Sample records for learning effects calculation

  1. Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning Robert Z. Zheng University of Utah, USA Hershey · New York of multimedia learning / Robert Zheng, editor. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: "This book identifies the role and function of multimedia in learning through a collection of research

  2. Quark model calculation of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benesh, C.J.; Goldman, T.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a potential model, we calculate quark distributions for a six-quark quasi-deuteron, including the effects of the Pauli Principle and quark tunneling between nuclei. Using a phenomenological sea distribution, the EMC ratio is calculated and found to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  3. Order Effects in Incremental Learning 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    of incremental learning and introducing some distinctions among types of order effects. We then turn to a moreOrder Effects in Incremental Learning 1. Introduction Intelligent agents, including humans, exist in an environment that changes over time. Thus, it seems natural that models of learning in such agents take

  4. Effect of gis learning on spatial ability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Won

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research used a spatial skills test and cognitive-mapping test to examine the effect of GIS learning on the spatial ability and spatial problem solving of college students. A total of 80 participants, undergraduate students at Texas A...

  5. Mesh size and code option effects of strength calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern Lagrangian hydrodynamics codes include numerical methods which allow calculations to proceed past the point obtainable by a purely Lagrangian scheme. These options can be employed as the user deems necessary to 'complete' a calculation. While one could argue that any calculation is better than none, to truly understand the calculated results and their relationship to physical reality, the user needs to understand how their runtime choices affect the calculated results. One step toward this goal is to understand the effect of each runtime choice on particular pieces of the code physics. This paper will present simulation results for some experiments typically used for strength model validation. Topics to be covered include effect of mesh size, use of various ALE schemes for mesh detangling, and use of anti-hour-glassing schemes. Experiments to be modeled include the lower strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) gas gun driven Taylor impact experiments and the higher strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) HE products driven perturbed plate experiments. The necessary mesh resolution and the effect of the code runtime options are highly dependent on the amount of localization of strain and stress in each experiment. In turn, this localization is dependent on the geometry of the experimental setup and the drive conditions.

  6. Fully microscopic shell-model calculations with realistic effective hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Coraggio; A. Covello; A. Gargano; N. Itaco; T. T. S. Kuo

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral perturbation theory, as well as the so-called V-low-k approach to the renormalization of the strong short-range repulsion contained in the potentials, have brought renewed interest in realistic shell-model calculations. Here we focus on calculations where a fully microscopic approach is adopted. No phenomenological input is needed in these calculations, because single-particle energies, matrix elements of the two-body interaction, and matrix elements of the electromagnetic multipole operators are derived theoretically. This has been done within the framework of the time-dependent degenerate linked-diagram perturbation theory. We present results for some nuclei in different mass regions. These evidence the ability of realistic effective hamiltonians to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  7. Fully microscopic shell-model calculations with realistic effective hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coraggio, L; Gargano, A; Itaco, N; Kuo, T T S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral perturbation theory, as well as the so-called V-low-k approach to the renormalization of the strong short-range repulsion contained in the potentials, have brought renewed interest in realistic shell-model calculations. Here we focus on calculations where a fully microscopic approach is adopted. No phenomenological input is needed in these calculations, because single-particle energies, matrix elements of the two-body interaction, and matrix elements of the electromagnetic multipole operators are derived theoretically. This has been done within the framework of the time-dependent degenerate linked-diagram perturbation theory. We present results for some nuclei in different mass regions. These evidence the ability of realistic effective hamiltonians to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  8. Effects of internal gain assumptions in building energy calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, C.; Perkins, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utilization of direct solar gains in buildings can be affected by operating profiles, such as schedules for internal gains, thermostat controls, and ventilation rates. Building energy analysis methods use various assumptions about these profiles. The effects of typical internal gain assumptions in energy calculations are described. Heating and cooling loads from simulations using the DOE 2.1 computer code are compared for various internal-gain inputs: typical hourly profiles, constant average profiles, and zero gain profiles. Prototype single-family-detached and multi-family-attached residential units are studied with various levels of insulation and infiltration. Small detached commercial buildings and attached zones in large commercial buildings are studied with various levels of internal gains. The results of this study indicate that calculations of annual heating and cooling loads are sensitive to internal gains, but in most cases are relatively insensitive to hourly variations in internal gains.

  9. What Learning Patterns are Effective for a Learner's Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    . In this paper we describe these three types of models and a mechanism to generate learning pattern by the learning theories. Concerning Task-augmented GM, we have eight types, and their validities are supportedWhat Learning Patterns are Effective for a Learner's Growth? An ontological support for designing

  10. Effectiveness of Learning Transportation Network Growth through Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Effectiveness of Learning Transportation Network Growth through Simulation Wenling Chen1 and David a high return on learning efforts Billhardt 2004 . Despite its potential, simulations are used. Simulation Provides Learners with Experiences The importance of experience in human learning has long been

  11. Effective Neuronal Learning with Ineffective Hebbian Learning Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    ; Palm & Sommer, 1996) derived the learn- ing rule that maximizes the network memory capacity, and showed of papers (Palm & Sommer, 1988; Palm, 1992; Palm & Sommer, 1996), Palm and Sommer have further studied

  12. Analytical calculation of neutral transport and its effect on ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, M.D.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Solano, E.R. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Inst. for Fusion Studies Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Fusion Research Center)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analytically calculate the neutral particle distribution and its effects on ion heat and momentum transport in three-dimensional plasmas with arbitrary temperature and density profiles. A general variational principle taking advantage of the simplicity of the charge-exchange (CX) operator is derived to solve self-consistently the neutral-plasma interaction problem. To facilitate an extremal solution, we use the short CX mean-free-path ({lambda}{sub x}) ordering. Further, a non-variational, analytical solution providing a full set of transport coefficient is derived by making the realistic assumption that the product of the CX cross section with relative velocity is constant. The effects of neutrals on plasma energy loss and rotation appear in simple, sensible forms. We find that neutral viscosity dominates ion viscosity everywhere, and in the edge region by a large factor. 13 refs.

  13. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  14. Scaffolding and Enhancing Learners’ Self-Regulated Learning: Testing the Effects of Online Video-Based Interactive Learning Environment on Learning Outcomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delen, Erhan

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    engaged with the content. Using an experimental design, this study investigates the effects of a newly designed online video-based interactive learning environment with embedded supports for self-regulation strategies on students’ learning behaviors...

  15. Scaffolding and Enhancing Learners’ Self-Regulated Learning: Testing the Effects of Online Video-Based Interactive Learning Environment on Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delen, Erhan

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    engaged with the content. Using an experimental design, this study investigates the effects of a newly designed online video-based interactive learning environment with embedded supports for self-regulation strategies on students’ learning behaviors...

