and 22.0 Gy, respectively) are highest with Coll-VMAT, and cord D05% (9.8 Gy vs. 10.0 Gy and 11.7 Gy) is lowest. Total beam-on time with Coll-VMAT (5,164 MU) is comparable to standard VMAT (4,868 MU) and substantially lower than IMRT (13,283 MU). Conclusion: Collimator trajectory optimization-based VMAT provides an additional degree of freedom that can improve target coverage and cord sparing of paraspinal SBRT plans compared with standard VMAT and IMRT approaches.

Zhang Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.or [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Happersett, Laura; Yang Yingli [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mageras, Gig; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiation Pneumonitis After Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Evaluation of the LQ(L) Model and Different Dose Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the linear quadratic (LQ) model for hypofractionated radiotherapy within the context of predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to investigate the effect if a linear (L) model in the high region (LQL model) is used. Methods and Materials: The radiation doses used for 128 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy were converted to the equivalent doses given in fractions of 2 Gy for a range of {alpha}/{beta} ratios (1 Gy to infinity) according to the LQ(L) model. For the LQL model, different cut-off values between the LQ model and the linear component were used. The Lyman model parameters were fitted to the events of RP grade 2 or higher to derive the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The lung dose was calculated as the mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume (V) receiving doses higher than a threshold dose of xGy (V{sub x}). Results: The best NTCP fit was found if the mean lung dose, or V{sub x}, was calculated with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The NTCP fit of other {alpha}/{beta} ratios and the LQL model were worse but within the 95% confidence interval of the NTCP fit of the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The V{sub 50} NTCP fit was better than the NTCP fit of lower threshold doses. Conclusions: For high fraction doses, the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy was the best method for converting the physical lung dose to predict RP.

Borst, Gerben R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ishikawa, Masayori [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nijkamp, Jasper [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Combination With Gefitinib in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with gefitinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had pathologically proved recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma. Patients started gefitinib (250 mg/day) 7 days before SRS and continued for 1 year or until disease progression. SRS was delivered in three fractions over 3 days. The planning target volume (PTV) was the T1-weighted MRI postcontrast enhancing lesion + 2 mm. The first cohort received an SRS dose of 18 Gy, and subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to the maximum dose of 36 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was any Grade 3 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2 of 6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Characteristics of the 15 patients enrolled were: 9 men, 6 women; median age, 47 years (range, 23-65 years); 11 glioblastoma, 4 AA; median prior RT dose, 60 Gy (range, 54-61.2 Gy); median interval since RT, 12 months (range, 3-57 months); median PTV, 41 cc (range, 12-151 cc). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range, 2-28 months). Median time on gefitinib was 5 months (range, 2-12 months). No patient experienced a DLT, and the SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy. Grade 1-2 gefitinib-related dermatitis and diarrhea were common (10 and 7 patients, respectively). Conclusion: Fractionated SRS to a dose of 36 Gy in three fractions is well tolerated with gefitinib at daily dose of 250 mg. Further studies of SRS and novel molecular targeted agents are warranted in this challenging clinical setting.

Schwer, Amanda L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Toxicity Assessment of Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Prostate for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate for patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective toxicity analysis was performed in 30 consecutive patients treated definitively with pelvic SIB-IMRT, all of whom also received androgen suppression. The IMRT plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 28 fractions (2.5 Gy/fraction) to the prostate while simultaneously delivering 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: The most common acute Grade 2 events were cystitis (36.7%) and urinary frequency/urgency (26.7%). At a median follow-up of 24 months, late toxicity exceeding Grade 2 in severity was uncommon, with two Grade 3 events and one Grade 4 event. Grade 2 or greater acute bowel toxicity was associated with signficantly greater bowel volume receiving {>=}25 Gy (p = .04); Grade 2 or greater late bowel toxicity was associated with a higher bowel maximal dose (p = .04) and volume receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = .02). Acute or late bladder and rectal toxicity did not correlate with any of the dosimetric parameters examined. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT with SIB to the prostate was well tolerated in this series, with low rates of Grade 3 or greater acute and late toxicity. SIB-IMRT combines pelvic radiotherapy and hypofractionation to the primary site and offers an accelerated approach to treating intermediate- to high-risk disease. Additional follow-up is necessary to fully define the long-term toxicity after hypofractionated, whole pelvic treatment combined with androgen suppression.

McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian; Newell, Sherri B.S.; Newman, Francis M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

Ozawa, Tomoko [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Faddegon, Bruce A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hu, Lily J. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bollen, Andrew W. [Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lamborn, Kathleen R. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Deen, Dennis F. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (?5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ?3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

Feddock, Jonathan, E-mail: jmfedd0@uky.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Arnold, Susanne M. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States) [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Shelton, Brent J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary [Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Chen, Li [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Rinehart, John [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Deere & Company Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for evaluating each unit's ene~gy savings techniques. Two more key elements merit attention. These are "energy ethic" and "feedback". The people that comprise a company can enhance a conservation program if they are convinced it is for their good as well... vital but "good business" as well. Meet Lester! One of our factories has had an an:i mated movie produced which ~eatures a polar bear: hero. He represents the central theme of an ene~gy conservation awareness program. The program con~ tinues...

Darby, D. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quality In-Plant Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ventilated air during the heating season. This requi~e? merlt by itself would increase total ene~gy use by 20%. This seemS cont~adictory to the co~po~ate goal of 2% actual energy ~eduction pe~ year, for the period of 1985 th~ough 1990. Howeve...~, integration of several concepts and utilizing waste energy f~om available sou~ces provides the oppor tunity to meet and exceed both goals in a cost effective manner, with an excellent payback. The presentation quantifies the excess ene~gy available...

Petzold, M. A.

265

Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the HDTV algorithm shows the best performance. At 50 mGy, the deviation from the reference obtained at 500 mGy were less than 4%. Also the LDPC algorithm provides reasonable results with deviation less than 10% at 50 mGy while PCF and MKB reconstruction show larger deviations even at higher dose levels. Conclusions: LDPC and HDTV increase CNR and allow for quantitative evaluations even at dose levels as low as 50 mGy. The left ventricular volumes exemplarily illustrate that cardiac parameters can be accurately estimated at lowest dose levels if sophisticated algorithms are used. This allows to reduce dose by a factor of 10 compared to today's gold standard and opens new options for longitudinal studies of the heart.

Maier, Joscha, E-mail: joscha.maier@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrie, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Variation of carrier concentration and interface trap density in 8MeV electron irradiated c-Si solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out for c-Si solar cells, irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5kGy 100kGy in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments. Capacitance Voltage measurements indicate that there is a slight reduction in the carrier concentration upon electron irradiation due to the creation of radiation induced defects. The conductance measurement results reveal that the interface state densities and the trap time constant increases with electron dose due to displacement damages in c-Si solar cells.

Bhat, Sathyanarayana, E-mail: asharao76@gmail.com; Rao, Asha, E-mail: asharao76@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mangalore Institute of Technology and Engineering, Moodabidri, Mangalore-574225 (India); Krishnan, Sheeja [Department of Physics, Sri Devi Institute of Technology, Kenjar, Mangalore-574142 (India); Sanjeev, Ganesh [Microtron Centre, Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri-574199 (India); Suresh, E. P. [Solar Panel Division, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore-560017 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

Mu suM national d'Histoire naturelle 57 rue Cuvier -75005 Paris -+33 (0)1 40 79 56 01 / 54 79 -www.mnhn.fr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- www.mnhn.fr 26 Hectares of galleries, greenHouses, laboratories, learning facilities and a zoo GrandeColoGy, sustainable develoPment and enerGy Cover Photos: Cypraea sp Or «COWZry», raDIOGrapHy © asT-rX/MNHN VIGNeNCHOT/MNHN. LarGe INsIDe pHOTOs LeFT TO rIGHT: Lys © MNHN ; BuTTerFLy arGeMa MIMOsae, MOZaMBIQue © XaVIer Des

268

Representative Doses to Members of the Public from Atmospheric Releases of 131I at the Mayak Production Association Facilities from 1948 through 1972  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping epidemiologic studies performed by researchers from the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute revealed an excess prevalence of thyroid nodules and an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among residents of Ozersk, Russia, who were born in the early 1950s. Ozersk is located about 5 km from the facilities where the Mayak Production Association produced nuclear materials for the Russian weapons program. Reactor operations began in June 1948 and chemical separation of plutonium from irradiated fuel began in February 1949. The U.S.Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research conducted a series of projects over a 10-year period to assess the radiation risks in the Southern Urals. This paper uses data collected under Committee projects to reconstruct individual time-dependent thyroid doses to reference individuals living in Ozersk from 131I released to the atmosphere. Between 3.221016 and 4.311016 Bq of 131I released may have been released during the 19481972 time period, and a best estimate is 3.761016 Bq. A child born in 1947 is estimated to have received a cumulative thyroid dose of 2.3 Gy for 19481972, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.517.3 Gy. Annual doses were the highest in 1949 and a child who was 5 years old in 1949 is estimated to have a received an annual thyroid dose of 0.93 Gy with a 95% confidence interval of 0.193.5 Gy.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

R()", \\, S.\\\\t~~..:'iS!j --\\rADEMY OF SCIENCE A JOURNAL OF THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Instead, coal were emphasIzed, many more efficient energy use, It would be possible to satisfy develLIAMS energy supplies to meet the energy re- Conventional thinkin g holds that increased ener gy con of energy use .~: global petroleum supplies and the high costs of expanding could not be supplied

Kammen, Daniel M.

270

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

JOM January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOM · January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy Global to fundamental advances in direct renewable energy and ener- gy storage and conversion which are needed to enable renewable energy and meet the general energy challenges and associated environmental effects. This paper

272

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, suppl6ment au Journal de Physique UI, Volume 4,juillet 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local measurements of thermal diffusivity in homogeneous and heterogeneous samples by photoreflectance a variant of the traditional photoreflectance microscopy. It allows thermal diffusivity measurements and their phase diffe- rence A@ obey the ~lation AL 1A@ = p = [~17gy112 where p is the thermal diffusion length, f

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

Custom Device for Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Biological Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the structural material is efficient to absorb most of the cosmic-ray energy and reduce the interior dose rate to below 1.2 mGy per day. However, the biological effects of prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation are not well understood. The purpose...

Bi, Ruoming

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

Thiede, M.E.

1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluating Quality and Palatability Characteristics of Beef Subprimals Treated with Low-dose Irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Paired subprimals were randomly assigned to treated (irradiated) and control (non-irradiated) groups. The treated group was irradiated with a surface dose of 1-1.5 kGy. Following treatment, subprimals were fabricated into thirds and randomly assigned...

Arnold, John

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Rationale for and Preliminary Results of Proton Beam Therapy for Mediastinal Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the potential of three-dimensional proton beam therapy (3D-PBT) for reducing doses to normal structures in patients with mediastinal lymphomas compared with conventional photon radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We treated 10 consecutive patients with mediastinal masses from lymphomas with 3D-PBT between July 2007 and February 2009 to 30.6-50.4 cobalt-Gray equivalents (CGE). Of those patients, 7 had primary refractory or recurrent disease, and 8 had Hodgkin lymphoma. Dosimetric endpoints were compared with those from conventional RT plans. Results: PBT delivered lower mean doses to the lung (6.2 vs. 9.5 Gy), esophagus (9.5 vs. 22.3 Gy), and heart (8.8 vs. 17.7 Gy) but not the breasts (5.9 vs. 6.1 Gy) than did conventional RT. Percentages of lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary artery (particularly the left anterior descending artery) volumes receiving radiation were consistently lower in the 3D-PBT plans over a wide range of radiation doses. Of the 7 patients who had residual disease on positron emission tomography before PBT, 6 (86%) showed a complete metabolic response. Conclusions: In patients with mediastinal lymphomas, 3D-PBT produced significantly lower doses to the lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary arteries than did the current conventional RT. These lower doses would be expected to reduce the risk of late toxicities in these major organs.

