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1

Organizational learning at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

Carroll, John S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Active Exploration for Robot Parameter Selection in Episodic Reinforcement Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Exploration for Robot Parameter Selection in Episodic Reinforcement Learning Oliver Kroemer-dimensional. Given the inherent exploration-exploitation dilemma of the problem, we propose treating in continuous multi- dimensional spaces. The approach is based on Gaussian process regression, which can

4

Estimating Building Simulation Parameters via Bayesian Structure Learning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many key building design policies are made using sophisticated computer simulations such as EnergyPlus (E+), the DOE flagship whole-building energy simulation engine. E+ and other sophisticated computer simulations have several major problems. The two main issues are 1) gaps between the simulation model and the actual structure, and 2) limitations of the modeling engine's capabilities. Currently, these problems are addressed by having an engineer manually calibrate simulation parameters to real world data or using algorithmic optimization methods to adjust the building parameters. However, some simulations engines, like E+, are computationally expensive, which makes repeatedly evaluating the simulation engine costly. This work explores addressing this issue by automatically discovering the simulation's internal input and output dependencies from 20 Gigabytes of E+ simulation data, future extensions will use 200 Terabytes of E+ simulation data. The model is validated by inferring building parameters for E+ simulations with ground truth building parameters. Our results indicate that the model accurately represents parameter means with some deviation from the means, but does not support inferring parameter values that exist on the distribution's tail.

Edwards, Richard E [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Optimal Selection of Sensors & Controller Parameters for Economic Optimization of Process Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Selection of Sensors & Controller Parameters for Economic Optimization of Process Plants of process plants Introduction Optimal operation Economic performance depends on the structural Madras) PhD VIVA VOCE September 15, 2014 2 / 35 #12;Economic performance of process plants Introduction

Skogestad, Sigurd

6

Display device for indicating the value of a parameter in a process plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL; Johnson, Shirley [Tucker Creek Consulting

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Seismic equipment qualification at Rocky Flats Plant: Lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic equipment qualification is being evaluated as a part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Initially it was believed that the experience database developed by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) for commercial nuclear power plants, as outlined in their Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP), would provide a substantial benefit for the seismic adequacy verification of equipment at RFP. However, further review of the simplified guidelines contained in the GIP with respect to the specific RFP structures and components revealed substantial differences from the GIP criteria. Therefore, the number of ``outliers`` from the experience database defined in the GIP is greater than was initially anticipated. This paper presents details of the differences found between the RFP structures and components and those represented in the GIP, and the challenges presented for their evaluation at RFP. Approaches necessary to develop seismic verification data are also discussed. The discussions focus on experience with one of the nuclear facilities at RFP, Building 707. However, the conclusions are generally applicable to other similar facilities that typically comprise the RFP nuclear facilities.

Peregoy, W.; Herring, K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of ‘safeguards by design’. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how ‘safeguardability’ was introduced into RRP.

Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records Package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Certifying the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Lessons Learned from the WIPP Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1998, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as being in compliance with applicable long-term regulations governing the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level, and transuranic radioactive wastes. The WIPP is the first deep geologic repository in the US to have successfully demonstrated regulatory compliance with long-term radioactive waste disposal requirements. The first disposal of TRU waste at WIPP occurred on March 26, 1999. Many of the lessons learned during the WIPP Project's transition from site characterization and experimental research to the preparation of a successful application may be of general interest to other repository programs. During a four-year period (1992 to 1996), the WIPP team [including the DOE Carlsbad Area Office (CAO), the science advisor to CAO, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the management and operating contractor of the WIPP site, Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WID)] met its aggressive schedule for submitting the application without compromising the integrity of the scientific basis for the long-term safety of the repository. Strong leadership of the CAO-SNL-WID team was essential. Within SNL, a mature and robust performance assessment (PA) allowed prioritization of remaining scientific activities with respect to their impact on regulatory compliance. Early and frequent dialog with EPA staff expedited the review process after the application was submitted. Questions that faced SNL are familiar to geoscientists working in site evaluation projects. What data should be gathered during site characterization? How can we know when data are sufficient? How can we know when our understanding of the disposal system is sufficient to support our conceptual models? What constitutes adequate ''validation'' of conceptual models for processes that act over geologic time? How should we use peer review and expert judgment? Other lessons learned by SNL and the WIPP team are more specific to the regulatory context of the project and the demands imposed by pervasive review by the regulator and other external organizations. How should we document the relationship between site data and the parameter values used in computer models? How can we manage software configuration and use it to support the regulatory requirement that analyses be traceable and reproducible? Can we institute a quality assurance (QA) program that will meet the regulatory requirements and enhance the process without unreasonable budget and schedule impacts? How can we resolve technical disputes, both within the project and with external critics? How should we involve regulators and stakeholders in the compliance process? The WIPP teams answers to these questions, and others like them, were, in many cases, pragmatic solutions based on the needs of the pro-warn at the time. Some problems encountered and their solutions may be of limited interest. However, that it is possible to license a geologic repository in a regulatory proceeding while incorporating meaningful public review and criticism is a lesson of general interest to all radioactive waste management programs.

Anderson, D.R. (Rip); Chu, Margaret S.Y.; Froehlich, Gary K.; Howard, Bryan A.; Howarth, Susan M.; Larson, Kurt W.; Pickering, Susan Y.; Swift, Peter N.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

Butcher, B.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Main report and appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This document is Volume 1, consisting of the executive summary, summary and observations, and an appendix listing the GALL literature review tables.

Kaza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The design of future central receiver power plants based on lessons learned from the Solar One Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10-MW{sub e} Solar One Pilot Plant was the world's largest solar central receiver power plant. During its power production years it delivered over 37,000 MWhrs (net) to the utility grid. In this type of electric power generating plant, large sun-tracking mirrors called heliostats reflect and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver mounted on top a of a tower. The receiver transforms the solar energy into thermal energy that heats water, turning it into superheated steam that drives a turbine to generate electricity. The Solar One Pilot Plant successfully demonstrated the feasibility of generating electricity with a solar central receiver power plant. During the initial 2 years the plant was tested and 4 years the plant was operated as a power plant, a great deal of data was collected relating to the efficiency and reliability of the plant's various systems. This paper summarizes these statistics and compares them to goals developed by the US Department of Energy. Based on this comparison, improvements in the design and operation of future central receiver plants are recommended. Research at Sandia National Laboratories and the US utility industry suggests that the next generation of central receiver power plants will use a molten salt heat transfer fluid rather than water/steam. Sandia has recently completed the development of the hardware needed in a molten salt power plant. Use of this new technology is expected to solve many of the performance problems encountered at Solar One. Projections for the energy costs from these future central receiver plants are also presented. For reference, these projections are compared to the current energy costs from the SEGS parabolic trough plants now operating in Southern California.

Kolb, G.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

Howarth, S.M.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged plants-lessons learned Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

range of access, part... -time and distance learning courses that can lead to University Certificates, Diplomas and Degrees. The ... Source: Swain, Peter - Centre for Systems...

22

Planning for coal power plant transition : lessons learned from communities in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As coal-fired power plants across the U.S. are retiring in increasing numbers - a trend likely to continue in the years ahead - the communities that host these plants will play a critical role in balancing local concerns ...

Nochur, Aditya Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Lessons learned from commercial experience with nuclear plant decontamination to safe storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully performed decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) on many production reactors it. DOE now has the challenge of performing D&D on a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe-storage status before conducting D&D-for perhaps as much as 20 yr. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and transition to D&D. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this paper are directly applicable to transitioning the DOE Weapons Complex.

Fischer, S.R.; Partain, W.L.; Sype, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from environmental cleanup to post-closure operations is complex and requires creative and innovative solutions. Future environmental cleanups can benefit from the lessons learned gained by DOE and contractor organizations. (authors)

Carpenter, C. P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Research Ridge 4, MS-K09, 3600 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507 (United States); Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Chiquita Building, 250 E. 5 th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States); Gallaher, D. M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, 955 Mound Road, Miamisburg, OH 45342 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition mechanisms of fuel particles and fission fragments during the initial phase of the Chernobyl accident. Through this study, it is now possible to generally reconstruct the radiological consequences by using a dispersion calculation technique, combined with the meteorological data at the time of the accident and land contamination densities of {sup 137}Cs measured and reported around the Chernobyl area. Although it is challenging to incorporate lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident into the source term issues, the author has already developed an example of safety goals by incorporating the radiological consequences of the accident. The example provides safety goals by specifying source term releases in a graded approach in combination with probabilities, i.e. risks. The author believes that the future source term specification should be directly linked with safety goals. (author)

Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 29, 2007 ... Keywords: parameter tuning, machine learning, design of experiments, artificial intelligence. Category 1: Optimization Software and Modeling ...

Mustafa Baz

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Determining the Viability of a Hybrid Experiential and Distance Learning Educational Model for Water Treatment Plant Operators in Kentucky.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Drinking water and wastewater industries are facing a nationwide workforce shortfall of qualified treatment plant operators due to factors including the en masse retirement… (more)

Fattic, Jana R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Management and integration of engineering and construction activities: Lessons learned from the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant China project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lessons learned during the early phase of design engineering and construction activities for the AP1000 China Project can be applied to any project involving multiple disciplines and multiple organizations. Implementation of a first-of-a-kind design to directly support construction activities utilizing resources assigned to design development and design delivery creates challenges with prioritization of activities, successful closure of issues, and communication between site organizations and the home office. To ensure successful implementation, teams were assigned and developed to directly support construction activities including prioritization of activities, site communication and ensuring closure of site emergent issues. By developing these teams, the organization is better suited to meet the demands of the construction schedule while continuing with design evolution of a standard plant and engineering delivery for multiple projects. For a successful project, proper resource utilization and prioritization are key for overcoming obstacles and ensuring success of the engineering organization. (authors)

McCullough, M. C.; Ebeling-Koning, D.; Evans, M. C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sulfate formation in oil-fired power plant plumes. Volume 1. Parameters affecting primary sulfate emissions and a model for predicting emissions and plume opacity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High sulfuric acid emissions with concomitant acid smuts and plume opacity concerns at oil fired utility boilers has been associated with combustion of high sulfur-, high vanadium-containing fuel. The purpose of this program was to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of flue gas H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and metal sulfates (MSO/sub 4/) and to determine the extent by which operating and controls parameters as well as the composition of the fuel affected those emissions. More than 200 flue gas measurements were made at a number of oil fired units and one coal fired unit, providing emissions levels of SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, MSO/sub 4/, total suspended particulate, and NO/sub x/. Parameters shown to significantly affect H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions were furnace O/sub 2/ level, sulfur and vanadium content of the fuel, the amount of corrosion inhibitor added to the oil, power level, and the composition of the fly ash. Correlations were developed which related the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions at oil fired units with the parameters above; predictions of emissions appear to be accurate to within +-25%. Based on limited data from the literature, the correlations were extended to include a means for predicting plume opacity and in-stack opacity. Recommendations for controlling the levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions as well as maintaining utility units in compliance with opacity regulations were made. Future research needs were indicated, including more studies relating H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ levels in flue gas with plume opacity and emissions studies at coal fired units. 85 references, 27 figures, 23 tables.

Dietz, R.N.; Wieser, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Parameter Estimation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Bayesian Approach ­Thumbtack vs Coin Toss · Uniform Prior vs Beta Prior ­Multinomial · Dirichlet Prior 2 · Statistical estimation theory deals with Confidence Intervals ­E.g., in election polls 61 + 2 percent plan

32

Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned Joseph F.C. DiMento The contributions insuccessful in bringing LESSONS LEARNED parties to discuss arelations." Yet LESSONS LEARNED "innovations" in the

DiMento, Joseph F.C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

34

Continual Learning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE.

35

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - auxiliary power plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Waterloo Collection: Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants 45 biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report Summary: of the plant...

37

Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra Dept of Computer Science for agents acting in a simulated learning environment. Varying parameter values can change the learning in a simulation that we can use to gain insights into the design of effective learning environments. Here, we

Sklar, Elizabeth

38

Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization Michael Biehl1 , Barbara

Biehl, Michael

39

Cesium Removal at Fukushima Nuclear Plant - 13215  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great East Japan Earthquake that took place on March 11, 2011 created a number of technical challenges at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. One of the primary challenges involved the treatment of highly contaminated radioactive wastewater. Avantech Inc. developed a unique patent pending treatment system that addressed the numerous technical issues in an efficient and safe manner. Our paper will address the development of the process from concept through detailed design, identify the lessons learned, and provide the updated results of the project. Specific design and operational parameters/benefits discussed in the paper include: - Selection of equipment to address radionuclide issues; - Unique method of solving the additional technical issues associated with Hydrogen Generation and Residual Heat; - Operational results, including chemistry, offsite discharges and waste generation. Results show that the customized process has enabled the utility to recycle the wastewater for cooling and reuse. This technology had a direct benefit to nuclear facilities worldwide. (authors)

Braun, James L.; Barker, Tracy A. [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)] [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Active Learning in Persistent Surveillance UAV Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of many complex UAV decision-making problems can be extremely sensitive to small errors in the model parameters. One way of mitigating this sensitivity is by designing algorithms that more effectively learn ...

Redding, Joshua

42

Pronunciation learning for automatic speech recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many ways, the lexicon remains the Achilles heel of modern automatic speech recognizers (ASRs). Unlike stochastic acoustic and language models that learn the values of their parameters from training data, the baseform ...

Badr, Ibrahim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Learning by learning to communicate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human intelligence is a product of cooperation among many different specialists. Much of this cooperation must be learned, but we do not yet have a mechanism that explains how this might happen for the "high-level" agile ...

Beal, Jacob Stuart Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Learning by Learning To Communicate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human intelligence is a product of cooperation among many different specialists. Much of this cooperation must be learned, but we do not yet have a mechanism that explains how this might happen for the "high-level" agile ...

Beal, Jacob

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

46

How the National Labs Help Us Understand the Inner Workings of Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn more about research at the National Energy Technology Lab that's helping us understand more about what happens inside power plants.

47

Land O'Lakes Shaves Gas Usage through Steam System In-Plant Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Twelve participants from 6 different facilities learned and practiced energy efficiency assessment skills during the recent in-plant training at a Land O'Lakes dairy plant in Carlisle, Pennsylvania...

