Sample records for learning parameters plants

  1. Organizational learning at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

  2. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  3. Efficient Algorithms for Bayesian Network Parameter Learning from Incomplete Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    in terms of the observed data, which is asymptotically consistent. Based on this framework, we contributeEfficient Algorithms for Bayesian Network Parameter Learning from Incomplete Data Guy Van den Broeck and Karthika Mohan and Arthur Choi and Judea Pearl University of California, Los Angeles Los

  4. Estimating Building Simulation Parameters via Bayesian Structure Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Richard E [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many key building design policies are made using sophisticated computer simulations such as EnergyPlus (E+), the DOE flagship whole-building energy simulation engine. E+ and other sophisticated computer simulations have several major problems. The two main issues are 1) gaps between the simulation model and the actual structure, and 2) limitations of the modeling engine's capabilities. Currently, these problems are addressed by having an engineer manually calibrate simulation parameters to real world data or using algorithmic optimization methods to adjust the building parameters. However, some simulations engines, like E+, are computationally expensive, which makes repeatedly evaluating the simulation engine costly. This work explores addressing this issue by automatically discovering the simulation's internal input and output dependencies from 20 Gigabytes of E+ simulation data, future extensions will use 200 Terabytes of E+ simulation data. The model is validated by inferring building parameters for E+ simulations with ground truth building parameters. Our results indicate that the model accurately represents parameter means with some deviation from the means, but does not support inferring parameter values that exist on the distribution's tail.

  5. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  6. A determination of microbial parameters of a coconut processing pilot plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajs, Theresa Marie

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A DETERMINATION OF MICROBIAL PARAMETERS OF A COCONUT PROCESSING PILOT PLANT A Thesis by Theresa Marie Kajs Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Subject: Microbiology A DETERMINATION OF MICROBIAL PARAMETERS OF A COCONUT PROCESSING PILOT PLANT A Thesis by Theresa Marie Kajs Approved as to style and content by: , ) g (Co-chairman of C~ittee) (Co-chairman of Committee...

  7. Parameter-insensitive kernel in extreme learning for non-linear support vector regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    Parameter-insensitive kernel in extreme learning for non-linear support vector regression Beno for regression which uses the e-sensitive loss and produces sparse models. However, non-linear SVRs are difficult.g. [2­4]). Used in conjunction with kernels, SVRs are powerful non-linear models for regression which

  8. Evolutionary parameter optimization of a fuzzy controller which is used to control a sewage treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebner, Marc

    Evolutionary parameter optimization of a fuzzy controller which is used to control a sewage, Abt. Rechnerarchitektur, Sand 1, 72076 Tübingen, Germany Patrick Stalph Julius inexpensive equipment, which controls parts of the plant in a new way. Fuzzy controllers are often used

  9. Display device for indicating the value of a parameter in a process plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  10. Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL; Johnson, Shirley [Tucker Creek Consulting

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

  11. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

  12. Seismic equipment qualification at Rocky Flats Plant: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peregoy, W.; Herring, K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic equipment qualification is being evaluated as a part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Initially it was believed that the experience database developed by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) for commercial nuclear power plants, as outlined in their Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP), would provide a substantial benefit for the seismic adequacy verification of equipment at RFP. However, further review of the simplified guidelines contained in the GIP with respect to the specific RFP structures and components revealed substantial differences from the GIP criteria. Therefore, the number of ``outliers`` from the experience database defined in the GIP is greater than was initially anticipated. This paper presents details of the differences found between the RFP structures and components and those represented in the GIP, and the challenges presented for their evaluation at RFP. Approaches necessary to develop seismic verification data are also discussed. The discussions focus on experience with one of the nuclear facilities at RFP, Building 707. However, the conclusions are generally applicable to other similar facilities that typically comprise the RFP nuclear facilities.

  13. Mentored Engagement of Secondary Science Students, Plant Scientists, and Teachers in an Inquiry-Based Online Learning Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Cheryl

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    PlantingScience (PS) is a unique web-based learning system designed to develop secondary students' scientific practices and proficiencies as they engage in hands-on classroom investigations while being mentored online by a scientist. Some students...

  14. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  15. Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of ‘safeguards by design’. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how ‘safeguardability’ was introduced into RRP.

  16. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  18. Abiotic Stress Effects on Physiological, Agronomic and Molecular Parameters of 1-MCP Treated Cotton Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Costa, Vladimir Azevedo

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and subsequent growth. Ion uptake by roots and their transport, as well as translocation of photoassimilates, is reduced; resistance to water flow in the xylem is increased due to cavitation (Hsiao, 1973); and expansion of leaf blades and plant growth... factorial experiment. The same pots were subjected to two watering treatments, as the split-block: 70 pots were subjected to irrigation at container capacity, and water was withheld from the other 70 pots during the 14 days trial. The magnitude...

  19. Determination of transport parameters of coincident inorganic and organic plumes in the Savannah River Plant M-Area, Aiken, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauffman, Toya Lyn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by TOYA. LYN CAUFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Geology DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN& SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis...

  20. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Main report and appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This document is Volume 1, consisting of the executive summary, summary and observations, and an appendix listing the GALL literature review tables.

  1. Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

  2. Planning for coal power plant transition : lessons learned from communities in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochur, Aditya Kumar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As coal-fired power plants across the U.S. are retiring in increasing numbers - a trend likely to continue in the years ahead - the communities that host these plants will play a critical role in balancing local concerns ...

  3. Operating experience and lessons learned at Alabama Electric Cooperative`s 110-MW 26-hour CAES plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, L.; Davis, L.; Schainker, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage options for utilities technologies using hydrostatic-head-, compressed air-, battery-, superconducting-magnet-, and flywheel-based power generation. Among these technologies, compressed-air energy storage (CAES) offers specific cost advantage in its range of capacity and stored energy. Partly because of this cost advantage, Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC), with assistance from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), now operates the first CAES power plant in the United States. This 110-MW, 26-hour CAES plant is located on top of the McIntosh salt dome, approximately 40 miles north of Mobile, Alabama. Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Inc. (ESPC) is Technical Engineering Support Contractor to EPRI on the project. This paper addresses operating statistics, narrates problems that influenced power generation, and provides selected lessons learned. Unit availability and reliability are noted and major events that affected them identified.

  4. Lessons learned from commercial experience with nuclear plant decontamination to safe storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Partain, W.L.; Sype, T.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully performed decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) on many production reactors it. DOE now has the challenge of performing D&D on a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe-storage status before conducting D&D-for perhaps as much as 20 yr. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and transition to D&D. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this paper are directly applicable to transitioning the DOE Weapons Complex.

  5. THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION and Learning Company. #12;ii THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT

  6. The ubiquitous problem of learning system parameters for dissipative two-level quantum systems: Fourier analysis versus Bayesian estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophie Schirmer; Frank Langbein

    2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the accuracy, precision and reliability of different methods for estimating key system parameters for two-level systems subject to Hamiltonian evolution and decoherence. It is demonstrated that the use of Bayesian modelling and maximum likelihood estimation is superior to common techniques based on Fourier analysis. Even for simple two-parameter estimation problems, the Bayesian approach yields higher accuracy and precision for the parameter estimates obtained. It requires less data, is more flexible in dealing with different model systems, can deal better with uncertainty in initial conditions and measurements, and enables adaptive refinement of the estimates. The comparison results shows that this holds for measurements of large ensembles of spins and atoms limited by Gaussian noise as well as projection noise limited data from repeated single-shot measurements of a single quantum device.

  7. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  8. Management and integration of engineering and construction activities: Lessons learned from the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant China project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, M. C.; Ebeling-Koning, D.; Evans, M. C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lessons learned during the early phase of design engineering and construction activities for the AP1000 China Project can be applied to any project involving multiple disciplines and multiple organizations. Implementation of a first-of-a-kind design to directly support construction activities utilizing resources assigned to design development and design delivery creates challenges with prioritization of activities, successful closure of issues, and communication between site organizations and the home office. To ensure successful implementation, teams were assigned and developed to directly support construction activities including prioritization of activities, site communication and ensuring closure of site emergent issues. By developing these teams, the organization is better suited to meet the demands of the construction schedule while continuing with design evolution of a standard plant and engineering delivery for multiple projects. For a successful project, proper resource utilization and prioritization are key for overcoming obstacles and ensuring success of the engineering organization. (authors)

  9. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  10. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  11. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  12. Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiMento, Joseph F.C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons Learned Joseph F.C. DiMento The contributions insuccessful in bringing LESSONS LEARNED parties to discuss arelations." Yet LESSONS LEARNED "innovations" in the

  13. Continual Learning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE.

  14. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. February 2,...

  15. What can I do with this degree? PLANT BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Industries including petrochemical, chemical, and lumber and paper Companiesincludingpharmaceutical computer skills. Joinrelatedprofessionalassociations. Learnfederalandstategovernmentjobapplication process agencies Applied Plant Science, Continued Learn federal, state and local government job application process

  16. Cesium Removal at Fukushima Nuclear Plant - 13215

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, James L.; Barker, Tracy A. [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)] [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that took place on March 11, 2011 created a number of technical challenges at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. One of the primary challenges involved the treatment of highly contaminated radioactive wastewater. Avantech Inc. developed a unique patent pending treatment system that addressed the numerous technical issues in an efficient and safe manner. Our paper will address the development of the process from concept through detailed design, identify the lessons learned, and provide the updated results of the project. Specific design and operational parameters/benefits discussed in the paper include: - Selection of equipment to address radionuclide issues; - Unique method of solving the additional technical issues associated with Hydrogen Generation and Residual Heat; - Operational results, including chemistry, offsite discharges and waste generation. Results show that the customized process has enabled the utility to recycle the wastewater for cooling and reuse. This technology had a direct benefit to nuclear facilities worldwide. (authors)

  17. A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost of U.S. fossil–steam power plants from 1981 to 1997curve: the case of steam-electric power plant design andpower plant; Learning-by-doing; Technological change; Steam

  18. Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sklar, Elizabeth

    Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra Dept of Computer Science for agents acting in a simulated learning environment. Varying parameter values can change the learning in a simulation that we can use to gain insights into the design of effective learning environments. Here, we

  19. 2009 IEEE 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 1 Learning to Make Facial Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    on the external physical and social world [3]. Here we apply this same idea to the problem of a robot learning production by a robotic head with 31 degrees of freedom. Facial motor parameters were learned using feedback illuminate the computational study of how infants learn to make facial expressions. I. INTRODUCTION The human

  20. Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biehl, Michael

    Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization Michael Biehl1 , Barbara

  1. APS Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Parameters APS Storage Ring Parameters M. Borland, G. Decker, L. Emery, W. Guo, K. Harkay, V. Sajaev, C.-Y. Yao Advanced Photon Source September 8, 2010 This document list the...

  2. Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

  3. Course info Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

    info 2 Machine Learning What's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor 3 Real's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor Machine Learning Using data to uncover Real life problems What's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor Formulation

  4. THE LEARNING Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    for different types of learning. You will need to adopt learning strategies that are most appropriateTHE LEARNING GUIDE Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning Canolfan Caerdydd ar gyfer Addysg Gydol Oes www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn www.caerdydd.ac.uk/dysgu #12;The Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning provides

  5. How the National Labs Help Us Understand the Inner Workings of Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn more about research at the National Energy Technology Lab that's helping us understand more about what happens inside power plants.

  6. LEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    of architectural historical heritage. Geometry of a heritage building Describing the geometry of a buildingLEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS Santiago Sanchez-Beitia, Javier Barrallo is the first phase of a heritage restoration work. A precise geometric model must be conceptually simple

  7. Land O'Lakes Shaves Gas Usage through Steam System In-Plant Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Twelve participants from 6 different facilities learned and practiced energy efficiency assessment skills during the recent in-plant training at a Land O'Lakes dairy plant in Carlisle, Pennsylvania...

  8. REEDMULTIMEDIA LEARNING Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    REEDMULTIMEDIA LEARNING Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning Stephen K. Reed Center overview of cognitive architectures that can form a theoretical foundation for designing multimedia operations. Architectures that are relevant to multimedia learning include Paivio's dual coding theory

  9. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  10. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for producing single-node cuttings. Regardless of reapplication stages, nutrient termination on 1 Oct. caused taller plants with more nodes, more leaves, more flowering nodes, more total flowers, and fewer aborted flowers than those being terminated earlier...

  11. Learning Biophysically-Motivated Parameters for Alpha Helix Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devadas, Srinivas

    - mentally determined free energy values makes it difficult to design accurate cost functions that can that a protein's secondary structure can be found by min- imizing a free-energy function G that is computed as a sum of elementary free- energies. For example, an elementary free-energy might represent the energetic

  12. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  13. LEARNING... INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    in black and white/ double-sided. To set up a Google Cloud Printer to connect to printers in the LibraryYOUR LIBRARY YOUR LEARNING... YOUR INFORMATION SERVICES YOUR RESOURCES... GOOGLE CLOUD PRINT You can use Google Cloud Print to print from your Chromebook, phone, tablet and Google Apps. PLEASE NOTE

  14. Pavement Thickness Design Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavement Thickness Design Parameter Impacts 2012 Municipal Streets Seminar November 14, 2012 Paul D. Wiegand, P.E. #12;Pavement Thickness Design · How do cities decide how thick to build their pavements;Pavement Thickness Design · Correct answer ­ A data-based analysis! · Doesn't have to be difficult and time

  15. Linear ParameterVarying versus Linear TimeInvariant Control Design for a Pressurized Water Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodenheimer, Bobby

    . The plant can thus have widely varying dynamics over the operating range. The controllers designed perform to a description of the problem statement. Section 4 describes the identification and modelling of the plant. Se the worst­case time variation of a measurable parameter which enters the plant in a linear fractional manner

  16. Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? How can you fulfill the requirements the initial Lessons Learned Plan after KDP A and incorporate into the Preliminary Project Plan; Hold a PaL after KDP D/launch, review and submit lessons · Consolidate all Lessons Learned into a Final Lessons

  17. Parameterizing the Deceleration Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Pavón; Ivan Duran; Sergio del Campo; Ramón Herrera

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and constrain with the latest observational data three parameterizations of the deceleration parameter, valid from the matter era to the far future. They are well behaved and do not diverge at any redshift. On the other hand, they are model independent in the sense that in constructing them the only assumption made was that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic at large scales.

  18. LEARN MORE @ CENTRALINA CLEAN FUELS COALITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEARN MORE @ ETHANOL E85 CENTRALINA CLEAN FUELS COALITION www.4cleanfuels.com GROWTH ENERGY www fuel made by fermenting plant-based sugars. Corn is the primary feedstock for ethanol in the U blend of ethanol and gasoline. A fuel sensor regulates the air/fuel ratio to optimize performance

  19. Learning Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Patrick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Version 5.0 of the Java 2 Standard Edition SDK is the most important upgrade since Java first appeared a decade ago. With Java 5.0, you'll not only find substantial changes in the platform, but to the language itself-something that developers of Java took five years to complete. The main goal of Java 5.0 is to make it easier for you to develop safe, powerful code, but none of these improvements makes Java any easier to learn, even if you've programmed with Java for years. And that means our bestselling hands-on tutorial takes on even greater significance. Learning Java is the most widely sou

  20. Learning Curve

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a fundamental human characteristic that a person engaged in a repetitive task will improve his performance over time. If data are gathered on this phenomenon, a curve representing a decrease in effort per unit for repetitive operations can be developed. This phenomenon is real and has a specific application in cost analysis, cost estimating, or profitability studies related to the examination of future costs and confidence levels in an analysis. This chapter discusses the development and application of the learning curve.