Li Jing; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Reed, Valerie; Allen, Pamela K.; Cai, Haihong; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D., E-mail: jcox@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Applied Mathematical Sciences, Vol. 3, 2009, no. 54, 2703 -2706 The Limit of the Statistic R/P in Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification: 86A99, 86A32 Keywords: modeling, oil production 1 Introduction When assessing the oil reserves the cumulative oil discovered GX(t) and the cumulative oil produced GY (t) is called the proven reserves; see [5/P in Models of Oil Discovery and Production Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen Mary

Stark, Dudley

279

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2005 1271 Measurement of Centi-Gray X-Ray Dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2005 1271 Measurement of Centi-Gray X- bination of single sheet higher film sensitivity to low energy X-rays along with a layered film dosimetryGy if required. Index Terms--Absorption spectra, gafchromic XR type T, low dose, radiation dosimetry

Yu, K.N.

280

Network of Centers for Very Small Entities (VSEs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-electric, wind, geothermal, solar or biomass-related energy.g gy · Company established 10 years ago, · Over 260 the ISO method to evaluate the Economic Benefits of Standards · Value chain · Costs and Benefits Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Total Cost to implement and maintain 59 600$ 50 100$ 50 100$ 159 800$ Net Benefits 255

Québec, Université du

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, suppl6ment au no I, Tome 45, janvier 1984 page C1-587  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*** !The Kansai EZectric Power Company, Inc., Japan *l'he Institute of Applied Ene~gy, Japan i* Toshiba Corporation, Japan ***Taisei Corporation, Japan RBsume - On pr6sente l e plan d'un systgme destine 21 l, resulting i n the 60%decrease. Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http

Boyer, Edmond

282

Summary of the D&D Engineering Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mandatory! · Clear responsibility and accountability! ! #12;Conduct of Operations WORK CONTROL CENTER DKeith Rule Summary of the D&D Engineering Operations Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12&D operations ! Maximum single individual external dose of 573 mRem (5.73 mGy) attributed to the sheer

283

Refreshments will be served For more information contact Kim Coleman at kcole@wustl.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Calcium Looping, Syngas and Coal- Direct Chemical Looping Processes. These processes control sulfur The concept of chemical loop- ing reactions has been widely applied in chemical industries. Fundamental research on chemical looping reactions has also been applied to ener- gy systems. Fossil fuel chemi- cal

Subramanian, Venkat

284

May2011|CountryProfile|GerMany|1 ataGlanCe:GerMany'SGloBal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooperation and Development 2009 oVerVieW Germany's engagement in global health has increased steadily over), and the rest was channeled through multilateral organizations. About half of Germany's multilateral health aidBalHealtHPrioritieSanDStrateGy Germany's overall global health strategy is guided by a human rights-based approach, which aims

Klein, Ophir

285

Safety Assurance of Pecans by Irradiation without a Detrimental Effect on Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-packed. Moreover, accelerated shelf life studies (4 weeks at 48.9oC) showed that vacuum-packed (VP) pecans can be stored at -25 degrees C up to three years, while irradiated (at 3.0 kGy) VP pecans can be stored only for eight months, without the detrimental effects...

Karagoz, Isin 1983-

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cultivar and E-Beam irradiation effects on phytochemical content and antioxidant properties of pecan kernels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kernels from the same cultivar but different location differed in their fatty acid composition but had similar TP. Irradiation of Kanza and Desirable kernels with 1.5 and 3.0 kGy had no detrimental effects on AC and TP by the end of experiments...

Villarreal Lozoya, Jose Emilio

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Antimicrobial packaging system for optimization of electron beam irradiation of fresh produce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study evaluated the potential use of an antimicrobial packaging system in combination with electron beam irradiation to enhance quality of fresh produce. Irradiated romaine lettuce up to 3.2 kGy showed negligible (p > 0.05) changes in color...

Han, Jaejoon

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effect of electron beam irradiation on quality and shelf-life of Tommy Atkins mango (Mangifera indica l.) and blueberry (Vaccinium corymbsum l.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

less acceptability for overall quality, color, texture and aroma. Irradiation of blueberries at 1.1 kGy had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on the fruits' physicochemical characteristics with the exception of ascorbic acid which decreased by 17% after...

Moreno Tinjaca, Maria Alexandra

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geology of the Carlos-East area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but '. Podrottf (1988) ?as able to trace thb nsaber for several sf les to the '. east of, the Carlos-East area, XRRpJLKgx?hho IEREgggiRR, ~+~a, gyQy Tho. topography of the Wellborn forsation is, ia general; very irregular. Fairly well-defined, high, northeast...

Walton, William Lawrence

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Four-point probe characterization of 4H silicon carbide N. Chandra a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four-point probe characterization of 4H silicon carbide N. Chandra a, , V. Sharma a , G.Y. Chung b carbide Four-point probe Thermionic-field emission Contact resistance a b s t r a c t We report on four

Schroder, Dieter K.

291

Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA D. Kozakov Á G.-Y. Chuang Á D. Beglov Á S. Vajda of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan 123 J Comput Aided Mol Des (2009) 23:491­500 DOI 10.1007/s10822-009-9283-2 #12;cognitive abilities [4], eventually leading to death. Although most cases of PD are sporadic, multiple genes

Vajda, Sandor

292

High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

294

Climate and groundwater effects on the establishment, growth and death of Prosopis caldenia trees in the Pampas (Argentina)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Pampas (Argentina) Stella M. Bogino , Esteban G. Jobbágy Departamento de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Avenida 25 de Mayo 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis, Argentina Grupo de Estudios Ambientales, IMASL ­ Universidad Nacional de San Luis y CONICET, San Luis, Argentina a r t i c l e

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

295

In the mIdst of an energy revolutIon, Purdue's world-class researchers lead the charge. we collaborate across a broad range of dIscIPlInes --to develoP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the mIdst of an energy revolutIon, Purdue's world-class researchers lead the charge. we rechargIng IndIana's renewable energy revolutIon #12;enerGY solutions solar The U.S. Department of Energy

Holland, Jeffrey

296

Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia Manuel Velasco Suarez, 14269 DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Portunes: Privacy-Preserving Fast Authentication for Dynamic Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign hli52@illinois.edu Gy¨orgy D´an KTH Royal Institute of Technology gyuri@kth.se Klara Nahrstedt University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign klara@illinois.edu Abstract. In order to allow a significant amount of energy to be transmitted to an EV in a charging section

Nahrstedt, Klara

298

An Iterative Solver-Based Long-Step Infeasible Primal-Dual Path ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 ???. 2005 ... ... t N00014-05-1-0183. tSc hoo l of Indus tr ial and Sys te ms Engin eer ing, G eor gia Ins t it u te of Te c h n o lo gy, A t lan t a, G eor gia 30332-.

299

Regional climate models, spatial data and extremes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density function. f(y) = eg(y) or g(y) = log(f(y)) we are interested in the (simple) behavior of g when p from five clim forcings due to solar activity and volcanoes. Red shaded bands show the 5­95% range greenhouse gases ­ without Summary figure from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fourth Assessement

Nychka, Douglas

300

Regional climate models, spatial data and extremes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density function. f(y) = eg(y) or g(y) = log(f(y)) we are interested in the (simple) behavior of g when y bands show the 5­95% range for 19 simulations from five clim forcings due to solar activity Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fourth Assessement Report. Used as evidence for attributing global

Nychka, Douglas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Improving the microbiological quality and safety of fresh-cut tomatoes by low dose electron beam irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in response to irradiation treatment. This study indicates that doses of irradiation greater than 1 kGy should be used in fresh-cut tomatoes to eliminate significant populations of pathogens, as well as to ensure the microbial quality of the product...

Schmidt, Heather Martin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cofinal types of directed orders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ) directed partial orders #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P orders Tukey reducibility: (P, ) T (Q, ) if f : P Q X P unbounded = f [X] Q unbounded g : Q P Y Q cofinal = g[Y ] P cofinal #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P

Mátrai, Tamás

303

Luffa fibers and gamma radiation as improvement tools of polymer Gonzalo Martnez-Barrera a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal c Institute of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Management (INEGI. The highest bending deformation is obtained with 0.9 wt% of fibers and 100 kGy of radiation dose. ? 2013, silica fume, silica sand; the last one the most used due to size distribution, ranging from 0.6 to 4.0 mm

North Texas, University of

304

Control of the immature stages of the boll weevil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satiate ingredients per asre. To Psr Ceat Psr Cen Boss X E sir Ccatro1 . 26 El X68 XXC 3' gy C ECO syunes TFaa each trestmejat Mere mad Xa a repH. sate, g/ ~ estd' ingreBLeats per asre, RESULT GF FXEXB TESTS TO HETERHXHE 'BK TQKXCXTX GF...

Lukefahr, M. J

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

306

Curriculum Vitae Masanori Murayama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and M E Larkum Skills Optical imaging (using voltage- and calcium-sensitive dye) with a conventional and Behavioral Neuroscience, (Prof. György Buzsáki) In vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recording from anaesthetized Neurophysiology (Prof. Atushi Nanbu) Recording unit activity from monkey and rats. Summer 2002, Department of Cell

Bern, Universität

307

NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts · West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts · eNerGy · Healt Global Insight, paid for by the West Virginia Department of Revenue. 2013 WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOKWest Virginia Economic Outlook 2013 is published by: Bureau of Business & Economic Research West

Mohaghegh, Shahab

308

www.nature.com/naturemethods nature methods | VOL.10 NO.4 | APRIL 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technoloGy feature 293 drilling into big cancer-genome data Vivien Marx neWs and VieWs 301 reproducibility Street, Fl 9, New York, NY 10013-1917. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing post offices. editorial office: 75 Varick Street, Fl 9, New York, NY 10013-1917. Tel (212) 726 9200

Cai, Long

309

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Miften, Moyed, E-mail: Moyed.Miften@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effects of N-Asterisk(1440) Resonance on Particle-Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions at Subthreshold Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bauer, and G.F. Bertsch, Phys. Rev. C 44, 2095 (1991). [19]Gy. Wolf et al. , Nucl. Phys. A517, 615 (1990). [20] P. Danielewicz and G.F. Bertsch, Nucl. Phys. A533, 712 (1991). [21] P. Danielewicz, Report No. MSUCL-946, 1994. [22] B.J. VerWest and R...

Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming; LI, GQ.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Renewable Energy Carriers Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/mass transfer phe- nomena and multi-phase reacting flows, with applications in solar power and fuels production, decarbonization and metallurgical processes, CO2 capture and recycling, ener- gy storage and sustainable energy the development of solar concentrating technologies for efficiently producing clean power, fuels, and materials

313

Segmented crystalline scintillators: An initial investigation of high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dose delivery in external beam radiotherapy. However, current AMFPI EPIDs, which are based on powdered by infusing crystalline CsI Tl in a 2 mm thick tungsten matrix, and the signal response was measured under exhibited less than 15% reduction in light output after 2500 cGy equivalent dose. The prototype CsI Tl

Cunningham, Ian

314

Mutation Research 684 (2010) 8189 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irradiation DNA double strand breaks Nitric oxide Cell proliferation a b s t r a c t Low-dose -particle irradiated by low-dose -particles (1­10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce

Yu, K.N.