  16. A Framework of Lessons Learned from Community-Based Marine Reserves and Its Effectiveness in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    A Framework of Lessons Learned from Community- Based Marine Reserves and Its Effectiveness factors for success. Reviewing relevant literature, we present a framework of "lessons learned" during; Community-based; coral reef conservation; Philippines; Alternative livelihood; Lessons learned Published

  17. Effective Preparation and Active Learning Strategies for Math&Stat TAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    is active learning? 2 Why bother? 3 Types of active learning 4 Effective Preparation 5 Strategies for asking out your log sheet! J. Zweck (UMBC) Active Learning Strategies September 2006 4 / 12 #12;Types in an argument presented by TA. J. Zweck (UMBC) Active Learning Strategies September 2006 5 / 12 #12;Types

  18. Network learning effects of ISO 22000 standard implementation in a food SME: a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Network learning effects of ISO 22000 standard implementation in a food SME: a case study Zam to a specific food SME case in order to test it and to identify the key network learning effects that occur will be especially targeted towards the strengthening of learning processes and effects between the SME

  19. Nonadiabatic calculations of ultraviolet absorption cross section of sulfur monoxide: Isotopic effects on the photodissociation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielache, Sebastian O.; Tomoya, Suzuki; Nanbu, Shinkoh [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)] [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kondorsky, Alexey [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science, Leninsky pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation) [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science, Leninsky pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky per., 9, Dolgoprudny Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Tokue, Ikuo [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of the main and substituted sulfur monoxide (SO) isotopologues were calculated using R-Matrix expansion technique. Energies, transition dipole moments, and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements were calculated at MRCI/AV6Z level. The calculated absorption cross section of {sup 32}S{sup 16}O was compared with experimental spectrum; the spectral feature and the absolute value of photoabsorption cross sections are in good agreement. Our calculation predicts a long lived photoexcited SO* species which causes large non-mass dependent isotopic effects depending on the excitation energy in the ultraviolet region.

  20. F&WL 501 -Lab #2 Stochastic Exponential Growth 1. In Chapter 2, you learned of the formula for calculating the geometric mean based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotella, Jay J.

    F&WL 501 - Lab #2 ­ Stochastic Exponential Growth 1. In Chapter 2, you learned of the formula for calculating the geometric mean based on an arithmetic mean and its variance. a. What is that formula? b. What is the name of the technique being used in this formula? c. Use that formula to generate values

  1. Microscopic Calculation of 240Pu Scission with a Finite-Range Effective Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations of hot fission in {sup 240}Pu have been performed with a newly-implemented code that uses the D1S finite-range effective interaction. The hot-scission line is identified in the quadrupole-octupole-moment coordinate space. Fission-fragment shapes are extracted from the calculations. A benchmark calculation for {sup 226}Th is obtained and compared to results in the literature. In addition, technical aspects of the use of HFB calculations for fission studies are examined in detail. In particular, the identification of scission configurations, the sensitivity of near-scission calculations to the choice of collective coordinates in the HFB iterations, and the formalism for the adjustment of collective-variable constraints are discussed. The power of the constraint-adjustment algorithm is illustrated with calculations near the critical scission configurations with up to seven simultaneous constraints.

  2. Exchange-only optimized effective potential calculation of excited state spectra for He and Be atoms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Muller, Richard Partain

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimized effective potential (OEP) method allows orbital-dependent functionals to be used in density functional theory (DFT), which, in particular, allows exact exchange formulations of the exchange energy to be used in DFT calculations. Because the exact exchange is inherently self-interaction correcting, the resulting OEP calculations have been found to yield superior band-gaps for condensed-phase systems. Here we apply these methods to the isolated atoms He and Be, and compare to high quality experiments and calculations to demonstrate that the orbital energies accurately reproduce the excited state spectrum for these species. These results suggest that coupling the exchange-only OEP calculations with proper (orbital-dependent or other) correlation functions might allow quantitative accuracy from DFT calculations.

  3. Effectiveness of Learning Transportation Network Growth through the Use of Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    0 Effectiveness of Learning Transportation Network Growth through the Use of Simulator May 19, 2004 as a tool for enhancing classroom learning. This article investigates the efficacy of using simulation....................................................................................................3 II. SIMULATION AND SIMULATOR OF NETWORK GROWTH (SONG 1

  4. Transuranic Transmutation and Criticality Calculation Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Lattice Effects - 12391

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaras, Sean A. [United States Military Academy, West Point, New York 10996 (United States); Knight, Travis W. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in traditional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies has been researched at length and has shown to provide the benefit of transmutation and targets the amount and toxicity of high level waste needed to be managed. Advanced MOX concepts using enriched Uranium Dioxide (UO{sub 2}) are required for multiple recycling of plutonium. The use of MOX and ordinary UO{sub 2} fuel in the same assembly as well as unfueled rods and assembly edge effects contrasts with the unit cell computational assumption of a uniform infinite array of rods. While a deterministic method of calculating the Dancoff factor has traditionally been employed in fuel assembly analysis due to the lighter computational and modeling requirements, this research seeks to determine the validity of the uniform, infinite lattice assumption with respect to Dancoff factor and determine the magnitude of the impact of nonuniform lattice effects on fuel assembly criticality calculations as well as transuranic isotope production and transmutation. This research explored the pin-to-pin interaction in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel rods through the impact of the calculated Dancoff factors from the deterministic method used in SCALE versus the Monte Carlo method used in the code DANCOFF-MC. Using the Monte Carlo method takes into account the non-uniform lattice effects of having neighboring fuel rods with different cross-sectional spectra whereas the Dancoff factor calculated by SCALE assumes a uniform, infinite lattice of one fuel rod type. Differences in eigenvalue calculations as a function of burnup are present between the two methods of Dancoff factor calculation. The percent difference is greatest at low burnup and then becomes smaller throughout the cycle. Differences in the transmutation rate of transuranic isotopes in the MOX fuel are also present between the Dancoff factor calculation methods. The largest difference is in Pu-239, Pu-242, and Am-241 composition whereas U-238, Pu-242, and Pu-238 composition was not changed by taking into account the non-homogenous lattice effects. Heterogeneous lattice effects do change the calculated eigenvalue and transmutation rate in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel. However, the uncertainty in the ENDF data used by SCALE in these calculations is large enough that the infinite lattice assumption remains valid. (authors)

  5. Ecological Engineering 25 (2005) 153167 Lessons learned: An assessment of the effectiveness of a National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Engineering 25 (2005) 153­167 Lessons learned: An assessment of the effectiveness lessons learned about the function of a national review Committee (National Technical Review Committee of the Mississippi Delta). Lessons learned are based on responses to five questions to the NTRC. What was the best

  6. Delayed Feedback Effects on Rule-Based and Information-Integration Category Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    , and whether different processes are involved in learning different types of category structuresDelayed Feedback Effects on Rule-Based and Information-Integration Category Learning W. Todd Maddox-integration category learning was investigated. Accuracy rates were examined to isolate global performance deficits

  7. Exploring the Effects of Lamarckian and Baldwinian Learning in Evolving Recurrent Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mak, Man-Wai

    ­ winian learning mechanism''. discuss the results of the simulations. Finally, we conclude our findings1 Exploring the Effects of Lamarckian and Baldwinian Learning in Evolving Recurrent Neural Networks solution. In order to reduce the number of gener­ ations taken, the Lamarckian learning mechanism

  8. EFFECTS OF THE USER MODEL ON SIMULATION-BASED LEARNING OF DIALOGUE STRATEGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Steve

    EFFECTS OF THE USER MODEL ON SIMULATION-BASED LEARNING OF DIALOGUE STRATEGIES Jost Schatzmann the past decade, a variety of user models have been proposed for user simulation-based reinforcement-learning investigated the use of a two-phased learning setup in- volving a simulated user. First, a stochastic model

  9. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model.

  10. TPR-00-14 SEMICLASSICAL CALCULATION OF SHELL EFFECTS IN DEFORMED NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize recent work in which the shell effect, which causes the onset of the mass asymmetry in nuclear fission, could be explained semiclassically in the framework of the periodic orbit theory. We also present new results for the inclusion of a spin-orbit interaction in the semiclassical calculation of the level density. 1

  11. Effect of tensile strain on the electronic structure of Ge: A first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Li [Key Laboratory for Microstructures and Institute of Materials Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hu, Lijuan; Zhao, Shi-Jin, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Microstructures and Institute of Materials Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking the change of L-point conduction band valley degeneracy under strain into consideration, we investigate the effect of biaxially tensile strain (parallel to the (001), (110), and (111) planes) and uniaxially tensile strain (along the [001], [110], and [111] directions) on the electronic structure of Ge using density functional theory calculations. Our calculation shows that biaxial tension parallel to (001) is the most efficient way to transform Ge into a direct bandgap material among all tensile strains considered. [111]-tension is the best choice among all uniaxial approaches for an indirect- to direct-bandgap transition of Ge. The calculation results, which are further elaborated by bond-orbital approximation, provide a useful guidance on the optical applications of Ge through strain engineering.