  1. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, M.W. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities.

  2. Scholarship of and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    is characterized by: A clear focus on student learning. The scholarship of teaching and learning is drivenLeadership for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Improve student learning Stimulate and their students learning; many today are trying new classroom approaches in the hopes of strengthening

  3. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  4. Learning Communities Peer Mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    , focused communities in which students, staff, and faculty can learn and grow together. Intended Outcomes Experience -Student Evaluations Archive Materials -Reflections of Previous Peer Mentors -Learning Community Activities -Student Evaluation Archives -Former Mentor Contact list #12;Learning Communities Vision Statement

  5. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants are the foundation of the range ecosystem. The plant species growing on a property can indicate the health of the watershed and the success of the land manager. Learn how to "read your plants to understand the effect of your management....

  6. Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:776:170

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    , production and role of plants in relation to human health, history and culture. Students will learn which · Origins of Agriculture · Plant Production in controlled Environments · Plants and or crops discussed, wine, coffee, chocolate, beer, distilled spirits, medicinal and drug crops, tobacco, Rubber, wood

  7. The energy balancing parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton R. Gutierrez

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameter method is introduced in order to estimate the relationship among the various variables of a system in equilibrium, where the potential energy functions are incompletely known or the quantum mechanical calculations very difficult. No formal proof of the method is given; instead, a sufficient number of valuable examples are shown to make the case for the method's usefulness in classical and quantum systems. The mathematical methods required are quite elementary: basic algebra and minimization of power functions. This method blends advantageously with a simple but powerful approximate method for quantum mechanics, sidestepping entirely formal operators and differential equations. It is applied to the derivation of various well-known results involving centrally symmetric potentials for a quantum particle such as the hydrogen-like atom, the elastic potential and other cases of interest. The same formulas provide estimates for previously unsolved cases. PACS: 03.65.-w 30.00.00

  8. Learning to Trade With Insider Information Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Sanmay

    Learning to Trade With Insider Information Sanmay Das Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering algorithms for learning how to trade using insider (superior) information in Kyle's model of fi- nancial and parameters of the market. I show here that it is possible to learn the equilibrium trading strategy when its

  9. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An errorPlant

  10. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  11. Stochastic Learning and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Xiren

    space [56]. The fundamental elements of learning and optimization are two types of performanceXi-Ren Cao Stochastic Learning and Optimization - A Sensitivity-Based Approach With 119 Figures, 27 be easily identified. Therefore, learning techniques have to be utilized. A Brief Description of Learning

  12. DOE Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Lessons Learned Information Services Catches the Eye of Corporations and Educational Institutions

  13. Learning Transformations From Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching Ming

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Natural Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Learning Continuous Transformation from VideoProposed Video Coder

  14. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  15. Protocol for secure quantum machine learning at a distant place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeongho Bang; Seung-Woo Lee; Hyunseok Jeong

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of machine learning to quantum information processing has recently attracted keen interest, particularly for the optimization of control parameters in quantum tasks without any pre-programmed knowledge. By adapting the machine learning technique, we present a novel protocol in which an arbitrarily initialized device at a learner's location is taught by a provider located at a distant place. The protocol is designed such that any external learner who attempts to participate in or disrupt the learning process can be prohibited or noticed. We numerically demonstrate that our protocol works faithfully for single-qubit operation devices. A tradeoff between the inaccuracy and the learning time is also analyzed.

  16. Methods for determining the physiological state of a plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, David M.; Sacksteder, Colette

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods for measuring a photosynthetic parameter. The methods of the invention include the steps of: (a) illuminating a plant leaf until steady-state photosynthesis is achieved; (b) subjecting the illuminated plant leaf to a period of darkness; (c) using a kinetic spectrophotometer or kinetic spectrophotometer/fluorimeter to collect spectral data from the plant leaf treated in accordance with steps (a) and (b); and (d) determining a photosynthetic parameter from the spectral data. In another aspect, the invention provides methods for determining the physiological state of a plant.

  17. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

  18. Lessons Learned | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lessons Learned Lessons Learned The Department of Energy utilizes project management lessons learned (PMLL) in the execution of DOE capital asset projects to improve current and...

  19. The iron nutrition of tropical foliage plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Harvey Joe

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction of Fe from fresh leaves proved to be a good indicator of the Fe status of plants. It consistently gave higher correlations with chlorophyll concentration than other methods tested. Conversely, total Fe analysis on dried leaves did not always... resolve the correct Fe status of the plant. The studies also suggested that P and the ratio of P/0. 1 N HC1-Fe may be important parameters in the diagnosis of Fe status. In a screening of 11 tropical foliage plants, Ficus benj ami ha and Nephroiepi...

  20. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  1. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  2. Incorporating Learning Styles in a Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Nathan

    they think and learn. Roschelle and Teasley focus more on the nature of interaction in collaborative learning a specific problem. Student reading groups for language learning courses are an example of learning groupsIncorporating Learning Styles in a Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Model Shuangyan Liua

  3. Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? II. How of a Lessons Learned Plan · Project Learning Processes · Timeline of Project Learning Ac;5/4/2012 11 #12;Timeline of AcYviYes · Review lessons learned from other relevant

  4. Cycle Track Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing

  5. Learning poisson binomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    We consider a basic problem in unsupervised learning: learning an unknown Poisson Binomial Distribution. A Poisson Binomial Distribution (PBD) over {0,1,...,n} is the distribution of a sum of n independent Bernoulli random ...

  6. What is Continual Learning?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE. Employee development in any organization and at any level is never ending.

  7. Specific Learning Difficulties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs) A guide for tutors Enabling Services Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Contents Dyslexia Support ............................................................................................................ 3 Recognising students with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties................. 4

  8. Machine LearningMachine Learning Stephen Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Stephen D.

    represents if-then rules num-of-wheelsnon-truck hauls-cargo relative-height truck yesno non-truck non-truck about trucks & combines Memorizes: But will he recognize others? #12;1/21/2004 Stephen Scott, Univ is MachineAgain, what is Machine Learning?Learning? Given several labeled examples of a concept ­ E.g. trucks

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

  10. Ethylene insensitive plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  11. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  12. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  13. SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning Internships Volunteer & Service-Learning Field Work quite broad, although the offerings are more limited than the programs in the general section. Teaching the programs with experiential learning opportunities offered by SUNY campuses. These listings give just

  14. Learning to change, changing to learn : district conditions for organizational learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Victor Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are each focused on student learning. ” By their reports,2011). The focused theme of students learning continues and

  15. Altered Fire Regimes Affect Landscape Patterns of Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    , average parameters can be hard to define as the frequency of the disturbance is of the same order of magni of disturbance and plant succession, to examine the resilience of dominant plant species, representing different disturbance response strate- gies, to the effect of varying fire rotation intervals (FRI). The simulated fire

  16. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to guidance for developing and reviewing ESP applications, issues involving ESP plant parameters, and suggestions for future ESP applicants. The development, submittal, and issuance of these first ESPs under DOE’s NP 2010 program started the momentum to exercise NRC’s new 10 CFR Part 52 licensing process. Several key questions that define critical issues regarding the effectiveness of regulations pertaining to ESPs have been identified and summarized in this report. However, the final resolution of whether the ESP component of the Part 52 process significantly contributes to the predictability in nuclear power plant licensing requires more experience and time, such as the completion of the ongoing combined Construction and Operating License (COL) process for the North Anna and Grand Gulf sites. The three ESP project participants prepared and submitted to DOE lessons learned reports from their experience in developing, submitting, and receiving an ESP. This document summarizes these reports, which are appended hereto. The Nuclear Energy Institute (http://www.nei.org/) and NRC (http://www.nrc.gov/) have also prepared reports regarding their perspectives on lessons learned during the ESP process. Their documents can be accessed on their respective web sites. Following is a summary of the lessons learned from the NP 2010 ESP projects. Effectiveness of the ESP Process: In general, the ESP process is expected (subject to demonstration of the ESP finality provisions in the North Anna and Grand Gulf ESPs) to provide high value for applicants as a site banking and risk mitigation strategy. However, several aspects of the initial process, such as NRC hearings and determining an acceptable approach to the NRC’s Emergency Planning requirements, proved challenging for the applicants. Project Execution: Initial regulatory and industry guidance for planning and executing an ESP application program proved to be insufficient to address NRC’s document review expectations. However, continuous communication between NRC and the applicants helped establish an acceptable framework

  17. FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS Fifteenth Dutch-Belgian Conference on Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    2006 will be organised jointly by the Bioinformatics group of the Department of Plant Systems Biology, May 11-12, 2006 http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/benelearn2006 Benelearn is the annual machine-Theoretic Planning Bayesian Networks Case-based Learning Computational Learning Theory Data Mining Evolutionary

  18. Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougan, A D; Blair, S

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL turned in 5 Declaration Line Items (DLI's) in 2006. Of these, one was declared completed. We made some changes to streamline our process from 2005, used less money, time and fewer team members. This report is a description of what changes we made in 2006 and what we learned. Many of our core review team had changed from last year, including our Laboratory Director, the Facility safety and security representatives, our Division Leader, and the OPSEC Committee Chair. We were able to hand out an AP Manual to some of them, and briefed all newcomers to the AP process. We first went to the OPSEC Committee and explained what the Additional Protocol process would be for 2006 and solicited their help in locating declarable projects. We utilized the 'three questions' from the AP meeting last year. LLNL has no single place to locate all projects at the laboratory. We talked to Resource Managers and key Managers in the Energy and Environment Directorate and in the Nonproliferation Homeland and International Security Directorate to find applicable projects. We also talked to the Principal Investigators who had projects last year. We reviewed a list of CRADA's and LDRD projects given to us by the Laboratory Site Office. Talking to the PI's proved difficult because of vacation or travel schedules. We were never able to locate one PI in town. Fortunately, collateral information allowed us to screen out his project. We had no problems in downloading new versions of the DWA and DDA. It was helpful for both Steve Blair and Arden Dougan to have write privileges. During the time we were working on the project, we had to tag-team the work to allow for travel and vacation schedules. We had some difficulty locating an 'activities block' in the software. This was mentioned as something we needed to fix from our 2005 declaration. Evidently the Activities Block has been removed from the current version of the software. We also had trouble finding the DLI Detail Report, which we included in our signature process last year. This report had been inadvertently omitted from the version of the software we used. We typed our own version of the Detail Report and the package was sent to signature. The final software was not available in time to include the DLI Report. We streamlined our review process for the Technical and Security Reviews by sending one letter to each entity instead of getting separate approvals from the subordinates, then getting an approval from the lead reviewer. The Review process took 20 days, far shorter than the 6 weeks it required last year. It will be difficult to shorten the process much more. One of our projects had associated laboratory work at NIF. This required many discussions with NIF management during the review process and before their paperwork came to them for signature since they were not aware of the Additional Protocol.

  19. Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Mckirdy

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

  20. Statistical Learning Theory of Protein Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrated statistical learning and simulation approach tomolecular simulation, using statistical learning theory tomolecular simulation and statistical learning theory of

  1. www.usask.ca/learning_charter OurLearningVision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    other institutions of learning. Our students undertake programs of many different types and durations types: Discovery,Knowledge, Integrity,Skills, and Citizenship. Core Learning Goals · Apply critical1 www.usask.ca/learning_charter OurLearningVision The University of Saskatchewan Learning Charter

  2. Experiential learning through internships and co-ops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    and environmental engineer/intern at the General Motors Baltimore Operations Plant. Popiel was an electrical of Engineering education: t Experiential learning through co-ops and internships t Hands-on experience t Global and computer engineer at the Department of Defense. Alkayyali was a biomedical engineer/intern at Johns Hopkins

  3. biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    0 biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report Vaibhav Nasery Roll No. 08D highly successful rural biogas models wherein biogas is produced and utilized as a cooking fuel by the villagers. The two models studied are the Community Biogas plant established by SUMUL Dairy at Bhintbudrak

  4. ABSTRACT: This paper describes one Learning in Optimal Non-linear Control *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    Functional ABSTRACT: This paper describes one Learning in Optimal Non-linear Control * ~. Irlicht of nonfinear systems is to apply f{.~wiback control based on plant linearization and application of linear qll)irve robustness in optimization control working with a linearized .tatr-depenrlent plant model. I;vel] wit 1

  5. Strategy for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeongho Bang; Junghee Ryu; Seokwon Yoo; Marcin Pawlowski; Jinhyoung Lee

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning. The method uses a quantum-classical hybrid simulator, where a "quantum student" is being taught by a "classical teacher." In other words, in our method, the learning system is supposed to evolve into a quantum algorithm for a given problem assisted by classical main-feedback system. Our method is applicable to design quantum oracle-based algorithm. As a case study, we chose an oracle decision problem, called a Deutsch-Jozsa problem. We showed by using Monte-Carlo simulations that our simulator can faithfully learn quantum algorithm to solve the problem for given oracle. Remarkably, learning time is proportional to the square root of the total number of parameters instead of the exponential dependance found in the classical machine learning based method.

  6. Using Genetic Algorithms to Improve the Visual Quality of Fractal Plants Generated with CSGPLSystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Using Genetic Algorithms to Improve the Visual Quality of Fractal Plants Generated with CSG­system, that generates a desired plant. Especially the tuning of the parameter values is time consuming and demands a lot genetic algorithms to find PL­systems that generate natural looking plants of a desired species. PL

  7. Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant Mitchell Colby University 204 Rogers Hall Corvallis, OR 97331 kagan.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT As power plants become power plant, showing that system parameters may be accurately measured and tracked more effectively than

  8. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  9. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  10. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  11. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  12. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  13. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8596 itr-t C,d.. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS jmethods of isolating the hydrocarbon-like material from I.privatelyownedrights. HYDROCARBONS AND ENERGY FROM PLANTS

  14. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety method SOFTWARE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS USING A QUALITATIVE FORMAL

  15. Propagation of Ornamental Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of Ornamental Plants I A. I?. DEWERTH, Head Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture Texas A. & M. College System THE MULTIPLICATION of ornamental plants is After sterilizing, firm the soil to within 1; receiving more...

  16. Machine Learning: Foundations and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-David, Shai

    with accident prevention systems that are built using machine learning algorithms. Machine learning is also to us). Machine learning tools are concerned with endowing programs with the ability to "learn if the learning process succeeded or failed? The second goal of this book is to present several key machine

  17. Poisonous Plant Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Toxic plants also contribute to indirect losses such as reduced calving , lambing or kidding percentages and reduced fiber production and weight gain. Direct and indirect losses from poisonous plants in Texas cost livestock producers from $50 million... to $100 million annually. In the United States, more than 400 species of poisonous plants have been identified. These toxic plants are generally not found in greatest abundance on good-to-excellent condition range but are, with few exceptions...

