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  1. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers, Jobs » Careers Stories » Employee Spotlight » Janice Lovato Janice Lovato-A gift for imagination The Associate Directorate for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations' Janice Lovato has turned her love for nature-watching and story-telling into writing a children's book called Germaine the Beetle. March 10, 2015 Janice Lovato Janice Lovato and her first children's book. "I am always telling stories, whether at bedtime, in the car going somewhere or sitting under a tree in the

  2. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janice Lovato March 10, 2015 A gift for imagination While the Associate Directorate for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations' Janice Lovato was still working as a cashier at Smith's Food and Drug Center in Los Alamos over a decade ago, a regular, usually friendly customer came through her line one day, but this time in an obviously disgruntled mood. As the shopper slowly placed his purchases on the cash register counter, he looked at Lovato in exasperation and told her that standing at the cash

  3. Janice Bryant Howroyd | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Janice Bryant Howroyd About Us Janice Bryant Howroyd - Founder, ACT-1 Janice Bryant Howroyd Janice Bryant Howroyd is the Founder and CEO of the ACT*1 Group, a global leader in deploying talent and resource management solutions. A North Carolina native, Janice left her hometown in 1976 armed with $900. Since then, she has dedicated her efforts to building an organization that is committed to keeping the humanity in human resources. She is a strong advocate for balance of education and

  4. Training and Technology … Janice Smiths story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janice Smith's story As we wind down the "TAT Treasures," as Don McMurray has dubbed these stories from TAT alumni, here is one from Janice Smith, a Y-12 employee in the Technology ...

  5. Janices start at Training & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janice's start at Training & Technology Janice West Christman, Vice President, Y-12 Quality Assurance, agreed to share her story the week she was retiring. Maybe I caught her at just the right moment because I had been after her to do this for some time and she just had not had the time to do so. For whatever reason, she agreed to tell first her story about her attendance at the historic training program, Training and Technology, or what was known locally as "The TAT School."