  12. Determination of Godiva`s effective delayed neutron fraction using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Campbell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}{sub eff} for a given reactor system, the assumed delayed neutron group spectra and the assumed number of delayed neutrons born per fission {nu}{sub d} can have a major impact on the final value. Over the years, the recommended values for the delayed neutron spectra and for {nu}{sub d} have slowly changed. To ascertain whether or not these changes have increased the accuracy of {beta}{sub eff} calculations in fast {sup 235}U systems, the authors have reevaluated {beta}{sub eff} for the benchmark system Godiva-I using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra and Tuttle`s recommended values of {nu}{sub d} for both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U.

  13. Effective field theory calculation of nd radiative capture at thermal energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sadeghi; S. Bayegan; Harald W. Griesshammer

    2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross section for the thermal neutron capture by the deuteron is calculated with pionless Effective Field Theory(EFT). No new Three-Nucleon forces are needed up to next-to-next-to-leading order in order to achieve cut-off independent results, besides those fixed by the triton binding energy and Nd scattering length in the triton channel. The cross-section is accurately determined to be $\\sigma_{tot}=[0.503\\pm 0.003]mb$. At zero energies, the magnetic $M1$-transition gives the dominant contribution and is calculated up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). Close agreement between the available experimental data and the calculated cross section is reached. We demonstrate convergence and cutoff independence order by order in the low-energy expansion.

  14. On Improving the Effectiveness of Open Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conati, Cristina

    specific student difficulties. ACE provides students with a highly-graphical, exploratory learning that support the exploratory behaviour of those students who would otherwise have trouble learning of tutor-controlled environments that monitor and structure the learning process through focused activities

  15. Magnetoimpedance effect at the high frequency range for the thin film geometry: Numerical calculation and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Corrêa; F. Bohn; R. B. da Silva; R. L. Sommer

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetoimpedance effect is a versatile tool to investigate ferromagnetic materials, revealing aspects on the fundamental physics associated to magnetization dynamics, broadband magnetic properties, important issues for current and emerging technological applications for magnetic sensors, as well as insights on ferromagnetic resonance effect at non-saturated magnetic states. Here, we perform a theoretical and experimental investigation of the magnetoimpedance effect for the thin film geometry in a wide frequency range. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoimpedance for single layered, multilayered or exchange biased systems from an approach that considers a magnetic permeability model for planar geometry and the appropriate magnetic free energy density for each structure. From numerical calculations and experimental results found in literature, we analyze the magnetoimpedance behavior, and discuss the main features and advantages of each structure. To test the robustness of the approach, we directly compare theoretical results with experimental magnetoimpedance measurements obtained in a wide range of frequencies for an exchange biased multilayered film. Thus, we provide experimental evidence to confirm the validity of the theoretical approach employed to describe the magnetoimpedance in ferromagnetic films, revealed by the good agreement between numerical calculations and experimental results.

  16. K-effective of the world: and other concerns for Monte Carlo Eigenvalue calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo methods have been used to compute k{sub eff} and the fundamental model eigenfunction of critical systems since the 1950s. Despite the sophistication of today's Monte Carlo codes for representing realistic geometry and physics interactions, correct results can be obtained in criticality problems only if users pay attention to source convergence in the Monte Carlo iterations and to running a sufficient number of neutron histories to adequately sample all significant regions of the problem. Recommended best practices for criticality calculations are reviewed and applied to several practical problems for nuclear reactors and criticality safety, including the 'K-effective of the World' problem. Numerical results illustrate the concerns about convergence and bias. The general conclusion is that with today's high-performance computers, improved understanding of the theory, new tools for diagnosing convergence (e.g., Shannon entropy of the fission distribution), and clear practical guidance for performing calculations, practitioners will have a greater degree of confidence than ever of obtaining correct results for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  17. Solar dynamo models with alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local 3D convection calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; I. Tuominen

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) Results from kinematic solar dynamo models employing alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local convection calculations are presented. We estimate the magnitude of these effects to be around 2-3 m/s. The rotation profile of the Sun as obtained from helioseismology is applied. We obtain an estimate of the ratio of the two induction effects, C_alpha/C_Omega \\approx 10^-3, which we keep fixed in all models. We also include a one-cell meridional circulation pattern having a magnitude of 10-20 m/s near the surface and 1-2 m/s at the bottom of the convection zone. The model essentially represents a distributed turbulent dynamo, as the alpha-effect is nonzero throughout the convection zone, although it concentrates near the bottom of the convection zone obtaining a maximum around 30 degrees of latitude. Turbulent pumping of the mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that, when all these effects are included in the model, it is possible to correctly reproduce many features of the solar activity cycle, namely the correct equatorward migration at low latitudes and the polar branch at high latitudes, and the observed negative sign of B_r B_phi. Although the activity clearly shifts towards the equator in comparison to previous models due to the combined action of the alpha-effect peaking at midlatitudes, meridional circulation and latitudinal pumping, most of the activity still occurs at too high latitudes (between 5-60 degrees). Other problems include the relatively narrow parameter space within which the preferred solution is dipolar (A0), and the somewhat too short cycle lengths of the solar-type solutions. The role of the surface shear layer is found to be important only in the case where the alpha-effect has an appreciable magnitude near the surface.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces: Role of many-body effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces: Role of many; published 29 May 2009 An approach is presented for obtaining a highly accurate description of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces, using quantum Monte Carlo calculations to include many-body effects

  19. Motor learning and its sensory effects: time course of perceptual change and its presence with gradual introduction of load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malfait, Nicole

    Motor learning and its sensory effects: time course of perceptual change and its presence 2012 Mattar AA, Darainy M, Ostry DJ. Motor learning and its sensory effects: time course of perceptual motor and sensory systems. We showed recently that motor learning leads to changes in the sensed

  20. Effectiveness of Concept Maps in Learning from a Computer-Based Instructional Video Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vural, Omer

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two different concept mapping methods - learner-generated and expert-generated concept mapping - in computer-based video learning. The students’ attitudes toward the use...

  1. The Effects of Exploratory Learning Environments on Students' Mathematics Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    that are transmitted to the learner by pictorial media (Clark & Mayer, 2011). As such, they help the learner identify meaningful pieces of information and link the information with the learner?s prior experience. Although the constructs of using diverse forms...? learning of mathematics concepts can be optimized by using a variety of representations. Clark and Mayer (2011) suggested that knowledge acquisition is based on the following principles of learning: (a) dual channel?people have separate channels...

  2. Examination of the contextual interference effect in motor skill learning using self-paced practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Immink, Maarten Alberto

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXAMINATION OF THE CONTEXTUAL INTERFERENCE EFFECT IN MOTOR SKILL LEARNING USING SELF-PACED PRACTICE A Thesis by MAARTEN ALBERTO IMMINK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Kinesiology EXAMINATION OF THE CONTEXTUAL INTERFERENCE EFFECT IN MOTOR SKILL LEARNING USING SELF-PACED PRACTICE A Thesis by MAARTEN ALBERTO IMMINK Submitted to Texas A...

