Sample records for lesotho gy guyana

  1. COLOMBIA GUYANA VENEZUELA FR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    PERU CHILE ARGENTINA PARAGUAY BOLIVIA COLOMBIA GUYANA SURINAME URUGUAY VENEZUELA FR. GUIANA POPULATION DENSITY, 2000 Population density measures the number of persons per square kilometer of land area the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area Projection ´ 0 500 1,000 km

  2. Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization Guyana Forestry Commission, The Government of Norway Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policiesdeployment programs,...

  3. Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy AgencyCompany Organization Inter-American Development Bank, World Watch Institute (WWI) Sector...

  4. Guyana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy Resources Jump

  5. Study in South Africa and Lesotho A Curriculum Development Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viola, Ronald

    Teachers Study in South Africa and Lesotho A Curriculum Development Project Integrating Visual Arts about the cultures and history of the Basotho people of southern Africa Participate in seminars-Hays award, graduate credit and/or CEUs Visit non-malarial and low risk areas in southern Africa and enjoy

  6. Loanwords in Kali'na, a Cariban language of French Guyana Odile Renault-Lescure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    distributed in these countries. 11.141 live in Venezuela, 3000 in Guyana (Forte 2000), 3000 in Suriname (Boven extremely from one place to another in the same country (30% loss in Venezuela, 80% in Guyana, 50 Guiana, as Carib in Suriname and as Kari'ña in Venezuela, belongs to the Cariban language family

  7. GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

  8. RenGyS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreviewAl.,RenGen Energy Ltd Jump to:RenGyS

  9. Lesotho Highlands Water Commission, Private Bag A156, Maseru, 100, Lesotho lkmoleko@lhwc.org.ls, molekolebohang@gmail.com, +(266) 22-31-51-97(W)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    -national (Lesotho-South Africa) supervisory body, which oversees the construction, maintenance and operation LEADERSHIP DATABASE, awaiting possible United Nations deployment, when I am available for a suitable position. It consisted of Human Rights, the Quick Impact Projects (QIPs), Mine Action, Conduct and Discipline, HIV

  10. 2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview #12;2008 Residential Energy Plan2008 Residential Energy Plan Review ChecklistReview Checklist Simplification ChecklistsOther Available Checklists 2005 and 2008 Residential Energy Documentation2005 and 2008 Residential

  11. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckendorf, Veronique, E-mail: v.beckendorf@nancy.fnclcc.fr [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Guerif, Stephane [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Poitiers (France); Le Prise, Elisabeth [Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes (France); Cosset, Jean-Marc [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Bougnoux, Agnes [Hopital Bretonneau Tours (France); Chauvet, Bruno [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France); Salem, Naji [Institut Paoli-Calmette, Marseille (France); Chapet, Olivier [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Bourdain, Sylvain [Centre Rene Gauducheau, Saint Herblain (France); Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Centre Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Maingon, Philippe [Centre George-Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Malissard, Luc [La Chaussee Saint Victor (France); Simon, Jean-Marc [Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Pommier, Pascal [Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Hay, Men [Centre Val D'Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Dubray, Bernard [Centre Henri Becquerel, Rouen (France); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Luporsi, Elisabeth [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Bey, Pierre [Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a better 5-year biochemical outcome with slightly greater toxicity.

  12. MEMORANDUM GY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-IGY DATE--- --

  13. 20 Gy Versus 44 Gy of Supplemental External Beam Radiotherapy With Palladium-103 for Patients With Greater Risk Disease: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology Inc, Mountain View, CA (United States); Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The necessity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a supplement to prostate brachytherapy remains unknown. We report brachytherapy outcomes for patients with higher risk features randomized to substantially different supplemental EBRT regimens. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and June 2004, 247 patients were randomized to 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy EBRT followed by a palladium-103 boost (115 Gy vs. 90 Gy). The eligibility criteria included clinically organ-confined disease with Gleason score 7-10 and/or pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 10-20 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. The median day 0 prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume was 125.7%; 80 men received androgen deprivation therapy (median, 4 months). Multiple parameters were evaluated for their effect on bPFS. Results: For the entire cohort, the cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival rates were 97.7%, 93.2%, and 80.8% at 8 years and 96.9%, 93.2%, and 75.4% at 10 years, respectively. The bPFS rate was 93.1% and 93.4% for the 20-Gy and 44-Gy arms, respectively (p = .994). However, no statistically significant differences were found in cause-specific survival or overall survival were identified. When stratified by PSA level of {<=}10 ng/mL vs. >10 ng/mL, Gleason score, or androgen deprivation therapy, no statistically significant differences in bPFS were discerned between the two EBRT regimens. On multivariate analysis, bPFS was most closely related to the preimplant PSA and clinical stage. For patients with biochemically controlled disease, the median PSA level was <0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: The results of the present trial strongly suggest that two markedly different supplemental EBRT regimens result in equivalent cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival. It is probable that the lack of benefit for a higher supplemental EBRT dose is the result of the high-quality brachytherapy dose distributions.

  14. Shell-shocked diffusion model for the light curve of SN2006gy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Richard McCray

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a simple model for the high luminosity of SN 2006gy involving photon diffusion of shock-deposited thermal energy. The distinguishing property of the model is that the large ``stellar'' radius of 160 AU required to prevent adiabatic losses is not the true stellar radius, but rather, the radius of an opaque, unbound circumstellar envelope, created when 10 Msun was ejected in the decade before the supernova in an eruption analogous to that of eta Carinae. The supernova light is produced primarily by diffusion of thermal energy following the passage of the blast wave through this shell. This model differs from traditional models of supernova debris interacting with external CSM in that here the shell is optically thick and the escape of radiation is delayed. We show that any model attempting to account for SN2006gy's huge luminosity with radiation emitted by ongoing CSM interaction fails for the following basic reason: the CSM density required to achieve the observed luminosity makes the same circumstellar envelope opaque, forcing a thermal diffusion solution. In our model, the weaker CSM interaction giving rise to SN2006gy's characteristic Type IIn spectrum and soft X-rays is not linked to the power source of the visual continuum; instead, it arises after the blast wave breaks free of the opaque shell into the surrounding wind. While a simple diffusion model can explain the gross properties of the early light curve of SN2006gy, it predicts that the light curve must plummet rapidly at late-times, unless an additional power source is present.

  15. GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.

  16. "Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, William Stafford

    "Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994. pp. 240-247. 1 DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION: SOLAR OVEN USE

  17. Guyana Francesa 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dense et le reste de mangroves, savanes, forêts secondaires et cultures sur la côte, entre le Surinam population : les chiffres du recensement de 1999 révisé font état de 197 000 habitants. A titre de deux réside dans l'île de Cayenne1 , mais un rééquilibrage progressif de la population sur le

  18. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.E.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; /Lab.Phys.Plasmas, Saint Maur des Fosses; Barry, B.; /Assoc.African Univ., Accra; Chukwuma; /Olabisi Onabanjo U.; Cottrell, R.L.; /SLAC; Kalim, U.; /Pakistan Natl. U.; Mebrahtu, A.; /Mekelle U.; Petitdidier, M.; /Lab. d'Atmos., Velizy; Rabiu, B.; /Federal Tech. U., Akure; Reeves, C.; /Earthworks bv, Delft; ,

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide - either as a direct policy objective, or indirectly as a means to an end, such as the development of an indigenous capability in science and technology for national development. The expectation is that informed opinion from the scientific community at the institutional, national, and international levels can be used to influence the decision makers and donors who are in a position to deliver better Internet capabilities.

  19. M(.)Ll:CULAR PluAuculAcon.c)Gy, 6, 391-401 Ligand Interaction with Hemoprotein P-450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calabrese, Ronald

    M(.)Ll:CULAR PluAuculAcon.c)Gy, 6, 391-401 391 Ligand Interaction with Hemoprotein P-450 Ill of High- and Low-Spin P-450 C. H. E. ,JEFCOATE, R. L. CALABRESE, AN!) J. L. GAYLOR Section of Biochemistry to octylaminie, of tine absolute amounts of inigh- arid loss--spins formsss of huemoproteini P-450 of rabbit

  20. Bovine babesiosis in Guyana: a comparison of the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and complement-fixation (CF) tests in determining the prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applewhaite, Lennox Mortimer

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~BH'1 1 (8 * ' ', 1887) h 8 'd *'f' d f d' g cattle throughout Guyana. (Craig, 1975) and is the only known vector of the disease in this geographic area ~ Babesia utilizes a vertebrate and an invertebrate h*''*1'f-yl. D lp. f g. ~b':'d B. b? th... and Lohr (1968), high IFA titre was not correlated '*hp * *' ' *tl ' P *d?'*hB. ~h' ' . P thermore the technique was unable to differentiate carrier and non-infected animals. The transf'er of' Babesia antibody via the colostrum has been studied...

  1. Analysis of hematopoiesis in mice irradiated with 500 mGy of X rays at different stages of development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grande, T.; Bueren, J.A. [U. de Biologia Molecular y Celular, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated whether a relatively low dose of 500 mGy of X rays given as a single acute irradiation at different stages of pre-and postnatal development induces significant changes in the content of femoral hematopoietic progenitores during a 1-year period after irradiation. Data obtained show that, in the case of 4-day-old embryos as well as in 2-day, 8-day and 12-week-old mice, this dose is below the threshold capable of inducing a long-term impairment of hematopoiesis in the mouse. Nevertheless, in mice irradiated at the 13th or the 17th day postconception, a hematopoietic dysfunction consisting of a significant reduction in the proportion of femoral granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) was manifested 1 year after irradiation. Our study confirms that, for most stages of development in the mouse, a single acute X irradiation of 500 mGy is below the threshold dose capable of inducing deterministic effects in the mouse hematopoietic system, although it reveals the induction of a significant impairment in the CFU-GM population when irradiation is given at the late stages of embryonic development. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy) [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy) [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Neurosurgery Unit, Umberto I Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Raco, Antonino [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Bozzao, Alessandro [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)] [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  3. NE]NL~GY r. ORNL/Sub/80-1 386/ &02 C)aS^" B ~Assessment of Internal Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NE]NL~GY r. ORNL/Sub/80-1 386/ &02 C)aS^" B ~Assessment of Internal Combustion LAnM~~l~Engines COMBUSTION ENGINES AS DRIVERS FOR HEAT PUMPS FINAL REPORT Date Published: January 1984 Report Prepared Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/Sub/80-13836/1&02 Dist. Category UC-95d ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL

  4. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  5. External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-Daily Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashtan, Itai M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brachtel, Elena [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi-Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D'Alessandro, Helen A. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-daily fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.

  6. Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation toPower andPoyry GroupPremierMonitoring,

  7. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a material's ability to reflect the sun's energy back into the atmosphere, much like how light is reflected by a mirror. Even for materials with high solar reflectance, a portion of the sun's energy is absorbedBLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  8. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGYHERSComplianceDocumentationRegisteredonorAfterOctober1,2010 B l u e p r i n t 9 8 N o v e m b e r D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Residential Radiant Barrier

  9. Lesotho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow TankOpen4906177°, -84.1857115°Leonics

  10. Guyana-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom...

  11. Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open Energy Information

  12. Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville Electric Board JumpGurley,Guttenberg,

  13. Guyana-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville Electric Board

  14. Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,Guizhou ZhenyuanGulfGuwahati

  15. Real exchange rate and international reserves in an era of growing financial and trade integration*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Riera-Crichton, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Korea Lesotho Malawi Malaysia Malta Mexico Morocco NicaraguaLesotho Malawi Malaysia Malta Mexico Terms of Trade Terms ofLesotho Malawi Malaysia Malta Mexico Morocco Netherlands New

  16. School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Postgraduate International Scholarship Opportunities 2014 / 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    , Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina

  17. School of Art & Design Postgraduate International Scholarship Opportunities 2014 / 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    , Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina

  18. GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  19. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  20. SE, HVILKE PRISZONER DE FORSKELLIGE LANDE HRER UNDER Frankrig (Monaco, Fransk Guyana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montenegro Polen Portugal (Azorerne, Madeira) Tyskland Ungarn strig vrige Europa og Thailand Albanien

  1. SE, HVILKE PRISZONER DE FORSKELLIGE LANDE HRER UNDER Frankrig (Monaco, Fransk Guyana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal (Azorerne, Madeira) Tjekkiet Tyskland Ungarn strig vrige Europa og Thailand Albanien Andorra

  2. Guyana-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,Guizhou

  3. Lesotho-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopold Kostal GmbH Co KGEnergy

  4. Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Michael

    ;Figure 2: US Liquid Demand by Sector and Fuel 2E Roberts, Energy in US Source: EIA: Annual Energy Outlook in US EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2012 #12;Figure 9: US Natural Gas Supply and Demand (as projected;Figure 11: US Liquid Fuels Supply and Demand 11E Roberts, Energy in US EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2012

  5. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dissemination Informabon gathenng (indudlng, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, site VISits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not IImiled 10, computer...

  6. P,OU)JI U.S. DEPARTIIIEN T OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  7. Analysis of AGS E880 polarimeter data at Gy = 12.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadman, R.; Huang, H.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D. (High Energy Physics); (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Data were collected with the AGS internal (E880) polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5 during the FY04 polarized proton run. Measurements were made with forward scintillation counters in coincidence with recoil counter telescopes, permitting an absolute calibration of the polarimeter for both nylon and carbon targets. The results are summarized and they will also be useful for an absolute calibration of the AGS CNI polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5.

  8. Inn vati ns at EECS: Techn l gy f r a gl bal future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    with Resiliency and Efficiency Lab) & BWRC (Berkeley Wireless Research Center) · Customized 3D Printed Implants - Peter Bailis, AMPLab (Algorithms, Machines, and People Laboratory) · Raven: An Energy Wireless Research Center) & E3S (Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science) · Occupant Detection

  9. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO GY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    · Environmental impact · GeoEnvironmental Water · Water quality · Sediment erosion · Water decision support . Urban Development Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (NOTE: Projected · Environmental Engineering · Math · Mechanical Engineering · Mechanical System Design · Mining Engineering

  10. Scientific and Engineering Challenges and New Strategy for Development of gy p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    nuclei ( f f )(the opposite of nuclear fission). Fusion powers the Sun and Stars. E = mc2 80% of energy80 accident No long-lived radioactive waste Fusion energy can be used to produce electricity and hydrogen Energy Mohamed Abdou Keynote Lecture at the 2nd GCOE International Symposium Kyoto University Global

  11. Keumsuk Lee $ Bureau of Economic Geolo-gy, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    at Austin. His main research interests are basin analysis based on seismic sequence stratigraphy the distribution of low-permeability concretions throughout the 3-D GPR volume. The interpretation of the 3-D GPR interpretation is consistent with the outcrop interpretation that, following a regressive period, bars

  12. U.S. DEPARTIlIENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RECIPIENT: Hi-Q Geophysical Inc Page I of2 STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE: Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems .' unding...

  13. Emergency Medicine in Guyana: Lessons from Developing the Countrys First Degree-conferring Residency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, Nicolas Pierre; Rohde, John Paul; Rambaran, Navindranauth; Rambaran, Madan; Wright, Seth Warren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medicine training program at the University of Cape Town/ Stellenbosch University: history, progress, and

  14. Emergency Medicine in Guyana: Lessons from Developing the Countrys First Degree-conferring Residency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, Nicolas Pierre; Rohde, John Paul; Rambaran, Navindranauth; Rambaran, Madan; Wright, Seth Warren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO. 5 : September 2013 Western Journal of Emergency Medicinein introducing an emergency medicine residency in Ghana.PW, Wallis LA. Emergency medicine in the developing world: A

  15. Some modifications to the design of a parabolic solar concentrator for construction in Lesotho and their effects on power production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Toni (Toni Jolene)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to test the effectiveness of design modifications terms of efficiency and power production in an existing parabolic solar concentrator. The proposed modifications included limiting the ...

  16. The Big Trees Were Kings: Challenges for Global Response to Climate Change and Tropical Forests Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irland, Lloyd C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POPULATION PRESSURES ON FOREST 2008 Rank United States France Malaysia Brazil Guyana Mexico Suriname

  17. 382 Florida Entomologist 92(2) June 2009 DETECTION SURVEYS AND POPULATION MONITORING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    , Venezuela and French Guyana (Humeres et al. 2009). Pseudacysta perseae was detected for the first time

  18. California Reach StandardsCalifornia Reach Standards for Building Energy Efficiencyfor Building Energy Efficiencyo u d g e gy c e cyo u d g e gy c e cy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    td Li hti High Efficacy Outdoor Lighting Service Water Heating in Large Restaurants 15% Solar Fraction or 95% water heater efficiencyor 95% water heater efficiency Tier I 95% of Energy Budget Tier, Part 11 - Residential Changes since May 2012 Proposal Removal of Maximum Hot Water Pipe Volume from

  19. u.s. DEPARThIENT OF F NER GY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM EN T CEN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (induding computer modeling). document preparation (such as...

  20. Set To Save *and* AB 811Set To Save and AB 811 Energy Independence Program (EIP)gy p g ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    .5 million for 208 loans; 88 PV solar and 120 EE projects. Currently a waiting list for EIP Phase 3-mail; quick! 5) Assist customers on correcting owners/trustees on title5) Assist customers on correcting contractors on program requirements. Meet often. 8) Tax Exempt properties; How to handle? #12;Customer Service

  1. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering GE O RGIA IN S TITU TE O F TE CHN O LO GY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    monitoring, pollution control and modeling · Environmental sciences · Industrial ecology ENVE #12;CEE @ GT (CEE) deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built AFFINITY GROUPS CEE @ GT RESEARCH + Construction Engineering + Environmental Engineering + Environmental

  2. QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 Weekly DownloadData71 2

  3. (page intentionally blank) CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    ).- Under the auspices of the National Protected Areas System (NPAS), Guyana is developing policies ........................................................................................... 7 Establishing a National Protected Area System (NPAS of Natural Science Turkeyen Campus Georgetown, Guyana 2003 #12;ABSTRACT Carol L. Kelloff. Smithsonian

  4. REVIEW Open Access Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France (French Guiana), Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The subregion covers some 7,200,000 sq km (Figure 1) and is populated by about 30 million people. The provision in the Americas [3]. The three Guyanas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) have the highest annual parasite index

  5. E3NE3R'GY ORNL/Sub/80-13817/1&20 RD&D Opportunities for Large Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .1.2 Applied systems (chillers) ....................... 2-4 2.1.2.1 Reciprocating compressors ............... 2-4 2.1.2.2 Centrifugal compressors .................

  6. ABSTRACT: FRANKEL K.L. & PAZZAGLIA F.J., Tectonic geomorpholo-gy, drainage basin metrics, and active mountain fronts. (IT ISSN 1724-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    and deformational style in the western United States and Italy. Our study is guided by initial results obtained from United States. We attribute the higher variance to the effects of overall larger drainage basin size settings. Here we report results from test cases on five mountain fronts with variable rates of rock uplift

  7. 2. Klausur Kontinuumsmechanik -WS11/12, Prof. Dr. rer. nat. V. Popov Losungshinweise Seite 1 (a) p(y) = W gy (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    W gbR2 (8) N = Fy + G = 1 + 2 W gbR2 (9) Der Grenzfall tritt ein, wenn beide Seiten gleich gro? - sinh l cosh l (37) Resonanz tritt auf wenn cos l = 0, z.B. l = 2 R = EI A 2l 2 (38) Aufgabe 4 (a) QD

  8. PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF NCSX1 D.A. Monticello, G.Y. Fu, R. Goldston, L.P. Ku, H. Mynick, R. Nazikian, G. Neilson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    state operation without the need for current drive (with its large recirculating power requirement fixed and the optimizer is requested to find an solution whose surface transform is different from this procedure. The optimizer strategy that produced this configuration asked for 40% of the transform to c

  9. Regional Differences in Stem and Transit Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Terminal Ileum and Colon of Mice After 12 Gy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandara, Ricardo M.C. [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Mahida, Yashwant R., E-mail: yash.mahida@nottingham.ac.uk [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Potten, Christopher S. [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of cell turnover, which is regulated by stem cells located near the base of crypts. We aimed to investigate stem cell-dependent characteristics of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and crypt size in terminal ileum and different regions of the colon. Methods and Materials: Mice were studied under steady-state conditions and after radiation-induced stem cell apoptosis. Percentage of proliferating or apoptotic cells at a particular cell position (cp) along the crypt axis was expressed as labeling or apoptotic index. Results: Under steady-state conditions: crypt size was smallest in the ascending colon. In contrast to other regions of the colon, the distribution profile of proliferating cells in ascending colon showed some similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Postirradiation: apoptotic cells were prominent at the bottom of the crypt of mid- and descending colon but in the ascending colon, they were seen with similar frequency from cp 1 to 4. During regeneration, a constant proliferative capacity was seen above Paneth cells in the terminal ileum. In the ascending (but not mid- or descending) colon, the profile of proliferating cells over the first 4 days after irradiation showed a similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Conclusions: Profiles of proliferating epithelial cells (under steady-state conditions and postirradiation) and apoptotic cells (postirradiation) suggest similarities in the location of stem cells in the ascending colon and terminal ileum.

  10. Simon FraSer UniverSity, vancoUver, canada GRCNEWSthe newSletter oF the GerontoloGy reSearch centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    volUme 30 no.1 2011 Tips: Technolology for injury prevenTion in seniors Why global Warming should: exploring the interface Between Population aging and Global Warming ­ May 25-26, 2011. Please see our deaths and 86% of all injury related hospitalizations. Unlike other external causes of death (e

  11. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho...

  12. Slide08 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Current Information Partners in WorldWideScience.org (cont.) Kenya Korea Lesotho Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Malawi Mauritius The Netherlands New Zealand Nigeria Portugal Senegal South...

  13. afrique du sud: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guine, Guine quatoriale, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Maroc 24 Impact des traitements antirtroviraux sur le risque de transmission sexuelle du...

  14. CI-OFF Ex A (Rev. 0.2, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania,...

  15. Amanda Lynn Buchanan The Florida State University Department of Biological Science, Ecology and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Station, Portal, AZ 20034 Teacher, Biology/Integrated Science, South Ruimveldt Secondary School, Guyana. Forager variability and the evolution of plant allocation schedule, (in prep, intended for American

  16. International reserves management and the current account

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guyana Indonesia Jordan Kazakhstan Kyrgyz Republic Laoof Iraq Jamaica Jordan Kazakhstan Macedonia, FYR MaldivesJamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Kuwait Kyrgyz

  17. International Migration and Human Rights: The Global Repercussions of U.S. Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martnez, Samuel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Mali, Mexico,including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan,ee to Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, where there are large

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - algeria bangladesh cuba Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guyana Philippines Bahrain Haiti Qatar Bangladesh India Russia Belarus... Republic of Libya Togo Congo, Republic of Macedonia Tunisia Cuba Madagascar Turkey Cyprus, northern part...

  19. The Right to Life with Dignity: Economic and Social Rights Respect in the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolp, Felicity Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hungary IcelandGuinea Papua New Guinea Haiti Mozambique Pakistan AppendixSierra Leone Bhutan Chad Haiti Ethiopia Niger Somalia

  20. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Bioecology of Stenoma catenifer (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ), Venezuela (Bosca´n de Martõ´nez and Godoy 1984), Guyana (Cervantes Peredo et al. 1999), Peru (Wysoki et al

  1. PROJECT INFORMATION Project Number: S61268-583

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    ANALYSIS Narrative summary Expected results Performance measurement Assumptions and level of risk Goal and decision-makers with tools for developing IWRM policies in three DC's (Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica) by Year 6, Grenada and Guyana are committed to achieving and sustaining project results. Level of Risk: Low 2

  2. Foreign Fishery Developments New Latin American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be delivered. Libya has announced the formation of several joint fishery ventures with Af- rican countries/58.) Taiwan and Libya have both recently forn1ed joint venture fishing companies in Latin America. Taiwan Trawling Venture Libya and Guyana have agreed to set up a $5 million joint fishing company in which Guyana

  3. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -building continuous ventilation and (2) local kitchen and bathroom exhaust ventilation. There are a variety of ways not open windows regularly for ventilation. As a result, the 2008 Standards include mandatory mechanical ventilation strategies intended to improve air quality in houses, apartments, and other residential buildings

  4. Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, M. C. Zarnstorff, A. Brooks, G.-Y. Fu, R. J. Goldston, L.-P. Ku,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, C. Nuehrenberg Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald, Germany High-beta, low and are insensitive to changes in beta. Coil configurations have been calculated that reconstruct these plasma

  5. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that plan be built under the 2005 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, even though the build- out of the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings is January 1 with the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. Separate Permits for Siting and Building Construction

  6. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission Hotline has received many calls from parties under the impression that a light-emitting diode (LED

  7. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Installation procedures for medium-density, closed-cell spray foam. Light-emitting diode light source testing

  8. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available. ·GuidanceforEnforcementAgenciesRegardingApprovalProcedureforWeigh-InMethod Energy,anunprecedentedpartnershipamong federal, state, and local government agencies, utilities, businesses, nonprofit organizations;CALIFORNIAENERGYCOMMISSIONBLUEPRINTEFFICIENCY and RENEWABLE ENERGY DIVISION page 2 Contractors Contractors are key to the success of Energy

  9. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Education Center Wins Awards Indoor Ventilation Requirements Energy Standards Hotline, Outdoor 53 Water Heating 42 Climate Zones 40 Computer Programs 37 Walls 36 Lighting, Kitchen 20 Website Reference Appendices 5 Other 111 Not recorded 65 Total 1966 Indoor Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2 Arnold

  10. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The largest single energy user in California homes is the central air conditioning and heating system SYSTEM DUCTING Most homes have a duct system that delivers cooled or heated air from the air conditioning or heating unit to the home's living spaces. The average duct system leaks about 30 percent

  11. Integrated Dam Assessment Models Towards Sustainability of Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    populations past (1900) ~300,000 present (2005) ~50,000 Steelhead populations past (1900) ~200,000 present Bolivia--Brazil-- Colombia-- Ecuador-- Guyana--Peru-- Suriname-- Venezuela 6 Treaty for Amazonian

  12. Pteronotus personatus (Chiroptera: Mormoopidae) J. ANTONIO DE LA TORRE AND RODRIGO A. MEDELLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    northern Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana and through northwestern Colombia, and in a band a species of ``Least Concern,'' but the status of many populations is uncertain. DOI: 10.1644/869.1. Key

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting northeastern brazil Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Guy- ana, known as the Guianas-Brazil... of northeastern Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana (1975-77). In A. C. Jones and L. Villegas (Editors... working group...