  18. Enhancing student learning: On-line interactive laboratory for modelling of real world control system applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    University has had satisfactory results regarding the use of a simulator for simulation of power plant operation (Ma et al, 2008). Firstly, in the simulation environment, students start up the plant, adjust its running parameter and explore plant's possible malfunction on the simulator. Thereafter, they operate

  19. PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants James S. Coleman Kelly D.M. McConnaughay David D. Ackerly Plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists frequently examine patterns of phenotypic phenotypic traits change throughout growth and development of individual plants, and that rates of growth

  20. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  1. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  2. LPG-recovery processes for baseload LNG plants examined

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, C.H. [Bechtel Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With demand on the rise, LPG produced from a baseload LNG plant becomes more attractive as a revenue-earning product similar to LNG. Efficient use of gas expanders in baseload LNG plants for LPG production therefore becomes more important. Several process variations for LPG recovery in baseload LNG plants are reviewed here. Exergy analysis (based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics) is applied to three cases to compare energy efficiency resulting from integration with the main liquefaction process. The paper discusses extraction in a baseload plant, extraction requirements, process recovery parameters, extraction process variations, and exergy analysis.

  3. Analyses of integrated MHD/steam plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D.J.; Willis, P.A.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work performed on Task I of the MHD Advanced Power Train (APT) Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. This program included an analysis of integrated MHD/Steam Power Plants in size ranges of 200, 500 and 1000 MW /SUB e/ . A parametric study of various cycle configurations and operating parameters resulted in an optimized, integrated configuration for which plant performance projections were calculated. These results are presented. The scalability of present day test configurations and their applicability to large-scale commercial components was investigated. The present state of MHD technology is evaluated, and extensions of that technology are presented.

  4. Designing for Learning: Multiplayer Digital Game Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supercharged! : learning physics with digital simulationsimulations, computer games, and pedagogy in e-learning andlearning environment based on the blending microworlds, simulations,

  5. reprinted from Learning through Multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    reprinted from Learning through Multimedia Roy D. Pea Institute for Research on Learning #12;Learning through Multimedia Roy D. Pea Institute for Research on writinguniteswritersandreaders.Society might come to regard multimedia literacy as essential as writing is today

  6. Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

  7. Parameters estimation for spatio-temporal maximum entropy distributions: application to neural spike trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasser, Hassan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a numerical method to learn Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) distributions with spatio-temporal constraints from experimental spike trains. This is an extension of two papers [10] and [4] who proposed the estimation of parameters where only spatial constraints were taken into account. The extension we propose allows to properly handle memory effects in spike statistics, for large sized neural networks.

  8. A Viterbi-like algorithm and EM learning for statistical abduction Taisuke SATO Yoshitaka KAMEYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Taisuke

    A Viterbi-like algorithm and EM learning for statistical abduction Taisuke SATO Yoshitaka KAMEYA@mi.cs.titech.ac.jp Abstract We propose statistical abduction as a #12;rst- order logical framework for representing and learning probabilistic knowledge. It com- bines logical abduction with a parameter- ized distribution over

  9. A Simulation Approach to Dynamic Portfolio Choice with an Application to Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, Jonathan

    A Simulation Approach to Dynamic Portfolio Choice with an Application to Learning About Return 2000 This Draft: December 2003 Abstract We present a simulation-based method for solving discrete, parameter and model uncertainty, and learning. We first establish the properties of the method

  10. Learning and Vision Machines BERND HEISELE, ALESSANDRO VERRI, AND TOMASO POGGIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    systems that learn and adapt represent one of the most im- portant trends in computer vision research & Telephone, Siemens Corporate Research, Inc., Toyota Motor Corporation, and The Whitaker Foundation. B on the control parameters x . When images are the inputs x , instead, the system learns to perform the inverse

  11. Optimization Online - Enclosing Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Xunkai

    2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 20, 2007 ... Abstract: This report introduces a new machine learning paradigm called enclosing machine learning for data mining. This novel method ...

  12. Treat Teaching as Learned Profession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen Duffy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Difference ACCORD UC/ Treat Teaching as Learned ProfessionPublic Policy Series PB-009-1104 Treat Teaching as Learned

  13. Towards more human-like concept learning in machines : compositionality, causality, and learning-to-learn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Brenden M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    People can learn a new concept almost perfectly from just a single example, yet machine learning algorithms typically require hundreds or thousands of examples to perform similarly. People can also use their learned concepts ...

  14. The Learning Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As a 4-H volunteer, you have tremendous influence in determining the learning that takes place within your 4-H club or group. Adult volunteers also have the task of making the learning experiences attractive to young people. Here are some important...

  15. Residential Learning University Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

  16. Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    1 Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially flowering plants) a major force driving the diversity of insects As diversity of land plants has increased, the diversity of insects has increased Interaction between plants and insects is an example of coevolution Coevolution

  17. Learned, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana: Energy ResourcesLeander Lake,Learned,

  18. Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development 105 Learning Strategies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    of success (Gu, 1994, 2003a; Moir & Nation, 2002). Largely two types of learning outcome measures have beenLearning Strategies for Vocabulary Development 105 Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development of changes in vocabulary learning strategies and how these changes are related to vocabulary development. One

  19. Perceptual learning: learning to see Dov Sagi and David Tanne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagi, Dov

    the existence of two types of learning, fast (binocular) and slow (monocular). The slow phase requiresPerceptual learning: learning to see Dov Sagi and David Tanne The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Perceptual learning in vision has been found to be highly specific for simple stimulus

  20. e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning http://etl.snu.ac.kr #12;about eTL eTL ? eTL(e-Teaching & Learning) , , , , . e , , , , , , , , , (, ) , SSO(Single Sign On) , , #12;e-Teaching & Learning System 4 1. Moodle Moodle Modular Object

  1. Distance learning meets Open Source Future-oriented Distance Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -learning on college level. One of the main problems is that study material as well as concepts have to be transformed component of the Open Source movement. Key words: distance learning, open source 1. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS of each semester. 2. THE CORE PROBLEM WHEN USING E-LEARNING-TOOLS IN DISTANCE LEARNING Most people

  2. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  3. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  4. The Knowledge Gradient for Optimal Learning Warren B. Powell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    of parameters; for online problems, we learn from rewards we are receiving, and we want to strike a balance path through New York City to respond to certain emergencies (e.g. getting a fire truck to city hall the best molecular compound to produce a particular result (curing cancer, storing energy, conducting

  5. BLENDED AND ONLINE LEARNING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    ) "Flipped classroom" - focus on active learning and enhanced student engagement in the classroom #12;First dissatisfied with student learning experience #12;Blended Learning Initiative Large, first-year courses student engagement improve student learning outcomes improve knowledge retention #12;Framework for Blended

  6. FACULTY GUIDE Service-Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    ?.............................................................. 5 Benefits of Service-Learning..................................... 5 Types of Experiential LearningFACULTY GUIDE to Service-Learning University of Massachuse s Lowell 20132014 #12;2 WELCOME Dear Colleague, Thank you for taking the time to read this introductory guide to service- learning

  7. Time series association learning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Papcun, George J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic input is recognized from inferred articulatory movements output by a learned relationship between training acoustic waveforms and articulatory movements. The inferred movements are compared with template patterns prepared from training movements when the relationship was learned to regenerate an acoustic recognition. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic articulatory relationships are learned by a neural network. Subsequent input acoustic patterns then generate the inferred articulatory movements for use with the templates. Articulatory movement data may be supplemented with characteristic acoustic information, e.g. relative power and high frequency data, to improve template recognition.

  8. Parameter 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympiaAnalysis) JumpPalcan sPaquin Energy andParameter

  9. A quantum speedup in machine learning: Finding a N-bit Boolean function for a classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seokwon Yoo; Jeongho Bang; Changhyoup Lee; Jinhyoung Lee

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare quantum and classical machines designed for learning an N-bit Boolean function in order to address how a quantum system improves the machine learning behavior. The machines of the two types consist of the same number of operations and control parameters, but only the quantum machines utilize the quantum coherence naturally induced by unitary operators. We show that quantum superposition enables quantum learning that is faster than classical learning by expanding the approximate solution regions, i.e., the acceptable regions. This is also demonstrated by means of numerical simulations with a standard feedback model, namely random search, and a practical model, namely differential evolution.

  10. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effluent steam from a conventional power plant. However,Steam Cycle Parameters Total turbine generator output Total auxiliary power Net plantpower plants provide a substantial improvement in thermodynamic efficiency over that possible with conventional steam

  11. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  12. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  13. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  14. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  15. PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

  16. Plant Ecology An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

  17. Computers for Learning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through Executive Order 12999, the Computers for Learning Program was established to provide Federal agencies a quick and easy system for donating excess and surplus computer equipment to schools...

  18. Experiments in service learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

  19. Robot learning [TC Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russell Louis

    Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

  20. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  1. AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, Stephen

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

  2. Sharing Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Bryan L.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

  3. Learning Innate Face Preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newborn humans preferentially orient to face-like patterns at birth, but months of experience with faces is required for full face processing abilities to develop. Several models have been proposed for how the interaction of genetic and evironmental influences can explain this data. These models generally assume that the brain areas responsible for newborn orienting responses are not capable of learning and are physically separate from those that later learn from real faces. However, it has been difficult to reconcile these models with recent discoveries of face learning in newborns and young infants. We propose a general mechanism by which genetically specified and environmentdriven preferences can coexist in the same visual areas. In particular, newborn face orienting may be the result of prenatal exposure of a learning system to internally generated input patterns, such as those found in PGO waves during REM sleep. Simulating this process with the HLISSOM biological model of the visual system, we demonstrate that the combination of learning and internal patterns is an efficient way to specify and develop circuitry for face perception. This prenatal learning can account for the newborn preferences for schematic and photographic images of faces, providing a computational explanation for how genetic influences interact with experience to construct a complex adaptive system.

  4. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhouse, Christopher James; /Oxford U.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters ({Delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub atm}). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin {sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}} = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup _0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.). The tension between these results is intriguing, and additional antineutrino data is currently being taken in order to further investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  5. Formative Assessment, Equity, and Opportunity to Learn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilberg, Soleste

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inquiry focused on student learning, and to explore theirinquiry focused on student learning, and (c) how this workinquiry focused on student learning. Interrelatedly, there

  6. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience Program. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICESUpon receipt of a Lessons Learned/Best Practices Feedbackreview disseminated Lessons Learned/Best Practices Briefings

  7. Unsupervised Learning of Object Descriptors and Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Xingyao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported Experiments A New Experiment on Human Learning ofof previous experiments on human chunk learning, along withnew psychophysical experiment, where human observers learned

  8. Mobile plant for low-level radioactive waste reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Panteleyev, V.I.; Demkin, V.I. [Government of Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Along with nuclear power plants, many scientific and industrial enterprises generate radioactive wastes, especially low-level liquid wastes. Some of these facilities generate only small amounts on the order of several dozen cubic meters per year. The Moscow scientific industrial association, Radon, developed a mobile pilot system, EKO, for the processing of LLW with a low salt content. The plant consists of three modules: ultrafiltration module; electrodialysis module; and filtration module. The paper describes the technical parameters and test results from the plant on real LLW.

  9. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  10. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  11. Decontamination and dismantlement of Plant 7 at Fernald

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertin, M.; Borgman, T.; Zebick, B.

    1994-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) tasks have been successfully completed on Plant 7 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The seven story facility was radiologically, chemically, and biologically contaminated. The work involved the D&D work beginning with safe shutdown and gross decontamination, and ended with removal of the structural steel. A series of lessons learned were gained which include use of explosives, bidding tactics, safe shutdown, building decontamination and lockdown, use of seam climbers, etc.

  12. Calibration of Cotton Planting Mechanisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per foot. To obtain a perfect stand of one plant to Foot, a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 11 plants per foot wonld have to be thinned out. The number for picker wheel- drop planting mechanisms ranged from a minimum of 2 to a maxi- mum of 27 plants... per foot, requiring the removal of from 1 to 26 nlants per foot to leave one plant per foot. CONTENTS Introduction History of cotton planter development ------------.---------------------------------- Cottonseed planting mechanisms Requirements...

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

  14. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  2. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  3. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  5. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  6. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  7. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  8. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  9. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  10. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  11. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Learning with online constraints : shifting concepts and active learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteleoni, Claire E. (Claire Elizabeth), 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many practical problems such as forecasting, real-time decision making, streaming data applications, and resource-constrained learning, can be modeled as learning with online constraints. This thesis is concerned with ...

  13. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  14. Poisonous Plant Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are most grass, acid leg paralysis, dribbling urine susceptible to poisoning sorghum, by sorghum sorghum alum Stillingia Trecul Hydrocyanic See prussic acid poisoning Numerous sheep losses to treculiana queensdelight acid this plant have occurred...

  15. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

  16. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  17. Use of the Hebb-Williams closed-field maze to determine learning ability in yearling horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, Cynthia Ann

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ve fillies whi ch had never before been used on any learning study were compared. After a 10-day adjustment and training period, horses were presented a new problem each day for 12 days and were given eight trials on each problem. The following... learning parameters were calculated: (1) total excess entry scores (TExES), (2) rapi dity of learning score (XR), the percent of total excess entries occurring during the first four trials of each problem; (3) error elimination score (EES...

  18. Adding a Learning Module -1 Adding a Learning Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Items focused on a specific subject that students can navigate at their own pace. For example or No for Enforce Sequential Viewing for the Learning Module. Selecting Yes will require students to view the Learning Module within a Table of Contents, which students can also use to navigate through the Learning

  19. : Abduction, Learning. A System for Learning Abductive Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dix, Juergen

    f g Keywords Abstract : Abduction, Learning. 1 A System for Learning Abductive Logic Programs Ferrara, Italy We present the system LAP for learning abductive logic programs from examples and from a background abductive theory. A new type of induction problem has been defined as an extension

  20. Language and Learning in the Digital Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rama, Paul S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projects examine the types of learning that occur thoughis even possible, this type of learning into schools? To

  1. The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned Plus Past and Future Challenges Presented to: Portland State Corridor **Trucked around Corridor but leaves or enters Southern California by rail. #12;Lessons Learned

  2. Discrimination learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeates, B. F

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science DISCRIMINATION LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by B. F. Yeates Approved as to styIe aod content by: ~C airman oi . , Ommlttec. g ~liemoer Pe comber 1 S76 ABSTRACT Discrimination Learning in Horses (December 1976) B. F. Yeates, B. S. , Texas... was subsequently given 7 days discrimination training on each of' three different stimuli in three successive periods. Ti percert correct response" vtas used to measure period, stimuli and horse efforts. iiean percentages for the three periods were 42? 51. 9...