  3. A SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE EFFECTS OF DAYLIGHT FROM CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , "The Calculation of Daylight Factor for Clear Skyand Predetermination of Daylight Illumination," ILLUMINATINGA MEASURING DIAGRAM FOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION, Batsford,

  4. Fundamental Parameters of Nearby Stars from the Comparison with Evolutionary Calculations: Masses, Radii and Effective temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Allende Prieto; David L. Lambert

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hipparcos mission has made it possible to constrain the positions of nearby field stars in the colour-magnitude diagram with very high accuracy. These positions can be compared with the predictions of stellar evolutionary calculations to provide information on the basic parameters of the stars: masses, radii, effective temperatures, ages, and chemical composition. The degeneracy between mass, age, and metallicity is not so large as to prevent a reliable estimate of masses, radii and effective temperatures, at least for stars of solar metallicity. The evolutionary models of Bertelli et al. (1994) predict those parameters finely, and furthermore, the applied transformation from the theoretical (log g-Teff) to the observational (Mv-B-V) plane is precise enough to derive radii with an uncertainty of ~ 6%, masses within ~ 8%, and Teffs within ~ 2% for a certain range of the stellar parameters. This is demonstrated by means of comparison with the measurements in eclipsing binaries and the InfraRed Flux Method. The application of the interpolation procedure in the theoretical isochrones to the stars within 100 pc from the Sun observed with Hipparcos provides estimates for 17,219 stars

  5. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  6. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

  7. Effects of kinesthetic and cutaneous stimulation during the learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena, Università di

    with movement disabilities [1]. A variety of assistive control strategies have been designed, including robots consists of applying a viscous curl field during the execution of point-to-point reaching movements, Member, IEEE Abstract--Haptic stimulation can help humans learn perceptual motor skills, but the precise

  8. The Use of Graphics Calculator in a Matriculation Statistics Classroom: A Malaysian Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mathematics: Why graphics calculator? Proceedings of the 2Learning statistics with graphics calculator: A case study.Learning statistics with graphics calculator: Students’

  9. Running head: COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF SEQUENCE 1 Comparing the Effects of Sequencing of Physical and Virtual Manipulatives on Student Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    consensus on the relative effectiveness of simulations and physical activities on student learning and Virtual Manipulatives on Student Learning and Confidence Adrian Carmichael1 , Jacquelyn J. Chini1 as physical manipulatives for promoting student learning. Here we focus on which sequence of using both

  10. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  11. Analysis of drilling fluid rheology and tool joint effect to reduce errors in hydraulics calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viloria Ochoa, Marilyn

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    .........................................................................45 V HYDRAULICS ....................................................................................49 5.1 Friction Pressure Loss Calculation..........................................50 VI TOOL JOINT... ......................................................................................71 6.1 Weld-On Tool Joint..................................................................71 VII STUDY APPROACHES TO ESTIMATE PRESSURE LOSSES BY CORRECTING FOR TOOL JOINT LOSSES .....................................77 7...

  12. No-core shell-model calculations with starting- energy-independent multi-valued effective interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Navratil; B. R. Barrett

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-space no-core shell model calculations have been performed for A=3-6 nuclei, using a starting-energy-independent two-body effective interaction derived by application of the Lee-Suzuki similarity transformation. This transformation can be performed by direct calculation or by different iteration procedures, which are described. A possible way of reducing the auxiliary potential influence on the two-body effective interaction has also been introduced. The many-body effects have been partially taken into account by employing the recently introduced multi-valued effective interaction approach. Dependence of the He5 energy levels on the harmonic-oscillator frequency as well as on the size of the model space has been studied. The Reid 93 nucleon-nucleon potential has been used in the study, but results have also been obtained using the Nijmegen II potential for comparison.

  13. Evaluating the learning effectiveness of using simulations in software project management education: results from a twice replicated experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Evaluating the learning effectiveness of using simulations in software project management education replicated experiment that evaluates the learning effectiveness of using a process simulation model a System Dynamics simulation model, the control group used the well-known COCOMO model as a predictive tool

  14. ULO Course Learning Outcome Assessment Method Pedagogy 01-01 Students will write effective lesson plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ENGL381 ULO Course Learning Outcome Assessment Method Pedagogy 01-01 Students will write effective lesson plans for a variety of audiences including peers, mentor teachers and administrators, as well as the course instructor and for themselves. Written lesson plans will be assessed for conventions

  15. Class Noise Handling for Effective Cost-Sensitive Learning by Cost-Guided

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xindong

    on expensive classes, which makes it attractive in dealing with data sets with a large cost-ratio. Experimental the misclassification cost of a CS classifier in noisy environments. Index Terms--Data mining, classification, cost for effective CS learning from noisy data sources. 2 COST-GUIDED ITERATIVE CLASSIFICATION FILTER Among all

  16. Application of a generalized matrix averaging method for the calculation of the effective properties of thin multiferroic layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starkov, A. S. [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Institute of Refrigeration and Biotechnology (Russian Federation); Starkov, I. A., E-mail: ferroelectrics@ya.ru [Brno University of Technology, SIX Research Centre (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to use a generalized matrix averaging (GMA) method for calculating the parameters of an effective medium with physical properties equivalent to those of a set of thin multiferroic layers. This approach obviates the need to solve a complex system of magnetoelectroelasticity equations. The required effective characteristics of a system of multiferroic layers are obtained using only operations with matrices, which significantly simplifies calculations and allows multilayer systems to be described. The proposed approach is applicable to thin-layer systems, in which the total thickness is much less than the system length, radius of curvature, and wavelengths of waves that can propagate in the system (long-wave approximation). Using the GMA method, it is also possible to obtain the effective characteristics of a periodic structure with each period comprising a number of thin multiferroic layers.

  17. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

  18. Vibrational Spectra of Water Solutions of Azoles from QM/MM Calculations: Effects of Solvation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    the decomposition of the vibrational density of states of the gas phase and solution dynamics. The calculated shifts the structural and dynamical aspects of water solutions. X-ray as well as neutron diffraction are the main source and electronic structure of the molecule.1 We expect therefore that also its vibrational properties could

  19. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

  20. The Effects of Human Resource Development Investment and Learning Practices on Innovative Performance of Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jin Nam

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increasing the various types of learning activities engagedstimulating various types of learning activities among itsthat among three types of learning practices, interpersonal

  1. Temperature effects on the energy bandgap and conductivity effective masses of charge carriers in lead telluride from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatapathi, S., E-mail: saran@vt.edu; Dong, B., E-mail: bind89@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Hin, C., E-mail: celhin@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the temperature effects on the electronic properties of lead telluride (PbTe) such as the energy bandgap and the effective masses of charge carriers by incorporating the structural changes of the material with temperature using ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Though the first-principles DFT calculations are done at absolute zero temperatures, by incorporating the lattice thermal expansion and the distortion of Pb{sup 2+} ions from the equilibrium positions, we could determine the stable structural configuration of the PbTe system at different temperatures.

  2. New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop on the Avidin/Biotin Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop energy and entropy. HSMD is extended here for the first time for calculating the absolute free energy change to the total free energy of binding is calculated here for the first time. Our result, A0 ) -24

  3. Lattice effective field theory calculations for A = 3,4,6,12 nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present lattice results for the ground state energies of tritium, helium-3, helium-4, lithium-6, and carbon-12 nuclei. Our analysis includes isospin-breaking, Coulomb effects, and interactions up to next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  4. A Calculation on the Self-field of a Point Charge and the Unruh Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hirayama; T. Hara

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, Hacyan and Sarmiento defined the vacuum stress-energy tensor with respect to the accelerated observer. They calculated it for uniform acceleration and circular motion, and derived that the rotating observer perceives a flux. Mane related the flux to synchrotron radiation. In order to investigate the relation between the vacuum stress and bremsstrahlung, we estimate the stress-energy tensor of the electromagnetic field generated by a point charge, at the position of the charge. We use the retarded field as a self-field of the point charge. Therefore the tensor diverges if we evaluate it as it is. Hence we remove the divergent contributions by using the expansion of the tensor in powers of the distance from the point charge. Finally, we take an average for the angular dependence of the expansion. We calculate it for the case of uniform acceleration and circular motion, and it is found that the order of the vacuum stress multiplied by $\\pi\\alpha$ ($\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ is the fine structure constant) is equal to that of the self-stress. In the Appendix, we give another trial approach with a similar result.