  14. La utilizacin de imgenes de Landsat TM para cuantificar reas de deforestacin en la regin de Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    , Colombia , Ecuador, Guyana, Venezuela y la Guayana Francesa. La Cuenca del Amazonas est siendo reducida de absorber y dispersar la radiacin solar en la regin azul e infrarroja d

  15. Parton energy loss limits and shadowing in DrellYan dimuon production M.A. Vasiliev i \\Lambda , M.E. Beddo g , C.N. Brown c , T.A. Carey f , T.H. Chang gy , W.E. Cooper c , C.A. Gagliardi i ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parton energy loss limits and shadowing in Drell­Yan dimuon production M.A. Vasiliev i \\Lambda , M Ridge, TN 37831 i Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843 j Valparaiso University, Valparaiso­parton momentum fraction set tight limits on the energy loss of quarks passing through a cold nucleus. 24.85.+p

  16. Ending Africa's Poverty Trap Africa's development crisis is unique. Not only is Africa the poorest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland), and a num- ber of very small economies (Cape assistance on issues regarding energy and transport infrastructure. #12;than tropical Africa. They growEnding Africa's Poverty Trap Africa's development crisis is unique. Not only is Africa the poorest

  17. SYDNEY UNIVERSITY WORLD SYDNEY UNIVERSITY WORLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jie

    three Ausaid scholarship recipients from the African nations of Zambia, Lesotho and South Africa. I hope and energy, innovation and hard work are helping to solve some of our most pressing global problems Commissioner for Mauritius and Dean of the Africa Group in Australia, her Excellency Mrs Marie France Roussety

  18. BY CLASSES, SEPTEMBER 2011 Graduate Students 56. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Uganda 4 United Arab Emirates 3 United Kingdom 7 Uzbekistan 2 Venezuela 1 Viet Nam 6 Yemen 1 Zimbabwe 6 Switzerland 2 Syrian Arab Republic 1 Taiwan 3 Tajikistan 1 United Republic of Tanzania 2 Thailand 4 Turkey 3's Democratic Republic 2 Lesotho 1 Liberia 1 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 1 Madagascar 1 Malawi 1 Malaysia 1 Mauritius

  19. 2nd Edition Nov. 2011 CampusFrance South Africa Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    2nd Edition Nov. 2011 CampusFrance South Africa Newsletter Table of contents : o Current Bursary offered by the French Embassy aim to respond to South Africa and Lesotho's need to train and equip French per country) for Honours and Masters students from South Korea, Mexico, India, USA, South Africa

  20. AFRICA ASIA SOUTH AMERICA Algeria Afghanistan Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    AFRICA ASIA SOUTH AMERICA Algeria Afghanistan Argentina Angola Armenia Bolivia Benin Azerbaijan Senegal Syria Seychelles Taiwan (Republic of China) Sierra Leone Tajikistan Somalia Thailand South Africa Kazakhstan Guinea Korea (North) Guinea-Bissau Korea (South) Kenya Kuwait Lesotho Kyrgyzstan Liberia Lao PDR

  1. ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AFRICA http://www.royalsocietysa.org.za ACADEMY OF SCIENCE OF SOUTH AFRICA and distribution of butterflies in the atlas region (South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland), thereby providing-ordinator of Africa's first butterfly atlas, entitled `The metamorphosis of the butterfly atlas' The Southern African

  2. Les Underhill and Dieter Oschadleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    , academics and researchers. Yet with modern technology, for example, the digital camera, it is possible in the agricultural sector. Some weavers pose a threat to energy security as their nests on transmission lines cause database of butterfly distribution records in south- ern Africa, including Swaziland and Lesotho, one

  3. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  4. WORK PROGRAMME 2010 COOPERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano-Bicocca, Università

    Argentina2 UM Guinea-Bissau L Niue UM Bolivia LM Kenya L Palau UM Brazil2 ** LM Lesotho LM Papua New L Chile of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). 4 Until the country becomes Associated to FP7 5 As defined by UNSC

  5. Contrib Mineral Petrol (2991) 109:10-18 Contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , which is now separated into the Liberian Craton in Africa and the Guyana Shieldofnorthern South America tholeiitic intrusions, including the dyke swarms in Africa, eastern North America and northern SouthCentre, Department of Geology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, K1N 6N5 z Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy

  6. POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Highlighting the genetic and epidemiologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname where there is a large population of East Indians brought during with many countries exceeding the WHO target of 5 cases / 100,000 populations. As a developing nation, many and the Grena- dines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Cai- cos. Analysis of "de-identified" patient

  7. Extreme polymorphism in a Y-linked sexually selected trait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -chromosome. Field surveys from 1999 to 2002 of nine populations in Guyana and Suriname, South America, indicate of the most complex polymorphisms known to occur within populations, whereas females are monomorphic. We de are overriding female preferences in these populations. Furthermore, Y-linkage of the colour polymorphism in P

  8. Langues amrindiennes : localisation des familles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bolivie Pérou Colombie Venezuela Brésil Suriname Guyana Guyane française caribe tupi-guarani arawak océan démographique des populations qui les parlent. ? titre d'exemple, la moyenne est de moins de mille locuteurs

  9. Studies on Neotropical Fauna und Environment Vol. 43, No. 3, December 2008, 177-180

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hödl, Walter

    crashes". We here report on two populations of Atelopus hoogmoedi from Suriname and Guyana which show ) have experienced drastic population reductions that some herald as potential extinction at the genus by the chytrid fungus, and climate change. Responses by Atelopus species typically involve rapid "population

  10. Mondialisation et territoires religieux dans les espaces tropicaux Effets et enjeux de la mondialisation sur la gographie mondiale de l'hindouisme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'émigration hindoue peuvent être classés en cinq phases: les mouvements de population antiques et précoloniaux ; les'abolition de l'esclavage4 (vers l'Ile Maurice, La Réunion, Guyana, le Surinam, la Guyane, la Martinique

  11. URBAN EXTENTS P a c i f i c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    URBAN EXTENTS Argentina Bolivia Chile Colombia Guyana Peru Paraguay Suriname Uruguay Venezuela Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP), Population Density Boundaries Note: National boundaries are derived from the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Urban

  12. ARAWAK VS. LOKONO. WHAT'S IN A NAME ? Denomination of one of the largest and geographically most extensive family of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the Columbian era to a specific Amerindian group living in the Guianese coastal area in Guyana, Suriname, French, where they are the most important Amerindian group, the global Arawak population is estimated 15,000; in Suriname, the 1980 census gives the figures of 700 speakers out of 2,051 individuals; in the French

  13. MFR PAPER 1087 Trap Fishing Explorations for Snapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lying south , southeast, and southwest of Jamaica ; north of Hispaniola; in the northern Leeward Islands, north of Hispaniola , and off Venezuela , Guyana, and Surinam. Higher catch rates of about 40 pounds per the Jamaica Banks were grunts , triggerfish, squirrelfish , and porgies taken as a group. North of Hispaniola

  14. Isotope Biogeochemistry of Diagenesis caused by a Black

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isotope Biogeochemistry of Diagenesis caused by a Black Shale-fueled Deep Marine Biosphere (ODP Leg Forschungsgemeinschaft and Max Planck Society #12;Black shales and Diagenesis: Processes and Proxies - Authigenic sulfur the coasts of Surinam and French Guyana #12; Black shales in Leg 207 sediments and pore water response depth

  15. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contents of this book are: Introduction, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bourkina (Upper Volta), Brazil, Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields, Appendix II, Phytomass Files, and References.

  16. SIT Workshops 1995 2011 Page 1 of 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaithersburg, MD General Standards and Conformity Assessment Bolivia Colombia Ecuador Peru Venezuela 8. US and improving national standards information distribution. Argentina Brazil Bolivia Chile Costa Rica Ecuador El Barbados Belize Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominica Ecuador El Salvador Grenada Guatemala Guyana

  17. Department of Geological Sciences Indiana University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Jackson Njau 3 856-3170 GY 513 jknjau Greg Olyphant 2 855-1351 GY 429 olyphant Gary Pavlis 1 855-5141 GY aschimme EMERITUS FACULTY Robert Blakely blakely David Dilcher 856-0618 GY S209 dilcher J. Robert Dodd GY

  18. 02/27/2006 08:36 AMPrint Story: Japan to reward to S.Korea for support on ITER reactor on Yahoo! News Page 1 of 1http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060227/sc_afp/japanskoreafranceit...AtjBk7obeO7F5QH10gY08IbQOrgF;_ylu=X3oDMTA3MXN1bHE0BHNlYwN0bWE-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IbQOrgF;_ylu=X3oDMTA3MXN1bHE0BHNlYwN0bWE- Back to Story - Help Japan to reward to S.Korea for support

  19. Department of Geological Sciences Indiana University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    jknjau Gary Pavlis 1 855-5141 GY 409 pavlis David Polly 1 855-7994 GY 524A pdpolly Lisa Pratt, Chair 1 aschimme EMERITUS FACULTY Robert Blakely blakely David Dilcher 856-0618 GY S209 dilcher J. Robert Dodd GY

  20. Flash polymerization of silicone oils using gamma radiation for conserving waterlogged wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidden, Richmond Paul

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the SFD-I /SFD-5 mix. These bulked samples were exposed to gamma radiation emitted from a nuclear research reactor and received gamma doses ranging from 30 Gy to 228 Gy with dose rates ranging from 0.6 Gy/min to 5.1 Gy/min. Following irradiation, thin...

  1. L'identit gomtrie variable des jeunes hommes Kali'na de Mana (Guyane franaise) : sur quelle mesure ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    disperse au Brésil, au Surinam, jusqu'au Guyana et au Venezuela (Ethnies 1985 :14). En 1958, la population'intérieur et ethnies du littoral. Les populations Kali'na1 du littoral, associées avec les populations Wayana française ­ de 670 à 2000 personnes en 1990. A ce chiffre s'ajoute les populations déplacées en 1995

  2. RPARTITION GOGRAPHIQUE En Guyane dans la rgion ctire, commune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    amérindiennes à être parlée sur le territoire de cinq ?tats différents : Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, Guyane française et Brésil1 . NOMBRE DE LOCUTEURS En Guyane la population kali'na peut être estimée à 4000 % de locuteurs; et 3000 au Suriname, dont 50% de locuteurs (J. Forte, 2000). Une trentaine de locuteurs

  3. Amrique latine et Carabes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 Amérique latine et Caraïbes La région Amérique latine et Caraïbes abrite une population d dernières années (le taux de pauvreté extrême est passé de 12 % de la population en 1990 à 5 % en 2012 selon P?ROU ?QUATEUR COLOMBIE VENEZUELA GUYANA SURINAME GUYANE FRAN?AISE MEXIQUE MARTINIQUE GUADELOUPE SAINT

  4. A study of the observed areal distribution of rainfall as a function of the density of rain gages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez Bernal, Fernando

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . W. K. Henry A study was made of reported rainfall as a function of the density oi gages for several geographical areas including Tezas, Colombia, Guyana, Panama, Venezuela, and Ecuador--each having different terrain effects. Consideration..., and Panama areas using mean-monthly data. . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 40 Comparison of depth-area relations from different gage density for one storm in East Yegua basin Cl?niiydg I l. 'ITRC?'UCTTOK Those "!ho i:ork i!it/ raiuf all iiata know...

  5. Pr'esentation du milieu ''Je ne concois pas quel gout vos gens d'Europe ont pour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    (Guin'ee, Mali, Mauritanie, Sierra Leone, Liberia, C??ote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Burkina Faso). Nous allons'Ouest [KDP97], sur une partie du Libe­ ria, de la Guin'ee, de la C??ote d'Ivoire et du Sierra Leone (``Man le Nord du Br'esil, l'Est de la Colombie, le Venezuela oriental, et les trois Guyanes (Guyana

  6. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  7. ICTP Public Information Office Page 1 12/05/2011 Country Total visitors Female visitors Person-months*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .05 United Arab Emirates 2 1 2.50 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland 154 24 92.15 United.71 Kazakhstan 2 0 0.99 Kenya 31 4 53.88 Kuwait 3 0 0.49 Lebanon 8 2 15.32 Lesotho 2 0 0.46 Libyan Arab Person-months* Sudan 27 10 80.28 Swaziland 1 0 0.46 Sweden 29 6 8.38 Switzerland 77 15 16.70 Syrian Arab

  8. ICTP Public Information Office Page 1 26/03/2014 Country Total visitors Female visitors Person-months*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .19 Ukraine 55 25 33.24 United Arab Emirates 1 0 0.13 United Kingdom 279 47 125.13 United Republic of Tanzania.50 Kenya 36 12 43.07 Kuwait 3 1 0.66 Kyrgyzstan 1 0 0.46 Lebanon 9 3 4.24 Lesotho 1 0 0.46 Libyan Arab.94 Syrian Arab Republic 6 0 9.63 Thailand 14 6 4.77 the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 8 3 15.88 Togo

  9. Exploratory Study: Vehicle Mileage Fees in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powered Vehicles in Texas Estimated Fleetwide Fuel Efficiency of Gasoline Powered Vehicles in Texas 20 25 gy, gy f , gy 90% 100% Other (EV, Plugin 70% 80% Hybrid, CNG, LPG, Fuel Cell) Electric Gasoline 10% 20% Conventional Passenger Vehicles 0% 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 #12;Projected Fuel Tax

  10. A preliminary analysis of geographic variation in the neotropical teiid lizard, Cnemidophorus lemniscatus (Sauria: Teiidae), from Mainland Central and South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrystal, Hugh Kreyer

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the biology of Honduras to Panama and east through French Guiana, possessed the typical C. lemniscatus patterns (DP7-9); In 46/. of all specimens examined in this study, pattern types DP7 and DP9 are observed almost equally. The third typical pattern type... = Puerto Cortes, Honduras; g4 = Surinam; T";5 = i~laturin, Venezuela; 66 Falcon, Venezuela; g7 = Bolivar, Venezuela; g8 = Camatagua, Venezuela; P9 = Guyana; $1G Baranquilla, Colombia; $11 = Yaviza, Panama; 514 = Apure, Venezuela; f16 = Villavicencio...

  11. H C Starck GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy Resources JumpH C

  12. H I Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy Resources JumpH

  13. H-D Electric Coop Inc (Minnesota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy Resources

  14. HAASE Energietechnik Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy ResourcesHAASE

  15. HDW Fuel Cell Systems GmbH HFCS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy ResourcesHAASEHDW

  16. HEAG Suedhessische Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy

  17. HERO BX formerly Lake Erie Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BX formerly

  18. HHH FEC Cooperation Mach Elec Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BX

  19. HHV Solar Technologies Private Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BXHHV Solar

  20. HI Kabelkonfektionierungs GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BXHHV SolarHI

  1. HIC Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BXHHV

  2. HISA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BXHHVHISA

  3. HL Green Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO BXHHVHISAHL

  4. HMS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHERO

  5. HOMEe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEe Jump to:

  6. HQ Energy Services (US), Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEe Jump

  7. HQ Engineering Srl | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEe JumpHQ

  8. HQMC Korea HQMCK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEe

  9. HR BioPetroleum HRBP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEeHR

  10. Habdank PV Montagesysteme GmbH Co KG Habdank PV Mounting Systems | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEeHREnergy

  11. Habersham Electric Membership Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:

  12. Hae In Corp Haein Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In Corp Haein Corp

  13. Hagerstown Light Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In Corp Haein

  14. Hainan Chengpo PowerStation Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In Corp HaeinHainan

  15. Hainan Greenland Microalgae Biotechnology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In Corp

  16. Hainan Hipoo Hi tech Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In CorpHainan Hipoo

  17. Hainan Nanhuamen Investment Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In CorpHainan

  18. Hainan Qiongzhong Borun HPP Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In CorpHainanHainan

  19. Hainan Runda Hydropower Plant Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae In

  20. Hainan Yingli New Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae InYingli New Energy

  1. Hainan Zhonghai New Energy Exploitation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae InYingli New

  2. Haitai New Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae InYingli NewHaitai

  3. Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae InYingli

  4. Haiti-IAEA Energy Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae InYinglidatabase-

  5. Haiti: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:Hae

  6. Halcyon Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyon Energy Pty Ltd

  7. Halifax Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyon Energy Pty

  8. Hamilton County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyon Energy

  9. Hammerfest UK | Open Energy Information

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  10. Han s Laser Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyonHan s Laser

  11. Hancock County Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyonHan s

  12. Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyonHan

  13. Hands-on Energy Adaptation Toolkit (HEAT) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana:HaeHalcyonHanHands-on

  14. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  15. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A., E-mail: leavitt.jacqueline@mayo.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ?8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ?8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ?12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  16. FINITE CATEGORIES: JULY 21 NOTES FOR THE REU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    : X * *! Y is a morphism in C , then the morphism in C opis fop : Y ! X and hence G(fop) : G(Y ) ! G

  17. PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of possible impact of passive cooling techniques for ene~gyTechniques for EvaluaUon of Solar Heating and Cooling SysU

  18. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahan, Margaret A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1000 Gy Transmission Ion Chamber (TIC) Secondary ElectronScintillator (SC) Thimble Ion Chamber (IC) Faraday Cup (FC)either a transmission ion chamber [TIC] (usually operated in

  19. J.I'.oJ\\

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "G"Y , - - - - - - - - EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEIEJU..IINAIION RECIPIENT:University of Colorado STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE : Using Solid Particles as Heat Transfer...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Rules.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    not limited to, end-use efficiency improvements; load control or load management; thermal energy storage; or pricing strategies (IA); g ; gy g ; p g g ( ); Energy Efficiency -...

  1. Proton-Proton Scattering at 340 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamberlain, Owen; Wiegand, Clyde

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Nuclear Physics. Basil. High yner gy Neutron- protonand Proton~proton Scattering 9 Helv. Phys. Acta (in press J a review

  2. Applied research at Coventry University Issue 9 summer 2011 Creating a low carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Robert

    TInenTS raising awareness about the risks migrants from nigeria face when travelling to europe 28 enerGY BOOST How

  3. Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's Power Industry," Cogeneration Technolo- gy, V o l .tion Development," Cogeneration Technol- ogy, V o l . 41, NE Y NATIONAL LABORATORY Cogeneration Development and Market

  4. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokic, Vesna, E-mail: vesna.prokic@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway) [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  5. Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

  6. Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizota, Atsushi, E-mail: mizota-a@med.teikyo-u.ac.j [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Tanaka, Minoru [Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari [Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Chiba Medical Center, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Emiko [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

  7. Alpha/Beta Ratio for Normal Lung Tissue as Estimated From Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body and Conventionally Fractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheenstra, Alize E.H.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Belderbos, Jos S.A.; Damen, Eugne M.F.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the ?/? ratio for which the dose-dependent lung perfusion reductions for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) are biologically equivalent. Methods and Materials: The relations between local dose and perfusion reduction 4 months after treatment in lung cancer patients treated with SBRT and CFRT were scaled according to the linear-quadratic model using ?/? ratios from 0 Gy to ? Gy. To test for which ?/? ratio both treatments have equal biological effect, a 5-parameter logistic model was optimized for both doseeffect relationships simultaneously. Beside the ?/? ratio, the other 4 parameters were d{sub 50}, the steepness parameter k, and 2 parameters (M{sub SBRT} and M{sub CFRT}) representing the maximal perfusion reduction at high doses for SBRT and CFRT, respectively. Results: The optimal fitted model resulted in an ?/? ratio of 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy), M{sub SBRT} = 42.6% (40.4%-44.9%), M{sub CFRT} = 66.9% (61.6%-72.1%), d{sub 50} = 35.4 Gy (31.5-9.2 Gy), and k = 2.0 (1.7-2.3). Conclusions: An equal reduction of lung perfusion in lung cancer was observed in SBRT and CFRT if local doses were converted by the linear-quadratic model with an ?/? ratio equal to 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy)

  8. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Prostate A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF GEFITINIB GIVEN CONCURRENTLY WITH RADIOTHERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed patients varies from 30% to 90% in different series. Despite increased awareness and earlier diagnosis

  9. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350WControl and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350Wp high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systemhigh temperature polymer electrolyte memb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350WControl and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350Wp high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, 9220 Aalborg East, Denmarkp gy gy g y pp g Introd ction Steam reforming of methanol for a HTPEM f el

  10. Annual Meeting of Energy Recovery Council, W hi DC D b 3 2011Washington DC, December 3. 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Annual Meeting of Energy Recovery Council, W hi DC D b 3 2011Washington DC, December 3. 2011 to the recyclers (e.g. metal smelters; secondary paper mills).(e.g. metal smelters; secondary paper mills). All, recovery (called WastetoEnergy; WTE) gy, , y ( gy; ) · All countries (and communities) who rely on WTE also

  11. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: rades.dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Evers, Jasmin N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lohynska, Radka [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  12. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widesott, Lamberto, E-mail: widesott@yahoo.it [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy); Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Lomax, Antony J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Amichetti, Maurizio [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Soukup, Martin [Section for Biomedical Physics, Universitatsklinik fur Radioonkologie, Tubingen (Germany); Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Schwarz, Marco [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  13. Short-course radiotherapy is not optimal for spinal cord compression due to myeloma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, Hannover (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Hoskin, Peter J. [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schulte, Rainer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Lubeck (Germany); Poortmans, Philip [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Dahm-Daphi, Jochen [Institute of Radiobiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Obralic, Nermina [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiotherapy, Siloah Hospital, Hannover (Germany); Bahrehmand, Roja [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Georg Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Engenhart-Cabilic, Rita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the suitability of short-course radiotherapy (RT) for spinal cord compression (SCC) in myeloma patients. Methods and Materials: Data for 172 myeloma patients irradiated between January 1994 and December 2004 for SCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy, 5 x 4 Gy, n = 61) and long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy, 15 x 2.5 Gy, 20 x 2 Gy, n = 111) were compared for functional outcome up to 24 months after RT. In addition, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 90 patients (52%). Forty-seven percent of nonambulatory patients regained the ability to walk. Functional outcome was significantly influenced by the time of developing motor deficits before RT. Improvement of motor function was more frequent after long-course RT than after short-course RT: 59% vs. 39% (p = 0.10) at 1 month, 67% vs. 43% (p 0.043) at 6 months, 76% vs. 40% (p = 0.003) at 12 months, 78% vs. 43% (p 0.07) at 18 months, and 83% v 54% (p = 0.33) at 24 months. A subgroup analysis of the long-course RT group demonstrated a similar functional outcome for 10 x 3 Gy when compared with 15 x 2.5 Gy and 20 x 2 Gy. Conclusions: Long-course RT is preferable for SCC in myeloma patients because it resulted in better functional outcome than short-course RT. Treatment with 10 x 3 Gy can be considered appropriate.

  14. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  15. Helical Tomotherapy Delivery of an IMRT Boost in Lieu of Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Setting of Gynecologic Malignancy: Feasibility and Dosimetric Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielda, Benjamin T., E-mail: Benjamin_gielda@rush.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL (United States); Shah, Anand P.; Marsh, James C.; Smart, Joseph P.; Bernard, Damian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL (United States); Rotmensch, Jacob [Section of Gynecologic Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL (United States); Griem, Katherine L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstitial brachytherapy is an important means by which to improve local control in gynecologic malignancy when intracavitary brachytherapy is untenable. Patients unable to receive brachytherapy have traditionally received conventional external beam radiation alone with modest results. We investigated the ability of Tomotherapy (Tomotherapy Inc., Madison, WI) to replace interstitial brachytherapy. Six patients were selected. The planning CT of each patient was contoured with the planning target volume (PTV), bladder, rectum, femoral heads, and bowel. Identical contour sets were exported to Tomotherapy and Nucletron PLATO (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands). With Tomotherapy, the PTV was prescribed 31 Gy in 5 fractions to 90% of the volume. With PLATO, 600 cGy x 5 fractions was prescribed to the surface of the PTV. Dose delivered was normalized to 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) and added to a hypothetical homogenous 45-Gy pelvic dose. Tomotherapy achieved a D90 of 87 Gy EQD2 versus 86 Gy with brachytherapy. PTV dose was more homogeneous with tomotherapy. The dose to the most at-risk 2 mL of bladder and rectum with Tomotherapy was of 78 and 71 Gy EQD2 versus 81 and 75 Gy with brachytherapy. Tomotherapy delivered more dose to the femoral heads (mean 1.23 Gy per fraction) and bowel. Tomotherapy was capable of replicating the peripheral dose achieved with brachytherapy, without the PTV hotspots inherent to interstitial brachytherapy. Similar maximum doses to bowel and bladder were achieved with both methods. Excessive small bowel and femoral head toxicity may result if previous pelvic irradiation is not planned accordingly. Significant challenges related to interfraction and intrafraction motion must be overcome if treatment of this nature is to be contemplated.

  16. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraan, Aafke C., E-mail: aafke.kraan@pi.infn.it [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive planning to improve adequate IMPT dose delivery.

  17. Does Three-Dimensional External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation Spare Lung Tissue Compared With Standard Whole Breast Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Anudh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Vallow, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)], E-mail: vallow.laura@mayo.edu; Gale, Ashley A.; Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (3D-PBI) spares lung tissue compared with whole breast irradiation (WBI) and to include the biologically equivalent dose (BED) to account for differences in fractionation. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were devised for WBI and 3D-PBI for 25 consecutive patients randomized on the NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. WBI plans were for 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and 3D-PBI plans were for 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Gy was recorded for each plan. The linear quadratic equation was used to calculate the corresponding dose delivered in 10 fractions and volume of ipsilateral lung receiving these doses was recorded for PBI plans. Ipsilateral mean lung dose was recorded for each plan and converted to BED. Results: There was a significant decrease in volume of lung receiving 20 Gy with PBI (median, 4.4% vs. 7.5%; p < 0.001), which remained after correction for fractionation (median, 5.6% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.02). Mean lung dose was lower for PBI (median, 3.46 Gy vs. 4.57 Gy; p = 0.005), although this difference lost significance after conversion to BED (median, 3.86 Gy{sub 3} vs 4.85 Gy{sub 3}, p = 0.07). PBI plans exposed more lung to 2.5 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: 3D-PBI exposes greater volumes of lung tissue to low doses of radiation and spares the amount of lung receiving higher doses when compared with WBI.

  18. activation chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state synchronized to the flow for both types of reactions. For particles of finite size an emptying transition might also occur leading to no products left in the wake. Gy....

  19. active chemical 4-tert-pentylphenol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state synchronized to the flow for both types of reactions. For particles of finite size an emptying transition might also occur leading to no products left in the wake. Gy....

  20. Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jingjie

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRELFeb2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    y gy g 6 Solar power Beginning in 2004, RMOTC and NREL partnered to test the use of solar panels in the oil field. The panels supplied power to a fluid transfer pump used in...

  2. Sellrejected as radioactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    to release com- pany reports detailing infonnation and interpretation from its site investigations since 199, hydrogeology and overall risk. Greenpeace presented 5 experts (one employed by Greenpeace), investigating site selection, geology, hydrogeolo- gy, flow modelling, geochemistry, and comparable investigations worldwide

  3. Bring Signal Processing to the Public IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING MAGAZINE [6] MARCH 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moura, José

    processing is a stealth technolo- gy." The words signal processing are not part of the popular lexicon even site may actually be rolled out before you read this message); providing open source materials (this

  4. AECL corporate power point presentation template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    kGy of Gamma (wet) gamma exposure S. Lalonde, et al. Charoacterization of Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Materials After Exposure to Beta and Gamma Radiation ,10 th...

  5. Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Z.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OUTLOOK FOR INDUSTRIAL ENERGY BENCHMARKING Zoe Hartley Environmental Protection Specialist U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an ~d~ ~~gy...

  6. R[CIPIENT:Loudoun County

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Loudoun County u.s. DEPARTl IENT OF ENER GY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERllINATION PROJEcr TITLE: EECBG Funded Projects - SOW (S) Page I of2 STATE: VA Funding...

  7. PPPL-3279, Preprint: January 1998, UC-420, 426 Toroidal Alfvn Eigenmodes in TFTR Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Tritium Plasmas R. Nazikian, G.Y. Fu, Z. Chang, S.H. Batha1 , H. Berk2 , R.V. Budny, Y. Chen, C.Z. Cheng, D

  8. Petrography and Provenance of Laecanius Amphorae from Istria, Northern Adriatic Region, Croatia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mange, M; Bezeczky, Tamas

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    age. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, 52, 797805. GirardiSzakmny, Gy. (1987). Petrology. In T. Bezeczky (Ed. ),Peacock, D.P.S. (1984). Petrology and origins. In M.G.

  9. Low dose ionizing radiation detection using conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, E.A.B.; Borin, J.F.; Nicolucci, P.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Netto, T. Ghilardi; Bianchi, R.F. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Centro de Cie circumflex ncias das Imagens e Fisica Medica, Hospital das Clinicas, FMRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia de Sistemas Integraveis, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, 158, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the effect of gamma radiation on the optical properties of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{sup '}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) is studied. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with different doses from 0 Gy to 152 Gy using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source. For thin films, significant changes in the UV-visible spectra were only observed at high doses (>1 kGy). In solution, shifts in absorption peaks are observed at low doses (<10 Gy), linearly dependent on dose. The shifts are explained by conjugation reduction, and possible causes are discussed. Our results indicate that MEH-PPV solution can be used as a dosimeter adequate for medical applications.

  10. NAME G RADIN G KEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (8) 7. Find the derivative of the function. G(y) = [y (1 + t2)%dt. '? 1. 1-.- jlntrz?ou + $0 (Wadi. / O can; = - 6+"5'Y'" + (1+ What. @ ea. 'G'= -(1+~a')"*+ 23 (Hwy?

  11. accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice...

  12. accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice...

  13. accelerated hyper-fractionated radiotherapy: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice...

  14. brief communications nature methods | VOL.7 NO.12 | DECEMBER2010 | 985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    angle were 2-24 s. The total X-ray exposure (~109 Gy) produced negligible radiation damage, as we features. Using Fourier optical theory, we calculated that our microscope design should produce a dramatic

  15. Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics S C R I P P S I N S T I T U T I O N O F O C E A N O G R A P H Y , U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , S A N D I E G O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    the behavior of ice sheets, improved methods of ener- gy exploration, monitoring of carbon dioxide sequestration and so on. Our work spans a broad range of subject matter in geophysics and oceanography. A wide

  16. EECE Department Seminar Dr. Gu is an associate professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, faculty and track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    assessment, biosensors, biological wastewater treatment processes and modeling, microbial ecology application of biotechnolo- gy for water and wastewater treatment, water quality monitoring and toxicity in wastewater ef- fluents demand for more reliable and better optimization of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR

  17. Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

  18. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improves lymph node coverage and dose to critical structures compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in clinically localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang-Chesebro, Alice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: awang@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Xia Ping [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Coleman, Joy [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Akazawa, Clayton C. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify gains in lymph node coverage and critical structure dose reduction for whole-pelvis (WP) and extended-field (EF) radiotherapy in prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for the first treatment phase of 45 Gy in the concurrent treatment of lymph nodes and prostate. Methods and Materials: From January to August 2005, 35 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with pelvic IMRT; 7 had nodes defined up to L5-S1 (Group 1), and 28 had nodes defined above L5-S1 (Group 2). Each patient had 2 plans retrospectively generated: 1 WP 3DCRT plan using bony landmarks, and 1 EF 3DCRT plan to cover the vascular defined volumes. Dose-volume histograms for the lymph nodes, rectum, bladder, small bowel, and penile bulb were compared by group. Results: For Group 1, WP 3DCRT missed 25% of pelvic nodes with the prescribed dose 45 Gy and missed 18% with the 95% prescribed dose 42.75 Gy, whereas WP IMRT achieved V{sub 45Gy} = 98% and V{sub 42.75Gy} = 100%. Compared with WP 3DCRT, IMRT reduced bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 78%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 48%, and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 232 cm{sup 3}. EF 3DCRT achieved 95% coverage of nodes for all patients at high cost to critical structures. For Group 2, IMRT decreased bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 90%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 54% and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 455 cm{sup 3} compared with EF 3DCRT. Conclusion: In this study WP 3DCRT missed a significant percentage of pelvic nodes. Although EF 3DCRT achieved 95% pelvic nodal coverage, it increased critical structure doses. IMRT improved pelvic nodal coverage while decreasing dose to bladder, rectum, small bowel, and penile bulb. For patients with extended node involvement, IMRT especially decreases small bowel dose.