  3. Virtual Simulation of Vision 21 Energy Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syamlal, Madhava; Felix, Paul E.; Osawe, Maxwell O. (Fluent Inc.); Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Sloan, David G. (ALSTOM Power); Zitney, Stephen E. (Aspen Technology, Inc.); Joop, Frank (Intergraph Corporation); Cleetus, Joseph; Lapshin, Igor B. (Concurrent Engineering Research Center, West Virginia University)

    2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision 21 Energy plants will be designed by combining several individual power, chemical, and fuel-conversion technologies. These independently developed technologies or technology modules can be interchanged and combined to form the complete Vision 21 plant that achieves the needed level of efficiency and environmental performance at affordable costs. The knowledge about each technology module must be captured in computer models so that the models can be linked together to simulate the entire Vision 21 power plant in a Virtual Simulation environment. Eventually the Virtual Simulation will find application in conceptual design, final design, plant operation and control, and operator training. In this project we take the first step towards developing such a Vision 21 Simulator. There are two main knowledge domains of a plant--the process domain (what is in the pipes), and the physical domain (the pipes and equipment that make up the plant). Over the past few decades, commercial software tools have been developed for each of these functions. However, there are three main problems that inhibit the design and operation of power plants: (1) Many of these tools, largely developed for chemicals and refining, have not been widely adopted in the power industry. (2) Tools are not integrated across functions. For example, the knowledge represented by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of equipment is not used in process-level simulations. (3) No tool exists for readily integrating the design and behavioral knowledge about components. These problems must be overcome to develop the Vision 21 Simulator. In this project our major objective is to achieve a seamless integration of equipment-level and process-level models and apply the integrated software to power plant simulations. Specifically we are developing user-friendly tools for linking process models (Aspen Plus) with detailed equipment models (FLUENT CFD and other proprietary models). Such integration will ensure that consistent and complete knowledge about the process is used for design and optimization. The technical objectives of the current project are the following: Develop a software integration tool called the V21-Controller to mediate the information exchange between FLUENT, other detailed equipment models, and Aspen Plus. Define and publish software interfaces so that software and equipment vendors may integrate their computer models into the software developed in this project. Demonstrate the application of the integrated software with two power plant simulations, one for a conventional steam plant and another for an advanced power cycle. The project was started in October 2000. Highlights of the accomplishments during the first year of the project are the following: Formed a multi-disciplinary project team consisting of chemical and mechanical engineers; computer scientists; CFD, process simulation, and plant design software developers; and power plant designers. Developed a prototype of CFD and process model integration: a stirred tank reactor model based on FLUENT was inserted into a flow sheet model based on Aspen Plus. The prototype was used to show the effect of shaft speed (a parameter in the CFD model) on the product yield and purity (results of process simulation). This demonstrated the optimization of an equipment item in the context of the entire plant rather than in isolation. Conducted a user survey and wrote the User Requirements, Software Requirements and Software Design documents for the V21-Controller. Adopted CAPE-OPEN standard interfaces for communications between equipment and process models. Developed a preliminary version of the V21-Controller based on CAPE-OPEN interfaces. Selected one unit of an existing conventional steam plant (Richmond Power & Light) as the first demonstration case and developed an Aspen Plus model of the steam-side of the unit. A model for the gas-side of the unit, based on ALSTOM's proprietary model INDVU, was integrated with the Aspen Plus model. An industrial Advisory Board was formed to guide the software deve

  4. How Minds Work Memories and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    & Learning 7 Types of Human Learning Requiring Distinct Mechanisms · Perceptual learning ­ Identify1 How Minds Work Memories and Learning Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;How Minds Work: Memory & Learning 2 Human Learning

  5. AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY TESTING SERVICE THE SERVICE uses morphological standards for forest to obtain information about the quality of their planting stock before planting. will indicate the likely Potential (RGP) 15 150 FURTHER INFORMATION See the Forest Research, Plant Quality Testing web page: http

  6. Writing and Assessing Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Outcomes... Are student-focused Focus on learning resulting from an activity rather than the activity outcomes) to describing effectiveness (Learning outcomes) · Links Student Affairs and Academic Affairs; links curricular and co-curricular #12;Biggest challenges to assessing learning · Students do

  7. Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning Robert Z. Zheng University of Utah, USA Hershey · New York of multimedia learning / Robert Zheng, editor. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: "This book identifies the role and function of multimedia in learning through a collection of research

  8. Century Learning through Apple Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    21st Century Learning through Apple Technology July 4 ­ 5, 2013 This exciting institute will appeal to educators who wish to enhance their teaching in support of 21st century learning using Apple technology. This institute begins with a keynote address that looks at how new technologies can enhance 21st century learning

  9. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    problems 20 2.3.1 Classes 20 2.3.2 Types of classi cation problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Li`ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Course;#12;APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li#12;ege

  10. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    .3.2 Types of classification problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2.3.4 Decision or classificationApplied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Liâ??ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Courseâ??e'' #12; #12; APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li

  11. Evolution, Learning & Information Brian Skyrms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    SIGNALS Evolution, Learning & Information Brian Skyrms #12;Signals: Evolution, Learning. The Flow of Information 4. Evolution 5. Evolution in Lewis Signaling Games 6. Deception 7. Learning 8 of evolution by differential reproduction and natural variation. In particular we use models of replicator

  12. Hybrid Machine Learning Princeton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    : Learn an apprentice policy !A such that V(!A) # V(!E) where the value function V(!) is unknown. Expert policy !E Apprentice policy !A Learning algorithm #12;Apprenticeship Learning !! Our contribution: New apprentice policy than existing algorithms. #12;Assumptions !! Definition: Let µ(!) be the feature vector

  13. South Ukraine NPP: Safety improvements through Plant Computer upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenman, O. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Chernyshov, M. A. [Westron, LLC, 1 Acad. Proskura St., Kharkiv 61070 (Ukraine); Denning, R. S. [Battelle, 505 King Ave, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Kolesov, S. A. [NAEK Energoatom, 3 Vetrov Str., Kiev, 01032 (Ukraine); Balakan, H. H.; Bilyk, B. I.; Kuznetsov, V. I. [PO South Ukraine NPP, NAEK Energoatom, Mylolayv Region, 55000 (Ukraine); Trosman, G. [US Dept. of Energy, International Nuclear Safety Program, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes some results of the Plant Computer upgrade at the Units 2 and 3 of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A Plant Computer, which is also called the Computer Information System (CIS), is one of the key safety-related systems at VVER-1000 nuclear plants. The main function of the CIS is information support for the plant operators during normal and emergency operational modes. Before this upgrade, South Ukraine NPP operated out-of-date and obsolete systems. This upgrade project wax founded by the U.S. DOE in the framework of the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP). The most efficient way to improve the quality and reliability of information provided to the plant operator is to upgrade the Human-System Interface (HSI), which is the Upper Level (UL) CIS. The upgrade of the CIS data-acquisition system (DAS), which is the Lower Level (LL) CIS, would have less effect on the unit safety. Generally speaking, the lifetime of the LL CIS is much higher than one of the UL CIS. Unlike Plant Computers at the Western-designed plants, the functionality of the WER-1000 CISs includes a control function (Centralized Protection Testing) and a number of the plant equipment monitoring functions, for example, Protection and Interlock Monitoring and Turbo-Generator Temperature Monitoring. The new system is consistent with a historical migration of the format by which information is presented to the operator away from the traditional graphic displays, for example, Piping and Instrument Diagrams (P and ID's), toward Integral Data displays. The cognitive approach to information presentation is currently limited by some licensing issues, but is adapted to a greater degree with each new system. The paper provides some lessons learned on the management of the international team. (authors)

  14. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Roberts

    2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

  15. ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS D for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak a simplified economic model and selecting uniform engineering performance parameters, this comparison

  16. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  17. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg Wilson

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  18. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Greg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  19. Reflecting to learn mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating reflective practice and writing to learn mathematics (WTLM) in order ... concern or interest as well as potential explanations for and solutions to ..... teacher, I know I need to be universally good in both language and numbers. ... The PSMTs' reflections also revealed that completing the prompts encouraged them to.

  20. Use and recovery of ammonia in power plant cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflug, H.D.; Bettenworth, H.J.; Syring, H.A. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hanover (Germany)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents some practical and theoretical aspects of the use of ammonia in power plant water/steam cycles. The plants considered are fully automated units with once-through boilers, which operate under complex conditions and are subject to frequent starts and load changes. The boilers are chemically conditioned with combined oxygen ammonia treatment and the condensate polishing plant is only operated during start-up, in the event of a condenser leak or to remove excess ammonia. The paper also covers the recovery of ammonia from the condensate polishing plant waste regenerants and reuse for conditioning the feedwater. In particular, the paper deals with the following points: theoretical analysis of the chemical equilibrium of ammonia and carbon dioxide in water, including calculation of the concentrations from the parameters normally measured, such as conductivities and pH; equipment for monitoring and controlling the amount of ammonia fed to the water/steam cycle, including the optimum positioning of the sampling and feed-points, the parameters suitable for feed control and their temperature dependence; the partial pressure and distribution coefficient of ammonia; the consumption and losses of ammonia through the water/steam cycle during operation; the recovery of ammonia from condensate polishing plant waste regenerants by steam stripping. The paper should be of interest to both planning engineers and plant operators.

  1. Willow plant name 'Preble'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.(Salix sachalinensis.times.Salix miyabeana) named `Preble`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 29% more woody biomass than the average of three current production cultivars (Salix.times.dasyclados `SV1` (unpatented), Salix sachalinensis `SX61` (unpatented), and Salix miyabeana `SX64` (unpatented)) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (three growing seasons after coppice) in two different trials in Constableville, N.Y. and Middlebury, Vt. `Preble` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Preble` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  2. Galaxy Structural Parameters in Source Extractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Holwerda

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the Concentration, Asymmetry and Smoothness (CAS), as well as the M20 and GINI parameters have become popular to automatically classify distant galaxies in images. Ellipticals, spirals and irregular galaxies all appear to occupy different regions of this parameter space. At the same time, the Source Extractor (SE) program has become the mainstay to produce ob ject catalogs from large image surveys. A logical next step would be to incorporate the structural parameters into the Source Extractor software. There are however several problems that arise: 1) the CAS parameters are fits to the images and Source Extractor eschews fits in the interest of speed, 2) the definition of the structural parameters changed over time. Now that there is a clear and agreed-upon definition of the structural parameters, I am incorporating computed versions in the Source Extractor code (v2.5). The fitted CAS parameters are available for the GOODS-N/S fields and I compare the computed structural parameters to those found by the previous fits. My goal is to expand the source structure information in Source Extractor catalogs in order to improve automatic identification of sources, specifically of distant galaxies. The computed parameters perform reasonably close to the fitted versions but noise appears in faint ob jects due to a lack of information. For a subset of objects, the asymmetry signal is outside the SE boundaries and Smoothness still fails to compute for many ob jects. Type classification based on the SE parameters still lacks resolving power.

  3. Association and Abstraction in Sequential Learning:“What is Learned?” Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Stephen B.; Doyle, Karen E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    serial-pattern learning; our SPAM simulations simply testedwalk" simulation model of multiple-pattern learning in ain rat serial pattern learning. In two simulation studies (

  4. Parameter study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale prototype hydrogen storage system as part of a Work For Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. For the current work, we have continued our evaluation of the GM Demonstration System to provide learning to DOE's hydrogen storage programs, specifically the new Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. Baseline refueling data during testing for GM was taken over a narrow range of optimized parameter values. Further testing was conducted over a broader range. Parameters considered included hydrogen pressure and coolant flow rate. This data confirmed the choice of design pressure of the Demonstration System, but indicated that the system was over-designed for cooling. Baseline hydrogen delivery data was insufficient to map out delivery rate as a function of temperature and capacity for the full-scale system. A more rigorous matrix of tests was performed to better define delivery capabilities. These studies were compared with 1-D and 2-D coupled multi-physics modeling results. The relative merits of these models are discussed along with opportunities for improved efficiency or reduced mass and volume.

  5. ASME PTC 47 -- Calculation of overall IGCC plant performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, T.; Horazak, D.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant is a combined chemical and power system that converts coal or other unrefined fuel into clean gaseous fuel, electric power, and other byproducts. The conversion process requires interactions among the gasification, gas cleaning, air or oxygen production, power and steam generation systems. Overall performance testing of IGCC plants. however, is based only on the streams that cross the overall plant boundary. This paper describes the calculation procedures required to conduct a fair and accurate performance test of an IGCC plant, as proposed for ASME Performance Test Code 47. Discussions include identification of parameters to be measured, calculations needed to evaluate performance, and corrections to performance data for test conditions that differ from reference conditions.

  6. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  7. Two-Parameter Dynamics and Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi Hu; Mulin Yan; Sen Hu

    2015-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the two-parameter dynamics which is implied by the law of inertia in flat spacetime. A remarkable perception is that (A)dS4 geometry may emerge from the two-parameter dynamics, which exhibits some phenomenon of dynamics/ geometry correspondence. We also discuss the Unruh effects within the context of two-parameter dynamics. In the last section we construct various invariant actions with respect to the broken symmetry groups.

  8. Uncertainty evaluation of delayed neutron decay parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jinkai

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .......... 80 Figure 6.1 Fitted E2 from Different Algorithms (Saturation Mode)................... 85 Figure 6.2 Standard Deviations of Fitted Parameter Ratios (Saturation Mode). 92 Figure 6.3 Standard Deviations of Fitted Parameter Ratios (Pulse Mode...)......... 92 Figure 6.4 Standard Deviations of Fitted Parameter Ratios with Group-1 Fixed (Pulse Mode) ........................................................................... 93 Figure 6.5 The Ratios of Different Data Sets to Keepin?s Values...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: main parameter determining laminate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameter determining laminate fatigue lifetime is the cumulative time under load New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On...

  10. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Injection Parameters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Investigation of Effect of Injection Parameters, Compression Ratio and Ultra-cooled EGR on CI Engine Performance and Emissions Low temperature combustion,...

  11. ONE-PARAMETER CONTINUOUS FIELDS OF KIRCHBERG ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    One-parameter separable unital continuous fields of Kirchberg algebras (nuclear purely infinite simple C*-algebras) with torsion free Ki-groups and trivial ...

  12. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identifying with most types of learning styles. © 2014others prefer re?ective types of learning opportuni- ties,learning style. Types of Learning Styles Kolb depicts

  13. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  14. B Plant hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  15. Pinellas Plant facts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

  16. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  17. Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    Steam Plant, 6% School of Medicine, 17% Irrigation, 3% Hospital, 22% Athletics, 2% Housing, 5 · Rainwater Cisterns · Reducing the number of once through cooling systems in labs · Expediting the connection for Irrigation ~15 million gallons Percent of Water Used for Irrigation that is Non-Potable ~10-15% Number

  18. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale insects on o rnamental plants B-6097 8-00 Mark A. Muegge and Michael Merchant* M any species of scale insects damage land- scape plants, shrubs and trees. Scale insects insert their mouthparts into plant tissues and suck out the sap. When... period. Most species never move again in their lives. Scale insects feed by inserting their hairlike mouth- parts into plant tissue and siphoning the plant?s sap. While feeding, many species excrete a sweet, sticky liquid referred to as ?honeydew...

  19. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Environmental Horticulture major Environmental Horticulture Science option Landscape Design option Biotechnology (Environmental Horticultural Science, Landscape Design, Plant Biology, Crop Science, and Biotechnology major Plant Biotechnology option Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems major Sustainable Crop

  20. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  1. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the physical attributes of airborne particulate matter, such as the airborne concentrations of particles and their sizes. The conditions of receptor exposure (duration of exposure in various microenvironments), breathing rates, and dosimetry of inhaled particulates are discussed in more detail in ''Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]).