48

Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? How can you fulfill the requirements the initial Lessons Learned Plan after KDP A and incorporate into the Preliminary Project Plan; Hold a PaL after KDP D/launch, review and submit lessons · Consolidate all Lessons Learned into a Final Lessons

Christian, Eric

49

Plant and Animal Sciences Val J. Anderson, Chair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture, law, public administration, or science. Wildlife and wildlands conservation is directed. Environmental Science Students majoring in environmental science learn a broad combination of chemistry, engineering, geology, geography, and plant and soil sciences to help them solve environmental problems

Hart, Gus

50

Learning Curve  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

It is a fundamental human characteristic that a person engaged in a repetitive task will improve his performance over time. If data are gathered on this phenomenon, a curve representing a decrease in effort per unit for repetitive operations can be developed. This phenomenon is real and has a specific application in cost analysis, cost estimating, or profitability studies related to the examination of future costs and confidence levels in an analysis. This chapter discusses the development and application of the learning curve.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Java Machine Learning Library Thomas Abeel, Yvan Saeys and Yves Van de Peer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Java Machine Learning Library Thomas Abeel, Yvan Saeys and Yves Van de Peer Department of Plant.abeel@psb.ugent.be What is Java-ML? Motivation Code & Documentation Applications 1. Machine learning techniques: · 18 style, no GUI 6. Open Source · Lack of a (good) machine learning library: · Reference implementations

Gent, Universiteit

52

Environmental labelling of green electricity with LCA key parameter models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the opening of European electricity markets, companies are launching green electricity products. In Switzerland the privately initiated eco-label “naturemade star ” ensures the environmental and ecological quality of electricity from renewable energy sources on a local scale and from a life cycle perspective. For the life cycle perspective, a simplified and partly site-specific life cycle assessment (LCA) is applied using the Eco-indicator 99 (Hierachist perspective) impact assessment method. In a first step, detailed LCAs case studies are made for power plants and technologies that are candidates for the „naturemade star “ label. They allow identifying technology-specific parameters that dominate the outcome of the LCA and for which data are available for the owner or operator of the power plant at issue. Based on this knowledge, key parameter models for photovoltaic, wind and hydroelectric power and electricity from biogas have been established on a spreadsheet-basis. With the help of the parameter models, operators of power plants can carry out the required LCA within a few hours. At the same time, they can check whether the plant fulfils the “naturemade star ” threshold or not, which has been set to 50 % of the environmental impact of a gas combined cycle power plant. Within a few months since the introduction of the labelling scheme, companies successfully applied the parameter models on nearly 50 photovoltaic and on several hydroelectric power plants. LCA is, in combination with other tools, a useful method for the definition of standards for environmental labelling of green electricity.

unknown authors

53

Course info Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course info Machine Learning Real life problems Lecture 1: Machine Learning Problem Qinfeng (Javen) Shi 28 July 2014 Intro. to Stats. Machine Learning COMP SCI 4401/7401 Qinfeng (Javen) Shi Lecture 1: Machine Learning Problem #12;Course info Machine Learning Real life problems Table of Contents I 1 Course

Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

54

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as...

55

Linear ParameterVarying versus Linear TimeInvariant Control Design for a Pressurized Water Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The plant can thus have widely varying dynamics over the operating range. The controllers designed perform to a description of the problem statement. Section 4 describes the identification and modelling of the plant. Se the worst­case time variation of a measurable parameter which enters the plant in a linear fractional manner

Bodenheimer, Bobby

56

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Storage Ring Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849 127,174 126,924Storage Ring Parameters

58

Jennifer Learned, Dana Nakase, Enrique Vivoni, and Sharon J . Hall. Arizona State University, PO Box 874501, Tempe AZ 85287-4501. Background: Plant growth in arid ecosystems is water limited. Soil water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Box 874501, Tempe AZ 85287-4501. Background: Plant growth in arid ecosystems is water limited. Soil and temperature sensors were installed at 7 cm. · Atmospheric temperature & humidity sensors were deployed in the soil box via sensors. · Simulations in Hydrus 2D were run to match soil box experiments. · Model output

Hall, Sharon J.

59

Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Learning Task-Optimal Registration Cost Functions for Localizing Cytoarchitecture and Function in the Cerebral Cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image registration is typically formulated as an optimization problem with multiple tunable, manually set parameters. We present a principled framework for learning thousands of parameters of registration cost functions, ...

Yeo, Boon Thye Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The energy balancing parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A parameter method is introduced in order to estimate the relationship among the various variables of a system in equilibrium, where the potential energy functions are incompletely known or the quantum mechanical calculations very difficult. No formal proof of the method is given; instead, a sufficient number of valuable examples are shown to make the case for the method's usefulness in classical and quantum systems. The mathematical methods required are quite elementary: basic algebra and minimization of power functions. This method blends advantageously with a simple but powerful approximate method for quantum mechanics, sidestepping entirely formal operators and differential equations. It is applied to the derivation of various well-known results involving centrally symmetric potentials for a quantum particle such as the hydrogen-like atom, the elastic potential and other cases of interest. The same formulas provide estimates for previously unsolved cases. PACS: 03.65.-w 30.00.00

Walton R. Gutierrez

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

DOE Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Lessons Learned Information Services Catches the Eye of Corporations and Educational Institutions

63

Learning Transformations From Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Natural Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Learning Continuous Transformation from VideoProposed Video Coder

Wang, Ching Ming

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities.

Patterson, M.W. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantum Learning Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel notion of a quantum learning machine for automatically controlling quantum coherence and for developing quantum algorithms. A quantum learning machine can be trained to learn a certain task with no a priori knowledge on its algorithm. As an example, it is demonstrated that the quantum learning machine learns Deutsch's task and finds itself a quantum algorithm, that is different from but equivalent to the original one.

Jeongho Bang; James Lim; M. S. Kim; Jinhyoung Lee

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

-Learning: A Robotics Oriented Reinforcement Learning Josep M. Porta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Learning: A Robotics Oriented Reinforcement Learning Algorithm Josep M. Porta Institut de Robotica Oriented Reinforcement Learning Algorithm Josep M. Porta Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (UPC

Portland State University

67

Impact of Advanced Physics and Technology on the Attractiveness of Tokamak Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Advanced Physics and Technology on the Attractiveness of Tokamak Fusion Power Plants--During the past ten years, the ARIES Team has studied a variety of tokamak power plants with different degrees to apply lessons learned from each ARIES design to the next. The results of ARIES tokamak power plant

Najmabadi, Farrokh

68

Protocol for secure quantum machine learning at a distant place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of machine learning to quantum information processing has recently attracted keen interest, particularly for the optimization of control parameters in quantum tasks without any pre-programmed knowledge. By adapting the machine learning technique, we present a novel protocol in which an arbitrarily initialized device at a learner's location is taught by a provider located at a distant place. The protocol is designed such that any external learner who attempts to participate in or disrupt the learning process can be prohibited or noticed. We numerically demonstrate that our protocol works faithfully for single-qubit operation devices. A tradeoff between the inaccuracy and the learning time is also analyzed.

Jeongho Bang; Seung-Woo Lee; Hyunseok Jeong

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

Rathbun, Julie A.

70

Lessons Learned | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Lessons Learned The Department of Energy utilizes project management lessons learned (PMLL) in the execution of DOE capital asset projects to improve current and...

71

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Getting Inside Plants | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance Get AssistanceGetting Inside Plants

73

Bagdad Plant  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon

74

Workplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workplace Learning & Development (WL&D) promotes employee and organizational growth, developmentWorkplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst 303 Goodell Amherst, MA 01003 Workplace Learning workshops to ALL UMass Amherst staff and faculty members. * Fall 2014 Programs Workplace Learning

Mountziaris, T. J.

75

Collaborative learning in software development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fields such as software process improvement, team research, organizational learning, organization scienceCollaborative learning in software development: An investigation of characteristics, prerequisites and Technology #12;[ii] Abstract Collaborative learning integrates individual and collective learning

Langseth, Helge

76

Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? II. How of a Lessons Learned Plan · Project Learning Processes · Timeline of Project Learning Ac;5/4/2012 11 #12;Timeline of AcYviYes · Review lessons learned from other relevant

Christian, Eric

77

Specific Learning Difficulties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs) A guide for tutors Enabling Services Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Contents Dyslexia Support ............................................................................................................ 3 Recognising students with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties................. 4

Anderson, Jim

78

What is Continual Learning?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE. Employee development in any organization and at any level is never ending.

79

Learning From Snapshot Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples are a powerful tool for teaching both humans and computers.In order to learn from examples, however, a student must first extractthe examples from its stream of perception. Snapshot learning is ageneral approach ...

Beal, Jacob

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Machine LearningMachine Learning Stephen Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represents if-then rules num-of-wheelsnon-truck hauls-cargo relative-height truck yesno non-truck non-truck about trucks & combines Memorizes: But will he recognize others? #12;1/21/2004 Stephen Scott, Univ is MachineAgain, what is Machine Learning?Learning? Given several labeled examples of a concept ­ E.g. trucks

Scott, Stephen D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Robot Learning Learning Models for Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to ensure the safe interaction with human beings. In contrast, traditional industrial robots45 Robot Learning Learning Models for Control Duy Nguyen-Tuong, Matthias Seeger1, Jan Peters Bringing anthropomorphic robots into human daily life requires backdrivable robots with compliant control

82

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics PhysicsWeek »Plant

83

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning Internships Volunteer & Service-Learning Field Work quite broad, although the offerings are more limited than the programs in the general section. Teaching the programs with experiential learning opportunities offered by SUNY campuses. These listings give just

Suzuki, Masatsugu

85

Learning and risk aversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

Oyarzun, Carlos

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Methods for determining the physiological state of a plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides methods for measuring a photosynthetic parameter. The methods of the invention include the steps of: (a) illuminating a plant leaf until steady-state photosynthesis is achieved; (b) subjecting the illuminated plant leaf to a period of darkness; (c) using a kinetic spectrophotometer or kinetic spectrophotometer/fluorimeter to collect spectral data from the plant leaf treated in accordance with steps (a) and (b); and (d) determining a photosynthetic parameter from the spectral data. In another aspect, the invention provides methods for determining the physiological state of a plant.

Kramer, David M.; Sacksteder, Colette

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to guidance for developing and reviewing ESP applications, issues involving ESP plant parameters, and suggestions for future ESP applicants. The development, submittal, and issuance of these first ESPs under DOE’s NP 2010 program started the momentum to exercise NRC’s new 10 CFR Part 52 licensing process. Several key questions that define critical issues regarding the effectiveness of regulations pertaining to ESPs have been identified and summarized in this report. However, the final resolution of whether the ESP component of the Part 52 process significantly contributes to the predictability in nuclear power plant licensing requires more experience and time, such as the completion of the ongoing combined Construction and Operating License (COL) process for the North Anna and Grand Gulf sites. The three ESP project participants prepared and submitted to DOE lessons learned reports from their experience in developing, submitting, and receiving an ESP. This document summarizes these reports, which are appended hereto. The Nuclear Energy Institute (http://www.nei.org/) and NRC (http://www.nrc.gov/) have also prepared reports regarding their perspectives on lessons learned during the ESP process. Their documents can be accessed on their respective web sites. Following is a summary of the lessons learned from the NP 2010 ESP projects. Effectiveness of the ESP Process: In general, the ESP process is expected (subject to demonstration of the ESP finality provisions in the North Anna and Grand Gulf ESPs) to provide high value for applicants as a site banking and risk mitigation strategy. However, several aspects of the initial process, such as NRC hearings and determining an acceptable approach to the NRC’s Emergency Planning requirements, proved challenging for the applicants. Project Execution: Initial regulatory and industry guidance for planning and executing an ESP application program proved to be insufficient to address NRC’s document review expectations. However, continuous communication between NRC and the applicants helped establish an acceptable framework

none,

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Statistical Learning Theory of Protein Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated statistical learning and simulation approach tomolecular simulation, using statistical learning theory tomolecular simulation and statistical learning theory of

Haas, Kevin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The iron nutrition of tropical foliage plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extraction of Fe from fresh leaves proved to be a good indicator of the Fe status of plants. It consistently gave higher correlations with chlorophyll concentration than other methods tested. Conversely, total Fe analysis on dried leaves did not always... resolve the correct Fe status of the plant. The studies also suggested that P and the ratio of P/0. 1 N HC1-Fe may be important parameters in the diagnosis of Fe status. In a screening of 11 tropical foliage plants, Ficus benj ami ha and Nephroiepi...

Lang, Harvey Joe

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

Ian Mckirdy

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

92

Strategy for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning. The method uses a quantum-classical hybrid simulator, where a "quantum student" is being taught by a "classical teacher." In other words, in our method, the learning system is supposed to evolve into a quantum algorithm for a given problem assisted by classical main-feedback system. Our method is applicable to design quantum oracle-based algorithm. As a case study, we chose an oracle decision problem, called a Deutsch-Jozsa problem. We showed by using Monte-Carlo simulations that our simulator can faithfully learn quantum algorithm to solve the problem for given oracle. Remarkably, learning time is proportional to the square root of the total number of parameters instead of the exponential dependance found in the classical machine learning based method.

Jeongho Bang; Junghee Ryu; Seokwon Yoo; Marcin Pawlowski; Jinhyoung Lee

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Experiential learning through internships and co-ops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental engineer/intern at the General Motors Baltimore Operations Plant. Popiel was an electrical of Engineering education: t Experiential learning through co-ops and internships t Hands-on experience t Global and computer engineer at the Department of Defense. Alkayyali was a biomedical engineer/intern at Johns Hopkins

Berdichevsky, Victor

94

biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report Vaibhav Nasery Roll No. 08D highly successful rural biogas models wherein biogas is produced and utilized as a cooking fuel by the villagers. The two models studied are the Community Biogas plant established by SUMUL Dairy at Bhintbudrak

Sohoni, Milind

95

On the Cover: One route to harvesting the energy of the sun involves learning to mimic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants. This many plants would need to be constructed to meet global demands for carbon-neutral energy#12;On the Cover: One route to harvesting the energy of the sun involves learning to mimic natural the chlorophylls, which play a central role in capturing light and using its energy for photosynthesis in green

Wu, Zhigang

96

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

Pázsit, Imre

97

Ethylene insensitive plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Designing for Learning: Multiplayer Digital Game Learning Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supercharged! : learning physics with digital simulationsimulations, computer games, and pedagogy in e-learning andlearning environment based on the blending microworlds, simulations,

Kim, Chung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Plant fatty acid hydroxylases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Embedding Learning Strategies into the Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and evaluation #12;Learning About Learning #12;Learning About Learning Highlight organizational skillsEmbedding Learning Strategies into the Curriculum VI VI AN FA YOWSKI BRENDA KOLLER Academic Success Centre UNBC CTLT Brown Bag Lunch October 23, 2013 #12;Learning About Learning Why embed learning

Northern British Columbia, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Treat Teaching as Learned Profession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Difference ACCORD UC/ Treat Teaching as Learned ProfessionPublic Policy Series PB-009-1104 Treat Teaching as Learned

Helen Duffy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cycle Track Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing driveways & low-volume streets Signalized intersections #12;Trend in kilometers cycled per year

Bertini, Robert L.