  19. SU-D-BRD-05: Decision Opportunities in Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, W.T.; Siebers, J.V. [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A method to reveal tradeoffs in radiation therapy treatments is introduced in order to aid in clinical, patient-specific decision making. Methods: A clinically acceptable treatment plan was varied for two patients, a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer case and a pituitary case, in order to reveal decision opportunities. Plans were optimized such that non-zero dose-volume objectives were defined for all organs at risk (OARS). At fixed planning target volume (PTV) dose, a single OAR is sacrificed, i.e. the weight of the dose volume objective is deceased, and potential dosimetric benefits in other regions of interest are identified. If tradeoffs are identified, plans are stored and presented as decision opportunities. Results: Clinically relevant tradeoffs were revealed by sacrificing individual OARs. The SBRT lung case was planned according to the Radiotherapy-Oncology Group (RTOG) 0813 protocol, but by violating the high-dose protocol objective (>2 cm from the PTV) in the patient's lung, mean heart dose was reduced by 1.7 Gy and the great vessel V20 was reduced from 42% to 2%. Tradeoffs in dose to the chestwall and heart were also revealed, an increase of 6 Gy in chestwall-Dmax reduces heart mean dose by 0.9 Gy and mean dose to the great vessels by 2.6 Gy. For the pituitary tumor, sacrificing the right parotid gland (increasing mean dose from 7.8 Gy to 14.1 Gy) spares the temporal lobes bilaterally (V20 is reduced by 4%) and left parotid mean dose is reduced from 6.4 Gy to 5.2 Gy. Conclusion: Clinical tradeoffs in radiation therapy treatment planning are revealed by sacrificing individual OARS. By revealing these tradeoffs, decision making in plan selection is simplified and can be considered in the context of patient-specific quality of life.

  20. Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg (Germany); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siloah Hospital Hannover (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer reduces volume of bowel treated to high dose levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Henrys, Anthony J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Adams, Elisabeth J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bedford, James L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Tait, Diana M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jenny.pearson@rmh.nthames.nhs.uk

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the bowel in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: The targets (pelvic nodal and rectal volumes), bowel, and bladder were outlined in 5 patients. All had conventional, three-dimensional conformal RT and forward-planned multisegment three-field IMRT plans compared with inverse-planned simultaneous integrated boost nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans. Equally spaced seven-field and five-field and five-field, customized, segmented IMRT plans were also evaluated. Results: Ninety-five percent of the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of both planning target volumes using all but the conventional plan (mean primary and pelvic planning target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was 32.8 {+-} 13.7 Gy and 23.7 {+-} 4.87 Gy, respectively), reflecting a significant lack of coverage. The three-field forward planned IMRT plans reduced the volume of bowel irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy by 26% {+-} 16% and 42% {+-} 27% compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Additional reductions to 69 {+-} 51 cm{sup 3} to 45 Gy and 20 {+-} 21 cm{sup 3} to 50 Gy were obtained with the nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans-64% {+-} 11% and 64% {+-} 20% reductions compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Reducing the number of beams and customizing the angles for the five-field equally spaced IMRT plan did not significantly reduce bowel sparing. Conclusion: The bowel volume irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy was significantly reduced with IMRT, which could potentially lead to less bowel toxicity. Reducing the number of beams did not reduce bowel sparing and the five-field customized segmented IMRT plan is a reasonable technique to be tested in clinical trials.

  2. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Drag Embedment Anchors and Suction Caissons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beemer, Ryan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NtHBtaHsrOMmtdeOoGBr UOFGBHhOtHuGOHAesOiGOimtdeOKoObtKAHocOsu&sfAtHHoOKoO&tysdiuObGyOimsAyOKGytHOuB&&GyiOtdhO bAdtdfAtHOtAhrOMmtdeOoGBcOUOfGBHhOdGiOmtNsOfGK&HsishOimAuOFAimOGBiOoGBrOLdhOt&&ysfAtiAGdO vGsuOiGOKoOuAaHAdvuOtdhOvytdh&tysdiuObGyOimsAyOAdisysui...

  3. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  4. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, San Francisco, California (United States)] [University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, San Francisco, California (United States); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Chang, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chao, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Muacevic, Alexander [European Cyberknife Center Munich in affiliation with University Hospitals of Munich, Munich (Germany)] [European Cyberknife Center Munich in affiliation with University Hospitals of Munich, Munich (Germany); Gorgulho, Alessandra [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Soltys, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerszten, Peter C. [Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ryu, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Angelov, Lilyana [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Gibbs, Iris [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Larson, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  5. Variations of the hypoxic fraction in the SCC VII tumors after single dose and during fractionated radiation therapy: Assessment without anesthesia or physical restraint of mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitakabu, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Sasai, K.; Ono, K.; Abe, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variations of the hypoxic fraction (HF) after single dose (13 Gy or 4 Gy) and during fractionated (5 fractions of 4 Gy, 1 or 2 fractions per day) radiation therapy were studied in SCC VII tumors implanted subcutaneously in the hind legs of C3H/He/Jms mice using the paired survival curve method. Whole-body irradiation was delivered to tumor-bearing mice without anesthesia or physical restraint, because both are known to increase the HF artificially. The HF decreased after a single 13 Gy dose in a biphasic fashion: extremely rapidly within 1 hr and comparatively slowly during the following 12-72 hr. On the other hand, nearly no fall of HF was observed in 24 hr following a single 4 Gy dose. Also, reoxygenation was found to occur more rapidly in the interfraction period as the number of fractions of 4 Gy increased irrespective of differences of interfraction time. However, the HF just before each radiation fraction was significantly higher than the pretreatment level for both fractionated regimens. Thus, the reoxygenation patterns observed after single low and high doses of irradiation were different from each other, and reoxygenation in each interfraction period did not always proceed in a similar manner to that after single low dose irradiation. Reoxygenation was facilitated as fractionated radiation therapy proceeded, but it was not sufficient for the HF to remain at a level comparable to that before irradiation.

  6. Dosimetric Evaluation Between Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Body Mass Index for Intracranial, Thoracic, and Pelvic Localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanAntwerp, April E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Raymond, Sarah M., E-mail: raymons9@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Addington, Mark C.; Gajdos, Stephen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose for organs at risk (OAR) within the cranium, thorax, and pelvis from megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Using a clinical treatment planning system, CBCT doses were calculated from 60 patient datasets using 27.4 x 27.4 cm{sup 2} field size and 200{sup o} arc length. The body mass indices (BMIs) for these patients range from 17.2-48.4 kg/m{sup 2}. A total of 60 CBCT plans were created and calculated with heterogeneity corrections, with monitor units (MU) that varied from 8, 4, and 2 MU per plan. The isocenters of these plans were placed at defined anatomical structures. The maximum dose, dose to the isocenter, and mean dose to the selected critical organs were analyzed. The study found that maximum and isocenter doses were weakly associated with BMI, but linearly associated with the total MU. Average maximum/isocenter doses in the cranium were 10.0 ({+-} 0.18)/7.0 ({+-} 0.08) cGy, 5.0 ({+-} 0.09)/3.5 ({+-} 0.05) cGy, and 2.5 ({+-} .04)/1.8 ({+-} 0.05) cGy for 8, 4, and 2 MU, respectively. Similar trends but slightly larger maximum/isocenter doses were found in the thoracic and pelvic regions. For the cranial region, the average mean doses with a total of 8 MU to the eye, lens, and brain were 9.7 ({+-} 0.12) cGy, 9.1 ({+-} 0.16) cGy, and 7.2 ({+-} 0.10) cGy, respectively. For the thoracic region, the average mean doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord were 6.6 ({+-} 0.05) cGy, 6.9 ({+-} 1.2) cGy, and 4.7 ({+-} 0.8) cGy, respectively. For the pelvic region, the average mean dose to the femoral heads was 6.4 ({+-} 1.1) cGy. The MV-CBCT doses were linearly associated with the total MU but weakly dependent on patients' BMIs. Daily MV-CBCT has a cumulative effect on the total body dose and critical organs, which should be carefully considered for clinical impacts.

  7. Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R.P.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

  8. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S. [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott, E-mail: stafford.scott@mayo.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the development of retinopathy.

  9. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  10. Clinical Response of Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenopathy to a Radiation Boost in the Definitive Management of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rash, Dominique L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Yongsook C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Kashefi, Amir [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Durbin-Johnson, Blythe [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Mathai, Mathew; Valicenti, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti S., E-mail: jyoti.mayadev@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Optimal treatment with radiation for metastatic lymphadenopathy in locally advanced cervical cancer remains controversial. We investigated the clinical dose response threshold for pelvic and para-aortic lymph node boost using radiographic imaging and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were treated for locally advanced cervical cancer; 40 patients had clinically involved pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes. Computed tomography (CT) or 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans obtained pre- and postchemoradiation for 18 patients were reviewed to assess therapeutic radiographic response of individual lymph nodes. External beam boost doses to involved nodes were compared to treatment response, assessed by change in size of lymph nodes by short axis and change in standard uptake value (SUV). Patterns of failure, time to recurrence, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined. Results: Sixty-four lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic involvement were identified. Radiation boost doses ranged from 0 to 15 Gy, with a mean total dose of 52.3 Gy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated with a slightly higher dose than para-aortic lymph nodes: mean 55.3 Gy versus 51.7 Gy, respectively. There was no correlation between dose delivered and change in size of lymph nodes along the short axis. All lymph nodes underwent a decrease in SUV with a complete resolution of abnormal uptake observed in 68%. Decrease in SUV was significantly greater for lymph nodes treated with ?54 Gy compared to those treated with <54 Gy (P=.006). Median follow-up was 18.7 months. At 2 years, OS and DFS for the entire cohort were 78% and 50%, respectively. Locoregional control at 2 years was 84%. Conclusions: A biologic response, as measured by the change in SUV for metastatic lymph nodes, was observed at a dose threshold of 54 Gy. We recommend that involved lymph nodes be treated to this minimum dose.

  11. Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

  12. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy)] [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  13. Comparison of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy resulting from the use of a tungsten alloy MLC or a brass collimator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Kirk, Maura L.; McDonough, James E.; Maughan, Richard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To apply the dual ionization chamber method for mixed radiation fields to an accurate comparison of the secondary neutron dose arising from the use of a tungsten alloy multileaf collimator (MLC) as opposed to a brass collimator system for defining the shape of a therapeutic proton field. Methods: Hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous ionization chambers were constructed with large volumes to enable measurements of absorbed doses below 10{sup -4} Gy in mixed radiation fields using the dual ionization chamber method for mixed-field dosimetry. Neutron dose measurements were made with a nominal 230 MeV proton beam incident on a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a solid brass block. The chambers were cross-calibrated against a {sup 60}Co-calibrated Farmer chamber in water using a 6 MV x-ray beam and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to account for variations in ionization chamber response due to differences in secondary neutron energy spectra. Results: The neutron and combined proton plus {gamma}-ray absorbed doses are shown to be nearly equivalent downstream from either a closed tungsten alloy MLC or a solid brass block. At 10 cm downstream from the distal edge of the collimating material the neutron dose from the closed MLC was (5.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. The neutron dose with brass was (6.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. Further from the secondary neutron source, at 50 cm, the neutron doses remain close for both the MLC and brass block at (6.9 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy and (6.3 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The dual ionization chamber method is suitable for measuring secondary neutron doses resulting from proton irradiation. The results of measurements downstream from a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a brass block indicate that, even in an overly pessimistic worst-case scenario, secondary neutron production in a tungsten alloy MLC leads to absorbed doses that are nearly equivalent to those seen from brass collimators. Therefore, the choice of tungsten alloy in constructing the leaves of a proton MLC is appropriate, and does not lead to a substantial increase in the secondary neutron dose to the patient compared to that generated in a brass collimator.

  14. A phase I trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States); Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Baron, Anna [Department of Biostatics, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A multicenter Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three liver metastases, tumor diameter <6 cm, and adequate liver function. The first cohort received 36 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions (F). Subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to a chosen maximum of 60 Gy/3F. At least 700 mL of normal liver had to receive a total dose <15 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 liver or intestinal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2/6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (10 male, 8 female): median age, 55 years (range, 26-83 years); most common primary site, colorectal (6 patients); median aggregate gross tumor volume, 18 ml (range, 3-98 ml). Four patients had multiple tumors. No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3F without reaching MTD. Conclusions: Biologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated in patients with limited liver metastases. Results of this study form the basis for an ongoing Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy over three fractions for liver metastases.

  15. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with ..beta.. emitters of high, medium, and low energies, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 170/Tm, and /sup 147/Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation /sup 90/Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. /sup 170/Tm and /sup 147/Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of ..beta.. energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED/sub 50/) were 30-45 Gy from/sup 90/Sr, approx.80 Gy from /sup 170/Tm, and approx.500 Gy from /sup 147/Pm. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to /sup 90/Sr irradiation. The ED/sub 50/ for moist desquamation ranged from approx.25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approx.450 Gy for a 1-mm source. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation.

  16. Possible Detection of a Pair Instability Supernova in the Modern Universe, and Implications for the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    SN 2006gy radiated far more energy in visual light than any other supernova so far, and potential explanations for its energy demands have implications for galactic chemical evolution and the deaths of the first stars. It remained bright for over 200 days, longer than any normal supernova, and it radiated more than 1e51 ergs of luminous energy at visual wavelengths. I argue that this Type IIn supernova was probably the explosion of an extremely massive star like Eta Carinae that retained its hydrogen envelope when it exploded, having suffered relatively little mass loss during its lifetime. That this occurred at roughly Solar metallicity challenges current paradigms for mass loss in massive-star evolution. I explore a few potential explanations for SN2006gy's power source, involving either circumstellar interaction, or instead, the decay of 56Ni. If SN 2006gy was powered by the conversion of shock energy into light, then the conditions must be truly extraordinary and traditional interaction models don't work. If SN 2006gy was powered by radioactive decay, then the uncomfortably huge 56Ni mass requires that the star exploded as a pair instability supernova. The mere possibility of this makes SN 2006gy interesting, especially at this meeting, because it is the first good candidate for a genuine pair instability supernova.

  17. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  18. Surface interpolation by bicubic spline techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, John Elkin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    follow the style of the ~P*~ f th Iver' 5th t1al~S (x ~ p y . ), i=1, ~ ~ ~, np and j =1 p pm' called grid points . Then a x j bicubic spline function G(x, y) is defined to be a function in H which is cubic in x for constant y and cubic in y... R T GY ( I ) = Y START OO 103 l=2gICOLS 103 GX (I)=GX( I-l) +XSPAC DO 104 J=2 g )ROWS 104 GY(J)=GY(J-1)+YSPAC C READ THE GRID VALUES TO BE INTERPOLATED FOP. 140 READ (5g102eEN0=64) XX(1) iYY(1) 102 FORMAT (2F 10 2) C BR ACKET CHECK SECTION...

  19. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects and the Penile Bulb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nam, Jiho [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gagliardi, Giovanna [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); El Naqa, Issam; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose, volume, and clinical outcome data for penile bulb are reviewed for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. Most, but not all, studies find an association between impotence and dosimetric parameters (e.g., threshold doses) and clinical factors (e.g., age, comorbid diseases). According to the data available, it is prudent to keep the mean dose to 95% of the penile bulb volume to <50 Gy. It may also be prudent to limit the D70 and D90 to 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively, but coverage of the planning target volume should not be compromised. It is acknowledged that the penile bulb may not be the critical component of the erectile apparatus, but it seems to be a surrogate for yet to be determined structure(s) critical for erectile function for at least some techniques.

  20. How We Achieved a 41% Energy Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maze, M. E.

    in this pape~. Abbott Labo~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide health ca~e company with 1984 sales in excess of $3.1 billion. Abbott employs some 34,000 people in 28 domestic and 44 inte~ational locations. ou~ ene~gy conse~vation p~og~am was sta~ted in 1973 du...~ing the A~ab oil emba~go, but the ene~gy conse~vation depa~tment was not fo~ed until 1977. This depa~tment consists of myself, 2 enginee~s, and a sec~eta~y, and we a~e the only people in the company devoting full time to ene~gy conse~vation. Each plant...

  1. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  2. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Combination With Gefitinib in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwer, Amanda L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with gefitinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had pathologically proved recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma. Patients started gefitinib (250 mg/day) 7 days before SRS and continued for 1 year or until disease progression. SRS was delivered in three fractions over 3 days. The planning target volume (PTV) was the T1-weighted MRI postcontrast enhancing lesion + 2 mm. The first cohort received an SRS dose of 18 Gy, and subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to the maximum dose of 36 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was any Grade 3 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2 of 6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Characteristics of the 15 patients enrolled were: 9 men, 6 women; median age, 47 years (range, 23-65 years); 11 glioblastoma, 4 AA; median prior RT dose, 60 Gy (range, 54-61.2 Gy); median interval since RT, 12 months (range, 3-57 months); median PTV, 41 cc (range, 12-151 cc). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range, 2-28 months). Median time on gefitinib was 5 months (range, 2-12 months). No patient experienced a DLT, and the SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy. Grade 1-2 gefitinib-related dermatitis and diarrhea were common (10 and 7 patients, respectively). Conclusion: Fractionated SRS to a dose of 36 Gy in three fractions is well tolerated with gefitinib at daily dose of 250 mg. Further studies of SRS and novel molecular targeted agents are warranted in this challenging clinical setting.

  3. Toxicity Assessment of Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Prostate for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian; Newell, Sherri B.S.; Newman, Francis M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate for patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective toxicity analysis was performed in 30 consecutive patients treated definitively with pelvic SIB-IMRT, all of whom also received androgen suppression. The IMRT plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 28 fractions (2.5 Gy/fraction) to the prostate while simultaneously delivering 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: The most common acute Grade 2 events were cystitis (36.7%) and urinary frequency/urgency (26.7%). At a median follow-up of 24 months, late toxicity exceeding Grade 2 in severity was uncommon, with two Grade 3 events and one Grade 4 event. Grade 2 or greater acute bowel toxicity was associated with signficantly greater bowel volume receiving {>=}25 Gy (p = .04); Grade 2 or greater late bowel toxicity was associated with a higher bowel maximal dose (p = .04) and volume receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = .02). Acute or late bladder and rectal toxicity did not correlate with any of the dosimetric parameters examined. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT with SIB to the prostate was well tolerated in this series, with low rates of Grade 3 or greater acute and late toxicity. SIB-IMRT combines pelvic radiotherapy and hypofractionation to the primary site and offers an accelerated approach to treating intermediate- to high-risk disease. Additional follow-up is necessary to fully define the long-term toxicity after hypofractionated, whole pelvic treatment combined with androgen suppression.

  4. Split-Volume Treatment Planning of Multiple Consecutive Vertebral Body Metastases for Cyberknife Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)], E-mail: arjunsahgal@yahoo.com; Chuang, Cynthia; Larson, David; Huang, Kim; Petti, Paula [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinstein, Phil [Department of Neurologic Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyberknife treatment planning of multiple consecutive vertebral body metastases is challenging due to large target volumes adjacent to critical normal tissues. A split-volume treatment planning technique was developed to improve the treatment plan quality of such lesions. Treatment plans were generated for 1 to 5 consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (CVBM) prescribing a total dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of the entire vertebral body(ies). Treatment plans were generated considering both the de novo clinical scenario (no prior radiation), imposing a dose limit of 8 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord, and the retreatment scenario (prior radiation) with a dose limit of 3 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord. The split-volume planning technique was compared with the standard full-volume technique only for targets ranging from 2 to 5 CVBM in length. The primary endpoint was to obtain best PTV coverage by the 24 Gy prescription isodose line. A total of 18 treatment plans were generated (10 standard and 8 split-volume). PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line worsened consistently as the number of CVBM increased for both the de novo and retreatment scenario. Split-volume planning was achieved by introducing a 0.5-cm gap, splitting the standard full-volume PTV into 2 equal length PTVs. In every case, split-volume planning resulted in improved PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line ranging from 4% to 12% for the de novo scenario and, 8% to 17% for the retreatment scenario. We did not observe a significant trend for increased monitor units required, or higher doses to spinal cord or esophagus, with split-volume planning. Split-volume treatment planning significantly improves Cyberknife treatment plan quality for CVBM, as compared to the standard technique. This technique may be of particular importance in clinical situations where stringent spinal cord dose limits are required.

  5. Treatment Techniques and Site Considerations Regarding Dysphagia-Related Quality of Life in Cancer of the Oropharynx and Nasopharynx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl; Noever, Inge; Rooij, Peter van; Voet, Peter; Est, Henrie van der; Sipkema, Dick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Sewnaik, Aniel; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert Jan [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bije, Daniel de la [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schmitz, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the relationship for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer and nasopharyngeal (NP) cancer between the dose received by the swallowing structures and the dysphagia related quality of life (QoL). Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 85 OP and 47 NP cancer patients were treated by radiation therapy. After 46 Gy, OP cancer is boosted by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), brachytherapy (BT), or frameless stereotactic radiation/cyberknife (CBK). After 46 Gy, the NP cancer was boosted with parallel-opposed fields or IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy; subsequently, a second boost was given by either BT (11 Gy) or stereotactic radiation (SRT)/CBK (11.2 Gy). Sixty OP and 21 NP cancer patients responded to functional and QoL questionnaires (i.e., the Performance Status Scales, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer H and N35, and M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory). The swallowing muscles were delineated and the mean dose calculated using the original three-dimensional computed tomography-based treatment plans. Univariate analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis. Results: Most dysphagia problems were observed in the base of tongue tumors. For OP cancer, boosting with IMRT resulted in more dysphagia as opposed to BT or SRT/CBK. For NPC patients, in contrast to the first booster dose (46-70 Gy), no additional increase of dysphagia by the second boost was observed. Conclusions: The lowest mean doses of radiation to the swallowing muscles were achieved when using BT as opposed to SRT/CBK or IMRT. For the 81 patients alive with no evidence of disease for at least 1 year, a dose-effect relationship was observed between the dose in the superior constrictor muscle and the 'normalcy of diet' (Performance Status Scales) or 'swallowing scale' (H and N35) scores (p < 0.01)

  6. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States)]. E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Zeidan, Omar A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Meeks, Sanford L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Willoughby, Twyla R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Wagner, Thomas H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Jeswani, Sam [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Ruchala, Kenneth J. [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Haimerl, Jason [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Olivera, Gustavo H. [TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 ({+-}SD) was 2.02 {+-} 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 ({+-}SD) was 7.0 {+-} 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 ({+-}SD) was 8.7 {+-} 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated.

  7. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstede, Theresa M. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lindberg, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  8. Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamart, Stephanie, E-mail: stephanie.lamart@nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Curtis, Rochelle E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Travis, Lois [Rubin Center for Cancer Survivorship and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Rubin Center for Cancer Survivorship and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Kwon, Deukwoo [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Morton, Lindsay M. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patients radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were {sup 60}Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower doses.

  9. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  10. China's Energy Management System Program for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, B.; Yu, Y.; Friedman, Z.; Taylor, R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    En er gy C o n su m p ti o n , Q u ad s Source: DOE EIA International Energy Outlook 2013 4 * Includes fuel for electricity generation and T&D losses ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... y En er gy C o n su m p ti o n , Q u ad s Source: DOE EIA International Energy Outlook 2013 Total Non-OECD Total OECD China U.S. India 5 ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May...

  11. Variation of carrier concentration and interface trap density in 8MeV electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, Sathyanarayana, E-mail: asharao76@gmail.com; Rao, Asha, E-mail: asharao76@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mangalore Institute of Technology and Engineering, Moodabidri, Mangalore-574225 (India); Krishnan, Sheeja [Department of Physics, Sri Devi Institute of Technology, Kenjar, Mangalore-574142 (India); Sanjeev, Ganesh [Microtron Centre, Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri-574199 (India); Suresh, E. P. [Solar Panel Division, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore-560017 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out for c-Si solar cells, irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5kGy 100kGy in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments. Capacitance Voltage measurements indicate that there is a slight reduction in the carrier concentration upon electron irradiation due to the creation of radiation induced defects. The conductance measurement results reveal that the interface state densities and the trap time constant increases with electron dose due to displacement damages in c-Si solar cells.

  12. Revised estimates of electron absorbed fractions and radionuclide S-values in trabecular bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parry, Robert Alan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of trabecular bone in the skeleton. (Adapted from ICRP 1975). 45 Table 5. 3. Relative weights of dry bones as percentages of total skeleton. (Adapted from ICRP 1975), 45 Table 5. 4. Fractional distribution of red marrow in the skeleton. (Adapted from ICRP... Table 6. 3. Average and maximum beta-particle energy for selected radionuclides. 69 Table 6. 4. S-values for sources in the marrow (in mGy'A4Bq 's '). Target: Marrow 7l Table 6. 5. S-values for sources in the marrow (in mGyMBq 's ') Target...

  13. Deere & Company Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for evaluating each unit's ene~gy savings techniques. Two more key elements merit attention. These are "energy ethic" and "feedback". The people that comprise a company can enhance a conservation program if they are convinced it is for their good as well... vital but "good business" as well. Meet Lester! One of our factories has had an an:i mated movie produced which ~eatures a polar bear: hero. He represents the central theme of an ene~gy conservation awareness program. The program con~ tinues...

  14. Quality In-Plant Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petzold, M. A.

    of ventilated air during the heating season. This requi~e? merlt by itself would increase total ene~gy use by 20%. This seemS cont~adictory to the co~po~ate goal of 2% actual energy ~eduction pe~ year, for the period of 1985 th~ough 1990. Howeve...~, integration of several concepts and utilizing waste energy f~om available sou~ces provides the oppor tunity to meet and exceed both goals in a cost effective manner, with an excellent payback. The presentation quantifies the excess ene~gy available...

  15. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable range. First clinical results indicate excellent LC. Further prospective multicenter studies are needed to establish this method and to confirm these results.

  16. Outcomes After Whole Brain Reirradiation in Patients With Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Christina H. [School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Jimenez, Rachel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Loeffler, Jay S.; Oh, Kevin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases are often treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for purposes of palliation. The treatment of those who experience subsequent intracranial disease progression can include a second course of WBRT, although there is controversy surrounding its safety and efficacy. This study examines the outcomes in patients at Massachusetts General Hospital who underwent reirradiation. Patients and Methods: We examined the medical records of 17 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital with brain metastases who were initially treated with WBRT between 2002 and 2008 and were subsequently retreated with a second course of WBRT. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range, 28-40 Gy), with a fraction size of 2 to 3 Gy (median, 2.5 Gy). The median dose at reirradiation was 21.6 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy), with a fraction size of 1.5 to 2 Gy (median, 1.8 Gy). Results: The second course of WBRT was administered upon radiographic disease progression in all patients. Of 10 patients with complete follow-up data, 8 patients experienced complete or partial symptom resolution, and 2 did not show clinical improvement. The time to radiographic progression was 5.2 months. The median overall survival for all patients after diagnosis of metastases was 24.7 months. The median survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 5.2 months (95% CI, 1.3-8.7). In 6 patients with stable extracranial disease, the median survival time after retreatment was 19.8 months (95% CI, 2.7-{infinity}), compared with 2.5 months (95% CI, 0.8-5.5) for those with extracranial disease progression (p = 0.05). Acute adverse reactions occurred in 70.5% of patients but were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: In select patients and especially those with stable extracranial disease, reirradiation may be an appropriate and effective intervention to provide symptomatic relief and slow intracranial disease progression. Side effects were minimal and did not cause substantial changes in quality of life.

  17. China's Energy Management System Program for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, B.; Yu, Y.; Friedman, Z.; Taylor, R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    En er gy C o n su m p ti o n , Q u ad s Source: DOE EIA International Energy Outlook 2013 4 * Includes fuel for electricity generation and T&D losses ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... y En er gy C o n su m p ti o n , Q u ad s Source: DOE EIA International Energy Outlook 2013 Total Non-OECD Total OECD China U.S. India 5 ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May...