  2. Lazy learning indirect control for discrete-time non-linear systems Gianluca Bontempi, Mauro Birattari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Gianluca

    Lazy learning indirect control for discrete-time non-linear systems Gianluca Bontempi, Mauro propose a hybrid architecture for the indirect control of non linear discrete time plants from of the resulting controller in a simplified case. Experimental results in the control of some non linear benchmarks

  3. Robotics for Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toh, Dennis; Lim, Matthew; Wee, Loo Kang; Ong, Matthew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teaching Robotics is about empowering students to create and configure robotics devices and program computers to nurture in students the skill sets necessary to play an active role in society. The robot in Figure 1 focuses on the design of scaffolds and physical assembly methods, coupled with a computer logic program to make that makes it move or behave in a very precise (remote controlled or autonomous) manner. This enables students to investigate, explore and refine the program to affect the robots. The Robotics approach takes into account the increasing popularity of Computer Science and the learning by doing (Schank, Berman, & Macpherson, 1999) approach to solve complex problems and use computers meaningfully in learning (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Jonassen, Howland, Marra, & Crismond, 2008). In Singapore, teachers and students in Woodlands Ring Secondary and Rulang Primary have incorporated robotics to varying extents into formal and informal curricula. In addition, other less expensive ...

  4. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  5. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

  6. Learning planar ising models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jason K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netrapalli, Praneeth [STUDENT UT AUSTIN

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

  7. Extragalactic database. VII Reduction of astrophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Paturel; H. Andernach; L. Bottinelli; H. Di Nella; N. Durand; R. Garnier; L. Gouguenheim; P. Lanoix; M. C. Marthinet; C. Petit; J. Rousseau; G. Theureau; I. Vauglin

    1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic database (LEDA) gives a free access to the main astrophysical parameters for more than 100,000 galaxies. The most common names are compiled allowing users to recover quickly any galaxy. All these measured astrophysical parameters are first reduced to a common system according to well defined reduction formulae leading to mean homogeneized parameters. Further, these parameters are also transformed into corrected parameters from widely accepted models. For instance, raw 21-cm line widths are transformed into mean standard widths after correction for instrumental effect and then into maximum velocity rotation properly corrected for inclination and non-circular velocity. This paper presents the reduction formulae for each parameter: coordinates, morphological type and luminosity class, diameter and axis ratio, apparent magnitude (UBV, IR, HI) and colors, maximum velocity rotation and central velocity dispersion, radial velocity, mean surface brightness, distance modulus and absolute magnitude, and group membership. For each of these parameters intermediate quantities are given: galactic extinction, inclination, K-correction etc.. All these parameters are available from direct connexion to LEDA (telnet lmc.univ-lyon1.fr, login: leda, no passwd OR http://www-obs.univ-lyon1.fr/leda ) and distributed on a standard CD-ROM (PGC-ROM 1996) by the Observatoire de Lyon via the CNRS (mail to petit@obs.univ-lyon1.fr).

  8. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  9. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  10. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  11. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

  13. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

  14. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

  15. Preference Learning Johannes Furnkranz, Eyke Hullermeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    types of prediction problems, the learning from/of preferences has recently received a lot of attention in the machine learning literature. Like other types of complex learning tasks, preference learning deviates provide a systematic exposition of different types of preference learning problems nor a comprehensive

  16. Benefits of multisensory learning Ladan Shams1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shams, Ladan B.

    of learning? Acquiring this skill can involve many types of learning and here we focus on aspectsBenefits of multisensory learning Ladan Shams1 and Aaron R. Seitz2 1 Department of Psychology, Riverside, CA 92521, USA Studies of learning, and in particular perceptual learning, have focused

  17. Organizational scenarios for the use of learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects Henry Hermans and Fred de Vries October 2006 Learning objects in practice 2 #12;Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects page 2 of 22 Colophon Organizational scenario's for the use of learning objects Learning objects in practice 2

  18. SW-ELM: a summation wavelet extreme learning machine algorithm with a priori parameter initialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the hidden layer, which can also be called as wavenet [4]. Ac- cording to literature, different models. Pourtaghi et al. [7] performed a thorough assessment on wavenet ability in comparison to Corresponding

  19. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  20. Dynamic Structure Learning of Factor Graphs and Parameter Estimation of a Constrained Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    optimization is that the underlying reservoir structure is unknown and changes continuously over time. One of the popular oil recovery techniques is waterflooding, which injects water into injectors with the optimization is that the underlying structure of oil reservoirs is unknown and it continuously changes over

  1. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  2. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

  3. (Carbon isotope fractionation in plants): Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants fractionate carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in ways which reflect photosynthetic pathway and environment. The fractionation is product of contributions from diffusion, carboxylation and other factors which can be understood using models which have been developed in our work. The object of our work is to use this fractionation to learn about the factors which control the efficiency of photosynthesis. Unlike previous studies, we do not rely principally on combustion methods, but instead develop more specific methods with substantially higher resolving power. We have recently developed a new short-term method for studying carbon isotope fractionation which promises to provide a level of detail about temperature, species, and light intensity effects on photosynthesis which has not been available until now. We are studying the isotopic compositions of metabolites (particularly aspartic acid) in C/sub 3/ plants in order to determine the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C/sub 3/ photosynthesis. We are studying the relative roles of diffusion and carboxylation in nocturnal CO/sub 2/ fixation in CAM plants. We are studying the use of isotopic content as an index of water-use efficiency in C/sub 3/ plants. We are developing new methods for studying carbon metabolism in plants. 3 refs

  4. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  5. NEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    their learning, both in and out of class. Simulations, learning games, threaded discussions, and videoNEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT Mona Laroussi 1'Ascq cedex - France KEYWORDS: Mobile learning, Ubiquitous learning, Wireless technology Abstract Ubiquitous

  6. Metafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    via discovery, educational simulations, social learning techniques, collaborative learning toolsMetafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics Toby as an emerging pedagogy for supporting Learning to Learn Together in science and mathematics education. Our goal

  7. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Labs., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters, graphic recorders, digital displays and counters, light indicators, visual and audio alarms, and cathode-ray tubes.

  8. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  9. Learning Tiny Theories Tim Menzies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    Learning Tiny Theories Tim Menzies , Rajesh Gunnalan , Kalaivani Appukutty , Amarnath Srinivasan Engineering, University of British Columbia, Canada {gunnalan|avani|amarnath}@csee

  10. Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schoen,,,

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

  11. Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, R.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes.

  12. The Parameter Space of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, R G; Goldstein, M; Benson, A J; Lacey, C G; Baugh, C M; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; .,

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-analytic models are a powerful tool for studying the formation of galaxies. However, these models inevitably involve a significant number of poorly constrained parameters that must be adjusted to provide an acceptable match to the observed universe. In this paper, we set out to quantify the degree to which observational data-sets can constrain the model parameters. By revealing degeneracies in the parameter space we can hope to better understand the key physical processes probed by the data. We use novel mathematical techniques to explore the parameter space of the GALFORM semi-analytic model. We base our investigation on the Bower et al. 2006 version of GALFORM, adopting the same methodology of selecting model parameters based on an acceptable match to the local bJ and K luminosity functions. The model contains 16 parameters that are poorly constrained, and we investigate this parameter space using the Model Emulator technique, constructing a Bayesian approximation to the GALFORM model that can be rapid...

  13. Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu; Peters, Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems ...

  14. Feedback controller parameterizations for reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, John William

    Reinforcement Learning offers a very general framework for learning controllers, but its effectiveness is closely tied to the controller parameterization used. Especially when learning feedback controllers for weakly stable ...

  15. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

  16. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjing Lu; Randall R. Rojas; Tom Beckers; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

  17. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 38th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

  18. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 39th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

  19. How to fool CMB parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Kinney

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With the release of the data from the Boomerang and MAXIMA-1 balloon flights, estimates of cosmological parameters based on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) have reached unprecedented precision. In this paper I show that it is possible for these estimates to be substantially biased by features in the primordial density power spectrum. I construct primordial power spectra which mimic to within cosmic variance errors the effect of changing parameters such as the baryon density and neutrino mass, meaning that even an ideal measurement would be unable to resolve the degeneracy. Complementary measurements are necessary to resolve this ambiguity in parameter estimation efforts based on CMB temperature fluctuations alone.

  20. Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008 Call for Nominations: Provost's Prize for Teaching with Technology Eligibility: Candidates must be a tenure-track or non's Prize for Teaching with Technology will be awarded to up to two recipients. Each recipient will receive

  1. Team Leader, Learning for Livelihoods Commonwealth of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Country Collaborators; Ajaga Nji; Collins Osei; Reuben Aggor; Edward Badu; Geoffrey Kironchi; Adewale Adekunle; Adeolu Ayanwale; Morolake Adekunle; Moses Ubaru; Aliyageen Alghali; Bob Conteh; Edwin Momoh; Camilius Sanga; Ayubu Jacob Churi; Siza Tumbo; Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Anthony Youdeowei; Savithri Swaminathan

    Moses Tenywa, Bernard Fungo, Mungule Chikoye and Martin KaongaThe Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government to encourage the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies.

  2. APRIL: Active Preference-learning based Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    behaviors (section 2). Resuming the preference-based policy learning (Ppl) approach [2], the con- tribution of the present paper is to extend Ppl along the lines of active learning, in order to minimize the number Bayesian approaches hardly scale up to large-dimensional continuous spaces. Secondly, the Ppl setting

  3. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  4. NEPA Lessons Learned Questionnaire

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of theTechno-economicOctober 2013 -DepartmentLessons Learned

  5. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  6. Thermophysical parameters of the LBO crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechin, Sergei G [Scientific-Research Institute of Radioelectronics and Laser Technology at the N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zuev, A V; Fokin, A S [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokh, Aleksandr E [V.S.Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moiseev, N V; Popov, Petr A; Sidorov, Aleksei A [Acad. I. G. Petrovskii Bryansk State University, Bryansk (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophysical parameters (linear thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and heat capacity) of the lithium triborate (LBO) crystal are measured and compared with previously published data. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  7. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  8. Language model parameter estimation using user transcriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Bo-June

    In limited data domains, many effective language modeling techniques construct models with parameters to be estimated on an in-domain development set. However, in some domains, no such data exist beyond the unlabeled test ...

  9. Compressing measurements in quantum dynamic parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magesan, Easwar

    We present methods that can provide an exponential savings in the resources required to perform dynamic parameter estimation using quantum systems. The key idea is to merge classical compressive sensing techniques with ...

  10. Homeokinesis A new principle to back up evolution with learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learning #12 space required Homeokinesis 8 September 2008 Different types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learning #12;· So far, only fairly simple successful examples, e

  11. Category and Perceptual Learning in Subjects with Treated Wilson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    many similarities. In both types of learning, observers arebetween different types of category and perceptual learning.

  12. Parameters and error of a theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the error of a theoretical model of the type whose parameters are determined from adjustment to experimental data. By applying a standard statistical method, the maximum-likelihoodlmethod, we derive expressions for both the parameters of the theoretical model and its error. We investigate the derived equations by solving them for simulated experimental and theoretical quantities generated by use of random number generators. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

  14. CHR(PRISM)-based Probabilistic Logic Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneyers, Jon; Vennekens, Joost; Kameya, Yoshitaka; Sato, Taisuke; 10.1017/S1471068410000207

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRISM is an extension of Prolog with probabilistic predicates and built-in support for expectation-maximization learning. Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) is a high-level programming language based on multi-headed multiset rewrite rules. In this paper, we introduce a new probabilistic logic formalism, called CHRiSM, based on a combination of CHR and PRISM. It can be used for high-level rapid prototyping of complex statistical models by means of "chance rules". The underlying PRISM system can then be used for several probabilistic inference tasks, including probability computation and parameter learning. We define the CHRiSM language in terms of syntax and operational semantics, and illustrate it with examples. We define the notion of ambiguous programs and define a distribution semantics for unambiguous programs. Next, we describe an implementation of CHRiSM, based on CHR(PRISM). We discuss the relation between CHRiSM and other probabilistic logic programming languages, in particular PCHR. Finally we identify ...

  15. E-learning? Technology enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loch, Birgit

    9/15/2010 1 E-learning? Technology enhanced teaching and learning in symbol-based disciplines? Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 2 #12;9/15/2010 2 An Example: Make t the subject 2 3 Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 3 HMS111 An Example: Make t the subject 2

  16. Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck Computer Engineering Group Faculty of Technology Bielefeld-521-106-6440 mail: wschenck@ti.uni-bielefeld.de Abstract This paper focuses on adaptive motor control in the kinematic domain. Several motor learning strategies from the literature are adopted to kinematic problems

  17. Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

  18. Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  19. Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering the coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of carbonaceous material from the effluent streams will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process in conjunction with pyrite depressants. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the Btu value. The process parameters will be modified to accept preparation plant effluents in order to produce a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal product that at a minimum is compatible with the quality requirements of the plant clean coal. This report covers the first quarter of the project. The main activities during this period were the drafting of a project work plan and the collection of four coal preparation plant effluent samples for testing. Effluent slurry samples were collected from four operating preparation plants in Illinois and shipped to Michigan Technological University for experimental work.

  20. Texas Plant Diseases Handbook.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, C. Wendell; Amador, Jose M.; Johnson, Jerral D.; McCoy, Norman L.; Philley, George L.; Lee, Thomas A. Jr.; Kaufman, Harold W.; Jones, Roger K.; Barnes, Larry W.; Black, Mark C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the lesion turns brown. With age, 1 es ions en 1 arge and coa 1 esce. The ent i re 1 eaf fi na 11 y drops. Stem lesions appear as long, reddish colored spots. When the plant begins to set fruit, lesions are formed at the nodes \\'Jhich girdle the stem... gi v i ng the 1 eaf a "shot-ho 1 e" appearance, simi 1 ar to those caused by anthracnose. Spots on fruit are usua lly sma 11 er and circul ar in shape. Bacteria overwinter in crop residue and on seed. Hard rains splash the bacteria to stems...

  1. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrustBonnevillePlans arePlants &

  2. B Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshleymonthlyAwards SmallStatutesPacificPlant

  3. Gasification Plant Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF GGaryPortalPlant

  4. adaptive parameter estimation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tokamak Heat Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: . Keywords: Thermonuclear fusion, distributed parameter systems, input state and parameter estimation,...

  5. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  6. Improving filtering and prediction of spatially extended turbulent systems with model errors through stochastic parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gershgorin, B. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States); Harlim, J. [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States)], E-mail: jharlim@ncsu.edu; Majda, A.J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The filtering and predictive skill for turbulent signals is often limited by the lack of information about the true dynamics of the system and by our inability to resolve the assumed dynamics with sufficiently high resolution using the current computing power. The standard approach is to use a simple yet rich family of constant parameters to account for model errors through parameterization. This approach can have significant skill by fitting the parameters to some statistical feature of the true signal; however in the context of real-time prediction, such a strategy performs poorly when intermittent transitions to instability occur. Alternatively, we need a set of dynamic parameters. One strategy for estimating parameters on the fly is a stochastic parameter estimation through partial observations of the true signal. In this paper, we extend our newly developed stochastic parameter estimation strategy, the Stochastic Parameterization Extended Kalman Filter (SPEKF), to filtering sparsely observed spatially extended turbulent systems which exhibit abrupt stability transition from time to time despite a stable average behavior. For our primary numerical example, we consider a turbulent system of externally forced barotropic Rossby waves with instability introduced through intermittent negative damping. We find high filtering skill of SPEKF applied to this toy model even in the case of very sparse observations (with only 15 out of the 105 grid points observed) and with unspecified external forcing and damping. Additive and multiplicative bias corrections are used to learn the unknown features of the true dynamics from observations. We also present a comprehensive study of predictive skill in the one-mode context including the robustness toward variation of stochastic parameters, imperfect initial conditions and finite ensemble effect. Furthermore, the proposed stochastic parameter estimation scheme applied to the same spatially extended Rossby wave system demonstrates high predictive skill, comparable with the skill of the perfect model for a duration of many eddy turnover times especially in the unstable regime.