315

Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4 radioligand [11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to estimate the human radiation absorbed dose of the radioligand based on its biodistribution in both monkeysWhole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4 in the anteroposterior direction. Results: Effective dose was 4.8 Gy/MBq based on 2D planar images. The effective dose

Shen, Jun

316

Explicit Communication and Synchronization in SARC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Communication using a 64bit, 5port bufferless crossbar switch · Three Diverse applications Jacobi, Bitonic cores · 2x4x reduced network traffic · 35%70% Energy reduction · 50%90% Energy Delay Product (EDP) gy y ( ) reduction · 15%30% Power consumption reduction Computer Architecture and VLSI Systems Laboratory (CARV

Katevenis, Manolis G.H.

317

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 134205 (2011) Atomic structure and electronic properties of the SixSb100-x phase-change memory material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.134205 PACS number(s): 64.70.dg, 61.20.Gy, 71.15.Mb, 71.15.Pd I. INTRODUCTION Most phase-change random access into the heating electrode (write or rewrite steps) that may result in degradation of the memory device. Further

Svane, Axel Torstein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONCOMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission$ gy 0% rate loans and technical assistance grants · $3M: California Workforce Investment Board· $3M: California Workforce Investment Board Competitive grants for community-based and workforce requests for planning projects and energy expenditure plans #12;CHAPTER 2: LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY AWARD

319

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 294 9 NOVEMBER 2001 1285 ood news" generally doesn't make  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than worse and to argue that we should not worry much about the state of the world. These are two--to argue that the world will not run out of core resources over this century. He sets these optimistic, ener- gy, and non-energy resources: Malthus, turn in your grave. Considering pollution, the air

Latham, Peter

320

ElEctricAl EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(groundwater and air monitoring) applications is an important research area for Alaska. Electric power systems, instrumentation and microwave circuit design, electric power and ener- gy systems, digital and computer hybrid electric power systems, electric power system design and analyses, electric power quality

Hartman, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lesotho gy guyana" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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321

Reconstruc~ao de Imagens de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo com Imageamento Paralelo II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dados de spiral FVE. Teoria Spiral FVE: RF Gz Gx Gy a b c d Figura: Sequ^encia de pulso da spiral FVE 146 segundos (256 batimentos card´iacos a uma taxa de 105 bpm). Resultados Qualitativos Uma avalia

Carvalho, João Luiz

322

Reconstruc~ao Paralelizada de Dados de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo em Processadores Multi-nucleo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multidimensionais: m(x, y, z, v, t) RF Gz Gx Gy a b c d Sequ^encia de pulso FVE espiral [1] Reconstru¸c~ao: NUFFT [3/corte (256 batimentos card´iacos a 105 bpm) 120 -120 0 0 500 velocidade(cm/s) tempo (ms) 120 -120 0 0 500 120

Carvalho, João Luiz

323

Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

Xu ZhiYong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liang Shixiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhu Ji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhao Jiandong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Lu Haijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Yang Yunli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Chen Long [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Wang Anyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Fu Xiaolong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jiang Guoliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China) and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Threshold sensor for high-doses of radiation I. Augustyniak, P. Knapkiewicz, J. Dziuban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear waste disposal site as well as after nuclear accidents. High radiation doses.augustyniak@pwr.wroc.pl M. Olszacki National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock, Poland michal.olszacki@ncbj.gov.pl A membrane I. INTRODUCTION High doses of radiation (>10 kGy) can be found in nuclear power plants, storage

Boyer, Edmond

325

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimen- sional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom.15.Gy, 05.45.-a, 45.20.Jj I. INTRODUCTION The hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields

326

Investigation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter mixture between LiF:Mg,Ti and Li2B4O7 in a solid form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on this data the minimal detectable dose was calculated to be 0.58 mGy, or three times the standard deviation of the background. A fading study revealed a percent loss of 65.6% in 7 days for one set of dosimeters, and 18.4% in 26 days in another. The dosimeters...

Walkowicz, Joshua Peter

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A comparison of Monte Carlo and Fermi-Eyges-Hogstrom estimates of heart and lung dose from breast electron boost treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Electrons are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer primarily to deliver a tumor bed boost. We compared the use of the Monte Carlo (MC) method and the Fermi-Eyges-Hogstrom (FEH) algorithm to calculate the dose distribution of electron treatment to normal tissues. Methods and materials: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with breast-conservation therapy at the University of California, San Francisco, were included in this study. Each patient received an electron boost to the surgical bed to a dose of 1,600 cGy in 200 cGy fractions prescribed to 80% of the maximum. Doses to the left ventricle (LV) and the ipsilateral lung (IL) were calculated using the EGS4 MC system and the FEH algorithm implemented on the commercially available Pinnacle treatment planning system. An anthromorphic phantom was irradiated with radiochromic film in place to verify the accuracy of the MC system. Results: Dose distributions calculated with the MC algorithm agreed with the film measurements within 3% or 3 mm. For all patients in the study, the dose to the LV and IL was relatively low as calculated by MC. That is, the maximum dose received by up to 98% of the LV volume was < 100 cGy/day. Less than half of the IL received a dose in excess of 30 cGy/day. When compared with MC, FEH tended to show reduced penetration of the electron beam in lung, and FEH tended to overestimate the bremsstrahlung dose in regions well beyond the electron practical range. These differences were clinically likely to be of little significance, comprising differences of less than one-tenth of the LV and IL volume at doses > 30 cGy and differences in maximum dose of < 35 cGy/day to the LV and 80 cGy/day to the IL. Conclusions: From our series, using clinical judgment to prescribe the boost to the surgical bed after breast-conserving treatment results in low doses to the underlying LV and IL. When calculated dose distributions are desired, MC is the most accurate, but FEH can still be used.

Coleman, Joy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Park, Catherine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Villarreal-Barajas, J. Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Petti, Paula [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Faddegon, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: faddegon@radonc17.ucsf.edu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions within 1 day have excellent tolerance with minimal acute and chronic toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging early results.

Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Comprehensive Analysis of Cardiac Dose in Balloon-Based High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate radiation dose to the heart in 60 patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using MammoSite or Contura applicators. Methods and Materials: We studied 60 consecutive women with breast cancer who were treated with 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions using MammoSite (n = 37) or Contura (n = 23) applicators. The whole heart and the left and right ventricles were retrospectively delineated, and dose-volume histograms were analyzed. Multiple dosimetrics were reported, such as mean dose (D{sub mean}); relative volume receiving 1.7, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (V1.7, V5, V10, and V20, respectively); dose to 1 cc (D{sub 1cc}); and maximum point dose (D{sub max}). Biologic metrics, biologically effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose were computed. The impact of lumpectomy cavity location on cardiac dose was investigated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation of D{sub mean} was 2.45 {+-} 0.94 Gy (range, 0.56-4.68) and 3.29 {+-} 1.28 Gy (range, 0.77-6.35) for the heart and the ventricles, respectively. The average whole heart V5 and V10 values were 10.2% and 1.3%, respectively, and the heart D{sub max} was >20 Gy in 7 of 60 (11.7%) patients and >25 Gy in 3 of 60 (5%) patients. No cardiac tissue received {>=}30 Gy. The V1.7, V5, V10, V20, and D{sub mean} values were all higher for the ventricles than for the whole heart. For balloons located in the upper inner quadrant of the breast, the average whole heart D{sub mean} was highest. The D{sub mean}, biologically effective dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose values for heart and ventricles decreased with increasing minimal distance from the surface of the balloon. Conclusions: On the basis of these comprehensive cardiac dosimetric data, we recommend that cardiac dose be routinely reported and kept as low as possible in balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning for patients with left-sided breast cancer so the correlation with future cardiac toxicity data can be investigated.

Valakh, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir@valakh.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E. Day; Trombetta, Mark G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D-CRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this will impact on development of coronary artery disease and other cardiac complications.

Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (4286) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.470 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (2686%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.

Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I [Acibadem Kozyatgi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M [Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Embryonic effects transmitted by male mice irradiated with 512 MeV/u {sup 56}Fe nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-energy, high-charge nuclei may contribute substantially to the yearly equivalent dose in space flight from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) at solar minimum. The largest single heavy-ion component is {sup 56}Fe. We used the mouse embryo chimera assay to test 512 MeV/u {sup 56}Fe nuclei for effects on the rate of proliferation of embryonic cells transmitted by sperm from irradiated mice. Male CD1 mice were acutely irradiated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 Gy (LET, 184 keV/{mu}m; fluence, 3.5 x 10{sup 4}-3.3 x 10{sup 5} nuclei/cm{sup 2}; average dose rate, 0.02 Gy/min) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVATRON/BEVALAC Facility in Berkeley, CA. Irradiated males were bred weekly for 7 weeks to nonirradiated females and their four-cell embryos were paired with control embryos, forming aggregation chimeras. After 30-35 h of culture, chimeras were dissociated to obtain {open_quotes}proliferation ratios{close_quotes} (number of cells contributed by the embryo from the irradiated male/total number of cells in the chimera). Significant dose-dependent decreases in proliferation ratios were obtained across all three dose groups for postirradiation week 2 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.003). The 0.01- and 0.05-Gy dose groups also produced significant decreases in proliferation ratios for postirradiation week 1 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.01) and the 0.05-Gy dose group produced significant decreases in proliferation ratios for postirradiation week 6 (P < 0.05). Postirradiation weeks 1, 2 and 6 correspond to irradiation of epididymal sperm, testicular spermatids and spermatogonia, respectively. We calculate that only about 5% of sperm in the 0.1-Gy, 2.5% in the 0.05-Gy and 0.5% in the 0.01-Gy dose groups sustained direct hits from {sup 56}Fe nuclei. However, up to 47% of sperm during postirradiation weeks 1 and 2 transmitted proliferation ratios that were at or below one standard deviation from control mean proliferation ratios. 26 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Wiley, L.M.; Van Beek, M.E.A.B.; Raabe, O.G.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy)] ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

Michalski, Jeff, E-mail: michalski@wustl.edu [Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Markoe, Arnold [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Radiation Oncology Associates, Sacramento, California (United States); Parliament, Matthew [Radiation Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Purdy, James A. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Valicenti, Richard K. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cox, James D. [Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Multicenter Analysis of Effect of High Biologic Effective Dose on Biochemical Failure and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Gleason Score 7-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rates and survival for Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologic effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 5,889 permanent prostate brachytherapy patients, of whom 1,078 had Gleason score 7 (n = 845) or Gleason score 8-10 (n = 233) prostate cancer and postimplant dosimetry results available. The median prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/mL (range, 0.4-300). The median follow-up for censored patients was 46 months (range, 5-130). Short-term hormonal therapy (median duration, 3.9 months) was used in 666 patients (61.8%) and supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 620 (57.5%). The patients were stratified into three BED groups: <200 Gy (n = 645), 200-220 Gy (n = 199), and >220 Gy (n = 234). Biochemical freedom from failure (bFFF) was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: The 5-year bFFF rate was 80%. The bFFF rate stratified by the three BED groups was 76.4%, 83.5%, and 88.3% (p < 0.001), respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, use of hormonal therapy, EBRT, and BED were associated with bFFF (p < 0.001). Freedom from metastasis improved from 92% to 99% with the greatest doses. The overall survival rate at 5 years for the three BED groups for Gleason score 8-10 cancer was 86.6%, 89.4%, and 94.6%, respectively (p = 0.048). Conclusion: These data suggest that permanent prostate brachytherapy combined with EBRT and hormonal therapy yields excellent bFFF and survival results in Gleason score 7-10 patients when the delivered BEDs are >220 Gy. These doses can be achieved by a combination of 45-Gy EBRT with a minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume of 120 Gy of {sup 103}Pd or 130 Gy of {sup 125}I.

Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approachesa single-field irradiator with a 200?kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4?Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by the SARRP plan due to the sensitivity of the lower energy microCT beam to target heterogeneities and image noise. Conclusions: The two treatment planning examples demonstrate that modern small animal radiotherapy techniques employing image guidance, variable collimation, and multiple beam angles deliver superior dose distributions to small animal tumors as compared to conventional treatments using a single-field irradiator. For deep-seated mouse tumors, however, higher-energy conformal radiotherapy could result in higher doses to critical organs compared to lower-energy conformal radiotherapy. Treatment planning optimization for small animal radiotherapy should therefore be developed to take full advantage of the novel conformal systems.

Bazalova, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: Planning and Evaluation for Prostate Cancer Cases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop an optimization method using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and evaluate VMAT plans relative to the standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) approach in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A single gantry rotation was modeled using 177 equispaced beams. Multileaf collimator apertures and dose rates were optimized with respect to gantry angle subject to dose-volume-based objectives. Our VMAT implementation used conjugate gradient descent to optimize dose rate, and stochastic sampling to find optimal multileaf collimator leaf positions. A treatment planning study of 11 prostate cancer patients with a prescription dose of 86.4 Gy was performed to compare VMAT with a standard five-field IMRT approach. Plan evaluation statistics included the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% of prescribed dose (V95), dose to 95% of PTV (D95), mean PTV dose, tumor control probability, and dosimetric endpoints of normal organs, whereas monitor unit (MU) and delivery time were used to assess delivery efficiency. Results: Patient-averaged PTV V95, D95, mean dose, and tumor control probability in VMAT plans were 96%, 82.6 Gy, 88.5 Gy, and 0.920, respectively, vs. 97%, 84.0 Gy, 88.9 Gy, and 0.929 in IMRT plans. All critical structure dose requirements were met. The VMAT plans presented better rectal wall sparing, with a reduction of 1.5% in normal tissue complication probability. An advantage of VMAT plans was that the average number of MUs (290 MU) was less than for IMRT plans (642 MU). Conclusion: The VMAT technique can reduce beam on time by up to 55% while maintaining dosimetric quality comparable to that of the standard IMRT approach.

Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.or [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Happersett, Laura; Hunt, Margie; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen, Norway and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo Faculty Division, Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Turesson, Ingela [Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Folin, Annika [Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Trovik, Clement S. [Departments of Oncology and of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ?60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radiation dose to the internal pudendal arteries from permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy as determined by time-of-flight MR angiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography to visualize the internal pudendal arteries (IPAs) in potent men undergoing permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy and to calculate the radiation dose received by these arteries. Methods and Materials: Prostate brachytherapy is performed at the University Health Network/Princess Margaret Hospital by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) preplanning and preloaded needles. All patients received {sup 125}I, with a mean seed activity of 0.32 mCi/seed (0.41 U). Postplan evaluation is performed at 1 month by magnetic resonance-computed tomography fusion. Twenty consecutive potent men had time-of-flight MR angiography as part of their postplan evaluation. Results: The mean V100 was 96.5%, and the mean D90 was171.5 Gy. The IPAs were easily visualized for 18 of the 20 men. The mean peak dose received by the IPA was 17 Gy. The highest peak dose received by any patient was 38.2 Gy, with only 1 other patient receiving a peak dose greater than 30 Gy. Eleven of 18 had a measurable portion of at least 1 IPA that received 10% of the prescribed dose (V10 = 14.5 Gy). Only 2 patients had nonzero values for V25. The distal third of the IPA received the highest dose for 16 of the 18 patients. Conclusions: The IPAs can be well visualized in the majority of potent men by use of time-of-flight MR angiography 1 month after brachytherapy. The IPAs receive a low but calculable dose from permanent-seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Further research is needed to determine if this outcome has any correlation with subsequent potency.

Gillan, Caitlin [Department of Radiation Medicine, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Kirilova, Anna [Department of Radiation Physics, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Landon, Angela [Department of Radiation Medicine, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Yeung, Ivan [Department of Radiation Physics, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Pond, Gregory [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)]. E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.

Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoene, Ted [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, IN (United States); Xiao, Lu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Buchsbaum, Jeffrey; Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, IN (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Dosimetric and Radiobiological Consequences of Computed TomographyGuided Adaptive Strategies for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy of the Prostate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. Methods and Materials: We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dosevolume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D{sub 95}, tumor control probability, V{sub 70Gy}, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. Results: The CTV D{sub 95} for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D{sub 95} values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D{sub 95} values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V{sub 70Gy} and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (<5 mm) to an adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning.

Battista, Jerry J., E-mail: j2b@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Healthcare (Radiation Oncology Systems), Fitchburg, Wisconsin (United States); Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Methods: Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. Results: The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Conclusions: Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pan, Charlie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amarnath, Sudha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ensminger, William D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

Niewald, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.niewald@uks.eu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany)] [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany)] [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muecke, Ralf [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany)] [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany); Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Impact of Gastric Filling on Radiation Dose Delivered to Gastroesophageal Junction Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study examined the impact of gastric filling variation on target coverage of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) tumors in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or IMRT with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) plans. Materials and Methods: Eight patients previously receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer had computed tomography (CT) datasets acquired with full stomach (FS) and empty stomach (ES). We generated treatment plans for 3DCRT, IMRT, or IMRT-SIB for each patient on the ES-CT and on the FS-CT datasets. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were planned to 50.4 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV), and the same for IMRT-SIB plus 63.0 Gy to the gross tumor volume (GTV). Target coverage was evaluated using dose-volume histogram data for patient treatments simulated with ES-CT sets, assuming treatment on an FS for the entire course, and vice versa. Results: FS volumes were a mean of 3.3 (range, 1.7-7.5) times greater than ES volumes. The volume of the GTV receiving >=50.4 Gy (V{sub 50.4Gy}) was 100% in all situations. The planning GTV V{sub 63Gy} became suboptimal when gastric filling varied, regardless of whether simulation was done on the ES-CT or the FS-CT set. Conclusions: Stomach filling has a negligible impact on prescribed dose delivered to the GEJ GTV, using either 3DCRT or IMRT planning. Thus, local relapses are not likely to be related to variations in gastric filling. Dose escalation for GEJ tumors with IMRT-SIB may require gastric filling monitoring.

Bouchard, Myriam, E-mail: mybouchard@gmail.co [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George, E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective.

Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Fehlauer, Fabian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum (Germany); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gao, Song; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A comparison of the radiation response of the epidermis in two strains of pig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of the epidermis was compared in two strains of pig, the English Large White and the Goettinger Miniature, after irradiation with 90Sr beta rays. The effects of two types of anesthesia were also tested in pigs of each strain, a volatile gas mixture of approximately 70% oxygen, approximately 30% nitrous oxide, and 2% halothane, and an intravenously administered narcotic azaperon/etimodat with the animals breathing air. Strain- and anesthetic-related changes were compared on the basis of dose-effect curves for the incidence of moist desquamation from which ED50 values (+/- SE) were determined, i.e., the dose required to produce this effect in 50% of the fields irradiated. For English Large White pigs anesthetized with the volatile gas mixture, an ED50 of 27.32 +/- 0.52 Gy was obtained for moist desquamation. Irradiation with the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia in this strain of pig produced a significantly higher ED50 of 33.36 +/- 0.76 Gy (P less than 0.001). This appeared to be related to the fact that the animals were breathing air, i.e., a lower oxygen concentration (approximately 21%), at the time of irradiation. For the Goettinger Miniature pig the ED50 values for moist desquamation were 38.93 +/- 3.12 Gy and 43.36 +/- 1.34 Gy while using the gaseous anesthetic mixture and the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia with the animals breathing air, respectively. These ED50 values are 10-11 Gy higher than those obtained for the English Large White pig under identical conditions of anesthesia, which resulted in a strain difference ratio of approximately 1.35. Radiation under the volatile gas mixture anesthesia resulted in a uniform irradiation response over the skin of the flank in both strains of pig. Radiation under azaperon/etomidat anesthesia resulted in a nonuniform skin response over the flank.

van den Aardweg, G.J.; Arnold, M.; Hopewell, J.W. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Initial Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Concurrent and Maintenance Erlotinib and Reirradiation for Recurrent and New Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer  

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Purpose: To present the first report of a Phase I trial evaluating concurrent and maintenance erlotinib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent or secondary primary head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent or new primary HNC with an interval of at least 6 months since prior radiation were eligible. Patients were treated in 3 sequential cohorts: Cohort I, 100 mg of erlotinib daily with reirradiation at 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; Cohort II, 150 mg of erlotinib with 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; and Cohort III, 150 mg of erlotinib with 66 Gy in 30 fractions. Maintenance erlotinib started immediately after reirradiation at 150 mg daily and was continued for 2 years or until disease progression or dose-limiting toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined as any Grade 4 or 5 toxicity or a toxicity-related delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. Results: Fourteen patients were accrued, 3 to Cohort I, 4 to Cohort II, and 7 to Cohort III. Thirteen patients were evaluable for toxicity. Median follow-up was 8.4 months overall and 15.1 months for surviving patients. One patient had a dose-limiting toxicity in Cohort III. This patient declined initial percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, was hospitalized with Grade 3 dysphagia and aspiration, and required a delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. No Grade 4 acute toxicity was observed. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 9 of 13 patients. No erlotinib-related toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was observed during maintenance therapy. One patient had Grade 5 carotid hemorrhage 6 months after reirradiation, and another patient had Grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Conclusions: Reirradiation (66 Gy in 2.2 Gy fractions) with concurrent and maintenance erlotinib (150 mg daily) for recurrent or new primary HNC is feasible.

Rusthoven, Kyle E. [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Feigenberg, Steven J. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Raben, David; Kane, Madeleine; Song, John I. [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Nicolaou, Nicos; Mehra, Ranee; Burtness, Barbara; Ridge, John [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Swing, Robyn [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Lango, Miriam; Cohen, Roger [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jimeno, Antonio [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.ed [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Observation of a Dose-Control Relationship for Lung and Liver Tumors After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for local control of primary or metastatic tumors within the lung or liver treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) within a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 141 consecutive patients with 246 lesions treated with three-fraction SBRT from Oct 1999 through Aug 2005 were reviewed. Local control was assessed radiographically. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the influence of the following factors on local control: total dose, expressed as either nominal prescription dose or equivalent uniform dose (EUD); gross tumor volume; primary site; treatment site (lung vs. other); histologic characteristics (adenocarcinoma vs. other); gender; age; and primary vs. metastatic tumor. Results: On univariate analysis, increased dose (either nominal or EUD) and smaller gross tumor volume were significant predictors of higher local control. Lesions treated to a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater had a 3-year actuarial local control rate of 89.3% compared with 59.0% and 8.1% for those treated to 36-53.9 Gy and less than 36 Gy. On multivariate analysis, only increased nominal dose and EUD retained statistical significance. Treatment was well tolerated; 5.7% of patients experienced Grade 3 or higher toxicity. Conclusions: This large single-institution series suggests a dose-control relationship within the range of SBRT doses applied. Excellent local control rates are achieved with a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater, corresponding to an EUD greater than 65.3 Gy. These results support the use of aggressive SBRT regimens when durable tumor control is the primary objective.