103

The Learning Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a 4-H volunteer, you have tremendous influence in determining the learning that takes place within your 4-H club or group. Adult volunteers also have the task of making the learning experiences attractive to young people. Here are some important...

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Residential Learning University Housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

Rusu, Adrian

105

Towards more human-like concept learning in machines : compositionality, causality, and learning-to-learn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People can learn a new concept almost perfectly from just a single example, yet machine learning algorithms typically require hundreds or thousands of examples to perform similarly. People can also use their learned concepts ...

Lake, Brenden M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

5, 95145, 2008 Soil parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools to sim- ulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for nu, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulicHESSD 5, 95­145, 2008 Soil parameter inversion ­ potential and limits A. Loew and W. Mauser Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

107

A Simulation Approach to Dynamic Portfolio Choice with an Application to Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulation Approach to Dynamic Portfolio Choice with an Application to Learning About Return 2000 This Draft: December 2003 Abstract We present a simulation-based method for solving discrete, parameter and model uncertainty, and learning. We first establish the properties of the method

Stroud, Jonathan

108

A Viterbi-like algorithm and EM learning for statistical abduction Taisuke SATO Yoshitaka KAMEYA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Viterbi-like algorithm and EM learning for statistical abduction Taisuke SATO Yoshitaka KAMEYA@mi.cs.titech.ac.jp Abstract We propose statistical abduction as a #12;rst- order logical framework for representing and learning probabilistic knowledge. It com- bines logical abduction with a parameter- ized distribution over

Sato, Taisuke

109

Enhancing student learning: On-line interactive laboratory for modelling of real world control system applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University has had satisfactory results regarding the use of a simulator for simulation of power plant operation (Ma et al, 2008). Firstly, in the simulation environment, students start up the plant, adjust its running parameter and explore plant's possible malfunction on the simulator. Thereafter, they operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Parameters estimation for spatio-temporal maximum entropy distributions: application to neural spike trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a numerical method to learn Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) distributions with spatio-temporal constraints from experimental spike trains. This is an extension of two papers [10] and [4] who proposed the estimation of parameters where only spatial constraints were taken into account. The extension we propose allows to properly handle memory effects in spike statistics, for large sized neural networks.

Nasser, Hassan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Can doxastic agents learn? On the temporal structure of learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, modifying the informativeness of the incoming data and changing the conditions of success of the learning

Amsterdam, University of

112

e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning http://etl.snu.ac.kr #12;about eTL eTL ? eTL(e-Teaching & Learning) , , , , . e , , , , , , , , , (, ) , SSO(Single Sign On) , , #12;e-Teaching & Learning System 4 1. Moodle Moodle Modular Object

Bahk, Saewoong

113

A Collaborative Learning Design Environment to Integrate Practice and Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to integrate organizational activities to solve practical problem with intel lect of type A, and learningA Collaborative Learning Design Environment to Integrate Practice and Learning based@jaist.ac.jp Abstract. The integration of practice and learning is a key to cultivation of or ganizational capability

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

114

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve Community Service by 4-H Project Area Development #12;New Hampshire 4-H Community Service by Project Area Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve that their service also relate to that project. This publication contains suggested service projects related

New Hampshire, University of

115

Case{based Meta Learning: Sustained Learning supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case{based Meta Learning: Sustained Learning supported by a Dynamically Biased Version Space Jacky{recognized that in practical in- ductive learning systems the search for a concept must be heavily biased. In addi- tion is sustained learn- ing, allowing transfer from known tasks to new ones. Previous work on dynamic bias has

Baltes, Jacky

116

PATHWAY PARAMETER AND THERMONUCLEAR FUNCTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In the theory of thermonuclear reaction rates, analytical evaluation of thermonuclear functions for non-resonant reactions, including cases with cut-off and depletion of the tail of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function were considered in a series of papers by Mathai and Haubold (1988). In the present paper we study more general classes of thermonuclear functions by introducing a pathway parameter ?, so that when ? ? 1 the thermonuclear functions in the Maxwell-Boltzmannian case are recovered. We will also give interpretations for the pathway parameter ? in the case of cut-off and in terms of moments. 1. Thermonuclear Functions The standard thermonuclear function in the Maxwell-Boltzmann case in the theory of nuclear reactions, is given by the following (Critchfield, 1972; Haubold and Mathai, 1985; Mathai and

H. J. Haubold

117

Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 79 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

118

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

Time series association learning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic input is recognized from inferred articulatory movements output by a learned relationship between training acoustic waveforms and articulatory movements. The inferred movements are compared with template patterns prepared from training movements when the relationship was learned to regenerate an acoustic recognition. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic articulatory relationships are learned by a neural network. Subsequent input acoustic patterns then generate the inferred articulatory movements for use with the templates. Articulatory movement data may be supplemented with characteristic acoustic information, e.g. relative power and high frequency data, to improve template recognition.

Papcun, George J. (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant Mitchell Colby University 204 Rogers Hall Corvallis, OR 97331 kagan.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT As power plants become power plant, showing that system parameters may be accurately measured and tracked more effectively than

Tumer, Kagan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Poisonous Plant Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carefully examine plants being grazed. Generally, a Significant quantity of toxic plant must be consumed to be lethaL Many times these plants are readily identified in the field by evidence of grazing. Also helpful at this time is a rumen sample... poisonous plants were most severe at heavy stocking rates, while few losses occurred at light stocking levels. Death ? losses were also directly related to kinds or combinations of livestock being grazed. When combinations of cattle, sheep and goats...

McGinty, Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Knowledge Gradient for Optimal Learning Warren B. Powell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of parameters; for online problems, we learn from rewards we are receiving, and we want to strike a balance path through New York City to respond to certain emergencies (e.g. getting a fire truck to city hall the best molecular compound to produce a particular result (curing cancer, storing energy, conducting

Powell, Warren B.

128

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

131

Robot learning [TC Spotlight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

Tedrake, Russell Louis

132

Experiments in service learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Computers for Learning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through Executive Order 12999, the Computers for Learning Program was established to provide Federal agencies a quick and easy system for donating excess and surplus computer equipment to schools...

134

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Learning Innate Face Preferences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newborn humans preferentially orient to face-like patterns at birth, but months of experience with faces is required for full face processing abilities to develop. Several models have been proposed for how the interaction of genetic and evironmental influences can explain this data. These models generally assume that the brain areas responsible for newborn orienting responses are not capable of learning and are physically separate from those that later learn from real faces. However, it has been difficult to reconcile these models with recent discoveries of face learning in newborns and young infants. We propose a general mechanism by which genetically specified and environmentdriven preferences can coexist in the same visual areas. In particular, newborn face orienting may be the result of prenatal exposure of a learning system to internally generated input patterns, such as those found in PGO waves during REM sleep. Simulating this process with the HLISSOM biological model of the visual system, we demonstrate that the combination of learning and internal patterns is an efficient way to specify and develop circuitry for face perception. This prenatal learning can account for the newborn preferences for schematic and photographic images of faces, providing a computational explanation for how genetic influences interact with experience to construct a complex adaptive system.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sharing Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

Mohler, Bryan L.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A quantum speedup in machine learning: Finding a N-bit Boolean function for a classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare quantum and classical machines designed for learning an N-bit Boolean function in order to address how a quantum system improves the machine learning behavior. The machines of the two types consist of the same number of operations and control parameters, but only the quantum machines utilize the quantum coherence naturally induced by unitary operators. We show that quantum superposition enables quantum learning that is faster than classical learning by expanding the approximate solution regions, i.e., the acceptable regions. This is also demonstrated by means of numerical simulations with a standard feedback model, namely random search, and a practical model, namely differential evolution.

Seokwon Yoo; Jeongho Bang; Changhyoup Lee; Jinhyoung Lee

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

How Selective is Social Learning in Dolphins?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L. (2007). Social learning and innovation are positivelyor experiences), innovation, and social learning. Bouchard,2003). Social learning: Promoter or inhibitor of innovation?

Kuczaj II, Stan A.; Yeater, Deirdre; Highfill, Lauren

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience Program. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICESUpon receipt of a Lessons Learned/Best Practices Feedbackreview disseminated Lessons Learned/Best Practices Briefings

Gravois, Melanie C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters ({Delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub atm}). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin {sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}} = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup _0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.). The tension between these results is intriguing, and additional antineutrino data is currently being taken in order to further investigate this apparent discrepancy.

Backhouse, Christopher James; /Oxford U.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Semi-Supervised Learning Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Brendan J. Frey Learning in Graphical Models, Michael I. Jordan Causation, Prediction, and Search, second Kandola John Lafferty Zoubin Ghahramani Many graph-based semi-supervised learning methods can be viewed

Lafferty, John

143

Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

Michael Sussman

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

System and method for motor parameter estimation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND LEARNING WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change and Learning Within Organizations". In Dynamics of organizational societies : Models, theories to organizational learning. This approach defines learning, culture, structure and behavior at the individual and organizational level. When organizations, as synthetic agents learn important organizational behaviors emerge

Sadeh, Norman M.

147

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve Community Service Projects All good community for learning. This publication contains a list of suggested service projects and ideas for expanding the system works. Mindy Turner, New Mexico 4-H Youth Development Specialist November 2006 #12;New Hampshire 4

New Hampshire, University of

149

: Abduction, Learning. A System for Learning Abductive Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f g Keywords Abstract : Abduction, Learning. 1 A System for Learning Abductive Logic Programs Ferrara, Italy We present the system LAP for learning abductive logic programs from examples and from a background abductive theory. A new type of induction problem has been defined as an extension

Dix, Juergen

150

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned Plus Past and Future Challenges Presented to: Portland State Corridor **Trucked around Corridor but leaves or enters Southern California by rail. #12;Lessons Learned

Bertini, Robert L.

152

Use of the Hebb-Williams closed-field maze to determine learning ability in yearling horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ve fillies whi ch had never before been used on any learning study were compared. After a 10-day adjustment and training period, horses were presented a new problem each day for 12 days and were given eight trials on each problem. The following... learning parameters were calculated: (1) total excess entry scores (TExES), (2) rapi dity of learning score (XR), the percent of total excess entries occurring during the first four trials of each problem; (3) error elimination score (EES...

McCall, Cynthia Ann

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hybrid Machine Learning Princeton University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Learn an apprentice policy !A such that V(!A) # V(!E) where the value function V(!) is unknown. Expert policy !E Apprentice policy !A Learning algorithm #12;Apprenticeship Learning !! Our contribution: New apprentice policy than existing algorithms. #12;Assumptions !! Definition: Let µ(!) be the feature vector

Mohri, Mehryar

154

Century Learning through Apple Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21st Century Learning through Apple Technology July 4 ­ 5, 2013 This exciting institute will appeal to educators who wish to enhance their teaching in support of 21st century learning using Apple technology. This institute begins with a keynote address that looks at how new technologies can enhance 21st century learning

155

Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization L. Nehaoua H modeling and parameters identification of a motorcycle simulator's platform. This model begins with some (cars and motorcycles) is possible by taking in care some characteristics of land vehicles. Indeed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Planet Parameters in Microlensing Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A planetary microlensing event occurs when a planet perturbs one of the two images created in a point-mass microlensing event, causing a deviation from the standard Paczy\\'nski curve. Determination of the two physical parameters that can be extracted from a planetary microlensing event, the planet/star mass ratio q, and the planet/star separation in units of the stellar Einstein ring, $y_p$, is hampered by several types of degeneracies. There are two distinct and qualitatively different classes of planetary events: major and minor image perturbations. For major image perturbations, there is a potentially crippling continuous degeneracy in q which is of order $\\delta_d^{-1}$, where $\\delta_d$ is the maximum fractional deviation of the planetary perturbation. Since the threshold of detection is expected to be $\\delta_d \\sim 5%$, this degeneracy in q can be a factor of $\\sim 20$. For minor image perturbations, the continuous degeneracy in q is considerably less severe, and is typically less than a factor 4. We show that these degeneracies can be resolved by observations from dedicated telescopes on several continents together with optical/infrared photometry from one of these sites. There also exists a class of discrete degeneracies. These are typically easy to resolve given good temporal coverage of the planetary event. Unambiguous interpretation of planetary microlensing events requires the resolution of both types of degeneracy. We describe the degeneracies in detail and specify the situations in which they are problematic. We also describe how individual planet masses and physical projected separations can be measured.

B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters. University of Pittsburgh Department of Industrial Engineering. Technical Report 2007-7. Mustafa Baz ...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bayesian learning in bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . 8 II.2.2. Historical Pathways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 II.2.3. Gene Class Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 II.3. Bayesian Learning for Microarrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 II.3.1. BLM1... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 II.3.2. BLM2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 II.3.3. BLM3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 II.3.4. Posterior Computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 II.3.5. False Discovery Analysis...

Gold, David L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

Greg Wilson

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

Wilson, Greg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

Felak, R. P.