  18. May2011|CountryProfile|GerMany|1 ataGlanCe:GerMany'SGloBal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Cooperation and Development 2009 oVerVieW Germany's engagement in global health has increased steadily over), and the rest was channeled through multilateral organizations. About half of Germany's multilateral health aidBalHealtHPrioritieSanDStrateGy Germany's overall global health strategy is guided by a human rights-based approach, which aims

  19. 1094 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .200900171 Biotechnol. J. 2009, 4, 1094 It is expected that biotech- nology will be at the heart been hit by the financial crisis. President Myung-Bak Lee announced a NationalVision of Green Growth crisis, green in- dustry based on green technolo- gy has been the only sector en- joying high growth

  20. Long-Lasting, Self-Sustaining, and Energy-Harvesting System-in-Package (SiP) Wireless Micro-Sensor Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    -mora@ieee.org, http://www.rincon-mora.com} Keywords: Energy harvesting, lithium-ion battery charger, micro- compatible micro-battery technologies, like micro-fuel cells and thin-film lithium-ion batteries-film lithium-ion battery. The ener- gy is harvested in small, intermittent "bursts," which is why the charger

  1. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Miften, Moyed, E-mail: Moyed.Miften@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  2. OTTE EXPORT M cies of the B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    UNC CHARLO I. Introd The Polic th th fa But over protectin could ham Export la technolog such cas foreign s work is demonstr "Researc that any must be reported agreemen scholarsh OTTE EXPORT M their r the past fe ng informatio mper U.S. e aws and regu gy and these In particu ns) exists w n export

  3. A mm-Scale Dosimetry System Based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Beryllium Oxide for Investigation of Dose Rate Profiles in Constricted Environments - 12219

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Marian; Jahn, Axel; Sommer, Dora; Henniger, Juergen [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics, Radiation Physics Group, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Praetorius, Reiner M. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, POB 1263, D-76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dismantling of the former German fuel reprocessing research center Wiederaufbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe requires extensive investigations of contamination and dose rate inside of the shielded areas. Particularly for first the exploration of radiation field existing thermo-element pipes may offer access to the tanks and to other interesting points without the risk of contamination. Because of their small dimension, almost no active dosimetry systems are able to measure inside the pipes. New mm-scale luminescence dosimeters in combination with a packing and transport technique are presented. The dosimeters could measure doses from 0.1 mGy up to more than 100 Gy. Hence, over the possible exposure time durations, dose rates from ?Gyh{sup -1} up to 1000 Gyh{sup -1} are ascertainable. For potential users the system opens the opportunity for investigation of dose rates inside of shielding and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is a unique solution for dose and dose rate measurement tasks. Within the linear dose range up to several ten Gy, the uncertainty of the results is less than 5%. 100 Gy-doses can be specified within 20%, with individual high dose calibration of the detectors even better. For WAK and other potential users the system offers the opportunity to investigate dose rates inside of shieldings and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is an unique solution for dose and dose rate measurements. (authors)

  4. Complex singing behavior of the White-breasted Wood Wren (Henicorhina leucosticta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harlow, Zachary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yellow circles), PKG/WYG and PPP/GyWY (May 20; Blue square),Songs from bird OWG and PPP were present on only the northKYO COO KWO WWB YCC COO PKG PPP COO PKG PPP GYK KYO KWO UOU

  5. Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

  6. Synthesis and cure characterization of high temperature polymers for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuntao

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the polymerization of BMI system until the temperature goes up to 100oC. However, a small amount of oligomers may be generated from solid-state cure reaction under low E-beam intensity radiation. Higher intensity E-beam at 40 kGy per pass can give above 75% reaction...

  7. On two-sample data analysis by exponential model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sujung

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density and exponential model. Assume that we have a random sample X1, . . . ,Xm from a continuous distribution F(y) = P(Xi y), i = 1, . . . ,m and a random sample Y1, . . . ,Yn from a continuous distribution G(y) = P(Yi y), i = 1, . . . ,n. Also assume...

  8. Curriculum Vitae Masanori Murayama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    and M E Larkum Skills Optical imaging (using voltage- and calcium-sensitive dye) with a conventional and Behavioral Neuroscience, (Prof. György Buzsáki) In vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recording from anaesthetized Neurophysiology (Prof. Atushi Nanbu) Recording unit activity from monkey and rats. Summer 2002, Department of Cell

  9. SCIENCE sciencemag.org 8 AUGUST 2014 VOL 345 ISSUE 6197 603 he importance of energy for development is un-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    consumption in rich countries (which are also largely supplied by coal) would "free" enough electricity Ener- gy for All. Among the goals is to provide univer- sal access to electricity and clean cooking- sulting pollution is an estimated 3.9 million prema- ture deaths annually. Over the decades, development

  10. NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    · NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts · West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts · eNerGy · Healt Global Insight, paid for by the West Virginia Department of Revenue. 2013 WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOKWest Virginia Economic Outlook 2013 is published by: Bureau of Business & Economic Research West

  11. Sufficient reductions in regressions with elliptically contoured1 inverse predictors2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bura, Efstathia

    for21 the regression of Y on X comprises of a linear and a non-linear component.22 1 Introduction23 There are two general approaches based on inverse regression for estimating the linear sufficient9 reductions with18 parameters (Y , ) and density gY , there is no linear non-trivial sufficient reduction except

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 134205 (2011) Atomic structure and electronic properties of the SixSb100-x phase-change memory material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .134205 PACS number(s): 64.70.dg, 61.20.Gy, 71.15.Mb, 71.15.Pd I. INTRODUCTION Most phase-change random access into the heating electrode (write or rewrite steps) that may result in degradation of the memory device. Further

  13. Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimen- sional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom.15.Gy, 05.45.-a, 45.20.Jj I. INTRODUCTION The hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields

  14. OPERA INSTITUTI ARCHAEOLOGICI SLOVENIAE LJUBLJANA 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cufar, Katarina

    . SERJEANTSON 2002, A Passion for Pork: Meat Consumption at the British Late Neo- lithic Site of Durrington in archaeolo- gy. V/in: R. Skates in R. Whitehouse (ur./ed.), Radio- carbon Dating and Italian Prehistory 20, 157172. BARTOSIEWICZ, L. 1999, Recent developments in archa- eological research in Slovenia

  15. Reconstruc~ao de Imagens de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo com Imageamento Paralelo II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    dados de spiral FVE. Teoria Spiral FVE: RF Gz Gx Gy a b c d Figura: Sequ^encia de pulso da spiral FVE 146 segundos (256 batimentos card´iacos a uma taxa de 105 bpm). Resultados Qualitativos Uma avalia

  16. Reconstruc~ao Paralelizada de Dados de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo em Processadores Multi-nucleo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    multidimensionais: m(x, y, z, v, t) RF Gz Gx Gy a b c d Sequ^encia de pulso FVE espiral [1] Reconstru¸c~ao: NUFFT [3/corte (256 batimentos card´iacos a 105 bpm) 120 -120 0 0 500 velocidade(cm/s) tempo (ms) 120 -120 0 0 500 120

  17. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    , Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA D. Kozakov Á G.-Y. Chuang Á D. Beglov Á S. Vajda of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan 123 J Comput Aided Mol Des (2009) 23:491­500 DOI 10.1007/s10822-009-9283-2 #12;cognitive abilities [4], eventually leading to death. Although most cases of PD are sporadic, multiple genes

  18. Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act of 1975 and tho State EnN'gy Effleiene), Pl'OgrRIl hl1pl'Ovomcnt Act of 1990 (SBI'); and 'lie Welll"el'IoJ A,YS,I'(llIIca Progrlm (WAP) tOI' Low-Income...

  19. U.S. industry leads the world in medical device innovation and production. From imaging instrumentation, monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    generation of medical devices will build on recent advances in bioengineering, biomaterials, genomics, computing and telecommunications. The UC San Diego Master of Advanced Study in Medical Device Engineering, and physioloGy. Master of Advanced Study Degree Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering - Bioengineering Medical

  20. Depuration of shellfish by irradiation: Final technical report, October 1, 1987--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beghian, L.E.; Mallett, J.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies by the University of Lowell Radiation Laboratory and the US National Marine Fisheries Service N.E. Laboratory in Gloucester, MA on softshelled clams (Mya arenaria) demonstrated the effectiveness of low to medium doses of Cobalt 60 source gamma irradiation in the inactivation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis. Post-irradiation survival and organoleptic studies when extended to hardshelled clams (Mercinaria mercenaria) and American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) showed no significant decline in consumer qualities or 6 day post irradiation survival in oysters at doses of up to 3.0 kGy. The capacities of the American oyster to sustain relatively high doses of gamma irradiation were demonstrated by 6 day post-exposure survivorship values of greater than 90% for samples receiving 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 kGy. Initial studies of inactivation of Polio I virus and a simian rotavirus (SA-11) was conducted in both hardshelled clams and oysters. Of greatest interest was the behavior of Hepatitis A virus (HAV), in live, irradiated shellfish. The average log decrement value for HAV in oysters was calculated at 2.0 kGy. From these data it appears that doses of up to 2 kGy can be applied to: reduce or eliminate bacterial pathogens, reduce the infectivity of human viral pathogens by one or more orders of magnitude, and preserve market qualities of longevity, appearance, odor, taste and texture. 23 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  2. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  3. Climate and groundwater effects on the establishment, growth and death of Prosopis caldenia trees in the Pampas (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    in the Pampas (Argentina) Stella M. Bogino , Esteban G. Jobbágy Departamento de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Avenida 25 de Mayo 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis, Argentina Grupo de Estudios Ambientales, IMASL ­ Universidad Nacional de San Luis y CONICET, San Luis, Argentina a r t i c l e

  4. In the mIdst of an energy revolutIon, Purdue's world-class researchers lead the charge. we collaborate across a broad range of dIscIPlInes --to develoP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    In the mIdst of an energy revolutIon, Purdue's world-class researchers lead the charge. we rechargIng IndIana's renewable energy revolutIon #12;enerGY solutions solar The U.S. Department of Energy

  5. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  6. Refreshments will be served For more information contact Kim Coleman at kcole@wustl.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    such as synthetic biology, systems biolo- gy, and protein engineering. Dr. Alper has published over 40 articles' Outstanding Teaching Award in 2012 and the 2013 Biotechnology and Bioengineer- ing Daniel I.C. Wang Award:00am Brauer Hall, room 12 Energy,Environmental&ChemicalEngineering #12;

  7. Explosions inside Ejecta and Most Luminous Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Blinnikov

    2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The extremely luminous supernova SN2006gy is explained in the same way as other SNIIn events: light is produced by a radiative shock propagating in a dense circumstellar envelope formed by a previous weak explosion. The problems in the theory and observations of multiple-explosion SNe IIn are briefly reviewed.

  8. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 294 9 NOVEMBER 2001 1285 ood news" generally doesn't make

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, Peter

    rather than worse and to argue that we should not worry much about the state of the world. These are two--to argue that the world will not run out of core resources over this century. He sets these optimistic, ener- gy, and non-energy resources: Malthus, turn in your grave. Considering pollution, the air

  9. ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamicsProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics coursecourse # 424304.0# 424304.0 v.v. 20132013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    EngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics coursecourse # 424304.0# 424304.0 v.v. 20132013 Solar energy (thermal, PV)gy ( , ) Ron Zevenhoven bo Akademi 2/52 #12;Potential Solar energy could within one hour provide the energy that is used in all human acitivities in a year. Drawbacks are relatively low energy (exergy) density Pic: IEA08 (exergy) density

  10. JOM January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOM January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy Global to fundamental advances in direct renewable energy and ener- gy storage and conversion which are needed to enable renewable energy and meet the general energy challenges and associated environmental effects. This paper

  11. Custom Device for Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Biological Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Ruoming

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , the structural material is efficient to absorb most of the cosmic-ray energy and reduce the interior dose rate to below 1.2 mGy per day. However, the biological effects of prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation are not well understood. The purpose...

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Therapy model for advanced intracerebral B16 mouse melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Therapy model for advanced intracerebral B16 mouse melanoma using radiation for advanced intracerebral B16 melanoma is reported. Implanted tumors (D0), suppressed by a single 15 Gy- bination therapies for brain tumors. Keywords B16 melanoma Mouse Brain tumor Radiation therapy

  13. Physics 123 Equations Winter 2012 Semester I. Equations you should know by heart (but I'm giving them to you anyway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    = Qc/|W| Heat pump: COPHP = Qh/|W| Carnot: emax = (Th Tc)/Th; COPR,max = Tc/(Th Tc); COPHP,max = Th 2 + gy2 (Bernoulli's Law, from energy conservation) Thermodynamics PV = nRT = NkBT Equipartition exerted by balls (atoms) from change in momentum = area under P-V curve First Law: Eint = Qadded + Won

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    on an already stretched world energy infrastructure. One alternative ener- gy/power source under serious consid of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densities for such electrochemical energy stor- age and conversion. It has been inten- sively studied for use as power supplies

  15. A Cyber Security Study of a SCADA Energy Management System: Stealthy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    of critical infrastructures in our society are the power, the gas and the water supply networks transmitted through unencrypted communication chan- nels, making these critical infrastructures vulnerable Estimator Andre Teixeira Gyorgy Dan Henrik Sandberg Karl H. Johansson School of Electrical

  16. SU-E-I-15: Comparison of Radiation Dose for Radiography and EOS in Adolescent Scoliosis Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, B; Walz-Flannigan, A [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate patient radiation dose for whole spine imaging using EOS, a new biplanar slot-scanning radiographic system and compare with standard scoliosis radiography. Methods: The EOS imaging system (EOS Imaging, Paris, France) consists of two orthogonal x-ray fan beams which simultaneously acquire frontal and lateral projection images of a standing patient. The patient entrance skin air kerma was measured for each projection image using manufacturer-recommended exposure parameters for spine imaging. Organ and effective doses were estimated using a commercially-available Monte Carlo simulation program (PCXMC, STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland) for a 15 year old mathematical phantom model. These results were compared to organ and effective dose estimated for scoliosis radiography using computed radiography (CR) with standard exposure parameters obtained from a survey of pediatric radiographic projections. Results: The entrance skin air kerma for EOS was found to be 0.18 mGy and 0.33 mGy for posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral projections, respectively. This compares to 0.76 mGy and 1.4 mGy for CR, PA and lateral projections. Effective dose for EOS (PA and lateral projections combined) is 0.19 mSv compared to 0.51 mSv for CR. Conclusion: The EOS slot-scanning radiographic system allows for reduced patient radiation dose in scoliosis patients as compared to standard CR radiography.

  17. Evaluating Quality and Palatability Characteristics of Beef Subprimals Treated with Low-dose Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, John

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Paired subprimals were randomly assigned to treated (irradiated) and control (non-irradiated) groups. The treated group was irradiated with a surface dose of 1-1.5 kGy. Following treatment, subprimals were fabricated into thirds and randomly assigned...

  18. Cogeneration Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongon, A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~gy plticu ov~ the lat decade ha mad~ ~n~gy ~6Mc..i~cy an Vnpolttant ~conomic. 6ae.-to/t 60/t mMt ~n~gy U~. Th~ 6ae.-t that combin~d 6t~am -~~e.-tJt.iWI1 '/'ch~u aM nM!tiy tw.{.c~ a "~n~gy e6Mc..ient" a tJtaeii.;t{.onai conden-6ation tU!tbinu h...M h~p~d to ma~~ cogen~on inc.Jteaingly ~e.-t.ive. Cog~n~on t~chnoiogy ha continued to Vnp/tov~ a6 mo/t~ e6Mc..i~nt and low~ coU 6y6teJM hav~ been dev~opp~d. Th~ 6haM 06. indutJtiai 6 g~n~on capawy a6 compalt~d to total. pltOdue.-t.ion va...

  19. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  20. Diet, Disease State, and the Space Environment Modify the Intestinal Microbiota and Mucosal Environment via Microbiota-directed Alterations in Colonocyte Signalling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Lauren E

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    particle exposure (50 cGy) and 1/6 G hind limb unloading (HLU), and 3) 13 d spaceflight. Bran diets upregulated proliferation, and repair protein (TFF3 and TGF?) and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) transporter (Slc16a1 and Slc5a8) expression post-DSS. Diet...

  1. Regional climate models, spatial data and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    density function. f(y) = eg(y) or g(y) = log(f(y)) we are interested in the (simple) behavior of g when p from five clim forcings due to solar activity and volcanoes. Red shaded bands show the 5­95% range greenhouse gases ­ without Summary figure from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fourth Assessement

  2. Regional climate models, spatial data and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    density function. f(y) = eg(y) or g(y) = log(f(y)) we are interested in the (simple) behavior of g when y bands show the 5­95% range for 19 simulations from five clim forcings due to solar activity Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fourth Assessement Report. Used as evidence for attributing global

  3. Download

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    NLMCF models congestion on transmission networks. When several messages must be ... allocate the flows on the generated paths in an optimal way. The authors in [3] use a .... The right derivative g+(y) of g at y = 0 is well-defined. Since g is...

  4. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, suppl6ment au no I, Tome 45, janvier 1984 page C1-587

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    *** !The Kansai EZectric Power Company, Inc., Japan *l'he Institute of Applied Ene~gy, Japan i* Toshiba Corporation, Japan ***Taisei Corporation, Japan RBsume - On pr6sente l e plan d'un systgme destine 21 l, resulting i n the 60%decrease. Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http

  5. PPPL-3231, Prinprint: February 1997, UC-420 Alpha-Driven Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Z. Cheng, D. Darrow, B. LeBlanc, F. M. Levinton1 , R. P. Majeski, D. K. Mans- ?eld,K. M. McGuire, H-Induced Alpha Loss in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Z. Chang, R. Nazikian, G.-Y. Fu, R. B. White, S. J. Zweben

  6. Comparison of Current Almond Pasteurization Methods and Electron Beam Irradiation as an Alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuervo Pliego, Mary

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , almonds that were inoculated with S. Enteritidis PT 30 and S. Senftenberg, were treated with electron beam irradiation (e-beam), blanching and oil roasting. The thermal death time (D-value) for S. Enteritidis PT 30 when treated with e-beam was 0.90 kGy, 15...

  7. Groundwater and soil chemical changes under phreatophytic tree plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Groundwater and soil chemical changes under phreatophytic tree plantations Esteban G. Jobbagy1 4 May 2007. [1] The onset of groundwater consumption by plants can initiate a pathway of chemical inputs from aquifers to ecosystems, typically absent in groundwater recharge areas. We explored

  8. An error indicator for semidiscrete schemes Daniele Marobin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    is the density, e is the internal energy, is the ratio of specific heats, and vx and vy are the x and y Refinement (AMR) codes for gas-dynamics, see for instance [1] for one of the most classic examples and [2 computations. 2 The entropy indicator We consider the hyperbolic system of conservation laws: ut + fx(u) + gy

  9. Renewable Energy Carriers Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /mass transfer phe- nomena and multi-phase reacting flows, with applications in solar power and fuels production, decarbonization and metallurgical processes, CO2 capture and recycling, ener- gy storage and sustainable energy the development of solar concentrating technologies for efficiently producing clean power, fuels, and materials

  10. www.nature.com/naturemethods nature methods | VOL.10 NO.4 | APRIL 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    technoloGy feature 293 drilling into big cancer-genome data Vivien Marx neWs and VieWs 301 reproducibility Street, Fl 9, New York, NY 10013-1917. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing post offices. editorial office: 75 Varick Street, Fl 9, New York, NY 10013-1917. Tel (212) 726 9200

  11. Mathematical niche theory Mathematical niche theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meszna, Gza

    Mathematical niche theory Mathematical niche theory Geza Meszena1 Gyorgy Barabas2 KalleUniversity of Turku MMEE 2011, Groningen #12;Mathematical niche theory Outline 1 Introduction 2 Core theory 3 Ways of niche segragation 4 Controversies #12;Mathematical niche theory Introduction Why are there so

  12. Investigation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter mixture between LiF:Mg,Ti and Li2B4O7 in a solid form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walkowicz, Joshua Peter

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on this data the minimal detectable dose was calculated to be 0.58 mGy, or three times the standard deviation of the background. A fading study revealed a percent loss of 65.6% in 7 days for one set of dosimeters, and 18.4% in 26 days in another. The dosimeters...

  13. Evolution of the Llanos Basin and the deformation of the Eastern Cordiller, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addison, F.; Cooper, M.; Hayward, A.; Howe, S. O'Leary, J. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., Santafe de Bogota (Colombia))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Llanos Basin is located on the flank of the Eastern Cordillera in northeast Colombia. Basin development commenced with the deposition of a synrift Triassic and Jurassic megasequence related to the separation of North and South America in the Caribbean. Basin development continued with the Cretaceous Back Arc Megasequence deposited in a back arc basin behind the Andean subduction zone. Three major sequences can be recognized corresponding to extensional pulses in the Tithonian, Albian, and the Santonian which control thickness and facies distributions. The primary reservoir in the basin is the Late Eocene Mirandor Formation which was deposited in a fluvial system which prograded from the Guyana Shield to the west-northwest. This was deposited as part of the Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence (Bartonian to Serravallian) which developed as a result of uplift onset and deformation in the Central Cordillera. This megasequence covered the Magdalena Valley the Eastern Cordillera ad the Llanos Basin. In the foothills of the Eastern Cordillera, the Mirador Formation begins to show evidence of marine influence and was probably deposited in a series of shoreface sands and offshore bar complexes in the Cordillera. The Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence includes the Eocene-Oligocene Carbonera Formation which was deposited in a low every fluvial system that was mud dominated. Within the Carbonera Formation, a series of major, grossly coarsening upward cycles can be seen which are separated by maximum flooding surfaces that approximate to time lines. These cycles correspond to the early phases of development of the Central Cordillera with each pulse being seen as an influx of coarser clastics to the basin. The deformation style in the Eastern Cordillera is a mixture of thin-skinned thrust structures and the inversion of the thick-skinned basement involved extension faults. The inversion structures include the Cuisana field, a giant oil and gas-condensate discovery.

  14. A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

  15. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy)] ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  16. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I [Acibadem Kozyatgi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M [Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (4286) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.470 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (2686%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.

  17. Embryonic effects transmitted by male mice irradiated with 512 MeV/u {sup 56}Fe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, L.M.; Van Beek, M.E.A.B.; Raabe, O.G.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy, high-charge nuclei may contribute substantially to the yearly equivalent dose in space flight from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) at solar minimum. The largest single heavy-ion component is {sup 56}Fe. We used the mouse embryo chimera assay to test 512 MeV/u {sup 56}Fe nuclei for effects on the rate of proliferation of embryonic cells transmitted by sperm from irradiated mice. Male CD1 mice were acutely irradiated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 Gy (LET, 184 keV/{mu}m; fluence, 3.5 x 10{sup 4}-3.3 x 10{sup 5} nuclei/cm{sup 2}; average dose rate, 0.02 Gy/min) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVATRON/BEVALAC Facility in Berkeley, CA. Irradiated males were bred weekly for 7 weeks to nonirradiated females and their four-cell embryos were paired with control embryos, forming aggregation chimeras. After 30-35 h of culture, chimeras were dissociated to obtain {open_quotes}proliferation ratios{close_quotes} (number of cells contributed by the embryo from the irradiated male/total number of cells in the chimera). Significant dose-dependent decreases in proliferation ratios were obtained across all three dose groups for postirradiation week 2 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.003). The 0.01- and 0.05-Gy dose groups also produced significant decreases in proliferation ratios for postirradiation week 1 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.01) and the 0.05-Gy dose group produced significant decreases in proliferation ratios for postirradiation week 6 (P < 0.05). Postirradiation weeks 1, 2 and 6 correspond to irradiation of epididymal sperm, testicular spermatids and spermatogonia, respectively. We calculate that only about 5% of sperm in the 0.1-Gy, 2.5% in the 0.05-Gy and 0.5% in the 0.01-Gy dose groups sustained direct hits from {sup 56}Fe nuclei. However, up to 47% of sperm during postirradiation weeks 1 and 2 transmitted proliferation ratios that were at or below one standard deviation from control mean proliferation ratios. 26 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Jeff, E-mail: michalski@wustl.edu [Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Markoe, Arnold [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Radiation Oncology Associates, Sacramento, California (United States); Parliament, Matthew [Radiation Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Purdy, James A. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Valicenti, Richard K. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cox, James D. [Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

  19. Multicenter Analysis of Effect of High Biologic Effective Dose on Biochemical Failure and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Gleason Score 7-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rates and survival for Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologic effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 5,889 permanent prostate brachytherapy patients, of whom 1,078 had Gleason score 7 (n = 845) or Gleason score 8-10 (n = 233) prostate cancer and postimplant dosimetry results available. The median prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/mL (range, 0.4-300). The median follow-up for censored patients was 46 months (range, 5-130). Short-term hormonal therapy (median duration, 3.9 months) was used in 666 patients (61.8%) and supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 620 (57.5%). The patients were stratified into three BED groups: <200 Gy (n = 645), 200-220 Gy (n = 199), and >220 Gy (n = 234). Biochemical freedom from failure (bFFF) was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: The 5-year bFFF rate was 80%. The bFFF rate stratified by the three BED groups was 76.4%, 83.5%, and 88.3% (p < 0.001), respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, use of hormonal therapy, EBRT, and BED were associated with bFFF (p < 0.001). Freedom from metastasis improved from 92% to 99% with the greatest doses. The overall survival rate at 5 years for the three BED groups for Gleason score 8-10 cancer was 86.6%, 89.4%, and 94.6%, respectively (p = 0.048). Conclusion: These data suggest that permanent prostate brachytherapy combined with EBRT and hormonal therapy yields excellent bFFF and survival results in Gleason score 7-10 patients when the delivered BEDs are >220 Gy. These doses can be achieved by a combination of 45-Gy EBRT with a minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume of 120 Gy of {sup 103}Pd or 130 Gy of {sup 125}I.

  20. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions within 1 day have excellent tolerance with minimal acute and chronic toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging early results.

  1. A comparison of the radiation response of the epidermis in two strains of pig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van den Aardweg, G.J.; Arnold, M.; Hopewell, J.W. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of the epidermis was compared in two strains of pig, the English Large White and the Goettinger Miniature, after irradiation with 90Sr beta rays. The effects of two types of anesthesia were also tested in pigs of each strain, a volatile gas mixture of approximately 70% oxygen, approximately 30% nitrous oxide, and 2% halothane, and an intravenously administered narcotic azaperon/etimodat with the animals breathing air. Strain- and anesthetic-related changes were compared on the basis of dose-effect curves for the incidence of moist desquamation from which ED50 values (+/- SE) were determined, i.e., the dose required to produce this effect in 50% of the fields irradiated. For English Large White pigs anesthetized with the volatile gas mixture, an ED50 of 27.32 +/- 0.52 Gy was obtained for moist desquamation. Irradiation with the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia in this strain of pig produced a significantly higher ED50 of 33.36 +/- 0.76 Gy (P less than 0.001). This appeared to be related to the fact that the animals were breathing air, i.e., a lower oxygen concentration (approximately 21%), at the time of irradiation. For the Goettinger Miniature pig the ED50 values for moist desquamation were 38.93 +/- 3.12 Gy and 43.36 +/- 1.34 Gy while using the gaseous anesthetic mixture and the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia with the animals breathing air, respectively. These ED50 values are 10-11 Gy higher than those obtained for the English Large White pig under identical conditions of anesthesia, which resulted in a strain difference ratio of approximately 1.35. Radiation under the volatile gas mixture anesthesia resulted in a uniform irradiation response over the skin of the flank in both strains of pig. Radiation under azaperon/etomidat anesthesia resulted in a nonuniform skin response over the flank.

  2. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  3. Initial Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Concurrent and Maintenance Erlotinib and Reirradiation for Recurrent and New Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E. [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Feigenberg, Steven J. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Raben, David; Kane, Madeleine; Song, John I. [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Nicolaou, Nicos; Mehra, Ranee; Burtness, Barbara; Ridge, John [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Swing, Robyn [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Lango, Miriam; Cohen, Roger [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jimeno, Antonio [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.ed [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present the first report of a Phase I trial evaluating concurrent and maintenance erlotinib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent or secondary primary head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent or new primary HNC with an interval of at least 6 months since prior radiation were eligible. Patients were treated in 3 sequential cohorts: Cohort I, 100 mg of erlotinib daily with reirradiation at 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; Cohort II, 150 mg of erlotinib with 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; and Cohort III, 150 mg of erlotinib with 66 Gy in 30 fractions. Maintenance erlotinib started immediately after reirradiation at 150 mg daily and was continued for 2 years or until disease progression or dose-limiting toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined as any Grade 4 or 5 toxicity or a toxicity-related delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. Results: Fourteen patients were accrued, 3 to Cohort I, 4 to Cohort II, and 7 to Cohort III. Thirteen patients were evaluable for toxicity. Median follow-up was 8.4 months overall and 15.1 months for surviving patients. One patient had a dose-limiting toxicity in Cohort III. This patient declined initial percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, was hospitalized with Grade 3 dysphagia and aspiration, and required a delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. No Grade 4 acute toxicity was observed. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 9 of 13 patients. No erlotinib-related toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was observed during maintenance therapy. One patient had Grade 5 carotid hemorrhage 6 months after reirradiation, and another patient had Grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Conclusions: Reirradiation (66 Gy in 2.2 Gy fractions) with concurrent and maintenance erlotinib (150 mg daily) for recurrent or new primary HNC is feasible.

  4. Observation of a Dose-Control Relationship for Lung and Liver Tumors After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCammon, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Robert.mccammon@uchsc.edu; Schefter, Tracey E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Zaemisch, Rebekah; Gravdahl, Daniel; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for local control of primary or metastatic tumors within the lung or liver treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) within a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 141 consecutive patients with 246 lesions treated with three-fraction SBRT from Oct 1999 through Aug 2005 were reviewed. Local control was assessed radiographically. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the influence of the following factors on local control: total dose, expressed as either nominal prescription dose or equivalent uniform dose (EUD); gross tumor volume; primary site; treatment site (lung vs. other); histologic characteristics (adenocarcinoma vs. other); gender; age; and primary vs. metastatic tumor. Results: On univariate analysis, increased dose (either nominal or EUD) and smaller gross tumor volume were significant predictors of higher local control. Lesions treated to a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater had a 3-year actuarial local control rate of 89.3% compared with 59.0% and 8.1% for those treated to 36-53.9 Gy and less than 36 Gy. On multivariate analysis, only increased nominal dose and EUD retained statistical significance. Treatment was well tolerated; 5.7% of patients experienced Grade 3 or higher toxicity. Conclusions: This large single-institution series suggests a dose-control relationship within the range of SBRT doses applied. Excellent local control rates are achieved with a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater, corresponding to an EUD greater than 65.3 Gy. These results support the use of aggressive SBRT regimens when durable tumor control is the primary objective.