McCammon, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Robert.mccammon@uchsc.edu; Schefter, Tracey E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Zaemisch, Rebekah; Gravdahl, Daniel; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Anastomotic Complications After Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Are Related to Radiation Dose to the Gastric Fundus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D{sub 50}). We studied the ability of the D{sub 50} to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Results: Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D{sub 50} on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D{sub 50} on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D{sub 50} limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. Conclusions: In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V{sub 30} below 40%.

Vande Walle, Caroline [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Ceelen, Wim P., E-mail: wim.ceelen@ugent.be [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: angela.vanbaardwijk@maastro.nl; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Maasland Hospital, Sittard (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Simons, Jean [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Jans Gasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes  

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Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

Kaprealian, Tania [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ?2 HT than did those with a dose of ?34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is associated with low rates of HT and high rates of weekly cisplatin use. The volume of bone marrow receiving 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow correlated with higher rates of grade ?2 toxicity among patients receiving weekly cisplatin (cervical cancer patients). Evaluation and limitation of the volume of bone marrow treated with pelvic IMRT is warranted in patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.

Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte E. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)] [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); D'Souza, David [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)] [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke's Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States)] [St. Luke's Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With 3-Week Accelerated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report early outcomes of accelerated whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost. Methods and Materials: This is a prospective, institutional review board-approved study. Eligibility included stage TisN0, T1N0, and T2N0 breast cancer. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were ineligible. The whole breast received 40.5 Gy in 2.7-Gy fractions with a concomitant lumpectomy boost of 4.5 Gy in 0.3-Gy fractions. Total dose to the lumpectomy site was 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 19 days. Results: Between October 2004 and December 2010, 160 patients were treated; stage distribution was as follows: TisN0, n=63; T1N0, n=88; and T2N0, n=9. With a median follow-up of 3.5 years (range, 1.5-7.8 years) the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.94) and 97% (95% CI 0.93-0.99), respectively. Five-year local relapse-free survival was 99% (95% CI 0.96-0.99). Acute National Cancer Institute/Common Toxicity Criteria grade 1 and 2 skin toxicity was observed in 70% and 5%, respectively. Among the patients with ?2-year follow-up no toxicity higher than grade 2 on the Late Effects in Normal TissuesSubjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic scale was observed. Review of the radiation therapy dosevolume histogram noted that ?95% of the prescribed dose encompassed the lumpectomy target volume in >95% of plans. The median dose received by the heart D{sub 05} was 215 cGy, and median lung V{sub 20} was 7.6%. Conclusions: The prescribed accelerated schedule of whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost can be administered, achieving acceptable dose distribution. With follow-up to date, the results are encouraging and suggest minimal side effects and excellent local control.

Chadha, Manjeet, E-mail: MChadha@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Woode, Rudolph; Sillanpaa, Jussi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Lucido, David [Department of Biostatistics, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Boolbol, Susan K.; Kirstein, Laurie; Osborne, Michael P.; Feldman, Sheldon [Division of Breast Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Division of Breast Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Harrison, Louis B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor response and 1-year freedom from local progression.

Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Murphy, James D. [School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

In vivo dosimetry with radiochromic films in low-voltage intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: EBT2 radiochromic films were studied and used for in vivo dosimetry in targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT), a technique in which the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) is used to perform intraoperative partial breast irradiation with x-rays of 50 kV{sub p}. Methods: The energy of the radiation emitted by the Intrabeam with the different spherical applicators, under 1 and 2 cm of solid water, and under the tungsten impregnated rubber used for shielding of the heart in TARGIT of the breast, was characterized with measurements of half-value layer (HVL). The stability of response of EBT2 was verified inside this range of energies. EBT2 films were calibrated using the red and green channels of the absorption spectrum in the 0-20 Gy dose range delivered by the Intrabeam x-rays. The dependence of film response on temperature during irradiation was measured. For in vivo dosimetry, pieces of radiochromic films wrapped in sterile envelopes were inserted after breast conserving surgery and before TARGIT into the excision cavity, on the skin and on the shielded pectoralis fascia for treatments of the left breast. Results: HVLs of the Intrabeam in TARGIT of the breast correspond to effective energies of 20.7-36.3 keV. The response of EBT2 was constant inside this range of energies. We measured the dose to the target tissue and to organs at risk in 23 patients and obtained an average dose of 13.52 {+-} 1.21 Gy to the target tissue. Dose to the skin in close proximity to the applicator was 2.22 {+-} 0.97 Gy, 0.29 {+-} 0.17 Gy at 5-10 cm from the applicator, and 0.08 {+-} 0.07 Gy at more than 10 cm from the applicator. Dose to the pectoral muscle for left breast treatment was 0.57 {+-} 0.23 Gy. Conclusions: Our results show that EBT2 films are accurate at the beam energies, dose range, and irradiation temperature found in TARGIT and that in vivo dosimetry in TARGIT with EBT2 films wrapped in sterile envelopes is a feasible procedure. Measured dose to the organs at risk indicates that the technique is safe from side effects to the skin and the heart.

Avanzo, M.; Rink, A.; Dassie, A.; Massarut, S.; Roncadin, M.; Borsatti, E.; Capra, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.96540.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Meta-analysis of the Alpha/Beta Ratio for Prostate Cancer in the Presence of an Overall Time Factor: Bad News, Good News, or No News?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To present a novel method for meta-analysis of the fractionation sensitivity of tumors as applied to prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor. Methods and Materials: A systematic search for radiation dose-fractionation trials in prostate cancer was performed using PubMed and by manual search. Published trials comparing standard fractionated external beam radiation therapy with alternative fractionation were eligible. For each trial the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted, and the data were synthesized with each study weighted by the inverse variance. An overall time factor was included in the analysis, and its influence on {alpha}/{beta} was investigated. Results: Five studies involving 1965 patients were included in the meta-analysis of {alpha}/{beta}. The synthesized {alpha}/{beta} assuming no effect of overall treatment time was -0.07 Gy (95% CI -0.73-0.59), which was increased to 0.47 Gy (95% CI -0.55-1.50) if a single highly weighted study was excluded. In a separate analysis, 2 studies based on 10,808 patients in total allowed extraction of a synthesized estimate of a time factor of 0.31 Gy/d (95% CI 0.20-0.42). The time factor increased the {alpha}/{beta} estimate to 0.58 Gy (95% CI -0.53-1.69)/1.93 Gy (95% CI -0.27-4.14) with/without the heavily weighted study. An analysis of the uncertainty of the {alpha}/{beta} estimate showed a loss of information when the hypofractionated arm was underdosed compared with the normo-fractionated arm. Conclusions: The current external beam fractionation studies are consistent with a very low {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer, although the CIs include {alpha}/{beta} ratios up to 4.14 Gy in the presence of a time factor. Details of the dose fractionation in the 2 trial arms have critical influence on the information that can be extracted from a study. Studies with unfortunate designs will supply little or no information about {alpha}/{beta} regardless of the number of subjects enrolled.

Vogelius, Ivan R., E-mail: vogelius@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is tolerable in selected patients with a T{sub 1}-weighted enhancing tumor <6 cm.

Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Robischon, Monica; Stuhr, Kelly; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Madden, Jennifer R. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Wilkening, Greta N. [Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Liu, Arthur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated IMRT With Temozolomide for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report toxicity and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status and organ or bone marrow function were eligible for this study. Patients received postoperative hypo-IMRT to the surgical cavity and residual tumor seen on T1-weighted brain MRI with a 5-mm margin to a total dose of 60 Gy in 10 fractions (6 Gy/fraction) and to the T2 abnormality on T2-weighted MRI with 5-mm margin to 30 Gy in 10 fractions (3 Gy/fraction). Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Toxicities were defined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Twenty-four patients were treated, consisting of 14 men, 10 women; a median age of 60.5 years old (range, 27-77 years); and a median Karnofsky performance score of 80 (range, 60-90). All patients received hypo-IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to protocol, except for 2 patients who received only 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 6.5 (range, 0-14).With a median follow-up of 14.8 months (range, 2.7-34.2 months) for all patients and a minimum follow-up of 20.6 months for living patients, no instances of grade 3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity were observed. The median OS was 16.6 months (range, 4.1-35.9 months). Six patients underwent repeated surgery for suspected tumor recurrence; necrosis was found in 50% to 100% of the resected specimens. Conclusion: In selected GBM patients, 60 Gy hypo-IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions over 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is safe. OS in this small cohort of patients was comparable to that treated with current standard of care therapy.

Reddy, Krishna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ney, Douglas [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada); Centre Intgr de Cancrologie de la Montrgie, Hpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montral, Qubec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Serum Amyloid A as a Predictive Marker for Radiation Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate serum markers associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade ?3 in patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment serum samples from patients with stage Ib-IV lung cancer who developed RP within 1 year after radiation therapy were analyzed to identify a proteome marker able to stratify patients prone to develop severe RP by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Dosimetric parameters and 3 biological factors were compared. Results: Serum samples from 16 patients (28%) with severe RP (grade 3-4) and 42 patients (72%) with no or mild RP (grade 0-2) were collected for analysis. All patients received a median of 54 Gy (range, 42-70 Gy) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with a mean lung dose (MLD) of 1502 cGy (range, 700-2794 cGy). An m/z peak of 11,480 Da was identified by SELDI-TOF-MS, and serum amyloid A (SAA) was the primary splitter serum marker. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of SAA (0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.00) was higher than those of C-reactive protein (0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.94), interleukin-6 (0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), and MLD (0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77). The best sensitivity and specificity of combined SAA and MLD for predicting RP were 88.9% and 96.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Baseline SAA could be used as an auxiliary marker for predicting severe RP. Extreme care should be taken to limit the lung irradiation dose in patients with high SAA.

Wang, Yu-Shan [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Animal Science, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Heng-Jui [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Su-Chen; Ko, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chih-Chia [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Yu-Wung; Jiang, Jiunn-Song [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, Kwan-Hwa, E-mail: M006565@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Science and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Relative Biologic Effects of Low-Dose-Rate {alpha}-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Rituximab and {beta}-Emitting {sup 90}Y-Tiuexetan-Ibritumomab Versus External Beam X-Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the relative biologic effects (RBE) of {alpha}-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-rituximab and of {beta}-radiation from {sup 90}Y-tiuexetan-ibritumomab (Zevalin) compared with external beam X-radiation in the Raji lymphoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Radioimmunoconjugates were administered intravenously in nude mice with Raji lymphoma xenografts at different levels of activity. Absorbed dose to tumor was estimated by separate biodistribution experiments for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and Zevalin. Tumor growth was measured two to three times per week after injection or X-radiation. Treatment-induced increase in growth delay to reach tumor volumes of 500 and 1,000 mm{sup 3}, respectively, was used as an end point. Results: The absorbed radiation dose-rate in tumor was slightly more than 0.1 Gy/d for the first week following injection of {sup 227}Th-rituximab, and thereafter gradually decreased to 0.03 Gy/d at 21 days after injection. For treatment with Zevalin the maximum dose-rate in tumor was achieved already 6 h after injection (0.2 Gy/d), and thereafter decreased to 0.01 Gy/d after 7 days. The relative biologic effect was between 2.5 and 7.2 for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and between 1 and 1.3 for Zevalin. Conclusions: Both at low doses and low-dose-rates, the {sup 227}Th-rituximab treatment was more effective per absorbed radiation dose unit than the two other treatments. The considerable effect at low doses suggests that the best way to administer low-dose-rates, {alpha}-emitting radioimmunoconjugates is via multiple injections.