163

Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coe#cients of the ``soft

California at Berkeley, University of

164

Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coefficients of the "soft

California at Berkeley, University of

165

PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

Fernandez, Eduardo

166

Plant fatty acid hydroxylase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Plant Ecology An Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

169

RESEARCH ARTICLE PLANT GENETICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relative) in the Brassicaceae plant family is determined by the genotype of the plant at the self-incompatibility-locus phenotype in a self-incompatible Arabidopsis species. Selection has created a dynamic repertoire of s of regulation among alleles. S porophytic self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetic system that evolved in hermaph

Napp, Nils

170

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

Demazière, Christophe

171

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

Pázsit, Imre

172

Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants are being closely grouped together, for example pv.oryzae pv. oryzae AvrXa21 and implications for plant innatePseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Tanzania. Plant Dis. 91,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Association and Abstraction in Sequential Learning:“What is Learned?” Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

serial-pattern learning; our SPAM simulations simply testedwalk" simulation model of multiple-pattern learning in ain rat serial pattern learning. In two simulation studies (

Fountain, Stephen B.; Doyle, Karen E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mobile plant for low-level radioactive waste reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with nuclear power plants, many scientific and industrial enterprises generate radioactive wastes, especially low-level liquid wastes. Some of these facilities generate only small amounts on the order of several dozen cubic meters per year. The Moscow scientific industrial association, Radon, developed a mobile pilot system, EKO, for the processing of LLW with a low salt content. The plant consists of three modules: ultrafiltration module; electrodialysis module; and filtration module. The paper describes the technical parameters and test results from the plant on real LLW.

Sobolev, I.A.; Panteleyev, V.I.; Demkin, V.I. [Government of Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

CSCL@Work Chapter Regional Learning in Software Industries CSCL@Networking -Regional Learning in Software Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

learning across organizational boundaries. Keywords Regional Learning, Software Industry, Networks learning across organizational boundaries. Keywords Regional Learning, Software Industry, Networks1 CSCL@Work ­ Chapter Regional Learning in Software Industries CSCL@Networking - Regional Learning

176

Calibration of Cotton Planting Mechanisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per foot. To obtain a perfect stand of one plant to Foot, a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 11 plants per foot wonld have to be thinned out. The number for picker wheel- drop planting mechanisms ranged from a minimum of 2 to a maxi- mum of 27 plants... per foot, requiring the removal of from 1 to 26 nlants per foot to leave one plant per foot. CONTENTS Introduction History of cotton planter development ------------.---------------------------------- Cottonseed planting mechanisms Requirements...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Robotics for Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teaching Robotics is about empowering students to create and configure robotics devices and program computers to nurture in students the skill sets necessary to play an active role in society. The robot in Figure 1 focuses on the design of scaffolds and physical assembly methods, coupled with a computer logic program to make that makes it move or behave in a very precise (remote controlled or autonomous) manner. This enables students to investigate, explore and refine the program to affect the robots. The Robotics approach takes into account the increasing popularity of Computer Science and the learning by doing (Schank, Berman, & Macpherson, 1999) approach to solve complex problems and use computers meaningfully in learning (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Jonassen, Howland, Marra, & Crismond, 2008). In Singapore, teachers and students in Woodlands Ring Secondary and Rulang Primary have incorporated robotics to varying extents into formal and informal curricula. In addition, other less expensive ...

Toh, Dennis; Lim, Matthew; Wee, Loo Kang; Ong, Matthew

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

179

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

180

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

182

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

183

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

184

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

185

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

186

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

187

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

188

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

189

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

190

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

191

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

192

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

193

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

194

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

195

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

196

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

197

Learning planar ising models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

Johnson, Jason K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netrapalli, Praneeth [STUDENT UT AUSTIN

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

Plant Vascular Biology 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

Ding, Biao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Geothermal Demonstration Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

200

Plant Operations Executive Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus North Campus Recycling Operations Materials Human Resources Payroll Misc Svs Special Projects Planning Spray Shop Glass Shop Upholstery Shop Plant IT Painting Services G. Weincouff Human Resources Business Services Estimating Shutdown Coordination Scheduling L. Rastique Human Resources 67398 M

Awtar, Shorya

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

202

Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

203

Two-Parameter Dynamics and Geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present the two-parameter dynamics which is implied by the law of inertia in flat spacetime. A remarkable perception is that (A)dS4 geometry may emerge from the two-parameter dynamics, which exhibits some phenomenon of dynamics/ geometry correspondence. We also discuss the Unruh effects within the context of two-parameter dynamics. In the last section we construct various invariant actions with respect to the broken symmetry groups.

Zhi Hu; Mulin Yan; Sen Hu

2015-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) The Learning and Organizational Change concentration helps you explore how  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) CURRICULUM The Learning and Organizational Change change through learning and organizational design. The assessment, design and implementation of knowledge, the concentration draws upon innovations in learning sciences and theories of organizational behavior to teach you

Shahriar, Selim

205

Adjustable Robust Parameter Design with Unknown Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 27, 2013 ... Adjustable Robust Parameter Design with Unknown Distributions. ihsan Yanikoglu(i.yanikoglu ***at*** uvt.nl) Dick den Hertog(d.denhertog ...

ihsan Yanikoglu

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

ONE-PARAMETER CONTINUOUS FIELDS OF KIRCHBERG ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-parameter separable unital continuous fields of Kirchberg algebras (nuclear purely infinite simple C*-algebras) with torsion free Ki-groups and trivial ...

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sandia National Laboratories: main parameter determining laminate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

parameter determining laminate fatigue lifetime is the cumulative time under load New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On...

208

Organizational scenarios for the use of learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects Henry Hermans and Fred de Vries October 2006 Learning objects in practice 2 #12;Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects page 2 of 22 Colophon Organizational scenario's for the use of learning objects Learning objects in practice 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

Kayran, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Dynamic Structure Learning of Factor Graphs and Parameter Estimation of a Constrained Nonlinear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization is that the underlying reservoir structure is unknown and changes continuously over time. One of the popular oil recovery techniques is waterflooding, which injects water into injectors with the optimization is that the underlying structure of oil reservoirs is unknown and it continuously changes over

Southern California, University of

211

10Things Kids CanDo in Tough Times Help prepare meals at home. Learn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10Things Kids CanDo in Tough Times Help prepare meals at home. Learn to cook some foods. Help set help your chances for a scholarship. 4 Plant or help take care of a food garden. You can use and cool in summer. Help recycle what your family uses. 6 Help your family save money by not asking them

Tullos, Desiree

212

Centers for Learning Advising Center Revised 04/12 College of Engineering Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering Curriculum Nuclear Engineering Option Freshman Year/Fall Semester.410 Plant Design 3 ___10.409 Engineering Economics 3 ___24.___ Nuclear Tech. Elect. 3 ___10.413 ProcessCenters for Learning Advising Center Revised 04/12 College of Engineering Bachelor of Science

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

213

NEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their learning, both in and out of class. Simulations, learning games, threaded discussions, and videoNEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT Mona Laroussi 1'Ascq cedex - France KEYWORDS: Mobile learning, Ubiquitous learning, Wireless technology Abstract Ubiquitous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Metafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

via discovery, educational simulations, social learning techniques, collaborative learning toolsMetafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics Toby as an emerging pedagogy for supporting Learning to Learn Together in science and mathematics education. Our goal

McLaren, Bruce Martin

215

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

schoen,,,

216

Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the physical attributes of airborne particulate matter, such as the airborne concentrations of particles and their sizes. The conditions of receptor exposure (duration of exposure in various microenvironments), breathing rates, and dosimetry of inhaled particulates are discussed in more detail in ''Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]).

M. Wasiolek

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

217

Plant physiology Heat of combustion, degree of reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant physiology Heat of combustion, degree of reduction and carbon content: 3 interrelated methods coefficient between heat of combustion and degree of reduction may vary according to the chemical composition parameters in consequence. construction cost / growth yield / heat of combustion / elemental analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Harmonic filter assessments at a Battery Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The facility set a peak demand of just over four megawatts in the twelve months prior to the plant expansion work. It contains 831 rectifier circuits, which represent about 60% of the plant load. Production is divided between building the batteries and charging them. The charging load can be carried based on production, or based on other parameters such as cost of electricity. The plant is served at 480 volts from Duke`s 44-kV sub-transmission system. Prior to the expansion, Duke operated two 1200-kvar switched capacitor banks on the 480-V bus for voltage regulation. After the expansion, Duke removed the capacitors and Freeborn installed a 1016-kvar switched harmonic filter on each delivery point. Inside the plant, Exide operates twelve 84-kvar harmonic filters on individual feeders. All harmonic filters are tuned to the 4.7th harmonic. As mentioned above, Exide operates 831 rectifier circuits. The typical AC system serving rectifiers consists of a 460/230-V transformer, connected wye-delta, rated at 124 kVA. This transformer serves 16 rectifiers. Note that the six-pulse bridge circuit consists of uncontrolled diodes. DC current control is achieved by adjusting current flow through the saturable AC reactors.

Adams, R.; Davis, J.; Callaghan, P.; Ray, L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

Randy Roberts

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

Ewing, Richard E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Extragalactic database. VII Reduction of astrophysical parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic database (LEDA) gives a free access to the main astrophysical parameters for more than 100,000 galaxies. The most common names are compiled allowing users to recover quickly any galaxy. All these measured astrophysical parameters are first reduced to a common system according to well defined reduction formulae leading to mean homogeneized parameters. Further, these parameters are also transformed into corrected parameters from widely accepted models. For instance, raw 21-cm line widths are transformed into mean standard widths after correction for instrumental effect and then into maximum velocity rotation properly corrected for inclination and non-circular velocity. This paper presents the reduction formulae for each parameter: coordinates, morphological type and luminosity class, diameter and axis ratio, apparent magnitude (UBV, IR, HI) and colors, maximum velocity rotation and central velocity dispersion, radial velocity, mean surface brightness, distance modulus and absolute magnitude, and group membership. For each of these parameters intermediate quantities are given: galactic extinction, inclination, K-correction etc.. All these parameters are available from direct connexion to LEDA (telnet lmc.univ-lyon1.fr, login: leda, no passwd OR http://www-obs.univ-lyon1.fr/leda ) and distributed on a standard CD-ROM (PGC-ROM 1996) by the Observatoire de Lyon via the CNRS (mail to petit@obs.univ-lyon1.fr).

G. Paturel; H. Andernach; L. Bottinelli; H. Di Nella; N. Durand; R. Garnier; L. Gouguenheim; P. Lanoix; M. C. Marthinet; C. Petit; J. Rousseau; G. Theureau; I. Vauglin

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

FGD systems -- Physical deterioration of the chemical plant facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act of 1970 established the initial requirements for the control of flue gas emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants in the US. Until then, only mechanical collectors and electrostatic precipitators regulated smoke and fly ash emissions from these plants. Now, a new technique for controlling the chemical emissions from a fossil-fuel-fired power plant had to be installed. Since there was practically no time for a research and development program, the power industry had to move quickly to select a compliance system. They chose to modify existing technology from the chemical industry for their specific need. Thus, wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems were born into the power industry and a chemical plant was added between the electrostatic precipitator and the chimney. This paper provides insight on how a program can be implemented to reconcile the materials and corrosion protection techniques available today to the specific areas of an FGD system. This paper focuses on a typical wet limestone FGD process. This type of process constitutes the vast majority of the FGD systems by total megawatt generation in the US. The power industry must learn from its chemical plant experience if it intends to extend the service life of FGD systems to match the design life of the remaining plant power block.

Dille, E.R.; Ridge, J.L. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship, not fitness for service) and with good engineering judgment. Fortuitously, those nuclear power plants were designed using defense-in-depth concepts, with nondestructive examination (NDE) an important layer, so they can tolerate almost any component failure and still continue to operate safely. In the 30+ years of reactor operation, many material failures have occurred. Unfortunately, NDE has not provided the reliability to detect degradation prior to initial failure (breaching the pressure boundary). However, NDE programs have been improved by moving from prescriptive procedures to performance demonstrations that quantify inspection effectiveness for flaw detection probability and sizing accuracy. Other improvements include the use of risk-informed strategies to ensure that reactor components contributing the most risk receive the best and most frequent inspections. Another challenge is the recent surge of interest in building new nuclear power plants in the United States to meet increasing domestic energy demand. New construction will increase the demand for NDE but also offers the opportunity for more proactive inspections. This paper reviews the inception and evolution of NDE for nuclear power plants over the past 40 years, recounts lessons learned, and describes the needs remaining as existing plants continue operation and new construction is contemplated.

Doctor, S. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS D for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak a simplified economic model and selecting uniform engineering performance parameters, this comparison

Najmabadi, Farrokh

225

Author's personal copy Fate of CuO-derived lignin oxidation products during plant combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Fate of CuO-derived lignin oxidation products during plant combustion natural chars originating from combustion of angiosperm/gymnosperm and woody/non-woody plants. The lignin to study the impact of combustion on lignins and their commonly used parameters. Our results show

Louchouarn, Patrick

226

APRIL: Active Preference-learning based Reinforcement Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behaviors (section 2). Resuming the preference-based policy learning (Ppl) approach [2], the con- tribution of the present paper is to extend Ppl along the lines of active learning, in order to minimize the number Bayesian approaches hardly scale up to large-dimensional continuous spaces. Secondly, the Ppl setting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Mobile Learning Initiative (MLI) Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Campus Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Mobile Learning Initiative (MLI) Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Campus Climate Assessment.............................................................................................................................. 30 A. Demographics of 2012 Faculty Mobile Computing Survey Respondents B. Demographics of 2011 and 2012 Student Mobile Computing Survey Respondents C. Example Faculty Comments from Open-Ended Feedback D

Barrash, Warren

228

Team Leader, Learning for Livelihoods Commonwealth of Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moses Tenywa, Bernard Fungo, Mungule Chikoye and Martin KaongaThe Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government to encourage the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies.

Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Country Collaborators; Ajaga Nji; Collins Osei; Reuben Aggor; Edward Badu; Geoffrey Kironchi; Adewale Adekunle; Adeolu Ayanwale; Morolake Adekunle; Moses Ubaru; Aliyageen Alghali; Bob Conteh; Edwin Momoh; Camilius Sanga; Ayubu Jacob Churi; Siza Tumbo; Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Anthony Youdeowei; Savithri Swaminathan

229

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008 Call for Nominations: Provost's Prize for Teaching with Technology Eligibility: Candidates must be a tenure-track or non's Prize for Teaching with Technology will be awarded to up to two recipients. Each recipient will receive

Southern California, University of

230

Learning by Learning To Communicate Jacob Stuart Michael Beal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning by Learning To Communicate by Jacob Stuart Michael Beal S.B., Massachusetts Institute To Communicate by Jacob Stuart Michael Beal Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer of my work than I expect. Jean and Jon Beal, my

231

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Welcome to the 39th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

232

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Welcome to the 38th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

233

Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

Hongjing Lu; Randall R. Rojas; Tom Beckers; Alan Yuille

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Feedback controller parameterizations for reinforcement learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reinforcement Learning offers a very general framework for learning controllers, but its effectiveness is closely tied to the controller parameterization used. Especially when learning feedback controllers for weakly stable ...