  6. QER- Comment of Janice Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposal for Conservation Reward Rate for Electricity First of all, thank you for the time you are taking to hear from the public along with the industry and government officials in this critical matter. I attended the public hearing in Hartford CT two days ago and was able to comment on parts of what we are proposing here. We are writing to open a conversation with you about a proposal that we have been discussing in our past meetings. We would like to see you initiate legislation that would mandate a "stepped rate" for electricity, under which consumers who used less would pay a lower rate per kilowatt hour than those who used more. Background North Quabbin Energy is a community group from the nine North Quabbin towns in north central Massachusetts that focuses on education and local action relating to ways to conserve energy and support local and regional enterprises that reduce our dependence on imported resources. The towns are Athol, Orange, Petersham, Royalston, Warwick, Wendell, New Salem, Erving and Phillipston. Our members include representatives from the appointed Energy Committees of these towns. For the past six years, we have participated in many different types of events and activities, always with an emphasis on the idea that the single best way to address the high financial, social, and environmental costs of our current energy use patterns is to consume less energy in the first place. What we have discovered in our community work is that most people seem aware of the reasons for conserving energy (lowering greenhouse gas emissions, saving money, reducing dependence on oil and other imported resources, etc.). Many are also knowledgeable about the basic weatherization and conservation strategies that utilities, municipalities, and community groups like ours try to promote (for example, adding insulation to homes, turning thermostats down, or using fluorescent or LED lighting rather than incandescent bulbs). Yet except when energy prices are extraordinarily high, it appears that there is a great deal of inertia among the general public about actually making changes in their energy consumption patterns. This proposal would address that issue of inertia by creating a direct incentive program for using less electricity. People could very quickly and easily make changes that would lower their electric use, and would see immediate results on their electric bills. Comparable programs Many utilities are beginning to offer peak and off-peak metering as a way to equalize demand on the electric grid, but although this is useful in making people more aware of their energy use patterns, it does nothing to reduce overall demand and may actually encourage more wasteful consumption at off-peak times. A few utilities are starting to offer the kind of stepped rate or rewards program that we are proposing. For example, Western Massachusetts Electric Company recently inaugurated a program that awards "points" (redeemable for consumer items) for the numbers of kilowatt hours saved. In our opinion, this kind of program sends the wrong message because it encourages people to save in one area (electricity use) in order to consume in another. Examples of programs more in line with what we are proposing already exist. One is British Columbia Hydro's "Conservation Rate," started in April 2010. Under their Residential Conservation Rate, customers pay 7.52 cents per kWh for the first 1,350 kWh they use over an average two-month billing period. Above that amount, customers pay 11.27 cents per kWh for the balance of the electricity used during the billing period. In nearby Vermont, the Washington Electric Cooperative has had stepped or tiered rates for years. They reward residential users with a relatively very low rate of 9.43 cents per kWhr for the first 200 kWhrs, and then charge a significantly higher rate of 21.06 cents thereafter. As a result, their customers use on average about 11% less than the households in our area. Points for discussion What might be a reasonable target figure for the stepped rate? The current Massachusetts average is about 610 kWh/month. Members of North Quabbin Energy have demonstrated that it is quite possible to use a half or even a third of that amount without any decline in standard or quality of living1. In fact, this level of reduction is imperative given the seriousness of climate change and resource depletion. How could this change best be promoted to the public? We would argue that this is not a rate increase, but rather a rate redistribution that rewards lower energy consumption. It seems important to emphasize the positive rewards of this kind of change, rather than framing it as a penalty for higher use2. It also seems crucial to demonstrate from the outset that reducing a household's electric use can be done with surprising ease, given a greater awareness of how much energy waste can be avoided with a change in behavior. How could the concerns of low-income customers, those with large families, or those who heat exclusively with electricity be addressed? The BCHydro and Washington Electric Cooperative programs provide useful models for addressing these questions, and there is a great deal of regional data that shows how these consumers would by no means be penalized in the kind of pricing structure we are proposing. What programs could be funded with the increased revenues? Public outrage would be justified if the money went into the general coffers of the utility companies and fossil fuel energy supply and distribution companies. Enhanced conservation programs should be the target of these revenues. Attachments: 1 NQE individual.pdf, 2 NQE proposed incentive rate Note - if attachments do not go through, see this web page for these documents: http://northquabbinenergy.org/wordpress/?page_id=205

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The Hall D Physics Program at JLab Leckey, John P. GlueX is one of the flagship experiments of the 12 GeV era at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The ...

  8. Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC Tom Leckey, EIA Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Statistics 2. Select segments 1. Select Primary Sampling Units (PSUs) - counties or groups of counties Main St Diagonal Ave 3. Select buildings How is CBECS Conducted? Nexus of Energy Use and and Technology, Buildings July 15, 2014 2 * No comprehensive source of buildings exists * Area frame - Randomly select small,

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leckey, John" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slice True-Up 101 pptx.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ted Barham, Janice Johnson and many others Content Organized and Presented by Craig Larson Slice History A Review of Subscription and RD(Regional Dialogue) Slice distinctions...

  11. HIV/Cancer DB Match Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COLLECTION AND VERIFICATION OF DATA FOR MATCHED RECORDS FROM US CANCER AND HIVAIDS REGISTRIES Janice Watkins, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, T. Borges, Robert Stafford, Oak...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... N-terminal additions to the WE14 peptide of chromogranin A create strong autoantigen agonists in type 1 diabetes Jin, Niyun ; Wang, Yang ; Crawford, Frances ; White, Janice ; ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-terminal additions to the WE14 peptide of chromogranin A create strong autoantigen agonists in type 1 diabetes Jin, Niyun ; Wang, Yang ; Crawford, Frances ; White, Janice ; ...

  14. Analysis of Alternative Extensions of the Existing Production Tax Credit for Wind Generators

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Requestor: Ms. Janice Mays, Chief Counsel, Committee on Ways & Means, U.S. House of Representatives This is a letter response requesting analysis of alternative extensions of the existing production tax credit (PTC) that would apply to wind generators only.