Dahle, Jostein [Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: jostein.dahle@rr-research.no; Bruland, Oyvind S. [University of Oslo and Department of Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway); Larsen, Roy H. [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the doseresponse relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched casecontrol study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ?5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation doseresponse relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear doseresponse relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

Kleinerman, Ruth A., E-mail: kleinerr@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Holowaty, Eric [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hall, Per [Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Pukkala, Eero [Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki (Finland); Vaalavirta, Leila [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaijser, Magnus [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Michael [Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Storm, Hans [Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark); Joensuu, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Lynch, Charles F. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

420 W. 118th Street, New York, New York 10027 | energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Center on Global Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mayor of New York City Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, U.S. Secretary of Energy Thomas E. Donilon, former National420 W. 118th Street, New York, New York 10027 | energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy CenterUEnergy #12;thE ChAnGinG EnErGy lAndsCAPE 1Center on Global Energy Policy | "Global leaders must now craft new

Qian, Ning

375

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded.

Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Aswin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hopman, Wim P.M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Normal Tissue Anatomy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Contouring Variability and Its Impact on Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the variability of organ at risk (OAR) delineation and the resulting impact on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 3 radiation oncologists jointly delineated OARs, including the parotid and submandibular glands (SM), pharyngeal constrictors (PC), larynx, and glottis (GL), in 10 patients with advanced oropharynx cancer in 3 contouring sessions, spaced at least 1 week apart. Contour variability and uncertainty, as well as their dosimetric impact on IMRT planning for each case, were assessed. Results: The mean difference in total volume for each OAR was 1 cm{sup 3} ({sigma} 0.5 cm{sup 3}). Mean fractional overlap was 0.7 ({sigma} 0.1) and was highest (0.8) for the larynx and bilateral SMs and parotids and lowest (0.5) for PC. There were considerable spatial differences in contours, with the ipsilateral parotid and PC displaying the most variability (0.9 cm), which was most prominent in cases in which tumors obliterated fat planes. Both SMs and GL had the smallest differences (0.5 cm). The mean difference in OAR dose was 0.9 Gy (range 0.6-1.1 Gy, {sigma} 0.1 Gy), with the smallest difference for GL and largest for both SMs and the larynx. Conclusions: Despite substantial difference in OAR contours, optimization was barely affected, with a 0.9-Gy mean difference between optimizations, suggesting relative insensitivity of dose distributions for IMRT of oropharynx cancer to the extent of OARs.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Demiroz, Candan; Vineberg, Karen A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

U.S. WRESTLING FEDERATION HALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S-86 S-87 S-36 S-85 S-90 S-75 S-76 HOUSE #6 S-89 S-91 OFFICE CENTER AGRICULTURE U.S.D.A. S-92 S-88. SMITH HALL ALUMNI CENTER HOUSING - JPI PHASE 1 BUILDING 3 HOUSING - JPI PHASE 1 BUILDING 4 STUDENT UNION. LAUNDRY RESOURCE Y CAGE LAB. POULTRY BATTERY LAB. BROODER FIRE TECH. OUTDOOR LAB. MO. LAB. GY CONS. CHAPEL

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

379

The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on the internal quality of redblush grapefruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'4 ~ 4' ' 4 Q jEIA 'f ~ 4 It' 0 4t 4' 4 4 II' 4 "k 5 4 It '+ % 4. % %I 4I' '6 0' 4 6 % 4 4, 4'lp ~ 4~y*''yyypsgy~yygyy@yyg~ggg;y~yy@~j @W~@ OL~ e ~ v s s s al ps s a w y v e e e a e+ ? + + 4 w a +a a s e+gy'%pal XXSI'0P SLRBB X. . Aeeeelbge Ac%@ ~94...

Blitch, Harold E

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

Moiseenko, Vitali, E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Harrow, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Thompson, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

Galloway, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Immunosuppression prior to marrow transplantation for sensitized aplastic anemia patients: comparison of TLI with TBI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From May 1980 through July 1986, 26 patients with severe aplastic anemia, sensitized with multiple transfusions of blood products, were treated on either of two immunosuppressive regimens in preparation for bone marrow transplantation from a matched donor. There were 10 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), 200 cGy/fraction X 4 daily fractions (800 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg/d X 2 d. An additional 16 patients were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (or, if they were infants, a modified TLI or thoracoabdominal irradiation (TAI)), 100 cGy/fraction, 3 fractions/d X 2 d (600 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 40 mg/kg/d X 4 d. The extent of immunosuppression was similar in both groups as measured by peripheral blood lymphocyte depression at the completion of the course of irradiation (5% of initial concentration for TBI and 24% for TLI), neutrophil engraftment (10/10 for TBI and 15/16 for TLI), and time to neutrophil engraftment (median of 22 d for TBI and 17 d for TLI). Marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis for assessment of percent donor cells was also compared in those patients in whom it was available. 2/2 patients studied with TBI had 100% donor cells, whereas 6/11 with TLI had 100% donor cells. Of the five who did not, three were stable mixed chimeras with greater than or equal to 70% donor cells, one became a mixed chimera with about 50% donor cells, but became aplastic again after Cyclosporine A cessation 5 mo post-transplant, and the fifth reverted to all host cells by d. 18 post-transplant. Overall actuarial survival at 2 years was 56% in the TLI group compared with 30% in the TBI group although this was not statistically significant. No survival decrement has been seen after 2 years in either group.

Shank, B.; Brochstein, J.A.; Castro-Malaspina, H.; Yahalom, J.; Bonfiglio, P.; O'Reilly, R.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b , E.G. Jobbágy b Cabañas S/N, Hurlingham (1686), Buenos Aires, Argentina b Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina c Grupo de Estudios Ambientales e IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

386

Importance of a Patient Dosimetry and Clinical Follow-up Program in the Detection of Radiodermatitis After Long Percutaneous Coronary Interventions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex percutaneous interventions often require high radiation doses likely to produce skin radiation injuries. We assessed the methodology used to select patients with potential skin injuries in cardiac procedures and in need of clinical follow-up. We evaluated peak skin dose and clinical follow-up in a case of radiodermatitis produced during a total occlusion recanalization. This prospective study followed CIRSE and ACC/AHA/SCAI recommendations for patient radiation dose management in interventional procedures carried out in a university hospital with a workload of 4200 interventional cardiac procedures per year. Patient dose reports were automatically transferred to a central database. Patients exceeding trigger levels for air kerma area product (500 Gy cm{sup 2}) and cumulative skin dose (5 Gy) were counseled and underwent follow-up for early detection of skin injuries, with dermatologic support. The Ethical Committee and the Quality Assurance and Radiation Safety Committee approved the program. During 2010, a total of 13 patients (3.0/1,000 that year) received dose values exceeding trigger levels in the cardiovascular institute. Only one patient, who had undergone two consecutive procedures resulting in 970 Gy cm{sup 2} and 13.0 Gy as cumulative skin dose, showed signs of serious radiodermatitis that resolved in 3.7 months. The remaining patients did not manifest skin lesions during follow-up, and whenever patient examination was not feasible as part of the follow-up, neither patients nor families reported any skin injuries. Peak skin dose calculation and close clinical follow-up were feasible and appropriate, with a moderate additional workload for the staff and satisfaction for the patient.

Vano, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain); Escaned, Javier [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Cardiovascular Institute (Spain)] [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Cardiovascular Institute (Spain); Vano-Galvan, Sergio [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Dermatology Service (Spain)] [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Dermatology Service (Spain); Fernandez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain); Galvan, Carmen, E-mail: cgalvan@med.ucm.es [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Radiotherapy Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Radiotherapy Service and Radiology Department (Spain)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Parotid Glands DoseEffect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were ?4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the doseeffect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dosesaliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were observed at first treatment, indicating potential benefit for more complex setup corrections or adaptive interventions in the minority of patients with large deviations detected early by CBCT.

Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

A new use for the Wheatstone bridge and transducer elements in measuring and computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gy. One of several types of transducers used was the electric re- sistance wire strain gage. E. C, Eaton (I) first used stretched raphy. Numbers in parentheses designate references in the Bibliog- metallic wires ior measuring strain... direct current tachometer generator, manufactured by the Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, with an output voltage proportional to the tachometer speed supplied this voltage The torque variable was represented by a change iu resistance...

Jobe, William Dibrell

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of photon irradiation treatment upon calcium content of ribs of Wistar rats using micro-XRF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health. Among the treatment strategies used for breast cancer treatment, the most used are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy may be given to destroy the cancer cells using high-dose x-rays. Protocols vary considerably, but generally whole body irradiation totals from 10 to 15 Gy, whereas local therapy totals from 40 to 70 Gy. In clinical practice, the quantitative evaluation of bone tissue relies on measurements of bone mineral density values, which are closely associated with the risk of osteoporotic fracture. Improved survivorship rates of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy increase the importance of understanding the mechanisms and long-term effects of radiation-induced bone loss. In this work, we investigated the variation on calcium distribution in ribs of female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) submitted to photon irradiation with a single dose of 20 Gy. The determination of the calcium distribution was performed using synchrotron radiation microfluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) at the X-ray Fluorescence beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Animals were irradiated using the linear accelerator Varian registered (CLINAC 2100) at the University Centre for Cancer Control of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (CUCC/UERJ). The total dose delivered was 20 Gy. The animals were about three months old and weighting about 200g. They were distributed into two groups (seven per group): control (did not receive any treatment) and irradiated (submitted to irradiation procedure) groups. Results showed that calcium content decreased within the dorsal ribs of rats submitted to radiotherapy in comparison to the control group.

Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Salata, Camila; Andrade, Cherley Borba; Silva, Claudia Marcello da [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches.

Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Research, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: jwong@coh.org; Rosenthal, Joseph [Division of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy [Division of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Research, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Division of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects of Processing on Immunoreactivity of Cashew Nut (Anacardium occidentale L.) Seed Flour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'DONNELL,# MARY SUSAN GERBER, KENNETH H. ROUX,§ AND SHRIDHAR K. SATHE*, Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise for 15 and 20 min; and 200 °C for 10 and 15 min), -irradiation (1, 5, 10, and 25 kGy), and pH (1, 3, 5, 7 eight" food groups responsible for food allergies. According to a Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network

Ronquist, Fredrik

392

Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Onicescu, Georgiana [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Clarke, Harry S. [Department of Urology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

Reeder, Reed [Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID (United States); Carter, Dennis L. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Dennis.Carter@usoncology.com; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Tallhamer, Michael [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States); Johnson, Tim [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi [Arapahoe Surgical Associates, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Kaske, Terese [Sally Jobe Diagnostic Breast Center, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Rose Hospital, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, Charles E. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamicsProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics coursecourse # 424304.0# 424304.0 v.v. 20132013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics coursecourse # 424304.0# 424304.0 v.v. 20132013 Solar energy (thermal, PV)gy ( , ) Ron Zevenhoven ??bo Akademi 2/52 #12;Potential Solar energy could within one hour provide the energy that is used in all human acitivities in a year. Drawbacks are ­ relatively low energy (exergy) density Pic: IEA08 (exergy) density

Zevenhoven, Ron

395

Advanced Calculus I (Math 309) Fall 2002 Lecture Notes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is invertible iff there exists a function g : Y X with (f g)(y) = y y Y and (g f)(x) = x x X, and then gAdvanced Calculus I (Math 309) Fall 2002 Lecture Notes Martin Bohner Version from December 11, 2002. Preliminaries 1 0.1. Sets 1 0.2. Functions 1 0.3. Proofs 2 Chapter 1. The Real Number System 3 1.1. The Field

Bohner, Martin

396

Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk {<=}20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade {>=}3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% {+-} 2.9% and 96.1% {+-} 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% {+-} 5.9%, 76.4% {+-} 8.8%, and 77.5% {+-} 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

Zilli, Thomas, E-mail: thomaszilli@inwind.it [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Jorcano, Sandra [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Rouzaud, Michel; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Toscas, Jose Ignacio [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Casanova, Nathalie; Wang, Hui [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Escude, Lluis; Molla, Meritxell; Linero, Dolors [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, Damien C. [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Miralbell, Raymond [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size {<=}2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm{sup 3} (range, 20-97 cm{sup 3}). Patients with {<=}47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary.

Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: BealK@MSKCC.org; McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

Dosimetric comparison of {sup 90}Y, {sup 32}P, and {sup 186}Re radiocolloids in craniopharyngioma treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In the radionuclide treatment of some forms of brain tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, the selection of the appropriate radionuclide for therapy is a key element in treatment planning. The aim was to study the influence by considering the beta-emitter radionuclide dose rate in an intracranial cyst. Methods: Dosimetry was performed using the MCNP4C radiation transport code. Analytical dosimetry was additionally performed using the Loevinger and the Berger formulas in the MATLAB software. Each result was compared under identical conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using {sup 90}Y versus {sup 32}P and {sup 186}Re were investigated. Results: The dose rate at the inner surface of the cyst wall was estimated to be 400 mGy/h for a 1 MBq/ml concentration of {sup 90}Y. Under identical conditions of treatment, the corresponding dose rates were 300 mGy/h for {sup 32}P and 160 mGy/h for {sup 186}Re. For a well-defined cyst radius and identical wall thickness, higher dose rates resulted for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: To achieve the same radiological burden, the required amount of physical activity of injectable solution is lower for {sup 32}P. This is found to be a consequence of both the radionuclide physical half-life and the pattern of energy deposition from the emitted radiation. According to the half-life and dose-rate results, {sup 90}Y would be a good substitute for {sup 32}P.

Sadeghi, Mahdi; Karimi, Elham; Hosseini, S. Hamed [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Engineering, Research and Science Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155/4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Implant breast reconstruction followed by radiotherapy: Can helical tomotherapy become a standard irradiation treatment?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the benefits and limitations of helical tomotherapy (HT) for loco-regional irradiation of patients after a mastectomy and immediate implant-based reconstruction. Ten breast cancer patients with retropectoral implants were randomly selected for this comparative study. Planning target volumes (PTVs) 1 (the volume between the skin and the implant, plus margin) and 2 (supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes, plus margin) were 50 Gy in 25 fractions using a standard technique and HT. The extracted dosimetric data were compared using a 2-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Doses for PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher with HT (V95 of 98.91 and 97.91%, respectively) compared with the standard technique (77.46 and 72.91%, respectively). Similarly, the indexes of homogeneity were significantly greater with HT (p = 0.002). HT reduced ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=}20 Gy (16.7 vs. 35%), and bilateral lungs (p = 0.01) and neighboring organs received doses that remained well below tolerance levels. The heart volume, which received 25 Gy, was negligible with both techniques. HT can achieve full target coverage while decreasing high doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. However, the low doses to normal tissue volumes need to be reduced in future studies.

Massabeau, Carole, E-mail: cmassabeau@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Wakil, Georges; Castro Pena, Pablo; Viard, Romain; Zefkili, Sofia; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A study of radiolytic stability of 25,27-bis(2-propyloxy) calix[4]-26,28-crown-6 (iPR-C[4]C-6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiolytic stability of 25,27-bis(2-propyloxy)calix[4] arene -26,28-crown-6 (iPr-C[4]C-6) was studied. {sup 60}co was used as a radiation source. Its dose rate was 437 Gy/min., and the total absorbed dose of the iPr-C[4]C-6 was from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} Gy. The iPr-C[4]C-6 solid and 0.025 mol/L iPr-C[4]C-6/n-octanol which were pre-equilibrated with 0.01 mol/L and 3 mol/L nitric acid, respectively, were given different doses, and their extraction performance was researched. Their degradation mechanism was investigated by mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results show that radiolytic stability of the iPr-C[4]C-6 solid and 0.025 mol/L iPr-C[4]C-6/n-octanol are good when their absorbed dose is less than 10{sup 6} Gy. The extracting system of iPr-C[4]C-6/n-octanol is promising for separating cesium from high-level liquid waste(HLLW)

Jianchen, Wang; Chongli, Song [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, Beijing 102201, P.O. Box: 1021 (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Plasminogen activator activity in lung and alveolar macrophages of rats exposed to graded single doses of. gamma. rays to the right hemithorax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Male rats were sacrificed 2 or 6 months after a single dose of 0-30 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays to the right hemithorax. At autopsy, macrophages were lavaged from the right lung, counted, and frozen. The right (irradiated) and the left (shielded) lungs were frozen, then assayed for plasminogen activator (PLA) activity by the fibrin plate lysis method. Freeze-thawed macrophages were assayed for both PLA activity (/sup 125/I-fibrin clot lysis method) and fibrinolytic inhibitor activity (inhibition of urokinase-induced fibrin lysis). There was a linear, dose-dependent decrease in right lung PLA activity over the dose range of 10-30 Gy at 2 and 6 months postirradiation, reductions of 3.1 and 2.6% per Gy, respectively. PLA activity at all radiation doses was 10-15% higher at 6 months than at 2 months indicative of a partial recovery of this endothelial function in the irradiated lung. PLA activity per 10/sup 6/ macrophages decreased with increasing radiation dose at both autopsy times, closely paralleling lung PLA activity. This radiation-induced decrease in macrophage PLA activity was not due to increased fibrinolytic inhibitor activity in the irradiated macrophages. These data quantitate the dose response and time course of radiation-induced fibrinolytic defects in rat lung and suggest that information obtained from a minimally invasive procedure such as bronchoalveolar lavage may serve as an index of the degree of pulmonary fibrinolytic dysfunction after irradiation.

Ts'ao, C.; Ward, W.F.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiation bronchitis and stenosis secondary to high dose rate endobronchial irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to describe a new clinical entity observed in follow-up bronchoscopies in patients who were treated with high dose rate and medium dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy of the tracheobronchial tree. Patients were treated by protocol with medium dose rate, 47 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 5 mm depth times three fractions, high dose rate 144 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions and high dose rate 151 patients receiving cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions followed by bronchoscopy. Incidence of this entity was 9% for the first group, 12% for the second, and 13% for the third group. Reactions were grade 1 consisting of mild inflammatory response with a partial whitish circumferential membrane in an asymptomatic patient; grade 2, thicker complete white circumferential membrane with cough and/or obstructive problems requiring intervention; grade 3, severe inflammatory response with marked membranous exudate and mild fibrotic reaction; and grade 4 a predominant fibrotic reaction with progressive stenosis. Variables associated with a slightly increased incidence of radiation bronchitis and stenosis included: large cell carcinoma histology, curative intent, prior laser photoresection, and/or concurrent external radiation. Survival was the strongest predictor of the reaction. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis is a new clinical entity that must be identified in bronchial brachytherapy patients and treated appropriately. 23 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Speiser, B.L. (St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Spratling, L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Bone marrow transplantation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 26, 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union exposed about 200 people to large doses of total-body radiation. Thirteen persons exposed to estimated total-body doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy received bone marrow transplants. Two transplant recipients, who received estimated doses of radiation of 5.6 and 8.7 Gy, are alive more than three years after the accident. The others died of various causes, including burns (the cause of death in five), interstitial pneumonitis (three), graft-versus-host disease (two), and acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (one). There was hematopoietic (granulocytic) recovery in nine transplant recipients who could be evaluated, six of whom had transient partial engraftment before the recovery of their own marrow. Graft-versus-host disease was diagnosed clinically in four persons and suspected in two others. Although the recovery of endogenous hematopoiesis may occur after exposure to radiation doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy, we do not know whether it is more likely after the transient engraftment of transplanted stem cells. Because large doses of radiation affect multiple systems, bone marrow recovery does not necessarily ensure survival. Furthermore, the risk of graft-versus-host disease must be considered when the benefits of this treatment are being weighed.

Baranov, A.; Gale, R.P.; Guskova, A.; Piatkin, E.; Selidovkin, G.; Muravyova, L.; Champlin, R.E.; Danilova, N.; Yevseeva, L.; Petrosyan, L. (Institute of Biophysics of the Ministry of Health and Clinical Hospital, Moscow (USSR))

1989-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45-72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3-10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100-141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [School of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujino, Masaharu [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Gomi, Kotaro [Cancer Institute Suwa Red-Cross Hospital, Suwa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki [School of Medicine, Kagawa University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeda, Atsuya [Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Ouchi, Atsushi [Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [School of Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Arimoto, Takuro [Kitami Red Cross Hospital, Kitami (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

RADIATION ECOLOGY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MURINE RODENTS AND SHREWS IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes major studies performed by the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory (Slavutich, Ukraine) on radioecology of murine rodents and shrews inhabiting the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The article addresses the long-term (1986-2005) and seasonal dynamics of radioactive contamination of animals, and reviews interspecies differences in radionuclide accumulations and factors affecting the radionuclide accumulations. It is shown that bioavailability of radionuclides in the 'soil-to-plant' chain and a trophic specialization of animals play key roles in determining their actual contamination levels. The total absorbed dose rates in small mammals significantly reduced during the years following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In 1986, the absorbed dose rate reached 1.3-6.0 Gy hr{sup -1} in the central areas of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (the 'Red Forest'). In 1988 and 1990, the total absorbed dose rates were 1.3 and 0.42 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. In 1995, 2000, and 2005, according to the present study, the total absorbed dose rates rarely exceeded 0.00023, 0.00018, and 0.00015 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. Contributions of individual radiation sources into the total absorbed dose are described.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

Damast, Shari, E-mail: damasts@mskcc.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ho, Alice Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Montgomery, Leslie [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Fornier, Monica N. [Department of Breast Cancer Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to performin vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. Methods: The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 1 cm{sup 2} and 20 20 cm{sup 2}) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. Results: The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. Conclusions: The measurements of relative dose using the spherical diode described in this work show its feasibility for the dosimetry of megavoltage photon beams. A particularly important feature is its good angular response in the MV range. They would be good candidates forin vivo dosimetry, and quality assurance of VMAT and tomotherapy, and other modalities with beams irradiating from multiple orientations, such as Cyberknife and ViewRay, with minor modifications.