  7. Pico: Parameters for the Impatient Cosmologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William A. Fendt; Benjamin D. Wandelt

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fast, accurate, robust and flexible method of accelerating parameter estimation. This algorithm, called Pico, can compute the CMB power spectrum and matter transfer function as well as any computationally expensive likelihoods in a few milliseconds. By removing these bottlenecks from parameter estimation codes, Pico decreases their computational time by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. Pico has several important properties. First, it is extremely fast and accurate over a large volume of parameter space. Furthermore, its accuracy can continue to be improved by using a larger training set. This method is generalizable to an arbitrary number of cosmological parameters and to any range of l-values in multipole space. Pico is approximately 3000 times faster than CAMB for flat models, and approximately 2000 times faster then the WMAP 3 year likelihood code. In this paper, we demonstrate that using Pico to compute power spectra and likelihoods produces parameter posteriors that are very similar to those using CAMB and the official WMAP3 code, but in only a fraction of the time. Pico and an interface to CosmoMC are made publicly available at http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~bwandelt/pico/.

  8. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  9. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  10. Investigations of biological processes in Austrian MBT plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tintner, J. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Smidt, E., E-mail: ena.smidt@boku.ac.a [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Boehm, K.; Binner, E. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become an important technology in waste management during the last decade. The paper compiles investigations of mechanical biological processes in Austrian MBT plants. Samples from all plants representing different stages of degradation were included in this study. The range of the relevant parameters characterizing the materials and their behavior, e.g. total organic carbon, total nitrogen, respiration activity and gas generation sum, was determined. The evolution of total carbon and nitrogen containing compounds was compared and related to process operation. The respiration activity decreases in most of the plants by about 90% of the initial values whereas the ammonium release is still ongoing at the end of the biological treatment. If the biogenic waste fraction is not separated, it favors humification in MBT materials that is not observed to such extent in MSW. The amount of organic carbon is about 15% dry matter at the end of the biological treatment.

  11. How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at some of these ways you can grow plants. CUTTINGS Many plants can be started from cuttings (pieces of a bigger plant). A good place to make a cutting is fromone of the growing points of the plant (stem-tip). Some plants like

  12. Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betczynski, M. T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    installed on several olefins cracking furnaces in order to improve heat recovery from the cracked process gas. As a result of the additional heat recovery, steam imported from the cogeneration facility was reduced by 45,000 lbs/hr. The large turbines... integrated an Aspen-based plant-wide data historian, which is utilized to compile process data from control and measurement points throughout the Morris plant. On-line optimization using this extensive data repository has helped the plant better...

  13. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  14. Overview BETTER BUILDINGS, BETTER PLANTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    are available to Better Plants Partners on a facilitated basis. These resources include free energy audits for qualifying facilities, energy analysis software tools, and...

  15. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  16. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  17. Constraining Orbital Parameters Through Planetary Transit Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Kane; Kaspar von Braun

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital parameters of extra-solar planets have a significant impact on the probability that the planet will transit the host star. This was recently demonstrated by the transit detection of HD 17156b whose favourable eccentricity and argument of periastron dramatically increased its transit likelihood. We present a study which provides a quantitative analysis of how these two orbital parameters affect the geometric transit probability as a function of period. Further, we apply these results to known radial velocity planets and show that there are unexpectedly high transit probabilities for planets at relatively long periods. For a photometric monitoring campaign which aims to determine if the planet indeed transits, we calculate the expected transiting planet yield and the significance of a potential null result, as well as the subsequent constraints that may be applied to orbital parameters.

  18. Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Bentley

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

  19. Indicator system for a process plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  20. Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

  2. The Importance of Modeling for the Future of Molecular Studies of Learning and Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Randall C.

    The Importance of Modeling for the Future of Molecular Studies of Learning and Memory Randall C. O'Reilly James L. McClelland Department of Psychology Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition University pathways within the hippocampal system; (d) effects of manipulations of hippocampal activation parameters

  3. Iteratively extending time horizon reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    - Belgium y Research Fellow FNRS, #3; Postdoctoral Researcher FNRS Abstract. Reinforcement learning aims

  4. Team Based Learning (TBL) Scott Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Team Based Learning (TBL) Bill Brown Scott Bryant Susan Dana MSU College of Business #12;Agenda · Overview of Team Based Learning (TBL) · RATs! · Team Learning Exercises · Graded Work Product · Challenges with TBL · Q & A #12;Overview of Team Based Learning · Comprehensive teaching strategy to enable active

  5. Nonparametric Bayesian Policy Priors for Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi-Velez, Finale P.

    We consider reinforcement learning in partially observable domains where the agent can query an expert for

  6. Session 3280 Why Bother Learning about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 3280 Why Bother Learning about Learning Styles and Psychological Types? Teresa Larkin instruction is designed with learning styles in mind 1 - 3 . The adoption of any type of new teaching and and psychological types will be addressed. A brief overview of two learning style models and assessment instruments

  7. Preference Learning Johannes Furnkranz, Eyke Hullermeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hüllermeier, Eyke

    with novel types of prediction problems, the learning from/of preferences has recently received a lot of attention in the machine learning literature. Just as other types of complex learning tasks, preference or the type of information provided as an input to the learning system. Needless to say, this short article

  8. Learning and Memory Eric R. Kandel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Nachum

    and memory we are interested in several questions. What are the major forms of P.1228 learning? What types of information about the environment are learned most easily? Do different types of learning give riseBack 62 Learning and Memory Eric R. Kandel Irving Kupfermann Susan Iversen BEHAVIOR IS THE RESULT

  9. Foundations for a New Science of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complex learning. In computer simulations, starting the learn- ing process with a low-resolution sensoryFoundations for a New Science of Learning Andrew N. Meltzoff,1,2,3 * Patricia K. Kuhl,1,3,4 Javier Movellan,5,6 Terrence J. Sejnowski5,6,7,8 Human learning is distinguished by the range and complexity

  10. E ective Neuronal Learning with Ine ective Hebbian Learning Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    ; Palm & Sommer, 1996) derived the learn- ing rule that maximizes the network memory capacity, and showed of papers (Palm & Sommer, 1988; Palm, 1992; Palm & Sommer, 1996), Palm and Sommer have further studied

  11. Effective Neuronal Learning with Ineffective Hebbian Learning Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    ; Palm & Sommer, 1996) derived the learn- ing rule that maximizes the network memory capacity, and showed of papers (Palm & Sommer, 1988; Palm, 1992; Palm & Sommer, 1996), Palm and Sommer have further studied

  12. Implementing Learning Design to support web-based learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA. UK. ** Educational Technology Expertise Centre (OTEC), Open Expertise Centre (OTEC) at the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL), who produced a Learning Design

  13. Learning with Online Constraints: Shifting Concepts and Active Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteleoni, Claire E.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many practical problems such as forecasting, real-time decisionmaking, streaming data applications, and resource-constrainedlearning, can be modeled as learning with online constraints. Thisthesis is concerned with analyzing ...

  14. Dual order parameters and the deconfinement transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian S. Fischer; Jens A. Mueller

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the chiral and the deconfinement transition within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger equations using quenched lattice data for the temperature dependent gluon propagator as input. We extract corresponding order parameters from the Landau gauge quark propagator with U(1)-valued boundary conditions. We study the chiral transition using the conventional quark condensate, whereas for the deconfinement transition we determine the dual condensate ('dressed Polyakov loop'). In addition we consider an alternative order parameter for deconfinement, the dual scalar quark dressing function. As a result we find almost the same transition temperatures for the chiral and deconfinement transitions.

  15. Black nickel selective absorber, optimization of parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinoglu, B.; Cercioglu, V.; Ecevit, A.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroplated black nickel selective absorber is one of the most commercially used element of solar energy systems. Electrodeposition parameters such as time of deposition, pH, current density, electrolyte temperature should be optimized to produce the most efficient selective absorber. The topology of the substrate material is very effective on selectivity and it should also be optimized. In this study, by controlling the conditions of electrodeposition black nickel selective absorbers are produced and their reflectivities are measured. The effects of the electrodeposition parameters together with the topology of the substrate, on the selective properties are investigated.

  16. Assessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    need to be student-focused rather than instructor-focused. Focus on the learning resulting fromAssessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on quizzes should be linked to our learning objectives. To properly assess student learning, you need to know what

  17. 1Building virtual learning communities and the learning of mathematics teacher student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    1 1Building virtual learning communities and the learning of mathematics teacher student Salvador of learning for student teachers. Firstly, I shall describe the characteristics of the design of learning trajectories in a video-based learning environment focusing on the exploration of mathematics teaching to help

  18. Promoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as incompatible. This is due to the origins of both types of learning environments which, when consideredPromoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Promoting Self Directed Learning in Simulation Based Discovery Learning Environments through Intelligent Support Koen

  19. Learning to be different: acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc

    skills for multiple prey types. (3) The learning curve for acquiring new foraging skills is acceleratingLearning to be different: acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental Question: How does the ability to improve foraging skills by learning, and to transfer that learned

  20. Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental March 2011 with renewable energy by 2020. Largescale solar developments are needed to achieve this goal

  1. Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada 1) Determine whether) If a permit is required from the CFIA* (a division of Agriculture Canada), please go to the CFIA website Agency Canada (PHAC) or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). #12;

  2. Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudgers, Jennifer

    Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition Jennifer A hosts the foliar endophytic fungus, Neotypho- dium coenophialum. We quantified vegetation development of the endophyte (KY-31, AR-542) in two tall fescue cultivars (Georgia-5, Jesup). The KY-31 endophyte produces

  3. Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants Take a step back to examine swollen nodules at the container edge, rather than circling like in a plastic container. The nodules store with soil or mulch ­ ignore these and find the first permanent woody root growing radially out from

  4. Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ciency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochastic Frontierthe existing stock of electricity generating plants. Betweenover 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting

  5. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  6. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  7. Parameters of charmonium states from KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aulchenko, V M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Batrakov, A M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Groshev, V R; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Kuyanov, I A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Ovtin, I V; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of experiments performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider. They include final results for the mass and other parameters of the $J/\\psi$, $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\psi(3770)$ and $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ branching fraction determination.

  8. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C W [ed.] [ed.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  9. PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade the location and subsequent remediation of contaminants in groundwater to the optimization of production on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely used

  10. Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating Polymer Network ProcessPolymer Network, PA 15213 #12;Interpenetrating Polymer Network Processp g y Monomer Initiator P l i ti tPolymerization reactor Seed particle Monomer droplet Aqueous mediaq Seed Polymer A Monomer B Seed Polymer A 2Fig 1. Seed

  11. SWOT Satellite Mission: Combined State Parameter Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    -parameter estimation problem Data assimilation experiments ­ Water depth ­ Discharge ­ Channel width ­ Roughness coefficient #12;3 Need for a surface water mission Importance to hydrology ­ gauge measurements insufficient hydraulics Amazon Siberia Ohio #12;4 Global gauge measurements #12;5 SWOT Technology These surface water

  12. Multiclass learning with simplex coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroueh, Youssef

    In this paper we discuss a novel framework for multiclass learning, defined by a suitable coding/decoding strategy, namely the simplex coding, that allows us to generalize to multiple classes a relaxation approach commonly ...

  13. Learning in the labor market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a collection of three independent essays that study the implication of learning on labor mobility, labor supply, wage distribution, wage dynamics, and allocations of workers under different assumptions about ...

  14. SPANISH STUDIES Program Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SPANISH STUDIES Program Learning Outcomes 1. Students will achieve advanced language proficiency in Spanish: they will have the ability to narrate language and literacy skills in Spanish: Students will acquire a foundation

  15. Learning task-specific similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakhnarovich, Gregory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The right measure of similarity between examples is important in many areas of computer science. In particular it is a critical component in example-based learning methods. Similarity is commonly defined in terms of a ...

  16. Social Learning in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberson, PJ

    This paper analyzes a model of social learning in a social network. Agents decide whether or not to adopt a new technology with unknown payoffs based on their prior beliefs and the experiences of their neighbors in the ...

  17. RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING Live on-campus in 2014-15 and participate in a unique as part of a residential community in Arroyo Vista! Open to all undergraduate students with 2-3 years

  18. Learning Outcomes Author: Paul Surgenor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 #12;Learning Outcomes "On completion of this [module/programme] students will be able to..." Biggs alignment (Biggs, 2002). Outcomes should also address a variety of cognitive levels, ensuring that students

  19. Enhancing the Engineering Curriculum: Defining Discovery Learning at Marquette University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurka, Mark L.

    learning is a form of student-centered learning in which the focus shifts from the teacher to the learn, student-centered learning, active learning. I. INTRODUCTION The College of Engineering at Marquette forms of experiential learning. Other schools include student-centered learning methods, such as active

  20. Exploring NK Fitness Landscapes Using an Imitative Learning Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontanari, José F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that a group of cooperating agents can solve problems more efficiently than when those agents work independently is hardly controversial, despite the little quantitative groundwork to support it. Here we investigate the performance of a group of agents in locating the global maxima of NK fitness landscapes with varying degrees of ruggedness. Cooperation is taken into account through imitative learning and the broadcasting of messages informing on the fitness of each agent. We find a trade-off between the group size and the frequency of imitation: for rugged landscapes, too much imitation or too large a group yield a performance poorer than that of independent agents. By decreasing the diversity of the group, imitative learning may lead to duplication of work and hence to a decrease of its effective size. However, when the parameters are set to optimal values the cooperative group substantially outperforms the independent agents.

  1. Directional learning and the provisioning of public goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nax, Heinrich H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an environment where players are involved in a public goods game and must decide repeatedly whether to make an individual contribution or not. However, players lack strategically relevant information about the game and about the other players in the population. The resulting behavior of players is completely uncoupled from such information, and the individual strategy adjustment dynamics are driven only by reinforcement feedbacks from each player's own past. We show that the resulting "directional learning" is sufficient to explain cooperative deviations away from the Nash equilibrium. We introduce the concept of k-strong equilibria, which nest both the Nash equilibrium and the Aumann-strong equilibrium as two special cases, and we show that, together with the parameters of the learning model, the maximal k-strength of equilibrium determines the stationary distribution. The provisioning of public goods can be secured even under adverse conditions, as long as players are sufficiently responsive to ...

  2. Do Plants Sweat? Core Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Bruce

    in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

  3. The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

  4. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  5. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Rule-Based Learning Explains Visual Perceptual Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stanley

    ). Alternatively, Mollon and Danilova (1996) hypothesized that learning occurs at a central site, but what learning hypoth- esis (Mollon and Danilova, 1996), the complete location transfer of learning indicates

  6. LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) The Learning and Organizational Change concentration helps you explore how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) CURRICULUM The Learning and Organizational Change change through learning and organizational design. The assessment, design and implementation of knowledge-based systems, involving people, technology and organizational structures and culture are a particular strength

  7. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here. Parameters necessary for estimating surface contaminant flux due to native plants expected to inhabit the NTS RWMSS are developed in this report. The model is specific to the plant communities found at the NTS and is designed for both short-term (<1,000 years) and long-term (>1,000 years) modeling efforts. While the model has been crafted for general applicability to any NTS PA, the key radionuclides considered are limited to the transuranic (TRU) wastes disposed of at the NTS.