Roberts, John William

236

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

File: 070629 Lessons Learned  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Programs forDecemberLessons Learned"

238

Use and recovery of ammonia in power plant cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents some practical and theoretical aspects of the use of ammonia in power plant water/steam cycles. The plants considered are fully automated units with once-through boilers, which operate under complex conditions and are subject to frequent starts and load changes. The boilers are chemically conditioned with combined oxygen ammonia treatment and the condensate polishing plant is only operated during start-up, in the event of a condenser leak or to remove excess ammonia. The paper also covers the recovery of ammonia from the condensate polishing plant waste regenerants and reuse for conditioning the feedwater. In particular, the paper deals with the following points: theoretical analysis of the chemical equilibrium of ammonia and carbon dioxide in water, including calculation of the concentrations from the parameters normally measured, such as conductivities and pH; equipment for monitoring and controlling the amount of ammonia fed to the water/steam cycle, including the optimum positioning of the sampling and feed-points, the parameters suitable for feed control and their temperature dependence; the partial pressure and distribution coefficient of ammonia; the consumption and losses of ammonia through the water/steam cycle during operation; the recovery of ammonia from condensate polishing plant waste regenerants by steam stripping. The paper should be of interest to both planning engineers and plant operators.

Pflug, H.D.; Bettenworth, H.J.; Syring, H.A. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hanover (Germany)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Abiotic Stress Effects on Physiological, Agronomic and Molecular Parameters of 1-MCP Treated Cotton Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 1986; Morgan et al., 1990; Narayana et al., 1991). Two key enzymes are involved in the ethylene synthesis pathway. The first enzyme ACC-synthase (ACS) converts S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which originates in the methionine cycle, to 1...) affects ethylene production and gene expression in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Greenhouse studies were conducted during two years as a 2x2 factorial design in a split-block arrangement with five replications. Treatments included two 1-MCP rates (0...

Da Costa, Vladimir Azevedo

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

A determination of microbial parameters of a coconut processing pilot plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Philippines . 36 Distribution of microbial types among isolates from the shell of coconuts from the Dominican Republic . 37 Aerobic plate count of raw coconut water removed aseptically from Jamaican coconuts 39 10 Microbiological analysis of spray... and Intermediate Moisture Concentrates were produced with aerobic plate counts 10, 000/g. Little if any microbial growth took place during extended storage of these products at 21 or 35 C. No increases in population were observed when Bacillus, Micrococcus...

Kajs, Theresa Marie

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

242

Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:015:440  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including traditional and organic farming, plant and animal production, energy, pest management, specialized we will try and have an interactive class environment. Learning Goals: · Be able to conduct a student Spring · Readings: o Global Food Production Systems o The Global Food System: A Research Agenda · Faith

Chen, Kuang-Yu

243

MFV Reductions of MSSM Parameter Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 100+ free parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) make it computationally difficult to compare systematically with data, motivating the study of specific parameter reductions such as the cMSSM and pMSSM. Here we instead study the reductions of parameter space implied by using minimal flavour violation (MFV) to organise the R-parity conserving MSSM, with a view towards systematically building in constraints on flavour-violating physics. Within this framework the space of parameters is reduced by expanding soft supersymmetry-breaking terms in powers of the Cabibbo angle, leading to a 24-, 30- or 42-parameter framework (which we call MSSM-24, MSSM-30, and MSSM-42 respectively), depending on the order kept in the expansion. We provide a Bayesian global fit to data of the MSSM-30 parameter set to show that this is manageable with current tools. We compare the MFV reductions to the 19-parameter pMSSM choice and show that the pMSSM is not contained as a subset. The MSSM-30 analysis favours a relatively lighter TeV-scale pseudoscalar Higgs boson and $\\tan \\beta \\sim 10$ with multi-TeV sparticles.

S. S. AbdusSalam; C. P. Burgess; F. Quevedo

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Parameter Space of Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-analytic models are a powerful tool for studying the formation of galaxies. However, these models inevitably involve a significant number of poorly constrained parameters that must be adjusted to provide an acceptable match to the observed universe. In this paper, we set out to quantify the degree to which observational data-sets can constrain the model parameters. By revealing degeneracies in the parameter space we can hope to better understand the key physical processes probed by the data. We use novel mathematical techniques to explore the parameter space of the GALFORM semi-analytic model. We base our investigation on the Bower et al. 2006 version of GALFORM, adopting the same methodology of selecting model parameters based on an acceptable match to the local bJ and K luminosity functions. The model contains 16 parameters that are poorly constrained, and we investigate this parameter space using the Model Emulator technique, constructing a Bayesian approximation to the GALFORM model that can be rapid...

Bower, R G; Goldstein, M; Benson, A J; Lacey, C G; Baugh, C M; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; .,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

REUSABLE LEARNING OBJECTS (RLOs) INSTRUCTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Water Science Department, University of Florida, 2181 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110290, Gainesville, FL: An Reusable Learning Object (RLO) is a small digital learning unit that can be reused, scaled, and shared be selected from the following disciplines: Environmental sciences (including soil, water, climate, policy

Ma, Lena

246

Learning Outcomes Food Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the long-term sustainability of Oregon's food processing industry · Provide service to the professionLearning Outcomes Food Science & Technology Oregon State University The Department's Learning of the Department of Food Science & Technology at Oregon State University is to serve food technologists, food

Escher, Christine

247

E-learning? Technology enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/15/2010 1 E-learning? Technology enhanced teaching and learning in symbol-based disciplines? Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 2 #12;9/15/2010 2 An Example: Make t the subject 2 3 Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 3 HMS111 An Example: Make t the subject 2

Loch, Birgit

248

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

California at Los Angeles, University of

249

Learning Management System Transition Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Management System Transition Project Kickoff Jim Snell Director Instructional Technology Services #12;History · Texas A&M started using the Campus Edition WebCT learning management system (LMS Process March 2012 · Project manager hired March 2012 · ITS project team assigned April 2012 · Contract

250

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

251

Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes.

Schindler, R.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Orthogonality of Macdonald polynomials with unitary parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For any admissible pair of irreducible reduced crystallographic root systems, we present discrete orthogonality relations for a finite-dimensional system of Macdonald polynomials with parameters on the unit circle subject to a truncation relation.

J. F. van Diejen; E. Emsiz

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The parameter estimation problem or the inverse problem of ordinary differential equations is prevalent in many process models in chemistry, molecular biology, control system design and many other engineering applications. It concerns the re...

Ng, Chee Loong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures for row-crop producers...

Kaase, Gregory Herman

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Uncertainty evaluation of delayed neutron decay parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters fit their individual measurement data well in spite of these differences. This dissertation focuses on evaluation of the errors and methods of delayed neutron relative yields and decay constants for thermal fission of U-235. Various numerical...

Wang, Jinkai

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

Lodde, P.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermophysical parameters of the LBO crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermophysical parameters (linear thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and heat capacity) of the lithium triborate (LBO) crystal are measured and compared with previously published data. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

Grechin, Sergei G [Scientific-Research Institute of Radioelectronics and Laser Technology at the N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zuev, A V; Fokin, A S [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokh, Aleksandr E [V.S.Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moiseev, N V; Popov, Petr A; Sidorov, Aleksei A [Acad. I. G. Petrovskii Bryansk State University, Bryansk (Russian Federation)

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Learning Rules In learning rules, we are interested in learning rules of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

{best} while frontier is not empty candidates all hypotheses generated by adding a test to a hypothesis at a time instead of just one. #12;Learn-One-Rule Beam-Search-Algorithm Learn-One-Rule best , frontier in frontier best best1 hypothesis in {best} candidates frontier best2 k hypotheses in candidates return

Bylander, Tom

260

Pinellas Plant facts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

Wang, Yan

262

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

263

B Plant hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

Broz, R.E.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Rainwater Storage Cisterns on Campus 150,000 gallons* Total Acres of Campus (Modeled for Stormwater Analysis% Chilled Water Plant, 26% Academics, 16% Washington Duke Inn, 3% Water & Stormwater Management Sustainability Facts Overview Existing Sustainability Initiatives Stormwater Regulation Duke University obtains

Zhou, Pei

265

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

266

System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orientation to maximize light exposure. Species Adaptations-Sun Solar tracking by leaves increases light1 Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick, succulent tissues to allow for organic acid and Light Some CAM plants not obligated to just CAM Can use C3 photosynthesis during day if conditions

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

268

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 4th Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado: G2G3/S2S3 Global distribution: Colorado (Larimer and Boulder counties). Possibly extending

269

adaptive parameter estimation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tokamak Heat Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: . Keywords: Thermonuclear fusion, distributed parameter systems, input state and parameter estimation,...

270

Implementing Learning Design to support web-based learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA. UK. ** Educational Technology Expertise Centre (OTEC), Open Expertise Centre (OTEC) at the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL), who produced a Learning Design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

272

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

273

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

Thomas, Andrew

274

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

275

Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big

279

Granby Pumping Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet AssistanceCatalytic SitesEmployee, RetireeaGranby

280

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010 Elaine Fairey, Director, Student Learning Commons Lynn delivery 4. Space 5. Internal relations 6. External relations Introduction The Student Learning Commons (SLC) was created in response to the report on Student Learning Support Services (October 2004

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty What is the SFU Student Learning Commons? The Student Learning Commons (SLC), is an academic learning centre which provides peer-based assistance with library reference, computer assistance, and other student academic support services. SLC programs

282

Iteratively extending time horizon reinforcement learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Belgium y Research Fellow FNRS, #3; Postdoctoral Researcher FNRS Abstract. Reinforcement learning aims

Wehenkel, Louis

283

Optimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright University of Wisconsin-Madison NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 Stephen Wright (UW-Madison) Optimization in Machine Learning NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 in machine learning. Stephen Wright (UW-Madison) Optimization in Machine Learning NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 2

Wright, Steve

284

Foundations for a New Science of Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex learning. In computer simulations, starting the learn- ing process with a low-resolution sensoryFoundations for a New Science of Learning Andrew N. Meltzoff,1,2,3 * Patricia K. Kuhl,1,3,4 Javier Movellan,5,6 Terrence J. Sejnowski5,6,7,8 Human learning is distinguished by the range and complexity

285

Nonparametric Bayesian Policy Priors for Reinforcement Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider reinforcement learning in partially observable domains where the agent can query an expert for

Doshi-Velez, Finale P.

286

Learning How to Learn Lean Construction Concepts and Principles Proceedings IGLC-7 411  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on adult education and organizational learning. Some approaches to improve learning processes on Lean organizational learning, and experimentation with action and reflection on action. KEY WORDS Concepts, lean construction, learning, organizational learning. 1 MSc, Senior Lecturer at Universidade Estadual de Londrina

Tommelein, Iris D.

287

Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Regulating nutrient allocation in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Importance of Modeling for the Future of Molecular Studies of Learning and Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Importance of Modeling for the Future of Molecular Studies of Learning and Memory Randall C. O'Reilly James L. McClelland Department of Psychology Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition University pathways within the hippocampal system; (d) effects of manipulations of hippocampal activation parameters

O'Reilly, Randall C.

291

Nonmyopic -Bayes-Optimal Active Learning of Gaussian Processes Trong Nghia Hoang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental sensing and monitoring ap- plications (e.g., precision agriculture, mineral prospecting (Low et al for minimiz- Proceedings of the 31st International Conference on Machine Learning, Beijing, China, 2014. JMLR parame- ters, these locations tend to be sub-optimal with respect to the true parameters, thus degrading

Jaillet, Patrick

292

Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

Ian Bentley

2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

: Computer Aided Learning in Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAL2 : Computer Aided Learning in Computer Architecture Laboratory JOVAN DJORDJEVIC,1 BOSKO NIKOLIC,1 TANJA BOROZAN,1 ALEKSANDAR MILENKOVIC´ 2 1 Computer Engineering Department, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia 2 Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Milenkovi, Aleksandar

294

Learning in the labor market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a collection of three independent essays that study the implication of learning on labor mobility, labor supply, wage distribution, wage dynamics, and allocations of workers under different assumptions about ...

Li, Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Learning Outcomes Author: Paul Surgenor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 #12;Learning Outcomes "On completion of this [module/programme] students will be able to..." Biggs alignment (Biggs, 2002). Outcomes should also address a variety of cognitive levels, ensuring that students

296

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING Live on-campus in 2014-15 and participate in a unique as part of a residential community in Arroyo Vista! Open to all undergraduate students with 2-3 years

Loudon, Catherine

297

Black nickel selective absorber, optimization of parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroplated black nickel selective absorber is one of the most commercially used element of solar energy systems. Electrodeposition parameters such as time of deposition, pH, current density, electrolyte temperature should be optimized to produce the most efficient selective absorber. The topology of the substrate material is very effective on selectivity and it should also be optimized. In this study, by controlling the conditions of electrodeposition black nickel selective absorbers are produced and their reflectivities are measured. The effects of the electrodeposition parameters together with the topology of the substrate, on the selective properties are investigated.

Akinoglu, B.; Cercioglu, V.; Ecevit, A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Statefinder parameters in two dark energy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The statefinder parameters ($r,s$) in two dark energy models are studied. In the first, we discuss in four-dimensional General Relativity a two fluid model, in which dark energy and dark matter are allowed to interact with each other. In the second model, we consider the DGP brane model generalized by taking a possible energy exchange between the brane and the bulk into account. We determine the values of the statefinder parameters that correspond to the unique attractor of the system at hand. Furthermore, we produce plots in which we show $s,r$ as functions of red-shift, and the ($s-r$) plane for each model.