  15. NEESConnect | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015, Kwang Jin Kim, Yue Qi Group, Chem E & Materials Science, MSU July 2015, Jonathan Larson, Janice Reutt-Robey Group, Chem & Biochem, UMD Aug 2015, Hyung Jung, Reza Ghodssi...

  16. Microsoft Word - TrainingAgenda_2013_06_25.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Guest: Mary Hawken, Janice Johnson Content Organized and Presented by: Craig Larson Format: Net meeting with in-house room reservation for HQ AE's Note: Agenda subject to...

  17. Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat & Cool » Home Cooling Systems » Air Conditioning Air Conditioning Air conditioners cost U.S. homeowners more than $11 billion each year, and regular maintenance can keep your air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard Air conditioners cost U.S. homeowners more than $11 billion each year, and regular maintenance can keep your air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard Two-thirds of all homes in the

  18. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil producing countries in the Middle East and North Africa, amid low global surplus crude oil production capacity, has also lent support to crude oil prices. A framework...

  19. Analysis of Selected Provisions of the Domestic Manufacturing and Energy Jobs Act of 2010

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This report responds to a letter dated August 16, 2010, from Janice Mays, Staff Director of the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Ways and Means, requesting that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze several provisions included in the July 26, 2010, discussion draft of the Domestic Manufacturing and Energy Jobs Act of 2010.

  20. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 15, 2014 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell Idaho Herb Bohrer, Harry Griffith Ann Riedesel Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre, Allison Majure Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Pete Osborne, Dave Adler, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts, Jim Ethridge Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah

  1. EM SSAB Chairs Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call March 26, 2015 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell, Joni Grindstaff Idaho Lori McNamara Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Pete Osborne, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah River Harold Simon, Eleanor

  2. N-terminal additions to the WE14 peptide of chromogranin A create strong

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    autoantigen agonists in type 1 diabetes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: N-terminal additions to the WE14 peptide of chromogranin A create strong autoantigen agonists in type 1 diabetes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: N-terminal additions to the WE14 peptide of chromogranin A create strong autoantigen agonists in type 1 diabetes Authors: Jin, Niyun ; Wang, Yang ; Crawford, Frances ; White, Janice ; Marrack, Philippa ; Dai,

  3. MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY Donna L. Cragle and Janice P. Watkins, Center for Epidemiologic Research; Kathryn Robertson-DeMers, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Donna Cragle, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Key Words: mortality study, radiation exposure, leukemia, occupational cohort, trend test INTRODUCTION Since 1952 the Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, South Carolina, has operated as a Department of

  4. UNIVERSITY PARK SCHOOLS SMALL TOWNS ON UPGRADES | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the small town lent itself to a strategy of community-based social marketing, where word of mouth and other inexpensive measures encouraged neighbors to participate in the program. ...

  5. Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What if every time you lent your neighbor a cup of flour, he invited you and the rest of your block to share his freshly baked chocolate cake in return? Through your contribution, your neighbor has...

  6. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Takes 2015 Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab Takes 2015 Virginia Science Bowl 2014 Virginia High School Science Bowl The team from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, swept through the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl undefeated on Feb. 7. The team of (back row, left to right) Matthew Barbano, Tiger Zhang and Janice Ong, and (front, l. to r.) Franklyn Wang and Ross Dempsey are coached by Mary Ann Donohue (front, far right). Joining the team is Beau Tyler, the 2015

  7. Health Surveillance Outcomes in Former Rocky Flats Radiation Workers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers Janice P. Watkins 1 , Elizabeth D. Ellis 1 , F. Joseph Furman 2 , Roger B. Falk 2 , Joe M. Aldrich 2 , and Donna L. Cragle 1 ORAU Technical Report # 2006-0408 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; P.O. Box 117; Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; 9950 W. 80 th Avenue, Suite 17; Arvada, CO 80005-3914 This report was funded by