  5. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joensuu, Greetta [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Timo [International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Nokisalmi, Petri [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Fehlauer, Fabian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum (Germany); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective.

  7. Anastomotic Complications After Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Are Related to Radiation Dose to the Gastric Fundus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vande Walle, Caroline [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Ceelen, Wim P., E-mail: wim.ceelen@ugent.be [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D{sub 50}). We studied the ability of the D{sub 50} to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Results: Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D{sub 50} on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D{sub 50} on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D{sub 50} limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. Conclusions: In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V{sub 30} below 40%.

  8. Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory-Department of Physics-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pinese, Jose P. P. [Department of Geosciences-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48,600 km{sup 2} in Southern Brazil. The source data was the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project back-calibrated in a cooperative work among the Geological Survey of Brazil, the Geological Survey of Canada, and Paterson, Grant and Watson Ltd. The concentrations of eU (ppm), eTh (ppm) and K (%) were converted to dose rates in air (nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}) by accounting for the contribution of each element's concentration. Regional variation was interpreted according to lithotypes and a synthesis was performed according to the basic geological units present in the area. Higher values of total dose were estimated for felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, with average values varying up to 119{+-}24 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}, obtained by Anitapolis syenite body. Sedimentary, metasedimentary and metamafic rocks presented the lower dose levels, and some beach deposits reached the lowest average total dose, 18.5{+-}8.2 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Thorium gives the main average contribution in all geological units, the highest value being reached by the nebulitic gneisses of Atuba Complex, 71{+-}23 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Potassium presents the lowest average contribution to dose rate in 53 of the 72 units analyzed, the highest contribution being obtained by intrusive alkaline bodies (28{+-}12 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}). The general pattern of geographic dose distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

  9. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: angela.vanbaardwijk@maastro.nl; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Maasland Hospital, Sittard (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Simons, Jean [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Jans Gasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  10. Dosimetric and Radiobiological Consequences of Computed TomographyGuided Adaptive Strategies for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, Jerry J., E-mail: j2b@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Healthcare (Radiation Oncology Systems), Fitchburg, Wisconsin (United States); Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. Methods and Materials: We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dosevolume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D{sub 95}, tumor control probability, V{sub 70Gy}, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. Results: The CTV D{sub 95} for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D{sub 95} values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D{sub 95} values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V{sub 70Gy} and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (<5 mm) to an adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning.

  11. Variation in the sensitivity of the mouse spermatogonial stem cell population to fission neutron irradiation during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose-response studies of the radiosensitivity of spermatogonial stem cells in various epithelial stages after irradiation with graded doses of fission neutrons of 1 MeV mean energy were carried out in the Cpb-N mouse. These studies on the stem cell population in stages IX-XI yielded simple exponential lines characterized by an average D0 value of 0.76 +/- 0.02 Gy. In the subsequent epithelial stages XII-III, a significantly lower D0 value of 0.55 +/- 0.02 Gy was found. In contrast to the curves obtained for stem cells in stages IX-III, the curves obtained in stages IV-VIII indicated the presence of a mixture of radioresistant and radiosensitive stem cells. In stage VII, almost no radioresistant stem cells appeared to be present and a D0 value for the radiosensitive stem cells of 0.22 +/- 0.01 Gy was derived. Previously, data were obtained on the size of colonies (in number of spermatogonia) derived from surviving stem cells. Combining these data with data from the newly obtained dose-response curves yielded the number of stem cells, per stage and with the specific radiosensitivities, present in the control epithelium. In stages IX-XI, there are approximately 6 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.76 Gy, which corresponds to one-third of the As population in these stages. (The As spermatogonia are presumed to be the stem cells of spermatogenesis.) IN stages XII-III, there are approximately 12 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.55 Gy, which roughly equals the number of A single spermatogonia in these stages. These calculations could not be made for stages IV-VIII since no simple exponential lines were obtained for these stages.

  12. A prospective study on radiation-induced changes in hearing function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Franziska [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Experimental Center, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Mueller, Rainer [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: thomas.herrmann@mailbox.tu-dresden.de

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitate changes in hearing function after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, 32 patients were irradiated for head-and-neck tumors. Three-dimensional treatment planning was applied. Total tumor doses were 30.0-77.6 Gy, local doses to the inner ear (n = 64) ranged from 1.7 to 64.3 Gy. Audiometry was performed before the onset of radiotherapy (RT), at a tumor dose of 40 Gy or at the end of palliative treatment, at the end of curative RT, and 2-6 months post-RT. Assays applied were frequency-specific threshold measurements for air and bone conduction, measurements according to Weber and Rinne, tympanometry and assessment of the stapedius reflex. Results: Age and prior disease significantly decreased, whereas previous or concurrent alcohol consumption significantly increased hearing ability. A significant reduction in hearing ability during RT was found for high frequencies (at 40 Gy) and low frequencies (at end of RT), which persisted after RT. No differences were observed for air or bone conduction. None of the other assays displayed time- or dose-dependent changes. Dose-effect analyses revealed an ED50 (dose at which a 50% incidence is expected) for significant changes in hearing thresholds (15 dB) in the range of 20-25 Gy, with large confidence limits. Conclusions: Radiation effects on hearing ability were confined to threshold audiogram values, which started during the treatment without reversibility during 6 months postradiotherapy.

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaprealian, Tania [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  14. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: Planning and Evaluation for Prostate Cancer Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.or [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Happersett, Laura; Hunt, Margie; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop an optimization method using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and evaluate VMAT plans relative to the standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) approach in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A single gantry rotation was modeled using 177 equispaced beams. Multileaf collimator apertures and dose rates were optimized with respect to gantry angle subject to dose-volume-based objectives. Our VMAT implementation used conjugate gradient descent to optimize dose rate, and stochastic sampling to find optimal multileaf collimator leaf positions. A treatment planning study of 11 prostate cancer patients with a prescription dose of 86.4 Gy was performed to compare VMAT with a standard five-field IMRT approach. Plan evaluation statistics included the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% of prescribed dose (V95), dose to 95% of PTV (D95), mean PTV dose, tumor control probability, and dosimetric endpoints of normal organs, whereas monitor unit (MU) and delivery time were used to assess delivery efficiency. Results: Patient-averaged PTV V95, D95, mean dose, and tumor control probability in VMAT plans were 96%, 82.6 Gy, 88.5 Gy, and 0.920, respectively, vs. 97%, 84.0 Gy, 88.9 Gy, and 0.929 in IMRT plans. All critical structure dose requirements were met. The VMAT plans presented better rectal wall sparing, with a reduction of 1.5% in normal tissue complication probability. An advantage of VMAT plans was that the average number of MUs (290 MU) was less than for IMRT plans (642 MU). Conclusion: The VMAT technique can reduce beam on time by up to 55% while maintaining dosimetric quality comparable to that of the standard IMRT approach.

  15. Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoene, Ted [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, IN (United States); Xiao, Lu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Buchsbaum, Jeffrey; Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.

  16. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen, Norway and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo Faculty Division, Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Turesson, Ingela [Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Folin, Annika [Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Trovik, Clement S. [Departments of Oncology and of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  17. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ?60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  18. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  19. Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Dose-Response Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, Johnny Ray [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J., E-mail: buskirk.steven@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N. [Biostatistics Unit, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Ko, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Macdonald, Orlan K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose and biochemical failure (BcF) of prostate cancer in patients who received salvage prostate bed EBRT for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with a rising PSA level after prostatectomy who received salvage EBRT between July 1987 and October 2007. Patients receiving pre-EBRT androgen suppression were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between EBRT dose and BcF. Dose was considered as a numeric variable and as a categoric variable (low, <64.8 Gy; moderate, 64.8-66.6 Gy; high, >66.6 Gy). Results: A total of 364 men met study selection criteria and were followed up for a median of 6.0 years (range, 0.1-19.3 years). Median pre-EBRT PSA level was 0.6 ng/mL. The estimated cumulative rate of BcF at 5 years after EBRT was 50% overall and 57%, 46%, and 39% for the low-, moderate-, and high-dose groups, respectively. In multivariable analysis adjusting for potentially confounding variables, there was evidence of a linear trend between dose and BcF, with risk of BcF decreasing as dose increased (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [5.0-Gy increase]; p = 0.05). Compared with the low-dose group, there was evidence of a decreased risk of BcF for the high-dose group (RR, 0.60; p = 0.04), but no difference for the moderate-dose group (RR, 0.85; p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our results suggest a dose response for salvage EBRT. Doses higher than 66.6 Gy result in decreased risk of BcF.

  20. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Thberge, Valrie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Qubec, L'Htel-Dieu de Qubec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschnes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschnes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Qubec, Hpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  1. Outcomes of Patients With Revised Stage I Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies 1-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Seibel, Nita L. [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ritchey, Michael [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)] [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Grundy, Paul E. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)] [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of children with revised stage I clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) using the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTS)-5 staging criteria after multimodality treatment on NWTS 1-5 protocols. Methods and Materials: All CCSK patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study Group protocols had their pathology slides reviewed, and only those determined to have revised stage I tumors according to the NWTS-5 staging criteria were included in the present analysis. All patients were treated with multimodality therapy according to the NWTS 1-5 protocols. Results: A total of 53 children were identified as having stage I CCSK. All patients underwent primary surgery with radical nephrectomy. The chemotherapy regimens used were as follows: regimen A, C, F, or EE in 4 children (8%); regimen DD or DD4A in 33 children (62%); regimen J in 4 children (8%); and regimen I in 12 children (22%). Forty-six patients (87%) received flank radiation therapy (RT). Seven children (13%) did not receive flank RT. The median delay between surgery and the initiation of RT was 9 days (range, 3-61). The median RT dose was 10.8 Gy (range, 10-36). The flank RT doses were as follows: 10.5 or 10.8 Gy in 25 patients (47%), 11-19.9 Gy in 2 patients (4%), 20-29.9 Gy in 9 patients (17%), and 30-40 Gy in 10 patients (19%). The median follow-up for the entire group was 17 years (range, 2-36). The relapse-free and cancer-specific survival rate was 100% at the last follow-up examination. Conclusions: The present results have demonstrated that children with revised stage I CCSK using the NWTS-5 staging criteria have excellent survival rates despite the use of varying RT doses and chemotherapy regimens in the NWTS 1-5 protocols.

  2. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheek, Gregory [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.

  3. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pan, Charlie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amarnath, Sudha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ensminger, William D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  4. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niewald, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.niewald@uks.eu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany)] [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany)] [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muecke, Ralf [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany)] [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany); Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  5. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gao, Song; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  6. Analysis of highdose rate brachytherapy dose distribution resemblance in CyberKnife hypofractionated treatment plans of localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudahar, H., E-mail: h.sudahar@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai (India); Kurup, P.G.G.; Murali, V.; Mahadev, P. [Department of Radiotherapy, Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai (India); Velmurugan, J. [Department of Medical Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study is to analyze the CyberKnife hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of highdose rate (HDR) brachytherapy equivalent doses to assess the degree of HDR brachytherapy resemblance of CyberKnife dose distribution. Thirteen randomly selected localized prostate cancer cases treated using CyberKnife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. HDR equivalent doses were calculated for 30 Gy in 3 fractions of HDR brachytherapy regimen. The D{sub 5%} of the target in the CyberKnife hypofractionation was 41.57 2.41 Gy. The corresponding HDR fractionation (3 fractions) equivalent dose was 32.81 1.86 Gy. The mean HDR fractionation equivalent dose, D{sub 98%}, was 27.93 0.84 Gy. The V{sub 100%} of the prostate target was 95.57% 3.47%. The V{sub 100%} of the bladder and the rectum were 717.16 and 79.6 mm{sup 3}, respectively. Analysis of the HDR equivalent dose of CyberKnife dose distribution indicates a comparable resemblance to HDR dose distribution in the peripheral target doses (D{sub 98%} to D{sub 80%}) reported in the literature. However, there is a substantial difference observed in the core high-dose regions especially in D{sub 10%} and D{sub 5%}. The dose fall-off within the OAR is also superior in reported HDR dose distribution than the HDR equivalent doses of CyberKnife.

  7. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated IMRT With Temozolomide for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Krishna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ney, Douglas [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report toxicity and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status and organ or bone marrow function were eligible for this study. Patients received postoperative hypo-IMRT to the surgical cavity and residual tumor seen on T1-weighted brain MRI with a 5-mm margin to a total dose of 60 Gy in 10 fractions (6 Gy/fraction) and to the T2 abnormality on T2-weighted MRI with 5-mm margin to 30 Gy in 10 fractions (3 Gy/fraction). Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Toxicities were defined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Twenty-four patients were treated, consisting of 14 men, 10 women; a median age of 60.5 years old (range, 27-77 years); and a median Karnofsky performance score of 80 (range, 60-90). All patients received hypo-IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to protocol, except for 2 patients who received only 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 6.5 (range, 0-14).With a median follow-up of 14.8 months (range, 2.7-34.2 months) for all patients and a minimum follow-up of 20.6 months for living patients, no instances of grade 3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity were observed. The median OS was 16.6 months (range, 4.1-35.9 months). Six patients underwent repeated surgery for suspected tumor recurrence; necrosis was found in 50% to 100% of the resected specimens. Conclusion: In selected GBM patients, 60 Gy hypo-IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions over 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is safe. OS in this small cohort of patients was comparable to that treated with current standard of care therapy.

  8. Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Robischon, Monica; Stuhr, Kelly; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is tolerable in selected patients with a T{sub 1}-weighted enhancing tumor <6 cm.

  9. Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Madden, Jennifer R. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Wilkening, Greta N. [Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Liu, Arthur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

  10. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, S. L.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors for patient dosimetry has increased by {approx}25% since 2005. Despite this increase, no standard calibration methodology has been identified nor calibration uncertainty quantified for the use of MOSFET dosimetry in CT. This work compares three MOSFET calibration methodologies proposed in the literature, and additionally investigates questions relating to optimal time for signal equilibration and exposure levels for maximum calibration precision. Methods: The calibration methodologies tested were (1) free in-air (FIA) with radiographic x-ray tube, (2) FIA with stationary CT x-ray tube, and (3) within scatter phantom with rotational CT x-ray tube. Each calibration was performed at absorbed dose levels of 10, 23, and 35 mGy. Times of 0 min or 5 min were investigated for signal equilibration before or after signal read out. Results: Calibration precision was measured to be better than 5%-7%, 3%-5%, and 2%-4% for the 10, 23, and 35 mGy respective dose levels, and independent of calibration methodology. No correlation was demonstrated for precision and signal equilibration time when allowing 5 min before or after signal read out. Differences in average calibration coefficients were demonstrated between the FIA with CT calibration methodology 26.7 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} versus the CT scatter phantom 29.2 {+-} 1.0 mV cGy{sup -1} and FIA with x-ray 29.9 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} methodologies. A decrease in MOSFET sensitivity was seen at an average change in read out voltage of {approx}3000 mV. Conclusions: The best measured calibration precision was obtained by exposing the MOSFET detectors to 23 mGy. No signal equilibration time is necessary to improve calibration precision. A significant difference between calibration outcomes was demonstrated for FIA with CT compared to the other two methodologies. If the FIA with a CT calibration methodology was used to create calibration coefficients for the eventual use for phantom dosimetry, a measurement error {approx}12% will be reflected in the dosimetry results. The calibration process must emulate the eventual CT dosimetry process by matching or excluding scatter when calibrating the MOSFETs. Finally, the authors recommend that the MOSFETs are energy calibrated approximately every 2500-3000 mV.

  11. Meta-analysis of the Alpha/Beta Ratio for Prostate Cancer in the Presence of an Overall Time Factor: Bad News, Good News, or No News?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelius, Ivan R., E-mail: vogelius@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present a novel method for meta-analysis of the fractionation sensitivity of tumors as applied to prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor. Methods and Materials: A systematic search for radiation dose-fractionation trials in prostate cancer was performed using PubMed and by manual search. Published trials comparing standard fractionated external beam radiation therapy with alternative fractionation were eligible. For each trial the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted, and the data were synthesized with each study weighted by the inverse variance. An overall time factor was included in the analysis, and its influence on {alpha}/{beta} was investigated. Results: Five studies involving 1965 patients were included in the meta-analysis of {alpha}/{beta}. The synthesized {alpha}/{beta} assuming no effect of overall treatment time was -0.07 Gy (95% CI -0.73-0.59), which was increased to 0.47 Gy (95% CI -0.55-1.50) if a single highly weighted study was excluded. In a separate analysis, 2 studies based on 10,808 patients in total allowed extraction of a synthesized estimate of a time factor of 0.31 Gy/d (95% CI 0.20-0.42). The time factor increased the {alpha}/{beta} estimate to 0.58 Gy (95% CI -0.53-1.69)/1.93 Gy (95% CI -0.27-4.14) with/without the heavily weighted study. An analysis of the uncertainty of the {alpha}/{beta} estimate showed a loss of information when the hypofractionated arm was underdosed compared with the normo-fractionated arm. Conclusions: The current external beam fractionation studies are consistent with a very low {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer, although the CIs include {alpha}/{beta} ratios up to 4.14 Gy in the presence of a time factor. Details of the dose fractionation in the 2 trial arms have critical influence on the information that can be extracted from a study. Studies with unfortunate designs will supply little or no information about {alpha}/{beta} regardless of the number of subjects enrolled.

  12. In vivo dosimetry with radiochromic films in low-voltage intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avanzo, M.; Rink, A.; Dassie, A.; Massarut, S.; Roncadin, M.; Borsatti, E.; Capra, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, 33081 Aviano (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: EBT2 radiochromic films were studied and used for in vivo dosimetry in targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT), a technique in which the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) is used to perform intraoperative partial breast irradiation with x-rays of 50 kV{sub p}. Methods: The energy of the radiation emitted by the Intrabeam with the different spherical applicators, under 1 and 2 cm of solid water, and under the tungsten impregnated rubber used for shielding of the heart in TARGIT of the breast, was characterized with measurements of half-value layer (HVL). The stability of response of EBT2 was verified inside this range of energies. EBT2 films were calibrated using the red and green channels of the absorption spectrum in the 0-20 Gy dose range delivered by the Intrabeam x-rays. The dependence of film response on temperature during irradiation was measured. For in vivo dosimetry, pieces of radiochromic films wrapped in sterile envelopes were inserted after breast conserving surgery and before TARGIT into the excision cavity, on the skin and on the shielded pectoralis fascia for treatments of the left breast. Results: HVLs of the Intrabeam in TARGIT of the breast correspond to effective energies of 20.7-36.3 keV. The response of EBT2 was constant inside this range of energies. We measured the dose to the target tissue and to organs at risk in 23 patients and obtained an average dose of 13.52 {+-} 1.21 Gy to the target tissue. Dose to the skin in close proximity to the applicator was 2.22 {+-} 0.97 Gy, 0.29 {+-} 0.17 Gy at 5-10 cm from the applicator, and 0.08 {+-} 0.07 Gy at more than 10 cm from the applicator. Dose to the pectoral muscle for left breast treatment was 0.57 {+-} 0.23 Gy. Conclusions: Our results show that EBT2 films are accurate at the beam energies, dose range, and irradiation temperature found in TARGIT and that in vivo dosimetry in TARGIT with EBT2 films wrapped in sterile envelopes is a feasible procedure. Measured dose to the organs at risk indicates that the technique is safe from side effects to the skin and the heart.

  13. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chugh, Rashmi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Janet Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  14. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Murphy, James D. [School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor response and 1-year freedom from local progression.

  15. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte E. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)] [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); D'Souza, David [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)] [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke's Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States)] [St. Luke's Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ?2 HT than did those with a dose of ?34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is associated with low rates of HT and high rates of weekly cisplatin use. The volume of bone marrow receiving 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow correlated with higher rates of grade ?2 toxicity among patients receiving weekly cisplatin (cervical cancer patients). Evaluation and limitation of the volume of bone marrow treated with pelvic IMRT is warranted in patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.

  16. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With 3-Week Accelerated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadha, Manjeet, E-mail: MChadha@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Woode, Rudolph; Sillanpaa, Jussi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Lucido, David [Department of Biostatistics, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Boolbol, Susan K.; Kirstein, Laurie; Osborne, Michael P.; Feldman, Sheldon [Division of Breast Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Division of Breast Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Harrison, Louis B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report early outcomes of accelerated whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost. Methods and Materials: This is a prospective, institutional review board-approved study. Eligibility included stage TisN0, T1N0, and T2N0 breast cancer. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were ineligible. The whole breast received 40.5 Gy in 2.7-Gy fractions with a concomitant lumpectomy boost of 4.5 Gy in 0.3-Gy fractions. Total dose to the lumpectomy site was 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 19 days. Results: Between October 2004 and December 2010, 160 patients were treated; stage distribution was as follows: TisN0, n=63; T1N0, n=88; and T2N0, n=9. With a median follow-up of 3.5 years (range, 1.5-7.8 years) the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.94) and 97% (95% CI 0.93-0.99), respectively. Five-year local relapse-free survival was 99% (95% CI 0.96-0.99). Acute National Cancer Institute/Common Toxicity Criteria grade 1 and 2 skin toxicity was observed in 70% and 5%, respectively. Among the patients with ?2-year follow-up no toxicity higher than grade 2 on the Late Effects in Normal TissuesSubjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic scale was observed. Review of the radiation therapy dosevolume histogram noted that ?95% of the prescribed dose encompassed the lumpectomy target volume in >95% of plans. The median dose received by the heart D{sub 05} was 215 cGy, and median lung V{sub 20} was 7.6%. Conclusions: The prescribed accelerated schedule of whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost can be administered, achieving acceptable dose distribution. With follow-up to date, the results are encouraging and suggest minimal side effects and excellent local control.

  17. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.96540.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

  18. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  19. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States); Koren, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York 10011 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York 10011 (United States); Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.583.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90) was 53 Gy (range: 13125 Gy).Conclusions: A three-dimensional inpatient dose reconstruction method has been developed that is based on the PET/CT data of a patient treated with {sup 90}Y microspheres. It allows for a complete description of the absorbed dose by the tumor and critical structures. It represents the first step in building predictive models for treatment outcomes for patients receiving this therapeutic modality as well as it allows for better analysis of patients' dose response and will ultimately improve future treatment administration.

  20. A third and a fourth order iteration process for non-linear equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawley, Alton Rudolph

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) is generated by ~(k+1) ~ ~(k) x -g(x ) and such that + y - g(y) + + . + Then if g(x) - g(y) has a non-vanishing Taylor remainder about y of order p for the class of functions F, the process is said to be of order p. One way to find processes... of S. 1 2 n Let x = [x x x ], and let f(x) = [fl(x) f2(x) ''' f (x)] n 1 n n be a vector valued function from S to R such that r(y) g -+ -+ Require f (x), 11r, s, t, u~n, to be continuous in S. gx gx Sx gx ~] We write the matrix J(x) = ? f. (x...

  1. On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada); Centre Intgr de Cancrologie de la Montrgie, Hpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montral, Qubec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Universit Laval and Dpartement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Qubec, Qubec, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  2. Performance of piezoresistive and piezoelectric sensors in pulsed reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbert, K. E. (Keith E.); McCready, S. S. (Steven S.); Heger, A. S. (A. Sharif); Harlow, T. H. (Thomas H.); Spearing, D. R. (Dane R.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed reactor-based experiments require radiation tolerant sensors that do not perturb the device under test, or allow a radiation-induced signal to mask the true sensor output. Several commercial off-the-shelf accelerometers, pressure transducers, and acoustic emission sensors were subjected to multiple high-power reactor pulses. A piezoresistive accelerometer capable of operation to at least 44 kGy and 8.7 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} is identified, and a piezoresistive pressure transducer that is resistant to about half that radiation level is selected. Further, two piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors employing lead metaniobate are also found to function to 55 kGy and 1.1 x 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and MacDiarmid Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade (New Zealand); Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz [Canadian Light Source Inc., University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5 (Canada)

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  4. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  5. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  6. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Precek, M. [Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, Prague 8, 18221 (Czech Republic); Paulenova, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Mincher, B.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Mezyk, S.P. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  7. Uptake swelling and thermal expansion of CFRP tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, P.; Lees, Janet M.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    epoxy, swelling occurs due to the opening up of the polymer physical structure as a result of the formation of hydrogen bonds between the dipoles on water molecules and groups on the polymer chains such as hydroxyls (OH groups).2 This behaviour also... % R H 0. 83 N o c A da m s an d Si ng h4 91 3 (C ib a- G ei gy ): [m ] T S ca rb on :[ f] 2. 0 58 10 0 St ea m 5. 92 N o N o da ta 91 4 (C ib a- G ei gy ): [m ] X A S ca rb on :[ f] 58 1. 00 Y es A bo t et al .6 A G P3 70 -5 H :[ m ] 35 01 -6 S...

  8. Total ionizing dose effects of domestic SiGe HBTs under different dose rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo-Han, Liu; Wu-Ying, Ma; Xin, Wang; Qi, Guo; Cheng-Fa, He; Ke, Jiang; Xiao-Long, Li; Ming-Zhu, Xiong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The total ionizing radiation (TID) response of commercial NPN silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) produced domestic were investigated under the dose rate of 800mGy(Si)/s and 1.3mGy(Si)/s with Co-60 gamma irradiation source, respectively. The changes of the transistor parameter such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current before and after irradiation are investigated. The results of the experiments shows that for the KT1151, the radiation damage have slightly difference under the different dose rate after the prolonged annealing, shows an time dependent effect(TDE). But for the KT9041, the degradations of low dose rate irradiation are more higher than the high dose rate, demonstrate that there have potential enhanced low dose rate sensitive(ELDRS) effect exist on KT9041. The underlying physical mechanisms of the different dose rates response induced by the gamma ray are detailed discussed.

  9. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Onicescu, Georgiana [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Clarke, Harry S. [Department of Urology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  10. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, Reed [Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID (United States); Carter, Dennis L. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Dennis.Carter@usoncology.com; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Tallhamer, Michael [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States); Johnson, Tim [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi [Arapahoe Surgical Associates, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Kaske, Terese [Sally Jobe Diagnostic Breast Center, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Rose Hospital, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, Charles E. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  11. Correlation of Local Failure With Measures of Dose Insufficiency in the High-Dose Single-Fraction Treatment of Bony Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovelock, D. Michael, E-mail: lovelocm@mskcc.or [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology-Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bekelman, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bilsky, Mark [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In the setting of high-dose single-fraction image-guided radiotherapy of spine metastases, the delivered dose is hypothesized to be a significant factor in local control. We investigated the dependence of local control on measures of dose insufficiency. Methods and Materials: The minimum doses received by the hottest 100%, 98%, and 95% (D{sub min}, D{sub 98}, and D{sub 95}) of the gross target volume (GTV) were computed for 91 consecutively treated lesions observed in 79 patients. Prescribed doses of 18-24 Gy were delivered in a single fraction. The spinal cord and cauda equina were constrained to a maximum dose of 12-14 Gy and 16 Gy, respectively. A rank-sum test was used to assess the differences between radiographic local failure and local control. Results: With a median follow-up of 18 months, seven local failures have occurred. The distributions of GTV D{sub min}, D{sub 98}, and D{sub 95} for treatments resulting in local failure were found to be statistically different from the corresponding distributions of the patient group as a whole. Taking no account of histology, p values calculated for D{sub min}, D{sub 98}, and D{sub 95} were 0.004, 0.012, and 0.031, respectively. No correlations between local failure and target volume or between local failure and anatomic location were found. Conclusions: The results indicate that D{sub min}, D{sub 98}, and D{sub 95} may be important risk factors for local failure. No local failures in any histology were observed when D{sub min} was >15 Gy, suggesting that this metric may be an important predictor of local control.

  12. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fahner, Tasha [University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  13. The effects of diet and ionizing radiation on azoxymethane induced colon carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, John Clifford

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    rats were exposed to a single dose of approximately 1 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon Fe-56 ions at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron/Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (AGS/RHIC) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY). Each rat was immobilized.... 11 CHAPTER II MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental design. Animal protocols used for this study were approved by the Institutional Animal Care Committees of Texas A&M University and Brookhaven National Laboratory and conform to the guidelines...