Grigoris Panotopoulos

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Holographic Dark Energy Model: State Finder Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we have studied interacting holographic dark energy model in the background of FRW model of the universe. The interaction is chosen either in linear combination or in product form of the matter densities for dark matter and dark energy. The IR cut off for holographic dark energy is chosen as Ricci's length scale or radius of the future event horizon. The analysis is done using the state finder parameter and coincidence problem has been graphically presented. Finally, universal thermodynamics has been studied using state finder parameters.

Nairwita Mazumder; Ritabrata Biswas; Subenoy Chakraborty

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ways to Help Children Learn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that fail. If you say, ?I?ve told you a thousand times,? try a new method. a73 Set a bad example. If you slap children, that?s what they learn. a73 Offer a choice if there really is not one. a73 Expect children to sit for long periods of time. a73 Ignore... your children. a73 Expect too much. E-134 12-01 Ways to Help Children Learn ...

Warren, Judith L.

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal-centered learning activities Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

learning activities Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Active Learning 10-701, Machine Learning, Spring 2011 Summary: Active Learning Yi Zhang 10-701, Machine Learning,...

302

Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Rule-Based Learning Explains Visual Perceptual Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Alternatively, Mollon and Danilova (1996) hypothesized that learning occurs at a central site, but what learning hypoth- esis (Mollon and Danilova, 1996), the complete location transfer of learning indicates

Klein, Stanley

304

Exploring NK Fitness Landscapes Using an Imitative Learning Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The idea that a group of cooperating agents can solve problems more efficiently than when those agents work independently is hardly controversial, despite the little quantitative groundwork to support it. Here we investigate the performance of a group of agents in locating the global maxima of NK fitness landscapes with varying degrees of ruggedness. Cooperation is taken into account through imitative learning and the broadcasting of messages informing on the fitness of each agent. We find a trade-off between the group size and the frequency of imitation: for rugged landscapes, too much imitation or too large a group yield a performance poorer than that of independent agents. By decreasing the diversity of the group, imitative learning may lead to duplication of work and hence to a decrease of its effective size. However, when the parameters are set to optimal values the cooperative group substantially outperforms the independent agents.

Fontanari, José F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

Not Available

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Planck 2015 results. XIII. Cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results based on full-mission Planck observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. These data are consistent with the six-parameter inflationary LCDM cosmology. From the Planck temperature and lensing data, for this cosmology we find a Hubble constant, H0= (67.8 +/- 0.9) km/s/Mpc, a matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.308 +/- 0.012 and a scalar spectral index with n_s = 0.968 +/- 0.006. (We quote 68% errors on measured parameters and 95% limits on other parameters.) Combined with Planck temperature and lensing data, Planck LFI polarization measurements lead to a reionization optical depth of tau = 0.066 +/- 0.016. Combining Planck with other astrophysical data we find N_ eff = 3.15 +/- 0.23 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom and the sum of neutrino masses is constrained to Spatial curvature is found to be |Omega_K| < 0.005. For LCDM we find a limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r <0.11 consistent with the B-mode constraints fr...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SWOT Satellite Mission: Combined State Parameter Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

river basins LISFLOOD-FP, a raster- based inundation model Based on a 1-D kinematic wave equation, 27 February 2008 #12;2 Outline Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission The state-parameter estimation problem Data assimilation experiments ­ Water depth ­ Discharge ­ Channel width ­ Roughness

Washington at Seattle, University of

308

Lumped-parameter models Lars Bo Ibsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Civil Engineering Division of Water and Soil Lumped-parameter models by Lars Bo Ibsen Morten Liingaard explanations and results than typically allowed in scientific journals. Technical Memoranda are produced of this kind. Contract Reports are produced to report scientific work carried out under contract. Publications

309

Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating Polymer Network ProcessPolymer Network, PA 15213 #12;Interpenetrating Polymer Network Processp g y Monomer Initiator P l i ti tPolymerization reactor Seed particle Monomer droplet Aqueous mediaq Seed Polymer A Monomer B Seed Polymer A 2Fig 1. Seed

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

310

Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

Miller, C W [ed.] [ed.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Parameters of charmonium states from KEDR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results of experiments performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider. They include final results for the mass and other parameters of the $J/\\psi$, $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\psi(3770)$ and $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ branching fraction determination.

Aulchenko, V M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Batrakov, A M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Groshev, V R; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Kuyanov, I A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Ovtin, I V; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

association learning: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 4 & Investigating Learning Deficits Associated with Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: An artificial grammar learning task was used to define two learning...

314

DOE Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday memos DOE Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday memos DOE Chief Learning Officer's DVU Birthday...

315

Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Calls Fall 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer...

318

Learning how to play Nash, potential games and alternating ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ... of the most important topic is how do players learn to play Nash equilibria (Chen and Gazzale [17]). Learning dynamics include Bayesian learning, ...

Megiddo

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The energy development assumptions identified in the Department of Energy's position paper, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, projected an exploding demand for wind energy-related workforce development. These primary assumptions drove a secondary set of assumptions that early stage wind industry workforce development and training paradigms would need to undergo significant change if the workforce needs were to be met. The current training practice and culture within the wind industry is driven by a relatively small number of experts with deep field experience and knowledge. The current training methodology is dominated by face-to-face, classroom based, instructor present training. Given these assumptions and learning paradigms, the purpose of the National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative was to determine the feasibility of developing online learning strategies and products focused on training wind technicians. The initial project scope centered on (1) identifying resources that would be needed for development of subject matter and course design/delivery strategies for industry-based (non-academic) training, and (2) development of an appropriate Learning Management System (LMS). As the project unfolded, the initial scope was expanded to include development of learning products and the addition of an academic-based training partner. The core partners included two training entities, industry-based Airstreams Renewables and academic-based Lake Area Technical Institute. A third partner, Vision Video Interactive, Inc. provided technology-based learning platforms (hardware and software). The revised scope yielded an expanded set of results beyond the initial expectation. Eight learning modules were developed for the industry-based Electrical Safety course. These modules were subsequently redesigned and repurposed for test application in an academic setting. Software and hardware developments during the project's timeframe enabled redesign providing for student access through the use of tablet devices such as iPads. Early prototype Learning Management Systems (LMS) featuring more student-centric access and interfaces with emerging social media were developed and utilized during the testing applications. The project also produced soft results involving cross learning between and among the partners regarding subject matter expertise, online learning pedagogy, and eLearning technology-based platforms. The partners believe that the most significant, overarching accomplishment of the project was the development and implementation of goals, activities, and outcomes that significantly exceeded those proposed in the initial grant application submitted in 2009. Key specific accomplishments include: (1) development of a set of 8 online learning modules addressing electrical safety as it relates to the work of wind technicians; (3) development of a flexible, open-ended Learning Management System (LMS): (3) creation of a robust body of learning (knowledge, experience, skills, and relationships). Project leaders have concluded that there is substantial resource equity that could be leverage and recommend that it be carried forward to pursue a Next Stage Opportunity relating to development of an online core curriculum for institute and community college energy workforce development programs.

Dr. James B. Beddow

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Texas Plant Diseases Handbook.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the lesion turns brown. With age, 1 es ions en 1 arge and coa 1 esce. The ent i re 1 eaf fi na 11 y drops. Stem lesions appear as long, reddish colored spots. When the plant begins to set fruit, lesions are formed at the nodes \\'Jhich girdle the stem... gi v i ng the 1 eaf a "shot-ho 1 e" appearance, simi 1 ar to those caused by anthracnose. Spots on fruit are usua lly sma 11 er and circul ar in shape. Bacteria overwinter in crop residue and on seed. Hard rains splash the bacteria to stems...

Horne, C. Wendell; Amador, Jose M.; Johnson, Jerral D.; McCoy, Norman L.; Philley, George L.; Lee, Thomas A. Jr.; Kaufman, Harold W.; Jones, Roger K.; Barnes, Larry W.; Black, Mark C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Propagation of Ornamental Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is well filled with roots. In the other types of layering, select shooi 1 of young growth that bend easily. It usuall: is advisable to wound the stem where it is covered with soil. This cut limits free movemen: ! of food materials and induces root... cuttings. lecent research findings have taken much of uesswork out of this type of propagation t now can be done for many plants with rlrative ease by the home gardener. Some alants remain difficult to propagate by any ' method, but most...

DeWerth, A. F.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPinkand Results Plans,Plants &

323

B Plant - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnicalAwards recognizeStatutes i TableAugustPlant

324

T Plant - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySynthetic fuelT Plant Projects

325

The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A procedure for oscillatory parameter identification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed where a power system is excited with a low-level pseduo-random probing signal and the frequency, damping, magnitude, and shape of oscillatory modes are identified using spectral density estimation and frequency-domain transfer-function identification. Attention is focussed on identifying system modes in the presence of noise. Two examples cases are studied: identification of electromechanical oscillation modes in a 16-machine power system; and turbine-generator shaft modes of a 3-machine power plant feeding a series-compensated 500-kV network.

Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

330

Lessons Learned from Safety Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

Hand, M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PID Parameters Optimization by Using Genetic Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time delays are components that make time-lag in systems response. They arise in physical, chemical, biological and economic systems, as well as in the process of measurement and computation. In this work, we implement Genetic Algorithm (GA) in determining PID controller parameters to compensate the delay in First Order Lag plus Time Delay (FOLPD) and compare the results with Iterative Method and Ziegler-Nichols rule results.

Mirzal, Andri; Furukawa, Masashi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process are disclosed. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions. 10 figs.

White, A.M.; Gross, K.C.; Kubic, W.L.; Wigeland, R.A.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Statefinder Parameters for Tachyon Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the statefinder parameters for the tachyon dark energy model. There are two kinds of stable attractor solutions in this model. The statefinder diagrams characterize the properties of the tachyon dark energy model. Our results show that the evolving trajectories of the attractor solutions lie in the total region and pass through the LCDM fixed point, which is different from other dark energy model.

Ying Shao; Yuanxing Gui

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Simulation Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As interest for clean renewable electric power technologies grows, a number of parabolic trough power plants of various configurations are being considered for deployment around the globe. It is essential that plant designs be optimized for each specific application. The optimum design must consider the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, annual generation, financial requirements, and time-of-use value of the power generated. Developers require the tools for evaluating tradeoffs between these various project elements. This paper provides an overview of a computer model that is being used by scientists and developers to evaluate the tradeoff between cost, performance, and economic parameters for parabolic trough solar power plant technologies. An example is included that shows how this model has been used for a thermal storage design optimization.

Price, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system.

Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIFE HISTORY PARAMETERS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

History Parameters of Common Marine Fish Subject to Entrainment. California Energy Commission, PIER · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Life History Parameters of Common Southern California MEdmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIFE HISTORY PARAMETERS OF COMMON SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MARINE FISHES

339

Indicator system for a process plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Knowledge management and learning in the organizational context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

63 Knowledge management and learning in the organizational context Albena Antonova, Elissaveta and explicit knowledge, considers organizational learning and knowledge workers specifics. In the centre management, learning, organizational learning 1. THE KNOWLEDGE DIMENSIONS The concepts and nature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to produce heavy components and nuclear-grade equipment - Transportation of heavy components - Constructionoperation workforce - Cost of new plants Cooling Technology...

344

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

345

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Power Plant Modeling and Simulation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

The segmentation problem in morphology learning Christopher D. Manning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

learning Christopher D. Manning (1998) The segmentation problem in morphology learning. In D.M.W. Powers

348

Total learning : education beyond the classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is a quality learning space? This thesis is a study of a prototype for secondary school to provide a stimulating learning environment and a nurturing growing space in an urban site through exploration of different ...

Im, Soo O., 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Interactions between learning and decision making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantify the effects of learning and decision making on each other in three parts. In the first part, we look at how knowledge about decision making can influence learning. Let the decision cost be the amount spent by ...

Tulabandhula, Theja

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SCIENCE LEARNING+: PLANNING GRANTS APPLICATION GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ is an international initiative that will explore and understand the power of informal learning experiences inside are part of the Science Learning+ scheme which aims to make a transformational step to improve

Rambaut, Andrew

351

An introducWon to Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the development, the analysis, and the application of algorithms that allow computers to learn LearningWons: autonomous driving DARPA Grand challenge 2005: build a robot capable of navigaWng 240 km through desert

Wehenkel, Louis

352

An introduc+on to Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the analysis, and the application of algorithms that allow computers to learn l Learning: l A computer;5 Applica+ons: autonomous driving l DARPA Grand challenge 2005: build a robot capable

Wehenkel, Louis

353

Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center #12;Overview 1. Lessons Learned a. NeuroNEXT Executive Committee b. NINDS clinical trials (NSD-K) study section c. PI

354

Learning strategies and performance in organizational teams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) shows that vicarious learning is positively associated with performance. I argue that vicarious team learning is an under-explored dimension of what makes teams and organizations competitive. The chapter concludes ...

Bresman, Henrik M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Durability Parameters of an Integrated Aftertreatment System used to Meet Tier II Emission Standards Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

356

Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada 1) Determine whether) If a permit is required from the CFIA* (a division of Agriculture Canada), please go to the CFIA website Agency Canada (PHAC) or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). #12;

357

Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition Jennifer A hosts the foliar endophytic fungus, Neotypho- dium coenophialum. We quantified vegetation development of the endophyte (KY-31, AR-542) in two tall fescue cultivars (Georgia-5, Jesup). The KY-31 endophyte produces

Rudgers, Jennifer

358

Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N I C A LMn4CaLearningLearning

359

Fun with Big Sky Learning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big Sky Learning WHEN: Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM -

360

(Photosynthesis in intact plants)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS by Alice Armstrong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS by Alice Armstrong Master of Science, August Science of The George Washington University certifies that Alice Armstrong has passed the Final of the dissertation. TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS Alice Armstrong Dissertation Research

Armstrong, Alice

363

Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors: Lessons from the Trenches Tim Menzies LCSEE, WVU tim@menzies.us October 28, 2008 1 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons change the rules of the game. 2 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches

Menzies, Tim

364

Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM language Abstract. Visual instructional design languages currently Botturi ; Todd Stubbs (Ed.) (2007) 254-280" #12;-1- Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Distributed Learning versus Information Sharing in the Smart Grid: A Learning Game Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Learning versus Information Sharing in the Smart Grid: A Learning Game Approach Hélène.bedo@orange.com Abstract In this article, the smart grid is modeled as a decentralized and hierarchical network, made: Distributed Learning; Information; Regret; Learning Game Theory 1 Introduction Smart grids are networks

366

Empirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mul­ titask learning, linking theoretical results to practical simulations. In our model all tasksEmpirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl SNN, University of Nijmegen are combined in a single feedforward neu­ ral network. Learning is implemented in a Bayesian fashion

Heskes, Tom

367

Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Webinar: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar, "National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status," originally presented on February 6, 2012.