  5. Test-Enhanced Learning in a Middle School Science Classroom: The Effects of Quiz Frequency and Placement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Kathleen

    Test-Enhanced Learning in a Middle School Science Classroom: The Effects of Quiz Frequency Typically, teachers use tests to evaluate students' knowledge acquisition. In a novel experimental study, we examined whether low-stakes testing (quizzing) can be used to foster students' learning of course content

  6. Effects of interactive transport and scavenging of smoke on the calculated temperature change resulting from large amounts of smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M.C.; Walton, J.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several theoretical studies with numerical models have shown that substantial land-surface cooling can occur if very large amounts (approx. 100 x 10/sup 12/ = 100 Tg) of highly absorbing sooty-particles are injected high into the troposphere and spread instantaneously around the hemisphere (Turco et al., 1983; Covey et al. 1984; MacCracken, 1983). A preliminary step beyond these initial calculations has been made by interactively coupling the two-layer, three-dimensional Oregon State University general circulation model (GCM) to the three-dimensional GRANTOUR trace species model developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GCM simulation includes treatment of tropospheric dynamics and thermodynamics and the effect of soot on solar radiation. The GRANTOUR simulation includes treatment of particle transport and scavenging by precipitation, although no satisfactory verification of the scavenging algorithm has yet been possible. We have considered the climatic effects of 150 Tg (i.e., the 100 Mt urban war scenario from Turco et al., 1983) and of 15 Tg of smoke from urban fires over North America and Eurasia. Starting with a perpetual July atmospheric situation, calculation of the climatic effects as 150 Tg of smoke are spread slowly by the winds, rather than instantaneously dispersed as in previous calculations, leads to some regions of greater cooling under the denser parts of the smoke plumes and some regions of less severe cooling where smoke arrival is delayed. As for the previous calculations, mid-latitude decreases of land surface air temperature for the 150 Tg injection are greater than 15/sup 0/C after a few weeks. For a 15 Tg injection, however, cooling of more than several degrees centigrade only occurs in limited regions under the dense smoke plumes present in the first few weeks after the injection. 10 references, 9 figures.

  7. Calculation of rotordynamic unbalance response including torque and cross-coupled stiffness and damping effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleespies, Henry Sattoli

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    code was developed using the transfer matrix method to investigate the effects of cross-coupled sti ffness, cross-coupled damping, and torque on synchronous response of rotating machinery. Several models showing the effects of cross.... Phase plot of rotor with ZX damping. Figure 3 1. Response plot for rotor with forward driving cross-coupled stiffness. Figure 32. Response plot with cross-coupled 53 55 57 sti ffness negating lateral damping. Figure 33. Response plot with cross...

  8. The effect of locus of control and learned helplessness on control of heart rate using biofeedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logsdon, Steven Alan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    func- tions through biofeedback training (Ray, 1971; Wagner, et al. , 1974) . Ray (1971) found that internals were able to increase their heart rates significantly better than externals and that externals were able to decrease their heart rates... for internals to increase heart rate than to decrease it, and it is easier for externals to decrease heart rate than to increase it. Roth s Kubal (in press) have shown that learned helplessness effects can be facilitated by an increased number of exposures...

  9. Effect of neglecting resistance in calculations of short circuit faults on power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayo, Samuel Jonathan

    1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Conductor B. Ef feet of Locat ion of i"ault C. Effect of Generator Impedances Effect of ". utual Impedance in Overhead ircuits E. 'ffect of Ground '&!res F. Effect of Type of Fault 1. Line to Line Fault 2, D&uble Line to Ground Fault Single Line...) Configuration of conductorS Fig. P . 59Ste, m 1. Two overheaci circu (rs with mutual coupling 12 IO t GEOAf ETR IC PER IV DIsT~NGE OF GRovND o' I RE F Ro III Co N D v c 7'ORS ~ 20 )(Io f 25 )(lo + fog FEET {a) One ground wire to 10 GEOM KTR I C...

  10. CALCULATION AND USE OF EFFECTIVE EXTERNAL BOUNDARY AND RELATED SETTING PARAMETERS IN CABLE YARDING PRODUCTION ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greulich, Francis E.

    in the more efficient use of existing capital and labor resources. Efficiency in timber harvesting starts YARDING PRODUCTION ESTIMATION Francis E. Greulich1 ABSTRACT.--The concept of the effective external-growth timber, very competitive bidding for logging contracts, high regional labor costs, shorter contract

  11. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  12. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  13. The effectiveness of simulated robots for supporting the learning of introductory programming: A multi-case case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, L.; Kyriacou, T.; Brereton, P.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the effectiveness of simulated robots as tools to support the learning of programming. After the completion of a Systematic Review and exploratory research a multi-case case study was undertaken. A simulator, named Kebot...

  14. The comparative effect of individually-generated vs. collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on science concept learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, So Young

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quasi-experimental design, the researcher investigated the comparative effects of individually-generated and collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. Qualitative data were analyzed...

  15. Highly accurate calculation of the resonances in the Stark effect in hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M Fernández; Javier Garcia

    2015-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtained accurate resonances for the Stark effect in hydrogen by means of three independent methods. Two of them are based on complex rotation of the coordinates and diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix (CRLM and CRCH). The other one is based on the Riccati equations for the logarithmic derivatives of factors of the wavefunction (RPM). The latter approach enabled us to obtain the most accurate results and extremely sharp resonances.

  16. Calculational and experimental investigations of void effect -- A simple theoretical model for space-dependent leakage treatment of heterogeneous assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoist, P.; Petrovic, I. (Commissariat a' l'Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Mondot, J. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saint Paul lez Durance (France))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This method, which takes into account the influence of assembly heterogeneity on neutron leakage, is based on the heterogeneous B[sub 1] formalism, which assumes the existence of a fundamental mode in an infinite and regular lattice of heterogeneous assemblies. A simplified formalism, TIBERE, is presented that allows one to define directional space-dependent leakage coefficients. This method, introduced for two-dimensional x-y geometry in the APOLLO-2 multigroup transport code, uses classical and directional first-flight collision probabilities. One can now define leakage cross sections as additional absorption cross sections that have space and energy dependence, as well as all other cross sections. Hence, one obtains perfectly consistent reaction and leakage rates used in an equivalence procedure, determining cell-homogenized parameters for a whole core calculation. The study of this refined heterogeneous leakage treatment was undertaken because of the insufficiency of the homogeneous leakage model, especially in cases when an assembly contain voided zones or almost voided zones, i.e., zones with a long mean free path, so that the streaming effect may become important. The fission rate comparison between the EPICURE reactor experimental results and the results of the corresponding whole reactor calculations were accomplished, with leakages calculated by the homogeneous and the TIBERE procedures of the APOLLO-2 code.