  14. Cdric Fournet , George Danezis Markulf Kohlweiss, Zhengqin Luo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    ;DemoPreview > ZQL.compile let setup (x, y) = let ox = sample() let oy = sample() let Cx = g^x * h^ox let Cy = g^y * h^oy let sigv = sign sk (concat (eltBytes Cx) (eltBytes Cy)) ((x, ox, Cx), (y, oy, Cy), sigv)) let prover ((x, ox, Cx), (y, oy, Cy), sigv)) = let r = 2*x ­ y let o = 2*ox - oy (Cx

  15. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  16. Measurement Traceability ISO 11137 Sect. 4.3.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 4th residual -1,50 -1,00 -0,50 0,00 0,50 1,00 1,50 2,00 1 10 100 1000 Dose, kGy Residual,% #12 effects of humidity (water content) effects of light UV and visible effects of dose rate stability;2 Before irradiation stability of response function light During irradiation temperature humidity (water

  17. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  18. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

  19. Characteristics and Feasibility of Marketing Texas Grease Wool on a Known Quality Basis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Stanley P.; Hunt, Robert L.; Holland, Robert L.

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics and Sociolo,gy (retirctl) , for 11is support and encouragement. Ackn~wled~gment is made for the ron- siderable assistance given by L. D. Howell, agricultural economist, U. S. Dcp;trtrncr~t of Agricultural Economics antl Sotiolog!, Further... means of measuring objectively some of the important physical properties of wool. They have devised sampling methods and laboratory tests for the determination of fineness, length and clean yield on small wool quantities or samples. These tests may...

  20. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands); Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Davids, J.A.G. [Lonbar Petrilaan, Overveen (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of prenatal X irradiation on postnatal development of the CBA/P mouse testis was studied. At days 14, 15 and 18 post coitus pregnant female mice were exposed to single doses of X rays ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy. Higher doses resulted in extensive loss of fetal mice. In the male offspring, at days 3 and 31 post partum, the numbers of gonocytes, type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells per testis were determined using the disector method. Furthermore, after irradiation at day 15 post coitus, the numbers of Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelial cells and perivascular cells per testis were also determined at days 3 and 31 post partum. At day 3 post partum, the number of germ cells was decreased after irradiation at days 14 and 15 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.7 Gy was determined for the radiosensitivity of the gonocytes at day 14 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.8 Gy was determined for the gonocytes at day 15 post coitus which, however, seems to be less accurate. No accurate D{sub o} value could be determined for the gonocytes at day 18 post coitus. At day 31 post partum, the repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium as well as testis weights and tubular diameters were more affected by irradiation with increasing age of the mice at the time of irradiation. The percentage of tubular cross sections showing spermatids decreased with increasing dose after irradiation at days 15 and 18 post coitus, but not after irradiation at day 14 post coitus. Furthermore, in tubular cross sections showing spermatids, exposure of testes to 1.25 and 1.5 Gy at day 18 post coitus resulted in significantly lower numbers of spermatids per cross section when compared to those testes exposed to the same doses at day 15 post coitus. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Antimicrobial packaging system for optimization of electron beam irradiation of fresh produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jaejoon

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . These films can control microbial contamination by reducing the growth rate and maximum growth population, as well as extending the lag period of the target microorganism, and therefore should help to prolong the product shelf life and maintain its safety... with 4 low-dose electron beam irradiation (1-3 kGy) provides a synergistic preservative effect, and therefore one can ensure the microbial safety of minimally processed leafy vegetables with negligible quality loss. The specific objectives are: 1...

  2. Immunosuppression prior to marrow transplantation for sensitized aplastic anemia patients: comparison of TLI with TBI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shank, B.; Brochstein, J.A.; Castro-Malaspina, H.; Yahalom, J.; Bonfiglio, P.; O'Reilly, R.J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From May 1980 through July 1986, 26 patients with severe aplastic anemia, sensitized with multiple transfusions of blood products, were treated on either of two immunosuppressive regimens in preparation for bone marrow transplantation from a matched donor. There were 10 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), 200 cGy/fraction X 4 daily fractions (800 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg/d X 2 d. An additional 16 patients were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (or, if they were infants, a modified TLI or thoracoabdominal irradiation (TAI)), 100 cGy/fraction, 3 fractions/d X 2 d (600 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 40 mg/kg/d X 4 d. The extent of immunosuppression was similar in both groups as measured by peripheral blood lymphocyte depression at the completion of the course of irradiation (5% of initial concentration for TBI and 24% for TLI), neutrophil engraftment (10/10 for TBI and 15/16 for TLI), and time to neutrophil engraftment (median of 22 d for TBI and 17 d for TLI). Marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis for assessment of percent donor cells was also compared in those patients in whom it was available. 2/2 patients studied with TBI had 100% donor cells, whereas 6/11 with TLI had 100% donor cells. Of the five who did not, three were stable mixed chimeras with greater than or equal to 70% donor cells, one became a mixed chimera with about 50% donor cells, but became aplastic again after Cyclosporine A cessation 5 mo post-transplant, and the fifth reverted to all host cells by d. 18 post-transplant. Overall actuarial survival at 2 years was 56% in the TLI group compared with 30% in the TBI group although this was not statistically significant. No survival decrement has been seen after 2 years in either group.

  3. A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

  4. Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b , E.G. Jobbágy b Cabañas S/N, Hurlingham (1686), Buenos Aires, Argentina b Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina c Grupo de Estudios Ambientales e IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San

  5. Ch 15. Thermodynamics Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Ch 15. Thermodynamics Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1 #12;I The First Law of ThermodynamicsI. The First Law of Thermodynamics Closed system: U=Q-Wy Q U Internal energy: all the energy of the moleculesgy gy for an ideal gas1B 2012 2 #12;Thermodynamic ProcessesThermodynamic Processes Isothermal: T=0, U=0, Q=W Adiabatic: Q

  6. Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zilli, Thomas, E-mail: thomaszilli@inwind.it [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Jorcano, Sandra [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Rouzaud, Michel; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Toscas, Jose Ignacio [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Casanova, Nathalie; Wang, Hui [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Escude, Lluis; Molla, Meritxell; Linero, Dolors [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, Damien C. [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Miralbell, Raymond [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk {<=}20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade {>=}3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% {+-} 2.9% and 96.1% {+-} 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% {+-} 5.9%, 76.4% {+-} 8.8%, and 77.5% {+-} 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

  7. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmoreaffect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d? and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.less

  8. Serum Amyloid A as a Predictive Marker for Radiation Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu-Shan [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Animal Science, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Heng-Jui [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Su-Chen; Ko, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chih-Chia [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Yu-Wung; Jiang, Jiunn-Song [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, Kwan-Hwa, E-mail: M006565@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Science and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate serum markers associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade ?3 in patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment serum samples from patients with stage Ib-IV lung cancer who developed RP within 1 year after radiation therapy were analyzed to identify a proteome marker able to stratify patients prone to develop severe RP by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Dosimetric parameters and 3 biological factors were compared. Results: Serum samples from 16 patients (28%) with severe RP (grade 3-4) and 42 patients (72%) with no or mild RP (grade 0-2) were collected for analysis. All patients received a median of 54 Gy (range, 42-70 Gy) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with a mean lung dose (MLD) of 1502 cGy (range, 700-2794 cGy). An m/z peak of 11,480 Da was identified by SELDI-TOF-MS, and serum amyloid A (SAA) was the primary splitter serum marker. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of SAA (0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.00) was higher than those of C-reactive protein (0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.94), interleukin-6 (0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), and MLD (0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77). The best sensitivity and specificity of combined SAA and MLD for predicting RP were 88.9% and 96.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Baseline SAA could be used as an auxiliary marker for predicting severe RP. Extreme care should be taken to limit the lung irradiation dose in patients with high SAA.

  9. Relative Biologic Effects of Low-Dose-Rate {alpha}-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Rituximab and {beta}-Emitting {sup 90}Y-Tiuexetan-Ibritumomab Versus External Beam X-Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahle, Jostein [Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: jostein.dahle@rr-research.no; Bruland, Oyvind S. [University of Oslo and Department of Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway); Larsen, Roy H. [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the relative biologic effects (RBE) of {alpha}-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-rituximab and of {beta}-radiation from {sup 90}Y-tiuexetan-ibritumomab (Zevalin) compared with external beam X-radiation in the Raji lymphoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Radioimmunoconjugates were administered intravenously in nude mice with Raji lymphoma xenografts at different levels of activity. Absorbed dose to tumor was estimated by separate biodistribution experiments for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and Zevalin. Tumor growth was measured two to three times per week after injection or X-radiation. Treatment-induced increase in growth delay to reach tumor volumes of 500 and 1,000 mm{sup 3}, respectively, was used as an end point. Results: The absorbed radiation dose-rate in tumor was slightly more than 0.1 Gy/d for the first week following injection of {sup 227}Th-rituximab, and thereafter gradually decreased to 0.03 Gy/d at 21 days after injection. For treatment with Zevalin the maximum dose-rate in tumor was achieved already 6 h after injection (0.2 Gy/d), and thereafter decreased to 0.01 Gy/d after 7 days. The relative biologic effect was between 2.5 and 7.2 for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and between 1 and 1.3 for Zevalin. Conclusions: Both at low doses and low-dose-rates, the {sup 227}Th-rituximab treatment was more effective per absorbed radiation dose unit than the two other treatments. The considerable effect at low doses suggests that the best way to administer low-dose-rates, {alpha}-emitting radioimmunoconjugates is via multiple injections.

  10. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A., E-mail: kleinerr@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Holowaty, Eric [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hall, Per [Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Pukkala, Eero [Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki (Finland); Vaalavirta, Leila [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaijser, Magnus [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Michael [Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Storm, Hans [Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark); Joensuu, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Lynch, Charles F. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the doseresponse relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched casecontrol study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ?5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation doseresponse relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear doseresponse relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  11. 420 W. 118th Street, New York, New York 10027 | energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Center on Global Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Mayor of New York City Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, U.S. Secretary of Energy Thomas E. Donilon, former National420 W. 118th Street, New York, New York 10027 | energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy CenterUEnergy #12;thE ChAnGinG EnErGy lAndsCAPE 1Center on Global Energy Policy | "Global leaders must now craft new

  12. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

  13. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Aswin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hopman, Wim P.M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded.

  14. Marginal Recurrence Requiring Salvage Radiotherapy After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Djemil, Toufik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Burdick, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tulane Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Woody, Neil; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Angelov, Lilyana [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: We sought to quantify and identify risk factors associated with margin recurrence (MR) requiring salvage radiotherapy after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients with spinal metastases who were treated with single-fraction SBRT between 2006 and 2009. Gross tumor was contoured, along with either the entire associated vertebral body(ies) or the posterior elements, and included in the planning target volume. No additional margins were used. MR was defined as recurrent tumor within one vertebral level above or below the treated lesion that required salvage radiotherapy. Only patients who presented for 3-month post-SBRT follow-up were included in the analysis. Fine and Gray competing risk regression models were generated to identify variables associated with higher risks of MR. MR was plotted using cumulative incidence analysis. Results: SBRT was delivered to 208 lesions in 149 patients. Median follow-up was 8.6 months, and median survival was 12.8 months. The median prescribed dose was 14 Gy (10-16 Gy). MR occurred in 26 (12.5%) treated lesions, at a median time of 7.7 months after SBRT. Patients with paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT (20.8% vs. 7.6% of patients; p = 0.02), and those treated with <16 Gy (16.3% vs. 6.3% of patients, p = 0.14) had higher rates of MR. Both variables were associated with significantly higher risk of MR on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: SBRT for spinal metastases results in a low overall rate of MR. The presence of paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT and a dose of <16 Gy were associated with higher risks of MR.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  16. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N. [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Trial of Concomitant Boost Using Indium-111-Capromab Pendetide (ProstaScint) Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Schild, Steven E.; Vora, Sujay A.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Ram, Panol C.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a prospective study, the use of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan to guide the delivery of a concomitant boost to intraprostatic region showing increased uptake while treating the entire gland with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From September 2002 to November 2005, 71 patients were enrolled. Planning pelvic CT and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan images were coregistered. The entire prostate gland received 75.6 Gy/42 fractions, whereas areas of increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan received 82 Gy. For patients with T3/T4 disease, or Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, 12 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given. In January 2005 the protocol was modified to give 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy to patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL or Gleason 7 disease. Results: Thirty-one patients had low-risk, 30 had intermediate-risk, and 10 had high-risk disease. With a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year biochemical control rates were 94% for the entire cohort and 97%, 93%, and 90% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Maximum acute and late urinary toxicities were Grade 2 for 38 patients (54%) and 28 patients (39%) and Grade 3 for 1 and 3 patients (4%), respectively. One patient had Grade 4 hematuria. Maximum acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 for 32 patients (45%) and 15 patients (21%), respectively. Most of the side effects improved with longer follow-up. Conclusion: Concomitant boost to areas showing increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan to 82 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy while the entire prostate received 75.6 Gy was feasible and tolerable, with 94% biochemical control rate at 5 years.

  18. Dosimetric Benefit of a New Ophthalmic Radiation Plaque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marwaha, Gaurav, E-mail: marwahg2@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bena, James [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States) [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Singh, Arun D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the computed dosimetry of a new ophthalmic plaque, EP917, when compared with the standard Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) plaques, could reduce radiation exposure to vision critical structures of the eye. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with COMS radiation plaques between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. These treatment plans were generated with the use of Bebig Plaque Simulator treatment-planning software, both for COMS plaques and for EP917 plaques using I-125. Dose distributions were calculated for a prescription of 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Doses to the optic disc, opposite retina, lens, and macula were obtained, and differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by standard parametric methods. Results: When compared with the COMS plaques, the EP917 plaques used fewer radiation seeds by an average difference of 1.94 (P<.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.06) and required less total strength of radiation sources by an average of 17.74 U (air kerma units) (P<.001; 95% CI, -20.16 to -15.32). The total radiation doses delivered to the optic disc, opposite retina, and macula were significantly less by 4.57 Gy, 0.50 Gy, and 11.18 Gy, respectively, with the EP917 plaques vs the COMS plaques. Conclusion: EP917 plaques deliver less overall radiation exposure to critical vision structures than COMS treatment plaques while still delivering the same total therapeutic dose to the tumor.

  19. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haddock, Michael G., E-mail: haddock.michael@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J. [Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Alberts, Steven R. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  20. Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes of Involved-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy After Chemotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma With Mediastinal Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Ningning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wu Runye; Zhang Ximei; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Fang Hui; Ren Hua; Wang Shulian; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Chen Bo; Dai Jianrong; Yu Zihao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and clinical outcomes of involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IF-IMRT) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with early-stage HL that involved the mediastinum were reviewed. Eight patients had Stage I disease, and 44 patients had Stage II disease. Twenty-three patients (44%) presented with a bulky mediastinum, whereas 42 patients (81%) had involvement of both the mediastinum and either cervical or axillary nodes. All patients received combination chemotherapy followed by IF-IMRT. The prescribed radiation dose was 30-40 Gy. The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The median mean dose to the primary involved regions (planning target volume, PTV1) and boost area (PTV2) was 37.5 Gy and 42.1 Gy, respectively. Only 0.4% and 1.3% of the PTV1 and 0.1% and 0.5% of the PTV2 received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent PTV coverage. The median mean lung dose and V20 to the lungs were 13.8 Gy and 25.9%, respectively. The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 100%, 97.9%, and 96%, respectively. No Grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Despite the large target volume, IF-IMRT gave excellent dose coverage and a favorable prognosis, with mild toxicity in patients with early-stage mediastinal HL.

  1. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  2. U.S. WRESTLING FEDERATION HALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    S-86 S-87 S-36 S-85 S-90 S-75 S-76 HOUSE #6 S-89 S-91 OFFICE CENTER AGRICULTURE U.S.D.A. S-92 S-88. SMITH HALL ALUMNI CENTER HOUSING - JPI PHASE 1 BUILDING 3 HOUSING - JPI PHASE 1 BUILDING 4 STUDENT UNION. LAUNDRY RESOURCE Y CAGE LAB. POULTRY BATTERY LAB. BROODER FIRE TECH. OUTDOOR LAB. MO. LAB. GY CONS. CHAPEL

  3. Parotid Glands DoseEffect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were ?4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the doseeffect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dosesaliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were observed at first treatment, indicating potential benefit for more complex setup corrections or adaptive interventions in the minority of patients with large deviations detected early by CBCT.

  4. The gaming pieces from the glass wreck at Serce Limani, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassavoy, Kenneth Albert

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE GAMING PIECES FROM THE GLASS WRECK AT SERgE LIMANI, TURKEY A Thesis by KENNETH ALBERT CASSAVOY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August... ml (Member) g n M. Bryant Jr (Head, Anthropo gy August 1985 ABSTRACT The Gaming Pieces from the Glass Wreck at Serge Limani, Turkey. (August 1985) Kenneth Albert Cassavoy, B. A. , Trent University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. George F...

  5. Importance of a Patient Dosimetry and Clinical Follow-up Program in the Detection of Radiodermatitis After Long Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vano, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain); Escaned, Javier [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Cardiovascular Institute (Spain)] [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Cardiovascular Institute (Spain); Vano-Galvan, Sergio [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Dermatology Service (Spain)] [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Dermatology Service (Spain); Fernandez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department (Spain); Galvan, Carmen, E-mail: cgalvan@med.ucm.es [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Radiotherapy Service and Radiology Department (Spain)] [Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Complutense University, Radiotherapy Service and Radiology Department (Spain)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex percutaneous interventions often require high radiation doses likely to produce skin radiation injuries. We assessed the methodology used to select patients with potential skin injuries in cardiac procedures and in need of clinical follow-up. We evaluated peak skin dose and clinical follow-up in a case of radiodermatitis produced during a total occlusion recanalization. This prospective study followed CIRSE and ACC/AHA/SCAI recommendations for patient radiation dose management in interventional procedures carried out in a university hospital with a workload of 4200 interventional cardiac procedures per year. Patient dose reports were automatically transferred to a central database. Patients exceeding trigger levels for air kerma area product (500 Gy cm{sup 2}) and cumulative skin dose (5 Gy) were counseled and underwent follow-up for early detection of skin injuries, with dermatologic support. The Ethical Committee and the Quality Assurance and Radiation Safety Committee approved the program. During 2010, a total of 13 patients (3.0/1,000 that year) received dose values exceeding trigger levels in the cardiovascular institute. Only one patient, who had undergone two consecutive procedures resulting in 970 Gy cm{sup 2} and 13.0 Gy as cumulative skin dose, showed signs of serious radiodermatitis that resolved in 3.7 months. The remaining patients did not manifest skin lesions during follow-up, and whenever patient examination was not feasible as part of the follow-up, neither patients nor families reported any skin injuries. Peak skin dose calculation and close clinical follow-up were feasible and appropriate, with a moderate additional workload for the staff and satisfaction for the patient.

  6. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Scott, David E. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Tsyusko, Olga [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Coughlin, Daniel P. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Hinton, Thomas G. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Inst. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Cadarache (France); Amendola, Roberto [ENEA, (Italy)

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d? and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  7. Effects of Processing on Immunoreactivity of Cashew Nut (Anacardium occidentale L.) Seed Flour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    'DONNELL,# MARY SUSAN GERBER, KENNETH H. ROUX,§ AND SHRIDHAR K. SATHE*, Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise for 15 and 20 min; and 200 °C for 10 and 15 min), -irradiation (1, 5, 10, and 25 kGy), and pH (1, 3, 5, 7 eight" food groups responsible for food allergies. According to a Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network

  8. Neural Stem Cell-Preserving External-Beam Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: ibarani@mcvh-vcu.edu; Cuttino, Laurie W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Bump, Edward A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Wu Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Chung, Theodore D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Broaddus, William C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Lin, Peck-Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recent discoveries have implicated neural stem cells (NSC) as the source of plasticity and repair in the mature mammalian brain. Treatment-induced NSC dysfunction may lead to observed toxicity. This study evaluates the feasibility of NSC-preserving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A single computed tomography (CT) dataset depicting a right periventricular lesion was used in this study as this location reflects the most problematic geometric arrangement with respect to NSC preservation. Conventional and NSC preserving radiotherapy (RT) plans were generated for the same lesion using two clinical scenarios: cerebral metastatic disease and primary high-grade glioma. Disease-specific target volumes were used. Metastatic disease was conventionally treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to 3,750 cGy (15 fractions) followed by a single stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost of 1,800 cGy to gross disease only. High-grade glioma was treated with conventional opposed lateral and anterior superior oblique beams to 4,600 cGy (23 fractions) followed by a 1,400 cGy (7 fractions) boost. NSC preservation was achieved in both scenarios with inverse-planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: Cumulative dose reductions of 65% (metastatic disease) and 25% (high-grade glioma) to the total volume of the intracranial NSC compartments were achieved with NSC-preserving IMRT plans. The reduction of entry and exit dose to NSC niches located contralateral to the target contributed most to NSC preservation. Conclusions: Neural stem cells preservation with current external beam radiotherapy techniques is achievable in context of both metastatic brain disease and high-grade glioma, even when the target is located adjacent to a stem cell compartment. Further investigation with clinical trials is warranted to evaluate whether NSC preservation will result in reduced toxicity.

  9. Advanced Calculus I (Math 309) Fall 2002 Lecture Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    is invertible iff there exists a function g : Y X with (f g)(y) = y y Y and (g f)(x) = x x X, and then gAdvanced Calculus I (Math 309) Fall 2002 Lecture Notes Martin Bohner Version from December 11, 2002. Preliminaries 1 0.1. Sets 1 0.2. Functions 1 0.3. Proofs 2 Chapter 1. The Real Number System 3 1.1. The Field

  10. BEAM DYNAMICS IN NS-FFAG EMMAWITH DYNAMICAL MAPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giboudot, Y; Edgecock, R; Wolski, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient EMMA has a compact linear lattice. Effect of Fringe Field on the beam has to be studied carefully. A numerical magnetic field map is generated by magnet measurements or magnet design softwares. We developed a technique that produces from the numerical field map, a dynamical map for a particle travelling in the entire EMMA cell for a reference energy without acceleration. Since the beam dynamics change with energy, a set of maps have been produce with different reference energies between 10 and 20MeV. For each reference energy, simulated tune and time of flight (TOF) have been compared with results in Zgoubi - tracking directly through numerical field map. The range of validity of a single map has been investigated by tracking particle with large energy deviation. From that, a ...

  11. Radiation hardness of the storage phosphor europium doped potassium chloride for radiation therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driewer, Joseph P.; Chen, Haijian; Osvet, Andres; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 and Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, E4431 Lafferre Hall, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: An important property of a reusable dosimeter is its radiation hardness, that is, its ability to retain its dosimetric merits after irradiation. The radiation hardness of europium doped potassium chloride (KCl:Eu{sup 2+}), a storage phosphor material recently proposed for radiation therapy dosimetry, is examined in this study. Methods: Pellet-style KCl:Eu{sup 2+} dosimeters, 6 mm in diameter, and 1 mm thick, were fabricated in-house for this study. The pellets were exposed by a 6 MV photon beam or in a high dose rate {sup 137}Cs irradiator. Macroscopic properties, such as radiation sensitivity, dose response linearity, and signal stability, were studied with a laboratory photostimulated luminescence (PSL) readout system. Since phosphor performance is related to the state of the storage centers and the activator, Eu{sup 2+}, in the host lattice, spectroscopic and temporal measurements were carried out in order to explore radiation-induced changes at the microscopic level. Results: KCl:Eu{sup 2+} dosimeters retained approximately 90% of their initial signal strength after a 5000 Gy dose history. Dose response was initially supralinear over the dose range of 100-700 cGy but became linear after 60 Gy. Linearity did not change significantly in the 0-5000 Gy dose history spanned in this study. Annealing high dose history chips resulted in a return of supralinearity and a recovery of sensitivity. There were no significant changes in the PSL stimulation spectra, PSL emission spectra, photoluminescence spectra, or luminescence lifetime, indicating that the PSL signal process remains intact after irradiation but at a reduced efficiency due to reparable radiation-induced perturbations in the crystal lattice. Conclusions: Systematic studies of KCl:Eu{sup 2+} material are important for understanding how the material can be optimized for radiation therapy dosimetry purposes. The data presented here indicate that KCl:Eu{sup 2+} exhibits strong radiation hardness and lends support for further investigations of this novel material.

  12. RADIATION ECOLOGY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MURINE RODENTS AND SHREWS IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes major studies performed by the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory (Slavutich, Ukraine) on radioecology of murine rodents and shrews inhabiting the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The article addresses the long-term (1986-2005) and seasonal dynamics of radioactive contamination of animals, and reviews interspecies differences in radionuclide accumulations and factors affecting the radionuclide accumulations. It is shown that bioavailability of radionuclides in the 'soil-to-plant' chain and a trophic specialization of animals play key roles in determining their actual contamination levels. The total absorbed dose rates in small mammals significantly reduced during the years following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In 1986, the absorbed dose rate reached 1.3-6.0 Gy hr{sup -1} in the central areas of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (the 'Red Forest'). In 1988 and 1990, the total absorbed dose rates were 1.3 and 0.42 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. In 1995, 2000, and 2005, according to the present study, the total absorbed dose rates rarely exceeded 0.00023, 0.00018, and 0.00015 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. Contributions of individual radiation sources into the total absorbed dose are described.

  13. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plataniotis, George A. [Department of Oncology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)], E-mail: george.plataniotis@nhs.net; Dale, Roger G. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  14. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis secondary to high dose rate endobronchial irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speiser, B.L. (St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Spratling, L.

    1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to describe a new clinical entity observed in follow-up bronchoscopies in patients who were treated with high dose rate and medium dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy of the tracheobronchial tree. Patients were treated by protocol with medium dose rate, 47 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 5 mm depth times three fractions, high dose rate 144 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions and high dose rate 151 patients receiving cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions followed by bronchoscopy. Incidence of this entity was 9% for the first group, 12% for the second, and 13% for the third group. Reactions were grade 1 consisting of mild inflammatory response with a partial whitish circumferential membrane in an asymptomatic patient; grade 2, thicker complete white circumferential membrane with cough and/or obstructive problems requiring intervention; grade 3, severe inflammatory response with marked membranous exudate and mild fibrotic reaction; and grade 4 a predominant fibrotic reaction with progressive stenosis. Variables associated with a slightly increased incidence of radiation bronchitis and stenosis included: large cell carcinoma histology, curative intent, prior laser photoresection, and/or concurrent external radiation. Survival was the strongest predictor of the reaction. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis is a new clinical entity that must be identified in bronchial brachytherapy patients and treated appropriately. 23 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J. [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  16. Dentofacial development in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A comparison of three treatment modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonis, A.L.; Tarbell, N.; Valachovic, R.W.; Gelber, R.; Schwenn, M.; Sallan, S. (Children's Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-seven children who were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before 10 years of age and treated with chemotherapy alone, chemotherapy plus 1800-cGy cranial irradiation (RT), or chemotherapy plus 2400-cGy RT were evaluated for effects of therapy on dentofacial development. All patients were seen at least 5 years postdiagnosis. Dental abnormalities were determined from panoramic radiographs, and craniofacial evaluations were made from lateral cephalometric radiographs. Ninety-one (94%) of all patients and 41 (100%) of patients younger than 5 years of age at diagnosis had abnormal dental development. The severity of these abnormalities was greater in children who received treatment before 5 years of age and in those who received RT. Observed dental abnormalities included tooth agenesis, arrested root development, microdontia, and enamel dysplasias. Craniofacial abnormalities occurred in 18 of 20 (90%) of those patients who received chemotherapy plus 2400-cGy RT before 5 years of age. Mean cephalometric values of this group showed significant deficient mandibular development. The results of this study suggest that the severity of dentofacial-developmental abnormalities secondary to antileukemia therapy are related to the age of the patient at the initiation of treatment and the use of cranial RT.

  17. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the prepubertal mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Eerdenburg, F.J.C.M. van [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands); Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Jong, F.H. de [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands); Davids, J.A.G. [Lonbar Petrilaan, Overveen (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of total-body X-irradiation on the prepubertal testis of the CBA/P mouse have been studied. At either day 14 or day 29 post partum male mice were exposed to single doses of X-rays ranging from 15-6.0 Gy. At 1 week after irradiation the repopulation index method was used to study the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells. A D{sub 0} value of 1.8 Gy was determined for the stem cells at day 14 post partum as well as for the stem cells at day 29 post partum, indicating that the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells in the prepubertal mouse testis is already comparable to that observed in the adult mouse. One, 2 or 3 weeks after irradiation total cell number per testis of Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelium and perivascular cells were determined using the disector method. The Sertoli cells and interstitial cell types appeared to be relatively radioresistant during the prepubertal period. No significant changes in plasma testosterone levels were found, indicating that there is no Leydig cell dysfunction after exposure to doses up to 6 Gy during the prepubertal period. Taken together, the radioresponse of the prepubertal mouse testis is comparable to that of the adult mouse testis. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Vinay [Johannesburg Hospital, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)], E-mail: sharmav@medicine.wits.ac.za; Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med. [Institut Curie, Hopital Aristide le Dentec, Univesite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Dakar (Senegal); Wahab, Sherif Abdel [Ain Shams University, Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt); Ndlovu, Ntokozo [Medical School, Radiotherapy Centre, Harare (Zimbabwe); Ngoma, Twalib [Ocean Road Hospital, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania); Vanderpuye, Verna [Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra (Ghana); Sowunmi, Anthonia [Teaching Hospital, University of Lagos, Surulere, Lagos (Nigeria); Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph [Radiotherapy Department, Makerere University, Kampala (Uganda); Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  19. Bone marrow transplantation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranov, A.; Gale, R.P.; Guskova, A.; Piatkin, E.; Selidovkin, G.; Muravyova, L.; Champlin, R.E.; Danilova, N.; Yevseeva, L.; Petrosyan, L. (Institute of Biophysics of the Ministry of Health and Clinical Hospital, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 26, 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union exposed about 200 people to large doses of total-body radiation. Thirteen persons exposed to estimated total-body doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy received bone marrow transplants. Two transplant recipients, who received estimated doses of radiation of 5.6 and 8.7 Gy, are alive more than three years after the accident. The others died of various causes, including burns (the cause of death in five), interstitial pneumonitis (three), graft-versus-host disease (two), and acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (one). There was hematopoietic (granulocytic) recovery in nine transplant recipients who could be evaluated, six of whom had transient partial engraftment before the recovery of their own marrow. Graft-versus-host disease was diagnosed clinically in four persons and suspected in two others. Although the recovery of endogenous hematopoiesis may occur after exposure to radiation doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy, we do not know whether it is more likely after the transient engraftment of transplanted stem cells. Because large doses of radiation affect multiple systems, bone marrow recovery does not necessarily ensure survival. Furthermore, the risk of graft-versus-host disease must be considered when the benefits of this treatment are being weighed.