369

LOWER BOUNDS ON LEARNING RANDOM STRUCTURES WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Learning Parity PAC PAC w/ noise "noisy parity" Statistical Queries Yes [Gauss] O(2n/logn) [BKW] maybe

Reyzin, Lev

370

A variable parameter thermionic energy converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A VARIABLE PARAMETER THERMIONIC ENERGY CONVERTER A Thesis By Bobby Joe Bragg Submitted to the Graduate School of the Texas A 8c M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1967 Major... LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. SIMPLE SCHEMATIC OF A THERMIONIC CONVERTER PAGE 2. POWER VS SPACING WITH A MINIMUM POWER POINT 3. POWER VS SPACING WITH NO MINIMUM POWER POINT 4. CONVERTER MOTIVE DIAGRAM~ O'E = 5. CONVERTER MOTIVE DIAGRAM~ 6. CONVERTER...

Bragg, Bobby Joe

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

LCLS CDR Appendix A - Parameter Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6 th7525T HE F IRSTA Parameter

372

LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6 th7525T HE FLCLS Parameters

373

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

Caulfield, R.

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (4), Rev. 1 Approved by: _James (4), Rev. 1 Page 2 of 15 Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program Manual RECORD OF REVISION........................................................................................ 15 #12;LBNL/PUB-5519 (4), Rev. 1 Page 4 of 15 Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program Manual 1

375

Design Approaches in Technology-Enhanced Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design Approaches in Technology-Enhanced Learning Yishay Mor* and Niall Winters Institute of Education, University of London, UK Design is critical to the successful development of any interactive learning environment (ILE). Moreover, in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) the design process requires

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

Active Learning of Group-Structured Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Learning of Group-Structured Environments G´abor Bart´ok, Csaba Szepesv´ari , Sandra Zilles with their environment. We investigate learning environments that have a group structure. We introduce a learning model an environment from partial information is far from trivial. However, positive results for special subclasses

Szepesvari, Csaba

377

Learning Object Behaviour Models Neil Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Object Behaviour Models by Neil Johnson Submitted in accordance with the requirements in the following articles: N. Johnson and D. Hogg. ``Learning the Distribution of Object Trajectories for Event 1995. N. Johnson and D. Hogg. ``Learning the distribution of object trajectories for event recognition

Hogg, David

378

Neural Plasticity of Development and Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural Plasticity of Development and Learning Galvan, 2010 Presented by Kristen Morin and Sunil Patel I. Defining Development and Learning II. Neural Plasticity III. Progressive and Regressive Changes with Learning IV. Plasticity of Developmental Timing V. Neural Mechanism- Same or Different? VI. Methodological

Gabrieli, John

379

Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina ION GNSS 2008 by the FAA Satellite Navigation Program Office #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 2 for probabilistic modeling and analysis #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 3 Key Sources

Stanford University

380

SPECIAL SEMINAR Cheating Lessons: Learning from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPECIAL SEMINAR Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty SPONSORED BY THE CENTER Lang is author of four books, the most recent of which are Cheating Lessons: Learning from Aca- demic FOR INNOVATION IN TEACHING & LEARNING AND NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL & RESEARCH ETHICS Thurs, May 29, 2014

Liberzon, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lessons Learned from the journ to Institutional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned from the journ to Institutional TransformationOctober 2013 University of Las Vegas I'll talk a little about what we've learned through an NSF Institutional Transformation grant- group preferences, more work to communicate, tokenism if learn

Hemmers, Oliver

382

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson Kurt VanLehn Department be called learning from lesson s'equence.~, because the extra information given to the learner is embedded section ,of this article, a variant of learning from lesson sequcnccs will bc discusscd whercm lessons arc

VanLehn, Kurt

383

INCOSE 2007 1 Lessons Learned From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCOSE 2007 1 Lessons Learned From Industrial Validation of COSYSMO 17th INCOSE Symposium Dr. Gan is not standardized · Model development process yielded 11 lessons learned Valerdi, R., Rieff, J., Roedler, G., Wheaton, M., Lessons Learned from Collecting Systems Engineering Data, Conference on Systems Engineering

de Weck, Olivier L.

384

Neuronal Representations of Learning Sensorimotor Skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of learning-related changes: additional controls and simulations....68-74 V. Viewing and Doing: SimilarNeuronal Representations of Learning Sensorimotor Skills Thesis submitted for the degree "Doctor.......................................................................................26-47 II. Preparatory Activity in Motor Cortex Reflects Learning of Local Visuomotor Skills

385

Scientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations and simulations. Statistical machine learning algorithms have enormous potential to provide data, and the analysis of hurricanes and tropical storms in climate simulations. #12;Supervised Learning for SupernovaScientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning Raquel Romano romano at hpcrd dot lbl dot gov

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

386

Title of Document | 1 UC Learning Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title of Document | 1 UC Learning Center Table of Contents Introduction to the UC Learning Center.....................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined. Managing Self-Reported Training ......................................................................................................................................19 #12;Title of Document | 2 Last updated 6/30/10 Introduction to the UC Learning Center The UC

Gleeson, Joseph G.

387

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Do Plants Sweat? Core Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

Kessler, Bruce

389

Dramatic change at T Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T Plant (221-T) was the first and largest of the early chemical separations plants at the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW), the name for the Hanford Site during World War II. Officially designated as a Cell Building by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) of the Army Corps of Engineers (agency responsible for HEW), T Plant served as the headquarters of chemical processing operations at Hanford from its construction until the opening of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Plant in January 1952. T Plant performed the third step in plutonium production operations, following the steps of uranium fuel manufacture and then irradiation in defense production reactors. The fissionable core (plutonium) used in the world`s first atomic explosion, the Trinity bomb test held at Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 16, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Likewise, the fissionable core of the weapon dropped over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Because it formed a crucial link in the first full-scale plutonium production operations in world history, T Plant meets criteria established in the National Historic Preservation Act of 19661 as a Historic Place.

Gerber, M.S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

Wood, RT

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

A vision for reinforcement learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California, San Diego August 21, 2011 1 / 29 #12;What is the goal of maintenance? Preventive maintenanceA vision for reinforcement learning and predictive maintenance Charles Elkan University. Intrinsically probabilistic: Reduce expected later cost. From reactive maintenance to proactive maintenance

Wang, Deli

392

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Degree Program: Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering 1) Students will have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2) Students will have the ability to design and conduct

Raja, Anita

393

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Degree Program: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 1) Students will have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2) Students will have the ability to design and conduct

Raja, Anita

394

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Higher Education Learning Agreement form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/year] ................ till [month/year] ............... Table A: Study programme abroad Web link to the course catalogue at the receiving institution describing the learning outcomes: [Web link(s) to be provided.] Table B: Group: [Please, specify or provide a web link to the relevant information.] Language competence of the student

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

396

Learning and Evolution Stefano Nolfi*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools employed by evolutionary biology and biology in general. From an engineering point of view variability. Learning, instead, is a set of modifications taking place within each single individual during lifetime, such as physical development, neural maturation, and synaptic plasticity. Finally, whereas

Cottrell, Garrison W.

397

LEARN TO EAT COUNSELLING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARN TO EAT HEALTHILY COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS) #12;Eating healthily much caffeine (coffee, energy drinks) ­ Eating foods with poor nutritional value (sugary, high and energy drinks, can also have a negative effect on mental performance and productivity, as well as have

Viglas, Anastasios

398

Machine learning onMachine learning onMachine learning onMachine learning on accelerator simulation dataaccelerator simulation data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Plasma acceleration: ­ LWFA: compact source of high-energy Energy 6MeV 32009 DOE Computer Graphics Forum to acceleration, given space and energy variables. · Goal: use machine learning to automate detection of compact (highest energy) group of particles in simulations; · Material: millions of particles in plasma under

399

A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: raettig@mpia.de, E-mail: klahr@mpia.de, E-mail: Wladimir.Lyra@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here. Parameters necessary for estimating surface contaminant flux due to native plants expected to inhabit the NTS RWMSS are developed in this report. The model is specific to the plant communities found at the NTS and is designed for both short-term (<1,000 years) and long-term (>1,000 years) modeling efforts. While the model has been crafted for general applicability to any NTS PA, the key radionuclides considered are limited to the transuranic (TRU) wastes disposed of at the NTS.

BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Early Entrance Coproduction Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

Aquatic plant control research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Learner characteristics involved in distance learning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distance learning represents a strategy for leveraging resources to solve educational and training needs. Although many distance learning programs have been developed, lessons learned regarding differences between distance learning and traditional education with respect to learner characteristics have not been well documented. Therefore, we conducted a survey of 20 distance learning professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to experts attending the second Distance Learning Conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This survey not only acquired demographic information from each of the respondents but also identified important distance learning student characteristics. Significant distance learner characteristics, which were revealed statistically and which influence the effectiveness of distance learning, include the following: reading level, student autonomy, and self-motivation. Distance learning cannot become a more useful and effective method of instruction without identifying and recognizing learner characteristics. It will be important to consider these characteristics when designing all distance learning courses. This paper will report specific survey findings and their implications for developing distance learning courses. 9 refs., 6 tabs.

Cernicek, A.T.; Hahn, H.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Atmospheric dispersion and the radiological consequences of normal airborne effluents from a nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the consequences of the normal exhaust of radioactive materials in air from nuclear power plants and atmospheric dispersion is studied. Because the source terms of the exhaust from a nuclear power plant are relatively low and their radiological consequences are far less than the corresponding authoritative limits, the atmospheric dispersion models, their various modifications, and selections of relevant parameters have few effects on those consequences. In the environmental assessment and siting, the emphasis should not be placed on the consequence evaluation of routine exhaust of nuclear power plants, and the calculation of consequences of the exhaust and atmospheric field measurements should be appropriately, simplified. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Fang, D.; Yang, L. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Sun, C.Z. [Suhou Nuclear Research Inst., Suzhou (China)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Collaborative-learning Support Function to Harness Organizational Intellectual Synergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Collaborative-learning Support Function to Harness Organizational Intellectual Synergy Hiroyuki of organizational activities. Then, it roughly outlines Kfarm while focusing on collaborative learning support, workplace learning, life-long learning, organizational learning, collaborative learning and so on, refer

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

411

Parameter monitoring compensation system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compensation system is described for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation. It utilizes sensors for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to an actual condition. The controller compares the actual condition to a condition which the program presumes to exist at the preselected stage and alters the program in accordance with detected variations between the actual condition and the assumed condition. Such conditions may be related to process parameters, such as a position, dimension or shape of the cutting tool or workpiece or an environmental temperature associated with the machining operation, and such sensors may be a contact or a non-contact type of sensor or a temperature transducer. 7 figs.

Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F.; DeMint, P.D.; Hebble, T.L.; Igou, R.E.; Williams, R.R.; Klages, E.J.; Rasnick, W.H.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Scanning the Parameter Space of Holographic Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study various physical quantities associated with holographic s-wave superconductors as functions of the scaling dimensions of the dual condensates. A bulk scalar field with negative mass squared $m^2$, satisfying the Breitenlohner-Freedman stability bound and the unitarity bound, and allowed to vary in $0.5$ unit intervals, were considered. We observe that all the physical quantities investigated are sensitive to the scaling dimensions of the dual condensates. For all the $m^2$, the characteristic lengths diverge at the critical temperature in agreement with the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The Ginzburg-Landau parameter, obtained from these length scales indicates that the holographic superconductors can be type I or type II depending on the charge and the scaling dimensions of the dual condensates. For a fixed charge, there exists a critical scaling dimension, above which a holographic superconductor is type I, below which it becomes a type II.

Obinna C. Umeh

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original implementation of Carvalho et al that allow us to retain the computational advantages of particle learning while improving the suitability of the methodology to the analysis of streaming data and simultaneously facilitating the real time discovery of latent cluster structures. Section 4 demonstrates our methodological enhancements in the context of several simulated and classical data sets, showcasing the use of particle learning methods for online anomaly detection, label generation, drift detection, and semi-supervised classification, none of which would be achievable through a standard MCMC approach. Section 5 concludes with a discussion of future directions for research.

Merl, D M

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

Robinson, A. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to the Fukushima nuclear plant accident. Journal of21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.

Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Use of neural networks in the operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (a) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, (b) detection of the change of mode of operation, (c) signal validation, (d) monitoring of check valves, (e) modeling of the plant thermodynamics, (f) emulation of core reload calculations, (g) analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's licensee event report,'' (h) monitoring of plant parameters, and (i) analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. the objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks. 6 refs.

Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

Not Available

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ASSESSING PLANTING STOCK QUALITY Comprehensive assessments of planting stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cold storage, and to evaluate effects of traditional and proposed nursery cultural practices on field and Jenkinson 1970, 1971) just after lifting and after cold storage to spring planting time · Field survival

Standiford, Richard B.

422

book review: Plants and Islands revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility as resources for tea? ching and learning.  Avoid describing the book chapter by chapter or listing 

Fernández-Palacios, José María

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

425

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

426

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

427

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

428

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

429

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August...

430

Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

431

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex...

432

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 2, 2002 Independent Oversight...

433

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford...

434

Method to Filter ECGs and Evaluate Clinical Parameter Distortion using Realistic ECG Model Parameter Fitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Method to Filter ECGs and Evaluate Clinical Parameter Distortion using Realistic ECG Model Abstract By fitting a previously published nonlinear model for generating realistic ECG to waveforms, the authors demonstrate that significant points (P, Q, R, S, and T) on the ECG can be determined

McSharry, Patrick E.

435

Lessons learned from RTG programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Cassini Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program, the heritage RTG design was reviewed and modified to incorporate lessons learned. Design changes were made both to resolve problems as they occurred and to correct difficulties noted in earlier missions. Topics addressed in this paper included problems experienced previously at the launch facility in attaching the pressure relief device to the generators, and the open circuit conditions that occurred at times in the resistance temperature device wiring harness. Also discussed is a problem caused by mistakes in software configuration management. How lessons learned refined the RTG design and integration with the spacecraft are discussed and the adopted solutions are described. {copyright} {ital 1998 Lockheed Martin Missles and Space, reproduced with permission.}

Reinstrom, R.M.; Cockfield, R.D. [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space, P.O. Box 8555, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

System safety management lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

Piatt, J.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables.

Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

439

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

440

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Fiberglass plastics in power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Site Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD ESI Forestland ESI Rangeland Data Access > Return CHARACTERISTICS Site Type: Rangeland Site Name: Red Sandy Loam 25-32" PZ Site ID: R082AY369TX Major Land Resource

444

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

445

Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop jointly a licensing strategy for the Next Generation Nuclear plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) for...

447

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should that prove to be impractical (e.g. due to excessive heat loss in the intermediate heat transfer loop), an earthen berm separating the two plants may be a suitable...

448

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

449

Mixtec plant nomenclature and classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capsicum pubescens L. , SOLANACEAE yutu tuya’a kuán: la matade chile amarillo (PIN) tuya’a: chili plants (JAM) chá’a:nika’ndi ya’a: chilar (CAB) tuya’a (COI) Clethra mexicana

de Avila, Alejandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these organisms to environmental factors (e .g. , temperature and solar radiation). Actual field data have been compared with simulation output with encouraging results. Starting biomass of the plants and numbers

US Army Corps of Engineers

451

A neighborhood alternative energy plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

Brooks, Douglas James

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

Thomas, Andrew

453

Parameter estimation with Sandage-Loeb test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion rate of the universe in the redshift range of $2\\lesssim z\\lesssim 5$ by detecting redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars. We discuss the impact of the future SL test data on parameter estimation for the $\\Lambda$CDM, the $w$CDM, and the $w_0w_a$CDM models. To avoid the potential inconsistency with other observational data, we take the best-fitting dark energy model constrained by the current observations as the fiducial model to produce 30 mock SL test data. The SL test data provide an important supplement to the other dark energy probes, since they are extremely helpful in breaking the existing parameter degeneracies. We show that the strong degeneracy between $\\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ in all the three dark energy models is well broken by the SL test. Compared to the current combined data of type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background, and Hubble constant, the 30-yr observation of SL test could improve the constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ by more than 60\\% for all the three models. But the SL test can only moderately improve the constraint on the equation of state of dark energy. We show that a 30-yr observation of SL test could help improve the constraint on constant $w$ by about 25\\%, and improve the constraints on $w_0$ and $w_a$ by about 20\\% and 15\\%, respectively. We also quantify the constraining power of the SL test in the future high-precision joint geometric constraints on dark energy. The mock future supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation data are simulated based on the space-based project JDEM. We find that the 30-yr observation of SL test would help improve the measurement precision of $\\Omega_m$, $H_0$, and $w_a$ by more than 70\\%, 20\\%, and 60\\%, respectively, for the $w_0w_a$CDM model.

Jia-Jia Geng; Jing-Fei Zhang; Xin Zhang

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Lessons Learned | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor Shade Landscaping for ShadeLessons Learned

455

COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

Johanning, J.; Reinke, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Computer Control of Unattended Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER CONTROL OF UNATTENDED PLANTS David R. Vinson, Nirma1 Chatterjee ? Ai r Products and Chemi ca 1s, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitori ng, control, and optimization package is a greater... the last decade, energy costs in some air separation plants are now more than half the total product cost. Starting in 1975, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. began implementing a program to retrofit existing major energy consuming facili ties...

Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

JOHN C WALKER

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Firenze, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Poletto, Giannina [INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: stpucci@arcetri.astro.it [Space Science Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, Al 35812 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ARCTURUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T{sub eff} = 4286 {+-} 30 K, log g = 1.66 {+-} 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 {+-} 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 {mu}m). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }, R = 25.4 {+-} 0.2 R{sub Sun }, and {tau} = 7.1{sup +1.5}{sub -1.2} Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

Ramirez, I. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Allende Prieto, C., E-mail: ivan@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: callende@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

463

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

464

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

John Anderson; Charles Schrader

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

465

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Is Machine Learning the Wrong Name? Xiaojin Zhu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is Machine Learning the Wrong Name? Xiaojin Zhu Department of Computer Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison October 2010 (University of Wisconsin) Is Machine Learning the Wrong Name? 1 / 33 #12;Iris Learns "Cow" (University of Wisconsin) Is Machine Learning the Wrong Name? 2 / 33 #12;Iris Learns "Cow

Zhu, Xiaojin "Jerry"

467

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS Annual Report 2007/08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS Annual Report 2007/08 Elaine Fairey, Director, Student Learning Commons ______________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction The Student Learning Commons (SLC) is an academic learning centre with the mandate to assist and support students in their academic pursuits, with a focus on providing writing and learning support

468

Gerhard Fischer 1 ICCE99 Lifelong Learning: Changing Mindsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- directed learning, (2) learning on demand, (3) informal learning, and (4) collaborative and organizational lifelong learning an important part of human life, new intellectual spaces, physical spaces, organizationalGerhard Fischer 1 ICCE99 Lifelong Learning: Changing Mindsets Gerhard Fischer Center for Life

Fischer, Gerhard

469

MOTOR SCHEMAS IN ROBOT LEARNING Lynne E. Parker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allows robot learning to scale to more complex robots or tasks, thus making practical applicationsMOTOR SCHEMAS IN ROBOT LEARNING Lynne E. Parker Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer in robot learning; Macro actions in robot learning; Basis behaviors for robot learning. Definition Motor

Parker, Lynne E.

470

Learning Goals for Major in Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Student Learning Initiative / University of California, Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Goals for Major in Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Student Learning Initiative / University of California, Berkeley Environmental Sciences (ES) is an interdisciplinary enterprise that deals, statistics, behavioral science, policy, economics, and law. Environmental Sciences provides a rigorous

Wildermuth, Mary C

471

A Case Study of the Applied Learning Academy: Reconceptualized Quantum Design of Applied Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the Applied Learning Academy (ALA) and allow the lessons learned from this public school to emerge from the narrative stories of past students, parents, teachers, administrators, and local...

Gordon, Denise

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

472

Leading for learning : behavioral, educational, and methodological perspectives on multicultural team learning processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study starts from the notion that leadership is about mobilizing learning, and simultaneously pursues multifaceted purposes that benefit from each other: 1) to shed new light on learning behaviors of teams facing ...

Kanehira, Naoto, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Profile of Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model Parameter Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent work on constraining the parameter space of the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model by theoretical and experimental results. Some characteristics of the model, in particular the distribution of masses in the surviving parameter space, are discussed.

Abdul Wahab El Kaffas; Odd Magne Ogreid; Per Osland

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

474

Adaptive Distributed Parameter and Input Estimation in Plasma Tokamak Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Thermonuclear fusion, distributed parameter systems, input state and parameter estimation, adaptive infinite-dimensional estimation, Galerkin method 1. INTRODUCTION In a controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor, the plasma thermal diffusivity and heating energy play an important role

Boyer, Edmond

475

LESSONS LEARNED IN AEROSOL MONITORING WITH THE RASA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

Forrester, Joel B.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carty, Fitz; Comes, Laura; Eslinger, Paul W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Litke, Kevin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.; Schrom, Brian T.; Van Davelaar, Peter; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

476

The relationship between small learning communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/vocational pathways. In the 1970s, schools progressed toward developing magnet programs, career academies, and mini-schools (Oxley, 2006). Charter schools became part of the high school evolution in the 1980s - 1990s, and are still strong advocates for small... traditional campus. Small Learning Communities Models and Strategies Sammon (2000) describes small learning communities by clustering them into six main models: career academies, houses, small learning community (SLC)/school- within-school, magnet schools...

Turnbo, Bobbie Jo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Dark energy models with variable equation of state parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark energy models with variable equation of state parameter $\\omega$ is investigated by using law of variation of Hubble's parameter that yields the constant value of deceleration parameter. The equation of state parameter $\\omega$ is found to be time dependent and its existing range for this model is consistent with the recent observations of SN Ia data, SN Ia data (with CMBR anisotropy) and galaxy clustering statistics. The physical significance of the dark energy models has also been discussed.

Anil Kumar Yadav; Farook Rahaman; Saibal Ray

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

478

Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in microcosms fed rural septic influent. The water parameters studied were water usage, ammonium-nitrogen, phosphorus, coliforms, suspended solids, BOD, pH, and turbidity. The BOD for all plants was reduced below the standard levels but none were significantly...

Varvel, Tracey W

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

479

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating winery effluent wastewater Carlos García-Diéguez 1 , Olivier Bernard 2 , Enrique Roca 1, * 1 USC ­ PRODES for winery effluent wastewater. A new reduced stoichiometric matrix was identified and the kinetic parameters

Boyer, Edmond

480

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

Kleyer, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning parameters plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

482

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

483

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES), a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco, General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc. GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP, Phase II RD&T included tests of an alternative (to Rentech's Dynamic Settler) primary catalyst/wax separation device and secondary catalyst/wax separation systems. The team evaluated multiple technologies for both primary and secondary catalyst/wax separation. Based on successful testing at Rentech (outside of DOE funding) and difficulties in finalizing a contract to demonstrate alternative primary catalyst/wax separation technology (using magnetic separation technology), ChevronTexaco has selected the Rentech Dynamic Settler for primary catalyst/wax separation. Testing has shown the Dynamic Settler is capable of producing filtrate exceeding the proposed EECP primary catalyst/wax separation goal of less than 0.1 wt%. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system appeared to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of 10 parts per million (weight) [ppmw]. The other technologies, magnetic separation and electrostatic separation, were promising and able to reduce the solids concentrations in the filtrate. Additional RD&T will be needed for magnetic separation and electrostatic separation technologies to obtain 10 ppmw filtrate required for the proposed EECP. The Phase II testing reduces the technical and economic risks and provides the information necessary to proceed with the development of an engineering design for the EECP Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax separation system.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Roko Bujas; Ming He; Ken Kwik; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Dennis Slater; Donald Todd; Don Wall

2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

484

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included tests for secondary catalyst/wax separation systems as part of Task 2.3--Catalyst/Wax Separation. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system was determined to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of producing F-T wax containing less than10 ppmw solids. As part of task 2.3, micro-filtration removal efficiencies and production rates for two FT feeds, Rentech Inc. bubble column reactor (BCR) product and LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) product, were evaluated. Based on comparisons between the performances of these two materials, the more readily available LaPorte AFDU material was judged an acceptable analog to the BCR material that would be produced in a larger-scale F-T synthesis. The present test was initiated to obtain data in an extended range of concentration for use in the scale-up design of the secondary catalyst/wax separation system that would be operating at the EECP capacity.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

485

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1999 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) award to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. (presently Texaco Energy Systems LLC, a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco) was made to provide a Preliminary Engineering Design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award presentation, work has been undertaken to achieve an economical concept design that makes strides toward the DOE Vision 21 goal. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to electric power plus transportation fuels, chemicals and useful utilities such as steam. The use of petroleum coke was added as a fuel to reduce the cost of feedstock and also to increase the probability of commercial implementation of the EECP concept. This objective has been pursued in a three phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems LLC and subcontractors General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Rentech's Fischer-Tropsch technology that has been developed for non-natural gas feed sources. GE is providing gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering to integrate the facility. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was completed in 2000. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was prepared based on making assumptions for the basis of design for various technologies that are part of the EECP concept. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was approved by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified technical and economic risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of the technical and economic success of the EECP. The Project Management Plan (Task 1) for Phase II was approved by the DOE in 2001. The results of RD&T efforts for Phase II are expected to improve the quality of assumptions made in Phase I for basis of design for the EECP concept. The RD&T work plan (Task 2 and 3) for Phase II has been completed. As the RD&T work conducted during Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Basic Engineering Design. Also due to the merger of Chevron and Texaco, the proposed refinery site for the EECP was not available. It became apparent that some additional technical development work would be needed to correctly apply the technology at a specific site. The objective of Task 4 of Phase II is to update the concept basis of design produced during Phase I. As part of this task, items that will require design basis changes and are not site dependent have been identified. The team has qualitatively identified the efforts to incorporate the impacts of changes on EECP concept. The design basis has been modified to incorporate those changes. The design basis changes for those components of EECP that are site and feedstock dependent will be done as part of Phase III, once the site has been selected.

Charles Benham; Mark Bohn; John Anderson; Earl Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Randy Roberts; Lalit Shah; Marjan Roos

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

491

PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this technology. REVIEW This Physical Plant Operating Policy/Procedure (PP/OP) will be reviewed in March of each Plant. Physical Plant's intention is to provide each employee reasonable access to the technology Plant technology will be a prime consideration. Requests for non-standard products will not be approved

Gelfond, Michael

492

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

petrochemical industry,· The methanol residue is substantially all fermentable to ethanol. There are other plants

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Machine Learning for Adaptive Computer Game Opponents .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the use of machine learning techniques in computer games to create a computer player that adapts to its opponent's game-play. This includes… (more)

Miles, Jonathan David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Welcome to the 20th Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue includes a cumulative index for the past five years.

495

Immersive Learning Environments for Teaching Software Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooper,R. Cutts,Q. Wang,C. Proceedings of the Third Workshiop on Teaching, Learning and Assessment of Database Systems

Cooper, R.; Cutts, Q.; Wang, C.; Proceedings of the Third Workshiop on Teaching, Learning and Assessment of Database Systems [More Details

496

Looking for project-based learning ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

featuring a variety of energy related topics including wind, solar, geothermal, electric vehicles, biofuels, fuel cells and hydropower. Learn the fundamental concepts behind...

497

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Welcome to the 35th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to include in this issue three new mini-guidance articles.

498

Learning Curve - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This chapter discusses the development and application of the learning curve. g4301-1chp21.pdf -- PDF Document, 28 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

499

Itookanoodletasting ass then learned new management leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Itookanoodletasting cl ass then learned new management leaders hip skillsthentookconversational Education, part of the Division of Educational Outreach at UNLV. We have gone through quite a transition

Hemmers, Oliver

500

Learn More About Interconnections | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Interconnections Learn More About Interconnections EASTERN INTERCONNECTION North America is comprised of two major and three minor alternating current (AC) power grids or...