Barbs, Benigno, E-mail: bbarbes@unav.es [Servicio de Oncologa Radioterpica, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII, 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)] [Servicio de Oncologa Radioterpica, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII, 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Azcona, Juan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Servicio de Oncologa Radioterpica, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Servicio de Oncologa Radioterpica, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Burguete, Javier [Departamento de Fsica y Matemtica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)] [Departamento de Fsica y Matemtica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Mart-Climent, Josep M. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)] [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Clnica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Po XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Subclinical Cardiotoxicity Detected by Strain Rate Imaging up to 14 months After Breast Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic modality that enables accurate measurement of regional myocardial function. We investigated the role of SRI and troponin I (TnI) in the detection of subclinical radiation therapy (RT)-induced cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This study prospectively included 75 women (51 left-sided and 24 right-sided) receiving adjuvant RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Sequential echocardiographs with SRI were obtained before RT, immediately after RT, and 8 and 14 months after RT. TnI levels were measured on the first and last day of RT. Results: Mean heart and left ventricle (LV) doses were both 9 4 Gy for the left-sided patients and 4 4 Gy and 1 0.4 Gy, respectively, for the right-sided patients. A decrease in strain was observed at all post-RT time points for left-sided patients (?17.5% 1.9% immediately after RT, ?16.6% 1.4% at 8 months, and ?17.7% 1.9% at 14 months vs ?19.4% 2.4% before RT, P<.01) but not for right-sided patients. When we considered left-sided patients only, the highest mean dose was given to the anterior left ventricular (LV) wall (25 14 Gy) and the lowest to the inferior LV wall (3 3 Gy). Strain of the anterior wall was reduced after RT (?16.6% 2.3% immediately after RT, ?16% 2.6% at 8 months, and ?16.8% 3% at 14 months vs ?19% 3.5% before RT, P<.05), whereas strain of the inferior wall showed no significant change. No changes were observed with conventional echocardiography. Furthermore, mean TnI levels for the left-sided patients were significantly elevated after RT compared with before RT, whereas TnI levels of the right-sided patients remained unaffected. Conclusions: In contrast to conventional echocardiography, SRI detected a regional, subclinical decline in cardiac function up to 14 months after breast RT. It remains to be determined whether these changes are related to clinical outcome. In the meantime, we encourage the use of radiation techniques that minimize the exposure of the anterior LV wall in left-sided patients.

Erven, Katrien, E-mail: katrien.erven@uzleuven.be [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Iridium Cancer Network, Antwerp (Belgium); Florian, Anca [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); IBBT-KU Leuven Future Health Department, Leuven (Belgium); Sweldens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Jurcut, Ruxandra [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania)] [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Wildiers, Hans [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Voigt, Jens-Uwe [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Weltens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Bilateral implant reconstruction does not affect the quality of postmastectomy radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine if the presence of bilateral implants, in addition to other anatomic and treatment-related variables, affects coverage of the target volume and dose to the heart and lung in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). A total of 197 consecutive women with breast cancer underwent mastectomy and immediate tissue expander (TE) placement, with or without exchange for a permanent implant (PI) before radiation therapy at our center. PMRT was delivered with 2 tangential beams + supraclavicular lymph node field (50 Gy). Patients were grouped by implant number: 51% unilateral (100) and 49% bilateral (97). The planning target volume (PTV) (defined as implant + chest wall + nodes), heart, and ipsilateral lung were contoured and the following parameters were abstracted from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data: PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, Lung V{sub 20}Gy > 30%, and Heart V{sub 25}Gy > 5%. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA) were performed to determine the association of variables with these parameters. The 2 groups were well balanced for implant type and volume, internal mammary node (IMN) treatment, and laterality. In the entire cohort, 90% had PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, indicating excellent coverage of the chest wall. Of the patients, 27% had high lung doses (V{sub 20}Gy > 30%) and 16% had high heart doses (V{sub 25}Gy > 5%). No significant factors were associated with suboptimal PTV coverage. On MVA, IMN treatment was found to be highly associated with high lung and heart doses (both p < 0.0001), but implant number was not (p = 0.54). In patients with bilateral implants, IMN treatment was the only predictor of dose to the contralateral implant (p = 0.001). In conclusion, bilateral implants do not compromise coverage of the target volume or increase lung and heart dose in patients receiving PMRT. The most important predictor of high lung and heart doses in patients with implant-based reconstruction, whether unilateral or bilateral, is treatment of the IMNs. Refinement of radiation techniques in reconstructed patients who require comprehensive nodal irradiation is warranted.

Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: hoa1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Patel, Nisha [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mehrara, Babak J.; Disa, Joseph J.; Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gelblum, Daphna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations. Microscopically involved margins remain a predictor of local and locoregional failure, despite radiation doses >70 Gy. Patients with tumors {>=}6 cm and microscopically involved margins are at high risk of treatment failure and death from the development of distant metastases.

San Miguel, Inigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martin-Algarra, Salvador [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy  

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Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy  

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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter for the surrounding normal tissue except for the dose received by the penile bulb and the right hip. Our dosimetric evaluation suggests significant underdosing with inaccurate target localization and emphasizes the importance of accurate patient setup and target localization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of intrafraction organ motion, rotation, and deformation on doses delivered to target volumes.

Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation  

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Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI.

Rodrguez, Nria, E-mail: nrodriguez@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Dengra, Josefa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Foro, Palmira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernndez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, scar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Biological-based optimization and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe biological-based optimization and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation-based treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung, liver, and prostate patients. Methods: Optimization strategies and VMAT planning parameters using a biological-based optimization MC planning system were analyzed for 24 SBRT patients. Patients received a median dose of 45 Gy [range, 34-54 Gy] for lung tumors in 1-5 fxs and a median dose of 52 Gy [range, 48-60 Gy] for liver tumors in 3-6 fxs. Prostate patients received a fractional dose of 10 Gy in 5 fxs. Biological-cost functions were used for plan optimization, and its dosimetric quality was evaluated using the conformity index (CI), the conformation number (CN), the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over the planning target volume (Rx/PTV50). The quality and efficiency of the delivery were assessed according to measured quality assurance (QA) passing rates and delivery times. For each disease site, one patient was replanned using physical cost function and compared to the corresponding biological plan. Results: Median CI, CN, and Rx/PTV50 for all 24 patients were 1.13 (1.02-1.28), 0.79 (0.70-0.88), and 5.3 (3.1-10.8), respectively. The median delivery rate for all patients was 410 MU/min with a maximum possible rate of 480 MU/min (85%). Median QA passing rate was 96.7%, and it did not significantly vary with the tumor site. Conclusions: VMAT delivery of SBRT plans optimized using biological-motivated cost-functions result in highly conformal dose distributions. Plans offer shorter treatment-time benefits and provide efficient dose delivery without compromising the plan conformity for tumors in the prostate, lung, and liver, thereby improving patient comfort and clinical throughput. The short delivery times minimize the risk of patient setup and intrafraction motion errors often associated with long SBRT treatment delivery times.

Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant doseresponse effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

Jebsen, Nina L., E-mail: nina.louise.jebsen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Engstrm, Katarina [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bauer, Henrik C. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Muren, Ludvig P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, Geir E. [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, yvind S. [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte, E-mail: ann-charlotte.waldenstrom@oncology.gu.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olsson, Caroline [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Al-Abany, Massoud [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tucker, Susan [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ?700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Szary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirov, Krassen [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

4? Non-Coplanar Liver SBRT: A Novel Delivery Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To improve the quality of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments, a novel 4? framework was developed with accompanying algorithms to optimize non-coplanar beam orientations and fluences. The dose optimization is performed on a patient-specific deliverable beam geometry solution space, parameterized with patient and linear accelerator gantry orientations. Methods and Materials: Beams causing collision between the gantry and the couch or patient were eliminated by simulating all beam orientations using a precise computer assisted design model of the linear accelerator and a human subject. Integrated beam orientation and fluence map optimizations were performed on remaining beams using a greedy column generation method. Testing of the new method was performed on 10 liver SBRT cases previously treated with 50 to 60 Gy in 5 fractions using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For each patient, both 14 and 22 non-coplanar fields were selected and optimized to meet the objective of ?95% of the planning target volume (PTV) covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk, normal liver volumes receiving <15 Gy, integral dose, and 50% dose spillage volumes were compared against the delivered clinical VMAT plans. Results: Compared with the VMAT plans, the 4? plans yielded reduced 50% dose spillage volume and integral dose by 22% (range 10%-40%) and 19% (range 13%-26%), respectively. The mean normal liver volume receiving <15 Gy was increased by 51 cc (range 21-107 cc) with a 31% reduction of the mean normal liver dose. Mean doses to the left kidney and right kidney and maximum doses to the stomach and spinal cord were on average reduced by 70%, 51%, 67%, and 64% (P?.05). Conclusions: This novel 4? non-coplanar radiation delivery technique significantly improved dose gradient, reduced high dose spillage, and improved organ at risk sparing compared with state of the art VMAT plans.

Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yang, Yingli; Low, Daniel; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV){sub 95%} of >99%; V{sub 107%} of <1.8 cc; heart V{sub 5Gy} of <10% and V{sub 10Gy} of <5%; and mean lung dose of <7 Gy. Treatment planning started with classic tangential beams. Optimization was done by adding a maximum of four segments before adding beams, in a second step. A breath-hold technique was used for heart sparing if necessary. Results: Dose constraints were met for all 60 patients. The classic tangential beam setup was not sufficient for any of the patients; in one-third of patients, additional segments were required (<3), and in two-thirds of patients, additional beams (<2) were required. Logistic regression analyses revealed central breast diameter (CD) and central lung distance as independent predictors for transition from additional segments to additional beams, with a CD cut-off point at 23.6 cm. Conclusions: Treatment plans fulfilling strict dose homogeneity criteria and normal tissue constraints could be obtained for all patients by stepwise dose intensity modification using limited numbers of segments and additional beams. In patients with a CD of >23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

Peulen, Heike, E-mail: h.peulen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hanbeukers, Bianca; Boersma, Liesbeth; Baardwijk, Angela van; Ende, Piet van den; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Murrer, Lars; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Planning Hybrid Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Whole-breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Results: Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose ({approx}5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses ({approx}20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Conclusions: Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation.

Farace, Paolo, E-mail: paolofarace@gmail.com [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)] [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)] [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orru, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo [Radiotherapy Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)] [Radiotherapy Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm{sup 3}) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm{sup 3}, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm{sup 3}, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm{sup 3}, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

Clark, Brenda G. [Departments of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, and Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)], E-mail: brclark@ottawahospital.on.ca; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael [Departments of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, and Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Results of Surgery, With or Without Radiotherapy, for Primary Spinal Myxopapillary Ependymoma: A Retrospective Study From the Rare Cancer Network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of patients with primary spinal myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE). Materials and Methods: Data from a series of 85 (35 females, 50 males) patients with spinal MPE were collected in this retrospective multicenter study. Thirty-eight (45%) underwent surgery only and 47 (55%) received postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Median administered radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 22.2-59.4). Median follow-up of the surviving patients was 60.0 months (range, 0.2-316.6). Results: The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 50.4% and 74.8% for surgery only and surgery with postoperative low- (<50.4 Gy) or high-dose ({>=}50.4 Gy) RT, respectively. Treatment failure was observed in 24 (28%) patients. Fifteen patients presented treatment failure at the primary site only, whereas 2 and 1 patients presented with brain and distant spinal failure only. Three and 2 patients with local failure presented with concomitant spinal distant seeding and brain failure, respectively. One patient failed simultaneously in the brain and spine. Age greater than 36 years (p = 0.01), absence of neurologic symptoms at diagnosis (p = 0.01), tumor size {>=}25 mm (p = 0.04), and postoperative high-dose RT (p = 0.05) were variables predictive of improved PFS on univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, only postoperative high-dose RT was independent predictors of PFS (p = 0.04). Conclusions: The observed pattern of failure was mainly local, but one fifth of the patients presented with a concomitant spinal or brain component. Postoperative high-dose RT appears to significantly reduce the rate of tumor progression.

Pica, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Miller, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); VillA, Salvador [Catalan Institute of Oncology, Badalona, Barcelona (Spain); Kadish, Sidney P. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Abusaris, Huda [Dr Bernard Verbeeten Instituut, Tilburg (Netherlands); Ozyigit, Gokhan [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Baumert, Brigitta G. M.D. Ph.D [Radiation therapy, MAASTRO, GROW, Maastricht (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Haller, Guy [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Statistics, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: Damien.Weber@medecine.unige.ch

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

439