  17. The effect of the number of wavebands used in spectral radiation heat transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S. L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectral radiation heat transfer model that conserves emitted and absorbed energy has been developed and used to model the combustion space of an industrial glass furnace. This comprehensive radiation heat transfer model coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used to investigate the effect of spectral dependencies on the computed results. The results of this work clearly indicate the need for a spectral approach as opposed to a gray body approach since the gray body approach (one waveband) severely underestimates the energy emitted via radiation.

  18. Assessing the Effect of Students’ Perceptions on Benefits Received from Participation in Service-Learning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goolsby, Tessa Maring

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined how teachers' perceptions and attitudes and students' perceptions impacted the learning outcomes students received from their participation in service-learning. Service-learning is a form of experiential ...

  19. Calculation of the effects of pumping, divertor configuration and fueling on density limit in a tokamak model problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several series of model problem calculations have been performed to investigate the predicted effect of pumping, divertor configuration and fueling on the maximum achievable density in diverted tokamaks. Density limitations due to thermal instabilities (confinement degradation and multifaceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge) and to divertor choking are considered. For gas fueling the maximum achievable density is relatively insensitive to pumping (on or off), to the divertor configuration (open or closed), or to the location of the gas injection, although the gas fueling rate required to achieve this maximum achievable density is quite sensitive to these choices. Thermal instabilities are predicted to limit the density at lower values than divertor choking. Higher-density limits are predicted for pellet injection than for gas fueling.

  20. Assessing the Effect of Students’ Perceptions on Benefits Received from Participation in Service-Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goolsby, Tessa Maring

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    concepts distinguishes service-learning from other types of experiential learning (Jacoby et al. 1996). Through the combination of these components and concepts, service-learning endeavors to enhance civic education, increase academic skills, develop... as having two main types of learning outcomes: civic and academic (Parker-Gwin and Mabry 1998). However, learning outcomes often span beyond citizenship and academics to include things such as personal and interpersonal development (e.g. leadership...

  1. ULO Course Learning Outcome Assessment Method Pedagogy 01-01 Students will write effective lesson plans (for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ED-LTCY346 ULO Course Learning Outcome Assessment Method Pedagogy 01-01 Students will write effective lesson plans (for using children's literature) for a variety of audiences including peers, mentor for the writing piece ; Written lesson plans will be assessed for conventions and effectiveness of professional

  2. Dealers, insiders and bandits : learning and its effects on market outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Sanmay, 1979-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to contribute to the understanding of markets populated by boundedly rational agents who learn from experience. Bounded rationality and learning have both been the focus of much research in computer ...

  3. Dealers, Insiders and Bandits: Learning and its Effects on Market Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Sanmay

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to contribute to the understanding of markets populated by boundedly rational agents who learn from experience. Bounded rationality and learning have both been the focus of much research in computer ...

  4. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a reinforced concrete slab bolted to a reaction structure. Both the slab thickness and soil media were varied in the test series. The wealth of data obtained from these tests along with the variations in experimental setups provide ample opportunity to assess the robustness of the Zapotec CEL methodology.

  5. Effect of intranasal manganese administration on neurotransmission and spatial learning in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Piechal, Agnieszka; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa, E-mail: etyszkiewicz@wum.edu.pl

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of intranasal manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O) exposure on spatial learning, memory and motor activity was estimated in Morris water maze task in adult rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats received for 2 weeks MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O at two doses the following: 0.2 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.2) or 0.8 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.8) per day. Control (Con) and manganese-exposed groups were observed for behavioral performance and learning in water maze. ANOVA for repeated measurements did not show any significant differences in acquisition in the water maze between the groups. However, the results of the probe trial on day 5, exhibited spatial memory deficits following manganese treatment. After completion of the behavioral experiment, the regional brain concentrations of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined via HPLC in selected brain regions, i.e. prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. ANOVA demonstrated significant differences in the content of monoamines and metabolites between the treatment groups compared to the controls. Negative correlations between platform crossings on the previous platform position in Southeast (SE) quadrant during the probe trial and neurotransmitter turnover suggest that impairment of spatial memory and cognitive performance after manganese (Mn) treatment is associated with modulation of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. These findings show that intranasally applied Mn can impair spatial memory with significant changes in the tissue level and metabolism of monoamines in several brain regions. -- Highlights: ? Intranasal exposure to manganese in rats impairs spatial memory in the water maze. ? Regional changes in levels of neurotransmitters in the brain have been identified. ? Cognitive disorder correlates with modulation of 5-HT, NA and DA neurotransmission.

  6. Hybrid Multideterminant calculation of energy levels of carbon isotopes with a chiral effective nucleon-nucleon interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Puddu

    2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform calculations for the binding energies and low-lying levels of ${}^{10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22}C$ nuclei starting from the chiral $N3LO$ nucleon-nucleon potential within the framework of the Hybrid Multideterminant scheme. The calculations are restricted to 4 major harmonic oscillator shells, via the Lee-Suzuki renormalization scheme. The results are compared with the experimental data.

  7. The Effect of the Recovery Act on the River Corridor Closure Project: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackay, S. M.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report provides a high-level lessons learned by WCH of the impact to its project performance. The context is limited to the WCH project alone.

  8. Monte Carlo calculation of delayed gamma dose rate in complex geometry using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the delayed gamma dose rate problem formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed gamma transport equations take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the flux coupling step required in conventional calculations and makes it easier to handle complex, multidimensional problems, especially those that call for Monte Carlo calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method in complex geometry are illustrated by its application in the Monte Carlo solution of a practical design problem.

  9. ZHU, BIWEN. Assessing the Effects of Feedback Type and Modality on Motor Skill Learning and Human Motivation. (Under the direction of Dr. David B. Kaber).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT ZHU, BIWEN. Assessing the Effects of Feedback Type and Modality on Motor Skill Learning of Feedback Type and Modality on Motor Skill Learning and Human Motivation by Biwen Zhu A dissertation and Human Motivation. (Under the direction of Dr. David B. Kaber). Two types of feedback, including

  10. Atomistic Calculations of the Effect of Minor Actinides on Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of UO{sub 2{+-}x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Adnersson, Davis; Battaile, Corbett; uberuaga, Blas

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The team will examine how the incorporation of actinide species important for mixed oxide (MOX) and other advanced fuel designs impacts thermodynamic quantities of the host UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel and how Pu, Np, Cm and Am influence oxygen mobility. In many cases, the experimental data is either insufficient or missing. For example, in the case of pure NpO2, there is essentially no experimental data on the hyperstoichiometric form it is not even known if hyperstoichiometry NpO{sub 2{+-}x} is stable. The team will employ atomistic modeling tools to calculate these quantities

  11. Effective theory for the non-rigid rotor in an electromagnetic field: Toward accurate and precise calculations of E2 transitions in deformed nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, E A Coello

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model-independent approach to electric quadrupole transitions of deformed nuclei. Based on an effective theory for axially symmetric systems, the leading interactions with electromagnetic fields enter as minimal couplings to gauge potentials, while subleading corrections employ gauge-invariant non-minimal couplings. This approach yields transition operators that are consistent with the Hamiltonian, and the power counting of the effective theory provides us with theoretical uncertainty estimates. We successfully test the effective theory in homonuclear molecules that exhibit a large separation of scales. For ground-state band transitions of rotational nuclei, the effective theory describes data well within theoretical uncertainties at leading order. In order to probe the theory at subleading order, data with higher precision would be valuable. For transitional nuclei, next-to-leading order calculations and the high-precision data are consistent within the theoretical uncertainty estimates. We also...