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Daniel E., E-mail: daniel.roos@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Potter, Andrew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Brophy, Brian P. [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  1. Natural radiation exposure in a municipality of the Brazilian Sertao

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malanca, A. [UFRN, Natal (Brazil)] [UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Gaidolfi, L. [Settore Fisico-Ambientale, Piacenza (Italy)] [Settore Fisico-Ambientale, Piacenza (Italy)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty-seven thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were distributed to the inhabitants of a Brazilian municipality located in the semi-arid inland (Sertao) of the state of Rio Grande do Norte. All the TLDs were exposed for 180 d in bedrooms or in living areas of the selected buildings and eventually returned to the authors` laboratory in italy. Radiological measurements gave a range of 32-330 nGy h{sup -1}, an arithmetic mean of 107 {+-} 47 nGy h{sup -1}, and a geometric mean of 99 nGy h{sup -1}. This last value corresponds to an annual indoor effective dose equivalent of 425 {mu}Sv. Concentrations of primordial radionuclides in some samples of building material, soil, and rock collected in the aformentioned territory were analytically determined by gamma spectrometer. The relatively high content of {sup 226}Ra (98.5 {+-} 12 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 232}Th (252.5 {+-} 47 Bq kg{sup -1}), and {sup 40}K (1533 {+-} 169 Bq kg{sup -1}) in bedrock is probably responsible for the elevated {lambda}-radiation environment of that municipality. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tab.

  2. Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

  3. Effective Dose Reduction to Cardiac Structures Using Protons Compared With 3DCRT and IMRT in Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Latif, Naeem [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Joyce, Michael; Sandler, Eric [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Nemours Children's Clinic and Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Nemours Children's Clinic and Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of proton therapy (PT) on various cardiac subunits in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: From June 2009 through December 2010, 13 patients were enrolled on an institutional review board-approved protocol for consolidative involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) for HL. Three separate treatment plans were developed prospectively by using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and PT. Cardiac subunits were retrospectively contoured on the 11 patients with intravenous-contrast simulation scans, and the doses were calculated for all treatment plans. A Wilcoxon paired test was performed to evaluate the statistical significance (p < 0.05) of 3DCRT and IMRT compared with PT. Results: The mean heart doses were 21 Gy, 12 Gy, and 8 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) with 3DCRT, IMRT, and PT, respectively. Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the mean doses to the left and right atria; the left and right ventricles; the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves; and the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the radiation doses to all major cardiac subunits. Limiting the doses to these structures should translate into lower rates of cardiac toxicities.

  4. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  5. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rombi, Barbara [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland) [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy)] [Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy; Italy; Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland) [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Timmermann, Beate [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland) [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of {sup 90}Y, {sup 32}P, and {sup 186}Re radiocolloids in craniopharyngioma treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Karimi, Elham; Hosseini, S. Hamed [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Engineering, Research and Science Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155/4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In the radionuclide treatment of some forms of brain tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, the selection of the appropriate radionuclide for therapy is a key element in treatment planning. The aim was to study the influence by considering the beta-emitter radionuclide dose rate in an intracranial cyst. Methods: Dosimetry was performed using the MCNP4C radiation transport code. Analytical dosimetry was additionally performed using the Loevinger and the Berger formulas in the MATLAB software. Each result was compared under identical conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using {sup 90}Y versus {sup 32}P and {sup 186}Re were investigated. Results: The dose rate at the inner surface of the cyst wall was estimated to be 400 mGy/h for a 1 MBq/ml concentration of {sup 90}Y. Under identical conditions of treatment, the corresponding dose rates were 300 mGy/h for {sup 32}P and 160 mGy/h for {sup 186}Re. For a well-defined cyst radius and identical wall thickness, higher dose rates resulted for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: To achieve the same radiological burden, the required amount of physical activity of injectable solution is lower for {sup 32}P. This is found to be a consequence of both the radionuclide physical half-life and the pattern of energy deposition from the emitted radiation. According to the half-life and dose-rate results, {sup 90}Y would be a good substitute for {sup 32}P.

  7. The change of radiation doses to the patient when switching from conventional technique to digital technique without films in barium enema and IVU examinations. Final report SSI research project P933

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjholm, B

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray examinations of the colon (barium enema) and the kidneys (IVU) are combined with rather high radiation doses to the patients when using analogue technique with film-screen systems. It is therefore of great interest to see if the change from analogue to digital technique involves a reduction of doses. Barium enema and IVU examinations were monitored with DAP-meters before and after the X-ray department changed to digital techniques. For IVU also the change from storage phosphor plates to a Direct Digital detector is included. The study comprises between 53 and 87 patients for each modality of the two examinations. A considerable dose reduction was observed. In barium enema the overview images with large field sizes were omitted when using digital technique. On the other hand the number of spot images was increased from 6 to 22. The fluoroscopy time was increased from 4 minutes to 6 minutes. The DAP value was reduced from 54,3 Gy cm sup 2 to 21,9 Gy cm sup 2. For IVU a dose reduction from 44,5 Gy cm sup 2...

  8. Biological-based optimization and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe biological-based optimization and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation-based treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung, liver, and prostate patients. Methods: Optimization strategies and VMAT planning parameters using a biological-based optimization MC planning system were analyzed for 24 SBRT patients. Patients received a median dose of 45 Gy [range, 34-54 Gy] for lung tumors in 1-5 fxs and a median dose of 52 Gy [range, 48-60 Gy] for liver tumors in 3-6 fxs. Prostate patients received a fractional dose of 10 Gy in 5 fxs. Biological-cost functions were used for plan optimization, and its dosimetric quality was evaluated using the conformity index (CI), the conformation number (CN), the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over the planning target volume (Rx/PTV50). The quality and efficiency of the delivery were assessed according to measured quality assurance (QA) passing rates and delivery times. For each disease site, one patient was replanned using physical cost function and compared to the corresponding biological plan. Results: Median CI, CN, and Rx/PTV50 for all 24 patients were 1.13 (1.02-1.28), 0.79 (0.70-0.88), and 5.3 (3.1-10.8), respectively. The median delivery rate for all patients was 410 MU/min with a maximum possible rate of 480 MU/min (85%). Median QA passing rate was 96.7%, and it did not significantly vary with the tumor site. Conclusions: VMAT delivery of SBRT plans optimized using biological-motivated cost-functions result in highly conformal dose distributions. Plans offer shorter treatment-time benefits and provide efficient dose delivery without compromising the plan conformity for tumors in the prostate, lung, and liver, thereby improving patient comfort and clinical throughput. The short delivery times minimize the risk of patient setup and intrafraction motion errors often associated with long SBRT treatment delivery times.

  9. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long-lasting breast pain compared to older women. Time since treatment may decrease the occurrence of pain.

  10. SU-E-T-118: Dose Verification for Accuboost Applicators Using TLD, Ion Chamber and Gafchromic Film Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisela, W; Yao, R; Dorbu, G [Columbus Regional Healthcare, Columbus, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To verify dose delivered with HDR Accuboost applicators using TLD, ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements and to examine applicator leakage. Methods: A microSelectron HDR unit was used to deliver a dose of 50cGy to the mid-plane of a 62mm thick solid water phantom using dwell times from Monte Carlo pre-calculated nomograms for a 60mm, 70mm Round and 60mm Skin-Dose Optimized (SDO) applicators respectively. GafChromic EBT3+ film was embedded in the phantom midplane horizontally to measure dose distribution. Absolute dose was also measured with TLDs and an ADCL calibrated parallel-plate ion chamber placed in the film plane at field center for each applicator. The film was calibrated using 6MV x-ray beam. TLDs were calibrated in a Cs-137 source at UW-Madison calibration laboratory. Radiation leakage through the tungsten alloy shell was measured with a film wrapped around outside surface of a 60mm Round applicator. Results: Measured maximum doses at field center are consistently lower than predicated by 5.8% for TLD, 8.8% for ion chamber, and 2.6% for EBT3+ film on average, with measurement uncertainties of 2.2%, 0.3%, and 2.9% for TLD, chamber, film respectively. The total standard uncertainties for ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurement are 4.9% and 4.6% respectively[1]. The area defined by the applicator aperture was covered by 80% of maximum dose for 62mm compression thickness. When 100cGy is delivered to mid-plane with a 60mm Round applicator, surface dose ranges from 60cGy to a maximum of 145cGy, which occurs at source entrance to the applicator. Conclusion: Measured doses by all three techniques are consistently lower than predicted in our measurements. For a compression thickness of 62 mm, the field size defined by the applicator is only covered by 80% of prescribed dose. Radiation leakage of up to 145cGy was found at the source entrance of applicators.

  11. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Bladder/Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Dosimetry Compared to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotter, Shane E. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Herrup, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Friedmann, Alison [Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Macdonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pieretti, Raphael V. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Robinson, Gregoire; Adams, Judith; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan was optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies incorporating extended follow-up, objective outcome measures, and quality-of-life analyses.

  12. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

  13. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  14. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  15. Bilateral implant reconstruction does not affect the quality of postmastectomy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: hoa1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Patel, Nisha [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mehrara, Babak J.; Disa, Joseph J.; Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gelblum, Daphna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine if the presence of bilateral implants, in addition to other anatomic and treatment-related variables, affects coverage of the target volume and dose to the heart and lung in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). A total of 197 consecutive women with breast cancer underwent mastectomy and immediate tissue expander (TE) placement, with or without exchange for a permanent implant (PI) before radiation therapy at our center. PMRT was delivered with 2 tangential beams + supraclavicular lymph node field (50 Gy). Patients were grouped by implant number: 51% unilateral (100) and 49% bilateral (97). The planning target volume (PTV) (defined as implant + chest wall + nodes), heart, and ipsilateral lung were contoured and the following parameters were abstracted from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data: PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, Lung V{sub 20}Gy > 30%, and Heart V{sub 25}Gy > 5%. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA) were performed to determine the association of variables with these parameters. The 2 groups were well balanced for implant type and volume, internal mammary node (IMN) treatment, and laterality. In the entire cohort, 90% had PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, indicating excellent coverage of the chest wall. Of the patients, 27% had high lung doses (V{sub 20}Gy > 30%) and 16% had high heart doses (V{sub 25}Gy > 5%). No significant factors were associated with suboptimal PTV coverage. On MVA, IMN treatment was found to be highly associated with high lung and heart doses (both p < 0.0001), but implant number was not (p = 0.54). In patients with bilateral implants, IMN treatment was the only predictor of dose to the contralateral implant (p = 0.001). In conclusion, bilateral implants do not compromise coverage of the target volume or increase lung and heart dose in patients receiving PMRT. The most important predictor of high lung and heart doses in patients with implant-based reconstruction, whether unilateral or bilateral, is treatment of the IMNs. Refinement of radiation techniques in reconstructed patients who require comprehensive nodal irradiation is warranted.

  16. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) vs. conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-guided dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer: A planning study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teoh, May, E-mail: m.teoh@nhs.net [Department of Oncology, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Beveridge, Sabeena [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Wood, Katie; Whitaker, Stephen [Department of Oncology, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Adams, Elizabeth; Rickard, Donna; Jordan, Tom; Nisbet, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Clark, Catharine H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)guided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer may potentially improve local control. We evaluated the feasibility of this approach using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and compared these plans with fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) focal dose escalation plans. Materials and methods: An initial study of 20 patients compared RapidArc with fixed-field IMRT using standard dose prescriptions. From this cohort, 10 were included in a dose escalation planning study. Dose escalation was applied to {sup 18}F-FDG-PETpositive regions in the primary tumor at dose levels of 5% (DL1), 10% (DL2), and 15% (DL3) above standard radical dose (65 Gy in 30 fractions). Fixed-field IMRT and double-arc RapidArc plans were generated for each dataset. Dose-volume histograms were used for plan evaluation and comparison. The Paddick conformity index (CI{sub Paddick}) and monitor units (MU) for each plan were recorded and compared. Both IMRT and RapidArc produced clinically acceptable plans and achieved planning objectives for target volumes. Dose conformity was significantly better in the RapidArc plans, with lower CI{sub Paddick} scores in both primary (PTV1) and elective (PTV2) planning target volumes (largest difference in PTV1 at DL3; 0.81 0.03 [RapidArc] vs. 0.77 0.07 [IMRT], p = 0.04). Maximum dose constraints for spinal cord and brainstem were not exceeded in both RapidArc and IMRT plans, but mean doses were higher with RapidArc (by 2.7 1 Gy for spinal cord and 1.9 1 Gy for brainstem). Contralateral parotid mean dose was lower with RapidArc, which was statistically significant at DL1 (29.0 vs. 29.9 Gy, p = 0.01) and DL2 (29.3 vs. 30.3 Gy, p = 0.03). MU were reduced by 39.849.2% with RapidArc (largest difference at DL3, 641 94 vs. 1261 118, p < 0.01). {sup 18}F-FDG-PETguided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer is feasible with RapidArc. Compared with conventional fixed-field IMRT, RapidArc can achieve better dose conformity, improve contralateral parotid sparing, and uses fewer MU.

  17. Long-Term Outcomes After High-Dose Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goenka, Anuj; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Schechter, Michael; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A. [Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the impact of high-dose radiotherapy (RT) in the postprostatectomy salvage setting on long-term biochemical control and distant metastases-free survival, and to identify clinical and pathologic predictors of outcomes. Methods and Materials: During 1988-2007, 285 consecutive patients were treated with salvage RT (SRT) after radical prostatectomy. All patients were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT. Two hundred seventy patients (95%) were treated to a dose {>=}66 Gy, of whom 205 (72%) received doses {>=}70 Gy. Eighty-seven patients (31%) received androgen-deprivation therapy as a component of their salvage treatment. All clinical and pathologic records were reviewed to identify treatment risk factors and response. Results: The median follow-up time after SRT was 60 months. Seven-year actuarial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free survival and distant metastases-free survival were 37% and 77%, respectively. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were vascular invasion (p < 0.01), negative surgical margins (p < 0.01), presalvage PSA level >0.4 ng/mL (p < 0.01), androgen-deprivation therapy (p = 0.03), Gleason score {>=}7 (p = 0.02), and seminal vesicle involvement (p = 0.05). Salvage RT dose {>=}70 Gy was not associated with improvement in biochemical control. A doubling time <3 months was the only independent predictor of metastatic disease (p < 0.01). There was a trend suggesting benefit of SRT dose {>=}70 Gy in preventing clinical local failure in patients with radiographically visible local disease at time of SRT (7 years: 90% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: Salvage RT provides effective long-term biochemical control and freedom from metastasis in selected patients presenting with detectable PSA after prostatectomy. Androgen-deprivation therapy was associated with improvement in biochemical progression-free survival. Clinical local failures were rare but occurred most commonly in patients with greater burden of disease at time of SRT as reflected by either radiographic imaging or a greater PSA level. Salvage radiation doses {>=}70 Gy may ultimately be most beneficial in these patients, but this needs to be further studied.

  18. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Taewoo, E-mail: taewoo.lee@utoronto.ca; Hammad, Muhannad [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl{sub 2} distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the predicted weights and IOM weights was less than 5 percentage points. Similarly, the difference in femoral head V54.3 Gy values between the two dose distributions was less than 5 percentage points for all but one patient. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a proof of concept that patient anatomy can be used to predict appropriate objective function weights for treatment planning. In the long term, such geometry-driven weights may serve as a starting point for iterative treatment plan design or may provide information about the most clinically relevant region of the Pareto surface to explore.

  19. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter for the surrounding normal tissue except for the dose received by the penile bulb and the right hip. Our dosimetric evaluation suggests significant underdosing with inaccurate target localization and emphasizes the importance of accurate patient setup and target localization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of intrafraction organ motion, rotation, and deformation on doses delivered to target volumes.

  20. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez, Nria, E-mail: nrodriguez@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Dengra, Josefa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Foro, Palmira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernndez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, scar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI.

  1. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, Franois [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 2.1 and 110.7 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 4.6 and 203.6 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 0.16 and 1.86 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 7.6 to 234.9 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 17.0 and 251.2 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 25.3 and 432.5 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

  2. Asymmetric dosevolume optimization with smoothness control for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: It is important to reduce fluence map complexity in rotating-shield brachytherapy (RSBT) inverse planning to improve delivery efficiency while maintaining plan quality. This study proposes an efficient and effective RSBT dose optimization method which enables to produce smooth fluence maps. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients each with a high-risk clinical-target-volume (HR-CTV) larger than 40 cm{sup 3} were considered as the test cases. The RSBT source was a partially shielded electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent). The anchor RSBT plans generated by the asymmetric dosevolume optimization with smoothness control (ADOS) method were compared against those produced by the dosesurface optimization (DSO) method and inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA). Either L{sub 1}-norm or L{sub 2}-norm was used to measure the smoothness of a fluence map in the proposed ADOS method as one weighted term of the objective function. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that HR-CTV D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. The quality of the anchor plans was measured with HR-CTV D{sub 90} of the anchor plans. Single-shielded RSBT [(S-RSBT), RSBT with single, fix sized delivery window] and dynamic-sheilded RSBT [(D-RSBT), RSBT with dynamically varying sized delivery window] delivery plans generated based on the anchor plans were also measured, with delivery time constraints of 10, 20, and 30 min/fraction (fx). Results: The average HR-CTV D{sub 90} values of the anchor plans achieved by the ADOS, DSO, and IPSA methods were 111.5, 94.2, and 107.4 Gy, respectively, where the weighting parameter ? used in ADOS with L{sub 2}-norm was set to be 100. By using S-RSBT sequencing and 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were 88.8, 81.9, and 83.4 Gy; while using D-RSBT sequencing with 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were 91.4, 88.3, and 78.9 Gy, respectively. The average optimization times for ADOS, DSO, and IPSA were, respectively, 77, 4, and 1800 s. By using L{sub 1}-norm instead of L{sub 2}-norm in the ADOS method, the optimization time was increased by 20 s, while the D{sub 90} was reduced by 6.8 Gy on average. ADOS-L1 was found to be more sensitive to the weighting parameter than ADOS-L2. If ? was increased to 10?000, the D{sub 90} drop with ADOS-L1 was 38 Gy, while the drop with ADOS-L2 is 13 Gy. Conclusions: The ADOS method had a reasonable optimization time cost, while achieving comparable RSBT dose plans as the IPSA method, which is of much higher time complexity. Compared to the DSO and IPSA methods, ADOS is able to generate anchor plans which are more suitable for RSBT delivery while preserving the high quality of the original plans. Compared to ADOS-L1, ADOS-L2 is able to achieve better quality of anchor plans more efficiently.

  3. Effect of induction chemotherapy on estimated risk of radiation pneumonitis in bulky nonsmall cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amin, Neha P., E-mail: npamin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Miften, Moyed; Thornton, Dale; Ryan, Nicole; Kavanagh, Brian; Gaspar, Laurie E [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients with bulky nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be at a high risk for radiation pneumonitis (RP) if treated with up-front concurrent chemoradiation. There is limited information about the effect of induction chemotherapy on the volume of normal lung subsequently irradiated. This study aims to estimate the reduction in risk of RP in patients with NSCLC after receiving induction chemotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 25 patients with Stage IV NSCLC were treated with chemotherapy alone (no surgery or radiation therapy [RT]) and had computed tomography (CT) scans before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Simulated RT plans were created for the prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans so as to deliver 60 Gy to the thoracic disease in patients who had either a >20% volumetric increase or decrease in gross tumor volume (GTV) from chemotherapy. The prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans were analyzed to compare the percentage of lung volume receiving?20 Gy (V20), mean lung dose (MLD), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Eight patients (32%) had a GTV reduction >20%, 2 (8%) had GTV increase >20%, and 15 (60%) had stable GTV. In the 8 responders, there was an absolute median GTV decrease of 88.1 cc (7.3 to 351.6 cc) or a 48% (20% to 62%) relative reduction in tumor burden. One had >20% tumor progression during chemotherapy, yet had an improvement in dosimetric parameters postchemotherapy. Among these 9 patients, the median decrease in V20, MLD, and NTCP was 2.6% (p<0.01), 2.1 Gy (p<0.01), and 5.6% (p<0.01), respectively. Less than one-third of patients with NSCLC obtain >20% volumetric tumor reduction from chemotherapy alone. Even with that amount of volumetric reduction, the 5% reduced risk of RP was only modest and did not convert previously ineligible patients to safely receive definitive thoracic RT.

  4. Phase I Dose Escalation Trial of Vandetanib With Fractionated Radiosurgery in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Emma C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E.; Liu, Arthur K.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen, Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vandetanib with fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with a recurrent malignant glioma and T1-enhancing recurrent tumor {<=}6 cm were eligible. Vandetanib was given orally, once per day, 7 days a week, starting at least 7 days before SRS and continued until a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) or disease progression. The planned vandetanib daily dose was 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg for the cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and was escalated using a standard 3+3 design. A total SRS dose of 36 Gy, 12 Gy per fraction, was delivered over 3 consecutive days. The MTD was defined as the dose of vandetanib at which less than 33% of patients developed DLTs, defined by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3 as any Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity and Grade 4 or greater hematologic toxicity. Results: Ten patients were treated, 6 on cohort 1 and 4 on cohort 2. Treatment characteristics were: 7 men, 3 women; median age, 40 years (range, 22-72); 7 GBM, 3 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA); median initial radiation (RT) dose, 60 Gy (range, 59.4-70); median interval since initial RT, 14.5 months (range, 7-123); All patients received SRS per protocol. The median follow-up time was 4 months (range, 1-10 months). Median time on vandetanib was 3 months (range 1-11). One of 6 patients in the first cohort developed a DLT of Grade 3 hemothorax while on anticoagulation. The MTD was reached when 2 of the 4 patients enrolled in the second cohort developed DLTs. Six patients had radiographic response, 2 with stable disease. Conclusion: The MTD of vandetanib, with SRS in recurrent malignant glioma, is 100 mg daily. Further evaluation of safety and efficacy is warranted.

  5. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbea, Leire, E-mail: larbea@unav.es [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Hernandez, Jose Luis [Department of General Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Sola, Jesus Javier [Department of Pathology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Ramos, Luis Isaac [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Subtil, Jose Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Nunez, Jorge [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  6. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ? 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.0217.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.8512.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  7. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Sasaki, Tomonari [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Kyushu Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Araya, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  8. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  9. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha [Department of Palliative Therapies, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiotherapy, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Department of Medical Physics, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Calista, Franco [Department of Palliative Therapies, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Serafini, Giovanni [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, General Hospital, Termoli (Italy); Digesu, Cinzia [Department of Radiotherapy, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.i [Department of Radiotherapy, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Picardi, Vincenzo; Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiotherapy, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Di Lullo, Liberato [Department of Oncology, General Hospital, Isernia (Italy); Giglio, Gianfranco [Department of Oncology, General Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Sallustio, Giuseppina [Department of Radiology, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Piermattei, Angelo [Department of Medical Physics, 'John Paul II' Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m{sup 2} plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  10. Combination External Beam Radiation and Brachytherapy Boost With Androgen Suppression for Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Initial Report of CALGB 99809

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Mark D. [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: mhurwitz@lroc.harvard.edu; Halabi, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ou, San-San [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); McGinnis, Lamar S. [Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Keuttel, Michael R. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); DiBiase, Steven J. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Small, Eric J. [University of California at San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy (TPPB) can be used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to provide a high-dose conformal boost to the prostate. The results of a multicenter Phase II trial assessing safety of combination of EBRT and TPPB boost with androgen suppression (AST) in treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer are present here. Materials and Methods: Patients had intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Six months of AST was administered. EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles was administered to 45Gy followed by TPPB using either {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd to deliver an additional 100Gy or 90Gy. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute CTC version 2 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring systems. Results: Sixty-three patients were enrolled. Median follow-up was 38 months. Side effects of AST including sexual dysfunction and vasomotor symptoms were commonly observed. Apart from erectile dysfunction, short-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was noted in 21% and 7%, primarily genitourinary related. Long-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicities were noted in 13% and 3%. Two patients had Grade 3 dysuria that resolved with longer follow-up. The most common Grade 2 long-term toxicity was urinary frequency (5%). No biochemical or clinical evidence of progression was noted for the entire cohort. Conclusions: In a cooperative group setting, combination EBRT and TPPB boost with 6 months of AST was generally well tolerated with expected genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. Further follow-up will be required to fully assess long-term toxicity and cancer control.

  11. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  12. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: sandra.nuyts@uzleuven.be; Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Clement, Paul M.J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Schoenaers, Joseph [Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaert, Walter van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  13. Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

  14. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  15. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naieve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bangma, Chris H. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naieve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

  16. Repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium became evident from Day 75 postirradiation onward after doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy of X rays. Cell counts in cross sections of seminiferous tubules revealed that during this repopulation the numbers of Apale (Ap) spermatogonia, Adark (Ad) spermatogonia, and B spermatogonia increased simultaneously. After 0.5 Gy the number of spermatogonia increased from approximately 10% of the control level at Day 44 to 90% at Day 200. After 1.0 and 2.0 Gy the numbers of spermatogonia increased from less than 5% at Day 44 to 70% at Days 200 and 370. The number of Ad and B spermatogonia, which are considered to be resting and differentiating spermatogonia, respectively, already had increased when the number of proliferating Ap spermatogonia was still very low. This early inactivation and differentiation of a large part of the population of Ap spermatogonia slows down repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium of the primates. By studying repopulating colonies in whole mounts of seminiferous tubules various types of colonies were found. In colonies consisting of only A spermatogonia, 40% of the A spermatogonia were found to be of the Ad type, which indicates that even before the colony had differentiated, 40% of the A spermatogonia were inactivated into Ad. Differentiating colonies were also found in which one or two generations of germ cells were missing. In some of those colonies it was found that the Ap spermatogonia did not form any B spermatogonia during one or two cycles of the seminiferous epithelium, while in other colonies all Ap spermatogonia present had differentiated into B spermatogonia. This indicates that the differentiation of Ap into B spermatogonia is a stochastic process.

  17. Helical Tomotherapy and Larynx Sparing in Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielda, Benjamin T., E-mail: benjamin_gielda@rush.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL (United States); Millunchick, Cheryl H.; Smart, Joseph P.; Marsh, James C.; Turian, Julius V.; Coleman, Joy L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining acceptance as a standard treatment technique for advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. Dose to the uninvolved larynx and surrounding structures can pose a problem in patients with significant neck disease, potentially compromising laryngeal function and quality of life. Tomotherapy may allow greater laryngeal sparing. Seven patients with stage IV SCC of the oropharynx were replanned using Tomotherapy version 3.1. All contours/planning target volumes (PTVs) from the original plans were preserved, with the exception of the larynx, which was drawn to include all soft tissue encompassed by the thyroid/cricoid cartilage. A simultaneous integrated boost technique was used with PTV 1, 2, and 3 receiving 69.96, 59.40, and 54.00 Gy, respectively in 33 fractions. Dosimetry was evaluated via the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS). Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated from the dose volume histogram (DVH) using the general method with 'a' = 5.0. Mean larynx dose for all patients was 24.4 Gy. Mean EUD to the larynx was 34.2 Gy. Homogeneity was adequate; average maximum dose was 109.7% of the highest prescription. All other organs at risk (OAR) were adequately spared. Tomotherapy can spare the uninvolved larynx in the setting of advanced SCC of the oropharynx to levels that are similar to or better than those reported with other techniques. Sparing is achieved without compromising target coverage or other OAR sparing. The clinical benefit of this sparing remains to be determined in a prospective study.