  8. The fuels program for the Nucla AFBC plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellin, M.A. [Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc., Montrose, CO (United States); Mahr, D. [Energy Associates, Towaco, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nucla Station originally consisted of three 1959 vintage, 36 (3 x 12) MWe, stoker-fired boilers. The plant was built under the Rural Electrification Administration program to service the scenic, western slope of Colorado. In 1988, the stokers were replaced by a new, dual combustor, 110 MWe AFBC boiler in EPRI`s fluidized bed demonstration program. A new 74 MWe topping steam turbine/generator, with extraction to the existing turbines, was installed at that time. The Nucla Plant was a key project in EPRI`s program to demonstrate the commercialization of AFBC technology. This program has been the subject of numerous reports and papers on fluidized bed combustion. The fuel used by the Nucla Station was a relatively good quality, bituminous coal. Nucla`s coal was trucked more than 100 miles to the plant from a mine in Colorado. In addition, some high sulfur coal was test burned in the plant. This coal was trucked to the plant from a mine located near Kayenta, Arizona. The primary purpose of the demonstration program was to scale-up the size of the combustor and examine parameters that affect fluidization, heat transfer, erosion, and other boiler related issues. Sulfur capture and the ability to utilize lower grade fuels was previously demonstrated in other, smaller scale programs. To utilize project funds efficiently, the 1988 AFBC retrofit was dedicated to adding the 110 MWe combustor and related equipment. The plant was revamped specifically for test purposes. To conserve funds, silo storage of coal for the AFBC unit was limited to an 8-hour supply. Existing plant auxiliaries, that could adequately perform during the demonstration, were not upgraded. These included the coal handling system.

  9. Age Related Changes in Motion Perception and Perceptual Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Jeffrey Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple stimuli after training. This type of learning differsfrom other types of learning in that it is hypothesized toin the other type of stimuli, transfer of learning between

  10. Learning in human-dolphin interactions at zoological facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeney, Diane L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expectations and the types of learning. Potential physicalevidence of multiple types of learning. In the spate ofis taken, multiple types of learning, beyond knowledge gain

  11. Psychology and Aging Normal Aging and the Dissociable Prototype Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    -based and information-integration classification learning (Ashby & Mad- dox, 2005). Recent research suggests & Mad- dox, 2004). Another important type of classification learning is prototype learning (Homa

  12. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

  13. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

  14. associative learning performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance Tsodyks, Misha 7 & Investigating Learning Deficits Associated with Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: An artificial grammar learning task was used to define two learning...

  15. avoidance learning paradigm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    across learning trials corresponded to sigmoid curves that could 33 Developmental dyslexia and implicit learning in childhood: evidence using the artificial grammar learning...

  16. association learning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 4 & Investigating Learning Deficits Associated with Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: An artificial grammar learning task was used to define two learning...

  17. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Calls Fall 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer...

  18. Learning how to play Nash, potential games and alternating ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... of the most important topic is how do players learn to play Nash equilibria (Chen and Gazzale [17]). Learning dynamics include Bayesian learning, ...

  19. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

  20. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  1. A procedure for oscillatory parameter identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is proposed where a power system is excited with a low-level pseduo-random probing signal and the frequency, damping, magnitude, and shape of oscillatory modes are identified using spectral density estimation and frequency-domain transfer-function identification. Attention is focussed on identifying system modes in the presence of noise. Two examples cases are studied: identification of electromechanical oscillation modes in a 16-machine power system; and turbine-generator shaft modes of a 3-machine power plant feeding a series-compensated 500-kV network.

  2. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  5. Early Entrance Coproduction Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  7. Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

  8. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  9. UPRE method for total variation parameter selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Variation (TV) Regularization is an important method for solving a wide variety of inverse problems in image processing. In order to optimize the reconstructed image, it is important to choose the optimal regularization parameter. The Unbiased Predictive Risk Estimator (UPRE) has been shown to give a very good estimate of this parameter for Tikhonov Regularization. In this paper we propose an approach to extend UPRE method to the TV problem. However, applying the extended UPRE is impractical in the case of inverse problems such as de blurring, due to the large scale of the associated linear problem. We also propose an approach to reducing the large scale problem to a small problem, significantly reducing computational requirements while providing a good approximation to the original problem.

  10. Kaon [ital B] parameter with Wilson fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.; Daniel, D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-8, MS-B285, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Kilcup, G.W. (Physics Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)); Patel, A. (Supercomputer Education and Research Centre and Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)); Sharpe, S.R. (Physics Department FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the kaon [ital B] parameter in quenched lattice QCD at [beta]=6.0 using Wilson fermions at [kappa]=0.154 and 0.155. We use two kinds of nonlocal ( smeared'') sources for quark propagators to calculate the matrix elements between states of definite momentum. The use of smeared sources yields results with much smaller errors than obtained in previous calculations with Wilson fermions. By combining results for [bold p]=(0,0,0) and [bold p]=(0,0,1), we show that one can carry out the noperturbative subtraction necessary to remove the dominant lattice artifacts induced by the chiral-symmetry-breaking term in the Wilson action. Our final results are in good agreement with those obtained using staggered fermions. We also present results for [ital B] parameters of the [Delta][ital I]=3/2 part of the electromagnetic penguin operators, and preliminary results for [ital B][sub [ital K

  11. Atmospheric dispersion and the radiological consequences of normal airborne effluents from a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, D.; Yang, L. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Sun, C.Z. [Suhou Nuclear Research Inst., Suzhou (China)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the consequences of the normal exhaust of radioactive materials in air from nuclear power plants and atmospheric dispersion is studied. Because the source terms of the exhaust from a nuclear power plant are relatively low and their radiological consequences are far less than the corresponding authoritative limits, the atmospheric dispersion models, their various modifications, and selections of relevant parameters have few effects on those consequences. In the environmental assessment and siting, the emphasis should not be placed on the consequence evaluation of routine exhaust of nuclear power plants, and the calculation of consequences of the exhaust and atmospheric field measurements should be appropriately, simplified. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, A. M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

  13. Regulatory status of transgrafted plants is unclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    publicatie/new-techniques-in- plant-biotechnology (accessedJuglans regia L. ). ).Plant Sci 163(3):591–7. Gonsalves D.improvement. Frontiers Plant Sci 3:39. Heselmans M. 2011.

  14. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp andField Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington. Seattle, WA:State’s 3600 vascular plants, 600 mosses, and 1000-1500

  15. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to the Fukushima nuclear plant accident. Journal of21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.

  16. Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................... 35 03 Rebuilding Coal Power Plants to Biomass.......................................................................................................................... 27 01 Advanced Pulverized Fuel Power PlantTechnology Data for Energy Plants June 2010 #12;ISBNwww: 978-87-7844-857-6 #12;2 Table of contents

  17. National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James B. Beddow

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary The energy development assumptions identified in the Department of Energy's position paper, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, projected an exploding demand for wind energy-related workforce development. These primary assumptions drove a secondary set of assumptions that early stage wind industry workforce development and training paradigms would need to undergo significant change if the workforce needs were to be met. The current training practice and culture within the wind industry is driven by a relatively small number of experts with deep field experience and knowledge. The current training methodology is dominated by face-to-face, classroom based, instructor present training. Given these assumptions and learning paradigms, the purpose of the National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative was to determine the feasibility of developing online learning strategies and products focused on training wind technicians. The initial project scope centered on (1) identifying resources that would be needed for development of subject matter and course design/delivery strategies for industry-based (non-academic) training, and (2) development of an appropriate Learning Management System (LMS). As the project unfolded, the initial scope was expanded to include development of learning products and the addition of an academic-based training partner. The core partners included two training entities, industry-based Airstreams Renewables and academic-based Lake Area Technical Institute. A third partner, Vision Video Interactive, Inc. provided technology-based learning platforms (hardware and software). The revised scope yielded an expanded set of results beyond the initial expectation. Eight learning modules were developed for the industry-based Electrical Safety course. These modules were subsequently redesigned and repurposed for test application in an academic setting. Software and hardware developments during the project's timeframe enabled redesign providing for student access through the use of tablet devices such as iPads. Early prototype Learning Management Systems (LMS) featuring more student-centric access and interfaces with emerging social media were developed and utilized during the testing applications. The project also produced soft results involving cross learning between and among the partners regarding subject matter expertise, online learning pedagogy, and eLearning technology-based platforms. The partners believe that the most significant, overarching accomplishment of the project was the development and implementation of goals, activities, and outcomes that significantly exceeded those proposed in the initial grant application submitted in 2009. Key specific accomplishments include: (1) development of a set of 8 online learning modules addressing electrical safety as it relates to the work of wind technicians; (3) development of a flexible, open-ended Learning Management System (LMS): (3) creation of a robust body of learning (knowledge, experience, skills, and relationships). Project leaders have concluded that there is substantial resource equity that could be leverage and recommend that it be carried forward to pursue a Next Stage Opportunity relating to development of an online core curriculum for institute and community college energy workforce development programs.

  18. Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, A.M.; Gross, K.C.; Kubic, W.L.; Wigeland, R.A.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process are disclosed. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions. 10 figs.

  19. PID Parameters Optimization by Using Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzal, Andri; Furukawa, Masashi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time delays are components that make time-lag in systems response. They arise in physical, chemical, biological and economic systems, as well as in the process of measurement and computation. In this work, we implement Genetic Algorithm (GA) in determining PID controller parameters to compensate the delay in First Order Lag plus Time Delay (FOLPD) and compare the results with Iterative Method and Ziegler-Nichols rule results.

  20. Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants With plants in development. Click...

  1. Use of neural networks in the operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (a) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, (b) detection of the change of mode of operation, (c) signal validation, (d) monitoring of check valves, (e) modeling of the plant thermodynamics, (f) emulation of core reload calculations, (g) analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's licensee event report,'' (h) monitoring of plant parameters, and (i) analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. the objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks. 6 refs.

  2. ASSESSING PLANTING STOCK QUALITY Comprehensive assessments of planting stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    for cold storage, and to evaluate effects of traditional and proposed nursery cultural practices on field and Jenkinson 1970, 1971) just after lifting and after cold storage to spring planting time · Field survival

  3. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  4. Automating An Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electricity requirements of the Component Works as well as all of the heat and a portion of the electricity needed by the adjacent John Deere Foundry. This paper describes the automation of an eXisting industrial power plant and tells how the project...AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant...

  5. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Application of modeling and simulation to nuclear power plants, by Berry Gibson, IBM, and Rolf Gibbels, Dassault Systems; Steam generators with tight manufacturing procedures, by Ei Kadokami, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; SG design based on operational experience and R and D, by Jun Tang, Babcock and Wilcox Canada; Confident to deliver reliable performance, by Bruce Bevilacqua, Westinghouse Nuclear; An evolutionary plant design, by Martin Parece, AREVA NP, Inc.; and, Designed for optimum production, by Danny Roderick, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. Industry Innovation articles include: Controlling alloy 600 degradation, by John Wilson, Exelon Nuclear Corporation; Condensate polishing innovation, by Lewis Crone, Dominion Millstone Power Station; Reducing deposits in steam generators, by the Electric Power Research Institute; and, Minimizing Radiological effluent releases, by the Electric Power Research Institute. The plant profile article is titled 2008 - a year of 'firsts' for AmerenUE's Callaway plant, by Rick Eastman, AmerenUE.

  6. Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Durability Parameters of an Integrated Aftertreatment System used to Meet Tier II Emission Standards Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

  7. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  8. affect colonization parameters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and 'Tejada, M., A. 1. Borderfas, and F. Jimenez 3 Parameters Affecting Water Hammer Wave Attenuation, Shape by Anton Bergant1 Engineering Websites Summary: Parameters Affecting...

  9. HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    molecular weights of various hydrocarbon materials for fuelof oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-producing plants. Into Die Naturwissenschaften HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: METHODS

  10. Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

  11. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  14. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Pre-In-Plant Training Webinar (Steam)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This pre-In-Plant training webinar for the Better Plants Program covers how to find energy savings in steam systems.

  16. The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation ? · Fuel Cells ? · Electric Cars ? · Solar Electric Cars · Natural Gas ? · Combo-Cars · Hydrogen Nuclear Plants Operating Very Well · But, Generating Companies not Interested in New Nuclear Plants

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control...

  19. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth...

  20. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

  1. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  2. Fiberglass plastics in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  3. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

  4. A neighborhood alternative energy plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Douglas James

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

  5. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore »and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  6. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  7. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

  8. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  9. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

  10. Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

  11. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan Biosolids Covered Subgrade basins Malfunction in Point Loma South Bay North City Metro Biosolids Center WW Pumping

  12. AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of these organisms to environmental factors (e .g. , temperature and solar radiation). Actual field data have been compared with simulation output with encouraging results. Starting biomass of the plants and numbers

  13. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

  14. Recap Lecture 1 Concepts of Supervised Learning (SL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

    ) Main types of Supervised Learning Classification Novelty detection Regression 3 Classification Learning (SL) Classification algorithms Supervised Learning definition revisit Main types of Supervised Learning Classification Novelty detection Regression Main types of SL We have (input, correct output

  15. Arts-Infused Learning in Middle Level Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorimer, Maureen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rich portrait of the types of learning and learning outcomesuncovered the types of arts-infused learning, along with thetypes of activities) and quality of arts-infused learning (

  16. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS Heteranthera sp. (Mud plantain) Water star grass, a submersed or floating rooted plant, usually is found along muddy shores and in water up to 5 ft. deep. The leaves are approximately 2 inches long and 3/16 inch wide... PONDWEEDS Potamogeton sp. The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds...

  17. Computer Control of Unattended Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPUTER CONTROL OF UNATTENDED PLANTS David R. Vinson, Nirma1 Chatterjee ? Ai r Products and Chemi ca 1s, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitori ng, control, and optimization package is a greater... the last decade, energy costs in some air separation plants are now more than half the total product cost. Starting in 1975, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. began implementing a program to retrofit existing major energy consuming facili ties...

  18. Valuable Plants Native to Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Harris Braley

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and makes a splendid plant for cover along mud flats where the seasona.1 change of water would leave bare places. Commercial. Arundo Donax L. This is the reed grass of southern Texas. It has been used for many years to aid in erosion control...LIBRARY, A b COttECE, CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS -- BULLETIN NO. 551 AUGUST, 1937 -- DIVISION OF APICULTVRE VALUABLE PLANTS NATIVE TO TEXAS i...

  19. COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanning, J.; Reinke, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

  20. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  1. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  2. Relaxed constraints on neutrino oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela P. Kirilova; Mariana P. Panayotova

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the cosmological constraints on active-sterile neutrino oscillations nu_e nu_s for the case when nu_s is partially filled initially, i.e. 0 nu_s oscillations, effective after neutrino decoupling, accounting for all known oscillations effects on cosmological nucleosynthesis. Cosmological constraints on oscillation parameters corresponding to higher than 5% He-4 overproduction and different non-zero initial populations of the sterile state delta N_s 0 are relaxed in comparison with the delta N_s = 0 case and the relaxation is proportional to delta N_s.