  12. Effect of the scheme of plasmachemical processes on the calculated characteristics of a barrier discharge in xenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Kulumbaev, E. B. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of a repetitive barrier discharge in xenon at a pressure of 400 Torr is simulated using a one-dimensional drift-diffusion model. The thicknesses of identical barriers with a dielectric constant of 4 are 2 mm, and the gap length is 4 mm. The discharge is fed with an 8-kV ac voltage at a frequency of 25 or 50 kHz. The development of the ionization wave and the breakdown and afterglow phases of a barrier discharge are analyzed using two different kinetic schemes of elementary processes in a xenon plasma. It is shown that the calculated waveforms of the discharge voltage and current, the instant of breakdown, and the number of breakdowns per voltage half-period depend substantially on the properties of the kinetic scheme of plasmachemical processes.

  13. Hydrogen Insertion Effects on the Electronic Structure of Equiatomic MgNi Traced by ab initio Calculations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Hydrogen Insertion Effects on the Electronic Structure of Equiatomic MgNi Traced by ab initio-xxx / Received October 18, 2012. Doi: 10.5560/ ZNB.2012-xxx For equiatomic MgNi which can be hydrogenated up to the composition MgNiH1.6 at an absorption/desorption temperature of 200 °C, the effects of hydrogen are approached

  14. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  15. Insights on Curriculum, Instruction, and Early Literacy Learning: Student Characteristic by Instruction Interaction Effects on Literacy Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    in focusing students' attention on learning activities within grade, from grade Insights on Curriculum, Instruction, and Early Literacy Learning: Student focused on children's learning in the classroom ­ from preschool through third

  16. MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OwenDavis

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  17. Modelling of steady-state fluid flow in 3D fractured isotropic porous media: Application to effective permeability calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Est, Laboratoire Navier (ENPC-IFSTTAR-CNRS) 77455 Marne la Vallée, France 2 BRGM, Risks Division, F-45060 Orléans, geological CO2 storage, geothermal energy, etc. However, determining effective permeability for fractured reservoirs for a long time [1-4]. DFN is introduced in several commercial softwares as UDEC (Itasca) [5

  18. Effective theory for the non-rigid rotor in an electromagnetic field: Toward accurate and precise calculations of E2 transitions in deformed nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Coello Pérez; T. Papenbrock

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model-independent approach to electric quadrupole transitions of deformed nuclei. Based on an effective theory for axially symmetric systems, the leading interactions with electromagnetic fields enter as minimal couplings to gauge potentials, while subleading corrections employ gauge-invariant non-minimal couplings. This approach yields transition operators that are consistent with the Hamiltonian, and the power counting of the effective theory provides us with theoretical uncertainty estimates. We successfully test the effective theory in homonuclear molecules that exhibit a large separation of scales. For ground-state band transitions of rotational nuclei, the effective theory describes data well within theoretical uncertainties at leading order. In order to probe the theory at subleading order, data with higher precision would be valuable. For transitional nuclei, next-to-leading order calculations and the high-precision data are consistent within the theoretical uncertainty estimates. We also study the faint inter-band transitions within the effective theory and focus on the $E2$ transitions from the $0^+_2$ band (the $\\beta$ band) to the ground-state band. Here, the predictions from the effective theory are consistent with data for several nuclei, thereby proposing a solution to a long-standing challenge.

  19. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: Measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Lefer, Barry; Hall, Samual R.; Shaw, William J.; Corr, Chelsea A.; Herndon, Scott C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic ?uxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  20. Effect of substrate compliance on the global unilateral post-buckling of coatings: AFM observations and finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parry, G. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex, (France)]. E-mail: guillaume.parry@etu.univ-poitiers.fr; Colin, J. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Coupeau, C. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Foucher, F. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Cimetiere, A. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Grilhe, J. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, du CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France)

    2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-critical regime of straight-sided wrinkles on compliant substrates of polycarbonate has been observed by atomic force microscope and investigated by means of finite element simulations. The effect of coupling between the film and its substrate has revealed a global buckling phenomenon, characterized by critical loads lower than those found in the case of a rigid substrate. Characteristic shapes of the buckled structure have been also found to spread over a region wider than the delaminated zone itself. A law relating the film deflexion to the stress has finally been established for any film/substrate system.

  1. Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiMento, Joseph F.C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons Learned Joseph F.C. DiMento The contributions insuccessful in bringing LESSONS LEARNED parties to discuss arelations." Yet LESSONS LEARNED "innovations" in the

  2. The effects of practice distribution upon the regional oscillatory activity in visuomotor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studer, Bettina; Koeneke, Susan; Blum, Julia; Jancke, Lutz

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , provided the original work is properly cited. motor learning. So far, explanations of the proposed superiority of distributed practice schedules were pri- marily based on practical considerations (e.g. attention demands, fatigue). The neural underpinnings... an explanation for this incon- sistency with the findings of most previous studies. The superiority of distributed over massed practice has pre- dominately been shown in simple motor tasks in which the temporal distribution of training sessions led to bet- ter...

  3. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  4. Continual Learning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE.

  5. Feedback controller parameterizations for reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, John William

    Reinforcement Learning offers a very general framework for learning controllers, but its effectiveness is closely tied to the controller parameterization used. Especially when learning feedback controllers for weakly stable ...

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be with meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastore, S. [University of South Carolina; Wiringa, Robert B. [ANL; Pieper, Steven C. [ANL; Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be. The realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Illinois-7 three-nucleon potentials are used to generate the ground state and nine excited states, with energies that are in excellent agreement with experiment. A dozen $M1$ and eight $E2$ transition matrix elements between these states are then evaluated. The $E2$ matrix elements are computed only in impulse approximation, with those transitions from broad resonant states requiring special treatment. The $M1$ matrix elements include two-body meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory, which typically contribute 20--30\\% of the total expectation value. Many of the transitions are between isospin-mixed states; the calculations are performed for isospin-pure states and then combined with the empirical mixing coefficients to compare to experiment. In general, we find that transitions between states that have the same dominant spatial symmetry are in decent agreement with experiment, but those transitions between different spatial symmetries are often significantly underpredicted.

  7. The effects of surface bond relaxation on electronic structure of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films by first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C., E-mail: canli1983@gmail.com; Zhao, Y. F.; Fu, C. X.; Gong, Y. Y. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); Chi, B. Q. [College of Modem Science and Technology, Jiliang University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Sun, C. Q. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of vertical compressive stress on Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films have been investigated by the first principles calculation, including stability, electronic structure, crystal structure, and bond order. It is found that the band gap of nano-film is sensitive to the stress in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-film and the critical thickness increases under compressive stress. The band gap and band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film has been affected collectively by the surface and internal crystal structures, the contraction ratio between surface bond length of nano-film and the corresponding bond length of bulk decides the band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film.

  8. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Learning in Coral Reef Maud C. O. Ferrari1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    : Ferrari MCO, Manassa RP, Dixson DL, Munday PL, McCormick MI, et al. (2012) Effects of Ocean Acidification

  9. The interactive effects of individual learning style, computer software, and teacher involvement on developing typing skill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Sarina Renae

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. 5 3. 2 4. 0 4. 0 3. 6 2. 9 3. 5 3. 5 3. 6 4 4 LS, p=0. 0494 4 1 4, 8 3. 8 4. 7 4. 4 4. 3 4. 8 3. 5 4. 6 16 17 21 22 25 26 27 29 34 35 36 4. 2 4. 3 4. 0 3. 5 4. 3 4. 4 4. 3 4. 0 4. 5 4. 7 3, 2 LS, p=0. 0437 3 7 3 p 3 p 3 p 4. 2 T...-29. Question 27 showed learning style to be significant when a student chose to do 10-key lessons. This is when a student actually leaves the typing section of the program and chooses to practice with the 10-key pad on the keyboard. The convergers (4. 0) far...