  8. B&W Y-12 names Kevin Corbett Vice President of Quality Assurance | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex B&W Y-12 names Kevin ... B&W Y-12 names Kevin Corbett Vice President of Quality Assurance Posted: April 23, 2013 - 3:59pm Kevin Corbett, B&W Y-12 Vice President, Quality Assurance Kevin Corbett has been named B&W Y-12 Vice President, Quality Assurance. He is replacing Janice Christman, who will be retiring from Y-12 at the end of April. With 32 years of experience, Corbett has managed quality programs on projects and installations for the U.S.

  9. ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1946

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACT OF 1946 (Public Law 585, 79'h Congress) Excerpted from "LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1946 (Public Law 585, 70th Congrcss)" Coinpilcd by Janics D. Niisc AEC Hcadqoartcrs Library Voliiinc I Principal Docriiiiciits U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, 1965 [PUBLIC LAW 5 8 5 - 7 9 ~ ~ CONQRESS] [CHAPTER 724-2~ SESSION] [S. 17171 AN ACT For the development and control o f atomic energy. Be it enacted 6y the Senate and House of Re resentdives of t b United States

  10. Dr. Robert Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert Tribble You may reach me at Office: Cyclotron (between ZAC and BLOC) Phone: 845-1411 Email: tribble@comp.tamu.edu Information about me: I have been teaching at Texas A&M since 1975. I carry out research in weak interactions, nuclear reactions at low and high energy and nuclear astrophysics. I received my Ph.D. degree from Princeton in 1973. My wife, Janice teaches math here. We have two children, Matthew (age 9) and Jennifer (age 7). Class information: Physics 304

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "White, Janice" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text0 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Crawford, Frances (1) Dai, Shaodong (1) Jin, Niyun (1) Kappler, John W. (1) Marrack, Philippa (1) Wang,

  12. Berkeley Joins the Cleantech University Prize | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Berkeley Joins the Cleantech University Prize Berkeley Joins the Cleantech University Prize March 8, 2016 - 10:13am Addthis Heating and air conditioning – an $11 billion industry in America - accounts for 5% of domestic energy use. By reducing contaminant buildup, a new technology could increase efficiency by as much as 25%. Photo courtesy: ©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard. Heating and air conditioning - an $11 billion industry in America - accounts for 5% of domestic energy use. By reducing

  13. Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System October 15, 2012 - 3:19pm Addthis Change your furnace filter to help keep allergies at bay and keep your furnace and air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/JaniceRichard. Change your furnace filter to help keep allergies at bay and keep your furnace and air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo

  14. MEMORANDUM OF EX PARTE COMMUNICATION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tuesday, September 10, 2013 Attendees: Dean Childs (DOE/NNSA), Donna Moore (DOE/NNSA), Marcella Boudi (DOE/NNSA), Catherine Mendelsohn (DOE/NNSA), Richard Goorevich (DOE/NNSA), Katie Strangis (DOE/NNSA), Anatoli Welihozkiy (DOE/NNSA), John Wengle (DOE/NNSA), Gretchen Smith (DOE/NNSA), Madeleine Foley (DOE/NNSA), Janice Rivera (DOE/NNSA), Xavier Asconio (DOE/NNSA), Glen Levis (GAO), Alisa Beyninson (GAO), Jeff Phillips (GAO) Summary of what was discussed: The September 10, 2013, meeting between

  15. #AskEnergySaver: Home Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling #AskEnergySaver: Home Cooling July 24, 2014 - 11:13am Addthis Home cooling accounts for 6 percent of the average household's energy use. To help you save money by saving energy, our experts are answering your home cooling questions. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard Home cooling accounts for 6 percent of the average household's energy use. To help you save money by saving energy, our experts are answering your home cooling questions. | Photo courtesy of