  18. On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

  19. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L., E-mail: nina.louise.jebsen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Engstrm, Katarina [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bauer, Henrik C. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Muren, Ludvig P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, Geir E. [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, yvind S. [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant doseresponse effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  20. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  1. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte, E-mail: ann-charlotte.waldenstrom@oncology.gu.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olsson, Caroline [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Al-Abany, Massoud [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tucker, Susan [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  2. Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

  3. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ?700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Szary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

  4. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  5. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

  6. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  7. Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peulen, Heike, E-mail: h.peulen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hanbeukers, Bianca; Boersma, Liesbeth; Baardwijk, Angela van; Ende, Piet van den; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Murrer, Lars; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV){sub 95%} of >99%; V{sub 107%} of <1.8 cc; heart V{sub 5Gy} of <10% and V{sub 10Gy} of <5%; and mean lung dose of <7 Gy. Treatment planning started with classic tangential beams. Optimization was done by adding a maximum of four segments before adding beams, in a second step. A breath-hold technique was used for heart sparing if necessary. Results: Dose constraints were met for all 60 patients. The classic tangential beam setup was not sufficient for any of the patients; in one-third of patients, additional segments were required (<3), and in two-thirds of patients, additional beams (<2) were required. Logistic regression analyses revealed central breast diameter (CD) and central lung distance as independent predictors for transition from additional segments to additional beams, with a CD cut-off point at 23.6 cm. Conclusions: Treatment plans fulfilling strict dose homogeneity criteria and normal tissue constraints could be obtained for all patients by stepwise dose intensity modification using limited numbers of segments and additional beams. In patients with a CD of >23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

  8. CHOD/BVAM Chemotherapy and Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laack, Nadia N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); O'Neill, Brian Patrick, E-mail: boneill@mayo.edu [Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Ballman, Karla V.; O'Fallon, Judith Rich; Carrero, Xiomara W. [Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kurtin, Paul J.; Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Department of Pathology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Habermann, Thomas M.; Colgan, Joseph P. [Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Gilbert, Mark R. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hawkins, Roland B. [Oschner CCOP, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Morton, Roscoe F. [Iowa Oncology Research Association CCOP, Des Moines, Iowa (United States); Windschitl, Harry E. [CentraCare Clinic, St. Cloud, Minnesota (United States); Fitch, Tom R. [Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pajon, Eduardo R. [Colorado Cancer Research Program, Denver, Colorado (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine, and dexamethasone (CHOD) plus bis-chloronitrosourea (BCNU), cytosine arabinoside, and methotrexate (BVAM) followed by whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients 70 years old and younger with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven PCNSL received one cycle of CHOD followed by two cycles of BVAM. Patients then received WBRT, 30.6 Gy, if a complete response was evoked, or 50.4 Gy if the response was less than complete; both doses were given in 1.8-Gy daily fractions. The primary efficacy endpoint was 1-year survival. Results: Thirty-six patients (19 men, 17 women) enrolled between 1995 and 2000. Median age was 60.5 years (range, 34 to 69 years). Thirty (83%) patients had baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scores of 0 to 1. All 36 patients were eligible for survival and response evaluations. Median time to progression was 12.3 months, and median survival was 18.5 months. The percentages of patients alive at 1, 2, and 3 years were 64%, 36%, and 33%, respectively. The best response was complete response in 10 patients and immediate progression in 7 patients. Ten (28%) patients had at least one grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicity. Conclusions: This regimen did improve the survival of PCNSL patients but also caused substantial toxicity. The improvement in survival is less than that reported with high-dose methotrexate-based therapies.

  9. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ?}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ?} ? 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  10. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirov, Krassen [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  11. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Brenda G. [Departments of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, and Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)], E-mail: brclark@ottawahospital.on.ca; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael [Departments of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, and Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm{sup 3}) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm{sup 3}, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm{sup 3}, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm{sup 3}, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  12. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Suk [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hyung Jin [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Gyu [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Jin [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  13. SU-E-J-62: Estimating Plausible Treatment Course Dose Distributions by Accounting for Registration Uncertainty and Organ Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thor, M; Saleh, Z; Oh, JH; Apte, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, NY City, NY (United States); Muren, L [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dose accumulation following deformable image registration (DIR) is challenging. In this study, we used a statistical sampling approach, which takes into account both DIR uncertainties and patient-specific organ motion, to study the distribution of possible true dose distributions. Methods: The study included ten patients (six CT scans/patient) treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. For each patient, the planned dose was re-calculated on the repeated geometries, following rigid registration based on fiducial markers. The dose re-calculated on the first CT served as our snapshot dose distribution (D1) and the average of the first five repeat scans as our treatment course reference dose distribution (Dref). Patient-specific motion and DIR-uncertainties, at each voxel in CT1, were assessed using a previously developed DIR performance measure, the distance discordance metric (DDM). To sample the distribution of possible true, predicted dose distributions (Dpred), we resampled D1 by perturbing the location of each voxel with the corresponding DDM. The three dose distribution approaches are compared for the rectum and the bladder. Results: The bladder generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from the averaged Dpred was closer to the gEUDref than to the gEUD1 (difference: 0.6 vs. 1.0 Gy). For both structures, the gEUDpred was higher than the gEUDref, and significantly higher (p?0.05) for the rectum (average: 50.8 Gy vs. 48.0 Gy). Conclusion: We have shown that the bladder gEUD values resulting from our DIR-uncertainty inclusive dose sampling approach, Dpred, were closer to the gEUD from Dref than the gEUD values from D1. For the rectum, gEUDpred overestimated gEUDref. Theoretically however, gEUDpred values, sampled from DDM uncertainties are more representative of dose uncertainties.

  14. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  15. Radiation Segmentectomy: A Novel Approach to Increase Safety and Efficacy of Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riaz, Ahsun; Gates, Vanessa L.; Atassi, Bassel; Lewandowski, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Mulcahy, Mary F. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Baker, Talia [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kulik, Laura [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramona [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Abecassis, Michael [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Benson, Al B. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Omary, Reed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Millender, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kennedy, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Radiology Oncology, Cary, NC (United States); Salem, Riad, E-mail: r-salem@northwestern.ed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe a technique of segmental radioembolization for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Radiation segmentectomy was defined as radioembolization of two or fewer hepatic segments. We sought to (1) calculate dose when activity is delivered segmentally assuming uniform and nonuniform distribution and, (2) determine safety and efficacy of this novel technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with HCC who were treated with {sup 90}Y radioembolization using a segmental approach were included in this analysis. The dose delivered to the segment was calculated assuming uniform and nonuniform microsphere distribution within the treatment volume. To calculate dose assuming nonuniform distribution, a tumor hypervascularity ratio was assigned. Posttreatment response (using size and necrosis guidelines), toxicity, time to progression, and survival were determined. Results: The median treatment volume was 110 cm{sup 3}. The median radiation-naive liver volume was 1403 cm{sup 3}. The median dose delivered to the segment(s) assuming uniform distribution was 521 Gy. Taking into account tumor hypervascularity (nonuniform distribution), the median dose delivered to the tumor and normal infused hepatic volume was 1214 Gy and 210 Gy, respectively. Response by size and necrosis guidelines was seen in 59% and 81% of patients. Grade 3/4 biochemical toxicities were observed in 8 patients (9%). Median time to progression was 13.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.3-18.7 months); median survival was 26.9 months (95% confidence interval, 20.5-30.2 months). Conclusions: Radiation segmentectomy is a safe and efficacious method of selectively delivering high dose to the tumor with minimal exposure of normal parenchyma.

  16. Variation in Mutation Rates Caused by RB69pol Fidelity Mutants Can Be Rationalized on the Basis of Their Kinetic Behavior and Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Xia; M Wang; H Lee; A Sinha; G Blaha; T Christian; J Wang; W Konigsberg

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously observed that stepwise replacement of amino acid residues in the nascent base-pair binding pocket of RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) with Ala or Gly expanded the space in this pocket, resulting in a progressive increase in misincorporation. However, in vivo results with similar RB69pol nascent base-pair binding pocket mutants showed that mutation rates, as determined by the T4 phage rI forward assay and rII reversion assay, were significantly lower for the RB69pol S565G/Y567A double mutant than for the Y567A single mutant, the opposite of what we would have predicted. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected result, we have determined the pre-steady-state kinetic parameters and crystal structures of relevant ternary complexes. We found that the S565G/Y567A mutant generally had greater base selectivity than the Y567A mutant and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP insertion, excision of the 3'-terminal nucleotide residue, and primer extension beyond a mispair differed not only between these two mutants but also between the two highly mutable sequences in the T4 rI complementary strand. Comparison of the crystal structures of these two mutants with correct and incorrect incoming dNTPs provides insight into the unexpected increase in the fidelity of the S565G/Y567A double mutant. Taken together, the kinetic and structural results provide a basis for integrating and interpreting in vivo and in vitro observations.

  17. High dose rate /sup 60/Co remote afterloading irradiation in cancer of the cervix in Haiti, 1977-1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streeter, O.E. Jr.; Goldson, A.L.; Chevallier, C.; Nibhanupudy, J.R.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1977 through 1984, 293 previously untreated patients with biopsy proven carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by whole pelvis irradiation and high intensity 60Co remote afterloading (RAL) intrauterine tandem techniques in Haiti. The treatment results were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the therapeutic results and prognostic factors of a strict protocol involving 40 Gy to the whole pelvis (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week). In addition, on the 5th day of the 3rd week, the first outpatient 60Co remote afterloading intracavitary insertion, delivering 7.5 Gy to point A with each insertion, repeated 3 times by a week separation for a total of 4 times. The total TDF for external beam plus RAL was 158 and 175 for early and late effects respectively. One hundred-four patients were evaluable after 1 year or more follow-up, with a median of 26.5 months. No evidence of disease (NED) by Stage at 1 year was: Stage I of 100% (3/3), Stage II of 82% (9/11), Stage III of 80% (47/59), and Stage IV of 58% (18/31). The post-therapeutic complication rate was 7.7%, with no fistulas or requirement of surgical intervention. Those with documented follow-up of at least 2 years (74 patients) had comparable survival to other high dose rate and low dose rate studies. This study shows that outpatient brachytherapy can be carried out without sophisticated and expensive equipment with minimal staff trained in radiation therapy. A detailed description of this outpatient RAL technique and results are described so that this method can be adapted to other developing and industrialized nations where cost containment is becoming a key issue.

  18. Coherent control of the Goos-Hanchen shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziauddin, Qamar S.; Qamar, Sajid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remains positive. The corresponding group index of the cavity is positive in both cases. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.023821 PACS number(s): 42.25.Bs, 42.50.Gy I. INTRODUCTION In 1947, Goos and Ha?nchen [1] experimentally observed evidence...,t is the phase associated with the reflection r(ky, ?p) or transmission t(ky, ?p) coefficients (with reflection and transmission coefficients being complex quantities). As a result the lateral or GH shift in the reflected and transmitted probe light beams can...

  19. Eating behaviors, food preferences and health locus of control in obese and overweight women before and after participation in an obesity treatment program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebner, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate changes to lose and ultimately control their weight. Objectives of this study were to assess the influence of participation in a weight reduction program on (1) food selection and (2) perception of control over health (weight) . Obese...(LE OF CONTENTS Y1 LIST OF CHAPTER TABLES Y 1 1. I INTRODUCTIOI'! LITERATURE RFVILW Dc mini ti. n and Epidemic logy c f Clbesity Et i lc gy - f Clbesit:y Fa( tc ii"s Af fee ting Fc d Preference and l&e 1 e c t ion E&eha Yic ral Ef fee ts of Obesity Hea'1...

  20. A new correction method serving to eliminate the parabola effect of flatbed scanners used in radiochromic film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppinga, D., E-mail: daniela.poppinga@uni-oldenburg.de; Schoenfeld, A. A.; Poppe, B. [Medical Radiation Physics, Carl v. Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26127, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, Pius Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Medical Radiation Physics, Carl v. Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26127, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, Pius Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Doerner, K. J. [Radiotherapy Department, General Hospital, Celle 29223 (Germany)] [Radiotherapy Department, General Hospital, Celle 29223 (Germany); Blanck, O. [CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Gstrow 18273, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Lbeck 23562 (Germany)] [CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Gstrow 18273, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Lbeck 23562 (Germany); Harder, D. [Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg-August-University, Gttingen 37073 (Germany)] [Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg-August-University, Gttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the correction of the lateral scanner artifact, i.e., the effect that, on a large homogeneously exposed EBT3 film, a flatbed scanner measures different optical densities at different positions along thex axis, the axis parallel to the elongated light source. At constant dose, the measured optical densitiy profiles along this axis have a parabolic shape with significant dose dependent curvature. Therefore, the effect is shortly called the parabola effect. The objective of the algorithm developed in this study is to correct for the parabola effect. Any optical density measured at given position x is transformed into the equivalent optical density c at the apex of the parabola and then converted into the corresponding dose via the calibration of c versus dose. Methods: For the present study EBT3 films and an Epson 10000XL scanner including transparency unit were used for the analysis of the parabola effect. The films were irradiated with 6 MV photons from an Elekta Synergy accelerator in a RW3 slab phantom. In order to quantify the effect, ten film pieces with doses graded from 0 to 20.9 Gy were sequentially scanned at eight positions along thex axis and at six positions along the z axis (the movement direction of the light source) both for the portrait and landscape film orientations. In order to test the effectiveness of the new correction algorithm, the dose profiles of an open square field and an IMRT plan were measured by EBT3 films and compared with ionization chamber and ionization chamber array measurement. Results: The parabola effect has been numerically studied over the whole measuring field of the Epson 10000XL scanner for doses up to 20.9 Gy and for both film orientations. The presented algorithm transforms any optical density at positionx into the equivalent optical density that would be measured at the same dose at the apex of the parabola. This correction method has been validated up to doses of 5.2 Gy all over the scanner bed with 2D dose distributions of an open square photon field and an IMRT distribution. Conclusions: The algorithm presented in this study quantifies and corrects the parabola effect of EBT3 films scanned in commonly used commercial flatbed scanners at doses up to 5.2 Gy. It is easy to implement, and no additional work steps are necessary in daily routine film dosimetry.

  1. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology Longowal, Punjab-148106 (India); Sonkawade, R. G. [School of Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow-226025 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  2. Identified charged hadron production in p plus p collisions at root s=200 and 62.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. -L; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanad, M.; Csoergo, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -A; Hachiya, T.; Henni, A. Hadj; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kral, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Liska, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mikes, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niita, T.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu; Pinkenburg, C.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ruzicka, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T. -A; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunecka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    | iipnetwork.org Chinas Energy Management System Program for Industry Bruce Hedman, Yongmiao Yu, Robert Taylor, Zach Friedman Institute for Industrial Productivity May 21 IETC 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy... En er gy C o n su m p ti o n , Q u ad s Source: DOE EIA International Energy Outlook 2013 4 * Includes fuel for electricity generation and T&D losses ESL-IE-14-05-24 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New...

  3. Toward Fully Automated Multicriterial Plan Generation: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voet, Peter W.J., E-mail: p.voet@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical CenterDaniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Fransen, Dennie; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical CenterDaniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical CenterDaniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To prospectively compare plans generated with iCycle, an in-house-developed algorithm for fully automated multicriterial intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam profile and beam orientation optimization, with plans manually generated by dosimetrists using the clinical treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: For 20 randomly selected head-and-neck cancer patients with various tumor locations (of whom 13 received sequential boost treatments), we offered the treating physician the choice between an automatically generated iCycle plan and a manually optimized plan using standard clinical procedures. Although iCycle used a fixed wish list with hard constraints and prioritized objectives, the dosimetrists manually selected the beam configuration and fine tuned the constraints and objectives for each IMRT plan. Dosimetrists were not informed in advance whether a competing iCycle plan was made. The 2 plans were simultaneously presented to the physician, who then selected the plan to be used for treatment. For the patient group, differences in planning target volume coverage and sparing of critical tissues were quantified. Results: In 32 of 33 plan comparisons, the physician selected the iCycle plan for treatment. This highly consistent preference for the automatically generated plans was mainly caused by the improved sparing for the large majority of critical structures. With iCycle, the normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid and submandibular glands were reduced by 2.4% 4.9% (maximum, 18.5%, P=.001) and 6.5% 8.3% (maximum, 27%, P=.005), respectively. The reduction in the mean oral cavity dose was 2.8 2.8 Gy (maximum, 8.1 Gy, P=.005). For the swallowing muscles, the esophagus and larynx, the mean dose reduction was 3.3 1.1 Gy (maximum, 9.2 Gy, P<.001). For 15 of the 20 patients, target coverage was also improved. Conclusions: In 97% of cases, automatically generated plans were selected for treatment because of the superior quality. Apart from the improved plan quality, automatic plan generation is economically attractive because of the reduced workload.

  4. SU-E-T-120: Dosimetric Characteristics Study of NanoDot,, for In-Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, A; Wasaye, A; Gohar, R; Rehman, L [Department of Oncology, Aga Khan Univesity Hospital (AKUH), Karachi (Pakistan); Hussein, S [Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to analyze the dosimetric characteristics (energy dependence, reproducibility and dose linearity) of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and validate their potential use during in-vivo dosimetry, specifically TBI. The manufacturer stated accuracy is 10% for standard nanoDot. Methods: At AKUH, the InLight microStar OSL dosimetry system for patient in-vivo dosimetry is in use since 2012. Twenty-five standard nanoDot were used in the analysis. Sensitivity and reproducibility was tested in the first part with 6MV and 18 MV Varian x-ray beams. Each OSLD was irradiated to 100cGy dose at nominal SSD (100 cm). All the OSLDs were read 3 times for average reading. Dose linearity and calibration were also performed with same beams in common clinical dose range of 0 - 500 cGy. In addition, verification of TBI absolute dose at extended SSD (500cm) was also performed. Results: The reproducibility observed with the OSLD was better than the manufacturer stated limits. Measured doses vary less than 2% in 19(76%) OSLDs, whereas less than 3% in 6(24%) OSLDs. Their sensitivity was approximately 525 counts per cGy. Better agreement was observed between measurements, with a standard deviation of 1.8%. A linear dose response was observed with OSLDs for both 6 and 18MV beams in 0 - 500 cGy dose range. TBI measured doses at 500 cm SSD were also confirmed to be within 0.5% and 1.3% of the ion chamber measured doses for 6 and 18MV beams respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetric results demonstrate that nanoDot can be potentially used for in-vivo dosimetry verification in various clinical situations, with a high degree of accuracy and precision. In addition OSLDs exhibit better dose reproducibility with standard deviation of 1.8%. There was no significant difference in their response to 6 and 18MV beams. The dose response was also linear.

  5. Effects of electron beam irradiation on polyamide 12 with fiberglass reinforcement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeun, Joon-Pyo; Shin, Bum-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Bin; Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun [Radiation Research Division for Industry and Environment, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Shinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, the effects of electron beam irradiation of polyamide 12 (PA12) with fiberglass reinforcement on the thermal and wear properties were investigated. Electron beam irradiation of PA 12 was carried out over a range of irradiation doses (100-600 kGy) in air. The gel formation in the presence of a curing agent was dependent on the radiation doses. The thermal properties of irradiated PA 12 were studied in the temperature region 50-250 deg. C to observe the changes in the melting point with radiation dose. The dimensional stability was significantly increased by electron beam irradiation and the related crosslinking of the PA 12.

  6. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: guckenberger_m@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Academic Unit of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Lung Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Partridge, Mike [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% {+-} 10% to 73% {+-} 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared with radiotherapy planning without ART.

  7. Intern experience at the Texas Transportation Institute: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Donald A.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    -Word Sequential Signs. Trthues osmmtis a gyOIEX ADEC CTfA EUxRT& yOIEX ADEC yOIEX ADEC CTfA EUxRT yaMavav yaMaMav yaMa&a& yaMava& yaMaMa& Ppqs v qFGFqsq 19 Ppqs 8 iFGsm 2js c:h1s" pn srupm:"sm "s(:F"sq 2p u"smsc2 2js sc2F"s hsmmtis) % CO RR EC T RE SP...

  8. Effect of dietary asorbic acid on cholesterol metabolism of the chicken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Barbara Jean

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of scurvy as a required cofactor for collagen biosynthesis, indicating an important cole in arterial wali repai(. . Ascorbic acid is also known This thesis follows the style used in Poultry Science to be a required cofactor for 7 alpha-hydroxylase which...-dependent enzyme. In most othe(. tissues, ascorbic acid is taken up by a dium-sensitive and ene( gy-dependent process (Cullen ~ 1986). Ascor bate uptake in these sodium-dependent stems is not competitively inhibited by glucose o( pendent on insulin...

  9. Experimental Method to Determine the Energy Envelope Performance of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, J.; Tasca-Guernouti, S. T.; Humbert, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e to v en til at io n A irf lo w lo ss du e to ai r tig ht n es s o f t he en v el o pe En er gy lo ss th ro u gh en v el o pe tr an sm iss io n s [k W H ea t s u pp... of the building, we are able to make the energy balance of building envelope and estimate the Ubuilding. Tool 1 Solar energy supply To determine the solar gain, we used the tool developed by J.A. Bouchet, CETE M?diterran?e, for the project PREBAT...

  10. Radiation Damage of Polypropylene Fiber Targets in Storage Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Rohdjess; D. Albers; J. Bisplinghoff; R. Bollmann; K. Buesser; O. Diehl; F. Dohrmann; H. -P. Engelhardt; P. D. Eversheim; J. Greiff; A. Gross; R. Gross-Hardt; F. Hinterberger; M. Igelbrink; R. Langkau; R. Maier; F. Mosel; M. Mueller; M. Muenstermann; D. Prasuhn; P. von Rossen; H. Scheid; N. Schirm; F. Schwandt; W. Scobel; H. J. Trelle; A. Wellinghausen; W. Wiedmann; K. Woller; R. Ziegler

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin polypropylene (CH$_2$) fibers have been used for internal experiments in storage rings as an option for hydrogen targets. The change of the hydrogen content due to the radiation dose applied by the circulating proton beam has been investigated in the range $1\\cdot10^6$ to $2\\cdot10^8$~Gy at beam momenta of 1.5 to 3 GeV/c by comparing the elastic pp-scattering yield to that from inelastic p-carbon reactions. It is found that the loss of hydrogen as a function of applied dose receives contributions from a fast and a slow component.

  11. Financing a Farm Business.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Harry M.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . $ticiness. Modern farming requires the wise use of credit. It will be more , -f~ 111 the future. tfest road to the profitable use of credit winds through the records is going on now in your business and is spotlighted by new gy. Practice will improve...Far m-Business SOUTHERN FARM MANAGEMENT EXTENSION PUBLICATION No. 8 I L FOREWORD i Scientific discoveries and the new technology growing out of them create a nec for constant adjustments in farming. Most of these changes call for capital...

  12. Determination of the properties of nuclear energy levels using resonance-scattered neutron capture gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Russell A

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GETElc&ii!'iV! cbN O. ' '! IE FROPENT1ES OF NUCI. EAIl El(E"". GY I. EYEc S USING GESOlIANCE-SCATTEIIEG NE'll'HGN . APTUPZ GAIIMA RAYS A !iles ls IU!Sb "ebb A. Mc. COFci!1CK SubmitteU to the Graclua!. e Colleoo or" Texas Afoul&! Uniser ity... RUSSELL A. PicCOPMTCK Approved "s to stylo and content I?: (CiInirman oE Coaaaittoe V (Member plead nf Dep, . tmont) P! v. oer) (Member) Ma&, l968 Detemsination of the properties of Nuclear Bnergy Lese is Osi: 6 Resonance-Scattered deut...

  13. Thermodynamic stability of recoding RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannon, Brian Ray

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    &e&no&eo Po asodJnd Jopq sUol)lsUBJ) o&eI& &sJIP a4) Jo) an(en Q~ Jo Leg+ a4) s&uasaJdaJ an&en s(4& 'ggo Jog '. suoI)IsueJ& aaJ4) &sJg a4~ Jo~ an(e&( O~ Jo Oy a4) s&uasaJdaJ an(e)( s&4& Gpg pue 'g&. yp '~ Jog, 0 L, Hd '(gy (Nw pg 'Sdpg (Nw 0[ uI s...

  14. Nonrandom distribution of mouse spermatogonial stem cells surviving fission neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colony formation by surviving spermatogonial stem cells was investigated by mapping pieces of whole mounted tubuli at intervals of 6 and 10 days after doses of 0.75 and 1.50 Gy of fission neutron irradiation. Colony sizes, expressed in numbers of spermatogonia per colony, varied greatly. The mean colony size found in different animals was relatively constant. The mitotic indices in large and small colonies and in colonies in different epithelial stages did not differ significantly. Size differences in these spermatogenic colonies are not caused by differences in growth rate. Surviving stem cells start to form colonies at variable times after irradiation. The number of colonies per unit area varied with the epithelial stages. Many more colonies were found in areas that during irradiation were in stages IX-III (IX-IIIirr) than in those that were in stages IV-VII (IV-VIIirr). After a dose of 1.50 Gy, 90% of all colonies were found in areas IX-IIIirr. In conclusion, the previously found difference in repopulation after irradiation between areas VIII-IIIirr and III-VIIIirr can be explained not by differences in colony sizes and/or growth rates of the colonies in these areas but by a difference in the number of surviving stem cells in both areas. In area XII-IIIirr three times more colonies were found after a dose of 0.75 Gy than after a dose of 1.50 Gy. In area IV-VIIirr the numbers of colonies differed by a factor of six after both doses. This finding indicates that spermatogonial stem cells are more sensitive to irradiation in epithelial stages IV-VII than in stages XII-III. In control material, spermatogonia with a nuclear area of 70-110 micron2 are rare. However, especially 6 days after irradiation, single cells of these dimensions are rather common. These cells were found to lie at random over the tubular basement membrane with no preference for areas with colonies.

  15. TrekISM Issue 65

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FINALLX} 'WITH Ih.L 1?::: Cf..=W S5CURITY CotU-P F,ND, 1H;;: =rvTERPRISS LI F-T5 OFF ANO H:::AD5 Fo~ F06,G,Y Lf. SrOCK SP':=ND5 THE 71/VlS WATcH/NCr TH::: RDDrnONAL F/UM ffl~ I(,DIV'A~RS HE R=AcTS 0001-'( 10 IH= OF TH:! H05Tfl~=S. .. .. to ve...

  16. Effects of N-Asterisk(1440) Resonance on Particle-Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions at Subthreshold Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming; LI, GQ.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and broaden- ing width of 5 resonance are well known [24] and have been a subject of much interest. On the contrary, little is known about the in-medium behavior of higher resonances. The very recent analysis of photoabsorption cross sections on nu- clei.... Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 41, 29 (1991). [4] W. Bauer, summary talk at the 9th High Energy Heavy Ion Study (Report No. MSUCL-917, 1994). [5] V. Metag, Frog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 30, 75 (1993); Nucl. Phys. A553, 283c (1993). [6] Gy. Wolf et al. , Nucl...

  17. GAL: General animation language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Gary Eugene

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for serving on my committee. To gy patient wife. TABLE OF CONTENTS III. IV. VI . INTRODUCTION A CLOSE LOOK AT SOME EXISTING COMPUTER ANIMATION SYSTEMS 1. BEFLIX 2. SOLIDS 3. CAFE 4. GENESYS 5. ANIMATOR 6. LDS-1 Real-Time Highway Dis... 66 71 73 73 75 TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont. ) D. 3. Keyword Symbol Table and Syntax Structure Table 4. Scanner 5. Recogni zer IMPLEMENTATION OF DISPLAY AND GRAPH FILES AND SYSTEM DICTIONARY 1. Di cti onary 2. Adding a Node to a Tree 3...

  18. A first generation compact microbeam radiation therapy system based on carbon nanotube X-ray technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadsell, M.; Shan, J.; Burk, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang, J.; Chang, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Laganis, P.; Sprenger, F. [XinRay Systems, Inc., 7020 Kit Creek Road, Suite 210, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)] [XinRay Systems, Inc., 7020 Kit Creek Road, Suite 210, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Zhang, L. [Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, H. [Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lu, J.; Zhou, O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a compact microbeam radiation therapy device using carbon nanotube cathodes to create a linear array of narrow focal line segments on a tungsten anode and a custom collimator assembly to select a slice of the resulting wedge-shaped radiation pattern. Effective focal line width was measured to be 131 ?m, resulting in a microbeam width of ?300 ?m. The instantaneous dose rate was projected to be 2 Gy/s at full-power. Peak to valley dose ratio was measured to be >17 when a 1.4 mm microbeam separation was employed. Finally, multiple microbeams were delivered to a mouse with beam paths verified through histology.

  19. A review of "Literacy and Written Culture in Early Modern Central Europe" by Istvan Gyorgy Toth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakub Basista

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the emergence of a public sphere. Istv?n Gy?rgy T?th. Literacy and Written Culture in Early Modern Central Europe. Central European University Press, 2000. x + 266 pp. Includes b&w illustrations, 31 tables and 2 maps. ?13.95 paper. Review by JAKUB BASISTA... in Central Europe on the base of research carried out in one region of Hungary. I realize that the notions of Central, Eastern, Central Eastern Europe, etc., are far from being precise, but I have problems accepting Central Europe as being limited only...

  20. Technologies for Reducing Nutrients in Dairy Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Wagner, Kevin; Gregory, Lucas

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    - strated by Miratech Division of Ten Cate Nicolon and General Chemical Corporation. The technolo- gy (Fig. 1) uses large, porous tubes made of heavy- duty synthetic fabric. In this system: 1. Alum and a polymer are added to bind and precipitate (separate... pump mixing the lagoon. #24; Alum and Cytec polymers were first added to the raw lagoon effluent, which was then pumped at about 400 gallons per minute into the Geotubes ? . Once the Geotubes ? were filled with the mix- ture of slurry and chemical...