  3. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  4. National FCEV Learning Demonstration: All Composite Data Products...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. 54021.pdf More Documents & Publications Controlled Hydrogen Fleet & Infrastructure Analysis National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status...

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

  7. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Charles Schrader

    2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

  8. An introduc+on to Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    , the analysis, and the application of algorithms that allow computers to learn l Learning: l A computer;5 Applica+ons: autonomous driving l DARPA Grand challenge 2005: build a robot capable

  9. Total learning : education beyond the classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Soo O., 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is a quality learning space? This thesis is a study of a prototype for secondary school to provide a stimulating learning environment and a nurturing growing space in an urban site through exploration of different ...

  10. Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center #12;Overview 1. Lessons Learned a. NeuroNEXT Executive Committee b. NINDS clinical trials (NSD-K) study section c. PI

  11. Early word learning through communicative inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael C., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How do children learn their first words? Do they do it by gradually accumulating information about the co-occurrence of words and their referents over time, or are words learned via quick social inferences linking what ...

  12. Learning strategies and performance in organizational teams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bresman, Henrik M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) shows that vicarious learning is positively associated with performance. I argue that vicarious team learning is an under-explored dimension of what makes teams and organizations competitive. The chapter concludes ...

  13. SCIENCE LEARNING+: PLANNING GRANTS APPLICATION GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    + is an international initiative that will explore and understand the power of informal learning experiences inside are part of the Science Learning+ scheme which aims to make a transformational step to improve

  14. 6.867 Machine Learning, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaakkola, Tommi S. (Tommi Sakari)

    Principles, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning from the point of view of statistical inference; representation, generalization, and model selection; and methods such as linear/additive models, active learning, ...

  15. Learning physics in context: a study of student learning about electricity and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    re-centres the discussion of student learning in physics to focus on context. In order to do soLearning physics in context: a study of student learning about electricity and magnetism This paper and inextricable role of context in student learning. This work sits within a broader effort to create and analyze

  16. WRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR AWRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR A COURSECOURSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    for a course, it is a good idea to think broadly. Course-level expected learning outcomes do not need to focus will know). Be sure to include learning outcomes that describe what the student can do and who they are2424 WRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR AWRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR A COURSECOURSE

  17. Developing Program Learning Outcomes Page 1 DevelopingProgramLearningOutcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    ..." you help ensure that the focus is on student learning and abilities. These are not student learning, 2011, R. W. Larsen Student learning outcomes (SLOs) can be written for a course, a program, or an institution. This document focuses specifically on learning outcomes for programs (e.g., degree programs

  18. Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors: Lessons from the Trenches Tim Menzies LCSEE, WVU tim@menzies.us October 28, 2008 1 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons change the rules of the game. 2 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches

  19. Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM Systems: a few lessons learned from CPM language Abstract. Visual instructional design languages currently Botturi ; Todd Stubbs (Ed.) (2007) 254-280" #12;-1- Visual Design of coherent Technology-Enhanced Learning

  20. 09s1: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Machine Learning for Numeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, Mike

    · define the problem of non-linear regression · define neural network learning in terms of non-linear the regression and model tree approaches for non-linear regression COMP9417: April 1, 2009 Machine Learning learning) learning non-linear predictors via hidden nodes between input and output · regression trees

  1. Scaffolding Self-Explanation to Improve Learning in Exploratory Learning Environments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunt, Andrea

    explore the available instructional material [11]. In theory, this type of active learning should enable of open learning environments for different types of learners, we have been working on devising adaptiveScaffolding Self-Explanation to Improve Learning in Exploratory Learning Environments. Andrea Bunt

  2. Using Learning Styles and Preferences to Incorporate Emerging E-learning Tools in Teaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    across all learner types. 1. Introduction The adoption level of emerging e-learning tools is on the riseUsing Learning Styles and Preferences to Incorporate Emerging E-learning Tools in Teaching Nauman@ict.swin.edu.au Abstract Emerging e-learning tools have the potential to enrich academic environments. However

  3. 1654 Learning and memory Perceptual and motor factors of implicit skill learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemeth, Dezso

    , auditory, etc.), and into consciousness types (implicit and explicit) [2]. Implicit motor skill learning1654 Learning and memory Perceptual and motor factors of implicit skill learning Dezso Nemetha,b , Emese Hallgato´a , Karolina Janacseka , Timea Sa´ndora and Zsuzsa Londec Implicit skill learning

  4. Reinforcement Learning in the brain Reading: Y Niv, Reinforcement learning in the brain, 2009.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seriès, Peggy

    basic types of animal conditioning animal learning) ow do these relate to RL? 20 Monday, 8 March 2010Reinforcement Learning in the brain · Reading: Y Niv, Reinforcement learning in the brain, 2009. wo Reinforcement learning and the brain: the problems we face all day · Decision making at all levels

  5. Empirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heskes, Tom

    mul­ titask learning, linking theoretical results to practical simulations. In our model all tasksEmpirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl SNN, University of Nijmegen are combined in a single feedforward neu­ ral network. Learning is implemented in a Bayesian fashion

  6. Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

  7. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -of EnergyLeadershipMn4CaLearningLearning

  8. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

  9. Engaging Faculty With Rethinking Learning and Teaching With Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    for student learning'. (within the lecture as well as out of class ) Shift the focus from `how do I teach this student learning - educational implications ­ `learning time' / `learning space' During this presentation Online or face to face ? #12;"Learning is not a spectator sport. Students do not learn much just

  10. Learning Community Peer Mentor Supervisor's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Learning Community Peer Mentor Supervisor's Manual #12;Table of Contents Introduction.........................................................................................................................................4 Timeline for Hiring Mentors.......................................................................................................7 Supervision of Mentors

  11. Webinar: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar, "National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status," originally presented on February 6, 2012.

  12. Learning inverse kinematics via crosspoint function decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torras, Carme

    industrial robots, that greatly reduces the number of movements needed to learn or relearn the IK to a given

  13. LOWER BOUNDS ON LEARNING RANDOM STRUCTURES WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Lev

    of Learning Parity PAC PAC w/ noise "noisy parity" Statistical Queries Yes [Gauss] O(2n/logn) [BKW] maybe

  14. Parameter exploration of optically trapped liquid aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Burnham; P. J. Reece; D. McGloin

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying the motion of optically trapped particles on the $\\mu s$ time scale, in low viscous media such as air, inertia cannot be neglected. Resolution of unusual and interesting behaviour not seen in colloidal trapping experiments is possible. In attempt to explain the phenomena we use power spectral methods to perform a parameter study of the Brownian motion of optically trapped liquid aerosol droplets concentrated around the critically damped regime. We present evidence that the system is suitably described by a simple harmonic oscillator model which must include a description of Fax\\'{e}n's correction, but not necessarily frequency dependent hydrodynamic corrections to Stokes' law. We also provide results describing how the system behaves under several variables and discuss the difficulty in decoupling the parameters responsible for the observed behaviour. We show that due to the relatively low dynamic viscosity and high trap stiffness it is easy to transfer between over- and under-damped motion by experimentally altering either trap stiffness or damping. Our results suggest stable aerosol trapping may be achieved in under-damped conditions, but the onset of deleterious optical forces at high trapping powers prevents the probing of the upper stability limits due to Brownian motion.

  15. A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: raettig@mpia.de, E-mail: klahr@mpia.de, E-mail: Wladimir.Lyra@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

  16. Criticality parameters for tank waste evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.A.

    1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality parameters were developed as a basis for evaluating criticality safety for waste stored in the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The plutonium critical concentration and critical mass were calculated using a conservative waste model (CWM). The primary requirement of a CWM is that it have a lower neutron absorption than any actual waste. Graphs are provided of the critical mass as a function of plutonium concentration for spheres and for uniform slab layers in a 22.9-m-diameter tank. Minimum subcritical absorber-to-plutonium mass rates were calculated for waste components selected for their relative abundance and neutron absorption capacity. Comparison of measured absorber-to-plutonium mass ratios in their corresponding subcritical limit mass ratios provides a means of assessing whether criticality is possible for waste of the measured composition. A comparison is made between the plutonium critical concentrations in CWM solids and in a postulated real waste. This comparison shows that the actual critical parameters are likely to be significantly larger than those obtained using the CWM, thus providing confidence that the margin of safety obtained to the criticality safety evaluation is conservative.

  17. Hyperparameter Learning for Graph Based Semi-supervised Learning Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wee Sun

    Statistical Machine Learning Program National ICT Australia, Canberra, Australia and CSL, RSISE, ANU, Canberra, Australia xinhua.zhang@nicta.com.au Wee Sun Lee Department of Computer Science National University for the harmonic energy minimization method; this is done by minimizing the leave-one-out prediction error

  18. What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    of the course Written exam (tentamen) Four labs Bonus Points Each lab finished (successfully examined) before its deadline gives one bonus point. Max bonus (=4) raises the final grade one step. Bonus can not save you from F (failed). Bonus points can not be saved to next year. What is Machine Learning? About

  19. What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    of the course Written exam (tentamen) Four labs Bonus Points Each lab finished (successfully examined) before its deadline gives one bonus point. Max bonus (=4) raises the final grade one step. Bonus can not save you from F (failed). Bonus points can not be saved to next year. #12;What is Machine Learning? About

  20. Why Machine Learning and Games? Machine Learning in Video Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    Controller Car Behaviour AI Driving Drivatar Racing Line Behaviour Model Drivatar Learning System Drivatar AI Driving #12;#12;Two phase process: 1. Pre-generate possible racing lines prior to the race from Conclusions #12;Adaptive avatar for driving Separate game mode Basis of all in-game AI Basis of "dynamic

  1. Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Scholars Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    is an immersive semester of exploration focused on leveraging mobile learning strategies to achieve course goals and on student learning. During the Spring 2012 semester, two cohorts of faculty were supported. Each faculty of the experience was assessed in the following ways: a) students enrolled in these mLearning courses were surveyed

  2. Service-Learning & Student Civic Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service-Learning & Student Civic Engagement: Journeys toward Discovery, Contribution & Civic is service-learning? Intentional student engagement that combines community service with academic instruction and/or co-curricular learning that is focused on critical, reflective thinking and civic

  3. Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina ION GNSS 2008 by the FAA Satellite Navigation Program Office #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 2 for probabilistic modeling and analysis #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 3 Key Sources

  4. SPECIAL SEMINAR Cheating Lessons: Learning from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    SPECIAL SEMINAR Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty SPONSORED BY THE CENTER Lang is author of four books, the most recent of which are Cheating Lessons: Learning from Aca- demic FOR INNOVATION IN TEACHING & LEARNING AND NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL & RESEARCH ETHICS Thurs, May 29, 2014

  5. Lessons Learned from the journ to Institutional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Lessons Learned from the journ to Institutional TransformationOctober 2013 University of Las Vegas I'll talk a little about what we've learned through an NSF Institutional Transformation grant- group preferences, more work to communicate, tokenism if learn

  6. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanLehn, Kurt

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson Kurt VanLehn Department be called learning from lesson s'equence.~, because the extra information given to the learner is embedded section ,of this article, a variant of learning from lesson sequcnccs will bc discusscd whercm lessons arc

  7. INCOSE 2007 1 Lessons Learned From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    INCOSE 2007 1 Lessons Learned From Industrial Validation of COSYSMO 17th INCOSE Symposium Dr. Gan is not standardized · Model development process yielded 11 lessons learned Valerdi, R., Rieff, J., Roedler, G., Wheaton, M., Lessons Learned from Collecting Systems Engineering Data, Conference on Systems Engineering

  8. Learning Structured Perceptrons for Coreference Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Conclusion 2 #12;Title Breakdown Learning Structured Perceptrons for Coreference Resolution with Latent president and chief operating officer, succeeding [Gary Wilber]. 3 #12;Title Breakdown Learning Structured president and chief operating officer, succeeding [Gary Wilber]. 3 #12;Title Breakdown Learning Structured

  9. The Computational Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved 77 #12;experience. We will briefly discuss1 these three types of learning and reinforcement-learning tasks differ in the type of feedback received by the learner (i.e., explicit correction these three types of learning are instantiated in neural computations. One of the earliest proposals

  10. META-LEARNING Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilalta, Ricardo

    .g., types of example distributions) under which a learning strategy is most appropriate. From a practicalChapter 1 META-LEARNING Concepts and Techniques Ricardo Vilalta University of Houston Christophe Giraud-Carrier ELCA Informatique SA Pavel Brazdil University of Porto Abstract The field of meta-learning

  11. Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    types. Transfer apparently facilitates the learning of this type of information from the input1 Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects ANAT NINIO* Abstract The hypothesis was tested that transfer and facilitation of learning in early syntactic development does not rely

  12. Machine Learning for Signature Verification Harish Srinivasan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    types of learning to be accomplished. In the first, the training set consists of genuines and forgeriesMachine Learning for Signature Verification Harish Srinivasan , Sargur N. Srihari and Matthew J it can be viewed as one that involves machine learning from a population of signatures. There are two

  13. Order Effects in Incremental Learning 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    of incremental learning and introducing some distinctions among types of order effects. We then turn to a moreOrder Effects in Incremental Learning 1. Introduction Intelligent agents, including humans, exist in an environment that changes over time. Thus, it seems natural that models of learning in such agents take

  14. Neuronal Representations of Learning Sensorimotor Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of learning-related changes: additional controls and simulations....68-74 V. Viewing and Doing: SimilarNeuronal Representations of Learning Sensorimotor Skills Thesis submitted for the degree "Doctor.......................................................................................26-47 II. Preparatory Activity in Motor Cortex Reflects Learning of Local Visuomotor Skills

  15. Scientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    observations and simulations. Statistical machine learning algorithms have enormous potential to provide data, and the analysis of hurricanes and tropical storms in climate simulations. #12;Supervised Learning for SupernovaScientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning Raquel Romano romano at hpcrd dot lbl dot gov

  16. Henry and Fred Learn about Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Henry and Fred Learn about Lead Joan Bothell Activity book #12;Henry and Fred Learn about Lead the children's storybook Henry and Fred Learn about Lead/Enrique y Federico aprenden sobre el plomo (2003 of this activity book. The Henry and Fred storybook is about keeping children safe from lead poisoning, a serious

  17. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  18. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (4), Rev. 1 Approved by: _James (4), Rev. 1 Page 2 of 15 Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program Manual RECORD OF REVISION........................................................................................ 15 #12;LBNL/PUB-5519 (4), Rev. 1 Page 4 of 15 Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program Manual 1

  19. WestVirginiaUniversity SHRM Learning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    of your tuition, you will receive the internationally recognized SHRM Learning System® which includesWestVirginiaUniversity ENROLL NOW SHRM Learning System Registration cost is $1,295 Early bird SHRM LEARNING SYSTEM COURSE Fall 2012 SHRM ESSENTIALS OF HR MANAGEMENT Spring 2013 Martina Bison

  20. Online learning processes artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heskes, Tom

    On­line learning processes in artificial neural networks Tom M. Heskes Bert Kappen Department, The Netherlands. Abstract We study on­line learning processes in artificial neural networks from a general point. Elsevier, pages 199-- 233. #12; On­line learning processes in artificial neural networks 1 1 Introduction 1