  16. Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting Print Light sources took center stage at several sessions at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2016 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC. The meeting's theme of Global Science Engagement lent itself well to the inherently collaborative nature of synchrotron science, which was featured in the following sessions. SESAME: A Scientific Source of Light in the Middle East SESAME light

  17. Y-12 employees, families and friends help East Tennessee during annual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteer Day | Y-12 National Security Complex employees, families ... Y-12 employees, families and friends help East Tennessee during annual Volunteer Day Posted: May 7, 2015 - 3:34pm Chris Clark, Contractor Assurance manager, and Rick Glass, Vice President of Mission Assurance for CNS, volunteered at the Oak Ridge Children's Museum. Y-12 National Security Complex employees, their families and friends lent helping hands to some 32 projects throughout the area - painting, landscaping,

  18. ORISE: REAC/TS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise to Empire 09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How ORISE is Making a Difference REAC/TS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise to Empire 09 Albany, N.Y. The Empire 09 exercise was held in Albany, N.Y. Medical and health physics professionals from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) lent their radiation emergency response expertise by providing support to the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) during Empire 09. How

  19. March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency March 19, 2012 - 12:25pm Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs The month of March represents many activities to celebrate: St. Patrick's Day, the first day of spring, the beginning of Lent, Daylight Savings Time, the month Coca Cola was invented, and most importantly, NCAA brackets! Now, with the understanding that it is unfair to place a higher

  20. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV, Part 9 0f 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory

  1. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Oral Examination Boards Phase III, Part 8 of 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel

  2. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Practical Training Phase II, Part 7 of 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Part 7 of 9 Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian

  3. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers Dave Lent Coleman Research Joe DeMers EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (formerly) Andy Hobbs FERMCO Dennis Maloney RUST - GJPO Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Michael

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National

  6. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National

  7. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training, Part 5 of 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los

  8. Climate change: Clinton affirms binding emissions reduction policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, P.

    1996-12-04

    In Australia last month President Clinton called for an international agreement to negotiate {open_quotes}legally binding commitments to fight climate change.{close_quotes} His comments affirmed the line the Administration adopted in July and lent prominence to the effort to bring about a treaty by December 1997. Environmentalists welcomed Clinton`s comments, but industry response is divided. The Global Climate Coalition (Washington), of which CMA is a member, has tried to slow negotiations by questioning the scientific consensus on climate change and suggesting {open_quotes}serious damage to the American economy{close_quotes} could result from emissions reduction.

  9. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  10. An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

    2009-03-31

    A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

  11. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  12. Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Creager

    2011-12-08

    The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

  13. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teh, Bin S.

    2005-03-31

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-LokTM bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2 x 2-cm field size. The dose beyond the interface recovered quickly and the dose reductions due to air cavity were 50%, 28%, 11%, and 1% at 2, 5, 10, and 15 mm, respectively, from the distal air-tissue interface. Evaluating the dose profiles of the more clinically relevant situation revealed the dose at air-tissue interface was approximately 15% lower in comparison to that without an air cavity. The dose built up rapidly so that at 1 and 2 mm, there was only an 8% and 5% differential, respectively. The dosimetric coverage at the depth of the posterior prostate wall was essentially equal with or without the air cavity. The median follow-up was 31.3 months. Rectal toxicity profile was very favorable: 81% (94/116) patients had no rectal complaint while 10.3% (12/116), 6.9% (8/116), and 1.7% (2/116) had grade 1, 2, and 3 toxicity, respectively. There was no grade 4 rectal toxicity. DVH analysis revealed that none of the patients had more than 25% of the rectum receiving 70 Gy or greater. Rectal balloon has rendered anterior rectal wall sparing by its dosimetric effects. In addition, it has reduced rectal volume, especially posterior and lateral rectal wall receiving high-dose radiation by rectal wall distension. Both factors may have contributed to decreased rectal toxicity achieved by IMRT despite dose escalation and higher than conventional fraction size. The findings have clinical significance for future very high-dose escalation trials whereby radiation proctitis is a major limiting factor.