  10. The Effect of Student Learning Styles on the Learning Gains Achieved When Interactive Simulations Are Coupled with Real-Time Formative Assessment via Pen-Enabled Mobile Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalski, F V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes results from a project in an undergraduate engineering physics course that coupled classroom use of interactive computer simulations with the collection of real-time formative assessment using pen-enabled mobile technology. Interactive simulations (free or textbook-based) are widely used across the undergraduate science and engineering curriculia to help actively engaged students increase their understanding of abstract concepts or phenomena which are not directly or easily observable. However, there are indications in the literature that we do not yet know the pedagogical best practices associated with their use to maximize learning. This project couples student use of interactive simulations with the gathering of real-time formative assessment via pen-enabled mobile technology (in this case, Tablet PCs). The research question addressed in this paper is: are learning gains achieved with this coupled model greater for certain types of learners in undergraduate STEM classrooms? To answer t...

  11. Deleterious Effects of Low Temperature Exposure on Learning Expression in a Parasitoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baaren, Joan van; Boivin, Guy; Outreman, Yannick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. N. (2004). Effect of cold storage on the quality of254, Leopold, R. A. (1998). Cold storage of insects forHagvar, E. (1977). Cold storage tolerance and supercooling

  12. INFORMATION SECURITY ATTACK TREE MODELING An Effective Approach for Enhancing Student Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the engineering principle of Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). The main goal of this principle, the project plan can be created more realistically. FMEA techniques [1] help to identify failure potential

  13. Writing and Assessing Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Outcomes... Are student-focused Focus on learning resulting from an activity rather than the activity outcomes) to describing effectiveness (Learning outcomes) · Links Student Affairs and Academic Affairs; links curricular and co-curricular #12;Biggest challenges to assessing learning · Students do

  14. Making sense of competing organizational goals : perspectives of practice that affect coordinated efforts and organizational learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Joanne Kirkpatrick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory framework, this type learning, called ‘expansivethat give rise to these types of learning, as well asimportance of each type of learning in achieving effective

  15. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  16. The effect of handwriting as a cue selection variable in paired-associate learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahnasarian, Michael

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESULTS Stimulus mode of presentation (cursive vs. typed) by stimulus color (red vs. blue) by cues present at test ( both, writing, color or neither) by word counterbalancing (four groups) analysis of variance was computed for the subjects' recall...) found that colors differ in their level of effectiveness, just as trigrams do. Solso found that color selections The format of this thesis follows the style of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. are greater for more meaningful colors (e...

  17. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations.

  18. Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biehl, Michael

    Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization Michael Biehl1 , Barbara

  19. Using learning decomposition to analyze student fluency development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostow, Jack

    introduces an approach called learning decomposition to analyze what types of practice are most effective TO LEARNING CURVES AND LEARNING DECOMPOSITION The goal of this paper is to investigate how different types learning curves to measure the relative impact of various types of learning events. For tracking student

  20. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  1. Hispanic Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Learning Communities: A Case Study of First-Year University Students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazen, Hayley D.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to participate in class discussions and ask for help from professors and classmates, they performed better not only in the freshmen seminar class, but also in the class that was connected to it as part of a learning community. At Texas A&M International... University, where this study took place, every freshman is required to enroll in a learning community, and each community contains a freshmen seminar course. The freshmen seminar course meets twice a week for fifty minutes during the Fall and Spring...

  2. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklin, Gabriel J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550, USA and Biophysics Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550 (United States)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550, USA and Biophysics Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550 (United States); Mobley, David L. [Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemistry, University of California Irvine, 147 Bison Modular, Building 515, Irvine, California 92697-0001, USA and Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States)] [Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemistry, University of California Irvine, 147 Bison Modular, Building 515, Irvine, California 92697-0001, USA and Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States); Dill, Ken A. [Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, 5252 Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-0001 (United States)] [Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, 5252 Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-0001 (United States); Hünenberger, Philippe H., E-mail: phil@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges ?5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ?mol{sup ?1}) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ?mol{sup ?1}). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pK{sub a} and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning.

  3. Relativistic density-functional theory with the optimized effective potential and self-interaction correction: Application to atomic structure calculations (Z=2–106)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Tong, Xiao-Min

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the relativistic regime also has been con- sidered @6,7#. However, with the exception of a recent rela- tivistic local-density-functional calculation @8#, there is no systematic relativistic DFT studies of atomic ground-state properties across the Periodic Table...-interaction energy @1#. A similar problem exists for the relativistic xc energy functionals @6,7#. For a quantitative treatment of photoionization or multipho- ton ionization processes, it is necessary that both the ioniza- tion potential and the excited...

  4. Vlach & Sandhofer, In Press, Child Development Distributing Learning Over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    of the spacing effect have focused on memory processes rather than for other types of learning simple and complex concepts. Spaced learning schedules promote several types of learning, strengtheningVlach & Sandhofer, In Press, Child Development Distributing Learning Over Time: The Spacing Effect

  5. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  6. Nonperturbative numerical calculation of the fine and hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen by Breit potential including the effects from the proton size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Hou-Rong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By solving the two-body Schordinger equation in a very high precise nonperturbative numerical (NPnum) way, we reexamine the contributions of fine, hyperfine structure splittings of muonic hydrogen based on the Breit potential. The comparison of our results with those by the first order perturbative theory ($^{1st}$PT) in the literature shows, when the structure of proton is considered, the differences between the results by the $^{1st}$PT and NPnum methods are small for the fine and hyperfine splitting of $2P$ state, while are about $-0.009$ meV and $0.08$ meV for the $F=1$ and total hyperfine splitting of $2S$ state of muonic hydrogen, respectively. These differences are larger than the current experimental precision and would be significant to be considered in the theoretical calculation.

  7. Nonperturbative numerical calculation of the fine and hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen by Breit potential including the effects from the proton size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou-Rong Pang; Hai-Qing Zhou

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    By solving the two-body Schordinger equation in a very high precise nonperturbative numerical (NPnum) way, we reexamine the contributions of fine, hyperfine structure splittings of muonic hydrogen based on the Breit potential. The comparison of our results with those by the first order perturbative theory ($^{1st}$PT) in the literature shows, when the structure of proton is considered, the differences between the results by the $^{1st}$PT and NPnum methods are small for the fine and hyperfine splitting of $2P$ state, while are about $-0.009$ meV and $0.08$ meV for the $F=1$ and total hyperfine splitting of $2S$ state of muonic hydrogen, respectively. These differences are larger than the current experimental precision and would be significant to be considered in the theoretical calculation.

  8. Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

  9. Course info Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

    info 2 Machine Learning What's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor 3 Real's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor Machine Learning Using data to uncover Real life problems What's Machine Learning? Types of Learning Overfitting Occam's Razor Formulation

  10. Sharing Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Bryan L.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

  11. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

  12. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

  13. THE LEARNING Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    for different types of learning. You will need to adopt learning strategies that are most appropriateTHE LEARNING GUIDE Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning Canolfan Caerdydd ar gyfer Addysg Gydol Oes www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn www.caerdydd.ac.uk/dysgu #12;The Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning provides

  14. Real-structure effects: Band gaps of Mg_xZn_{1-x}O, Cd_xZn_{1-x}O, and n-type ZnO from ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schleife, A; Bechstedt, F

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many-body perturbation theory is applied to compute the quasiparticle electronic structures and the optical-absorption spectra (including excitonic effects) for several transparent conducting oxides. We discuss HSE+G{sub 0}W{sub 0} results for band structures, fundamental band gaps, and effective electron masses of MgO, ZnO, CdO, SnO{sub 2}, SnO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is solved to account for excitonic effects in the calculation of the frequency-dependent absorption coefficients. We show that the HSE+G{sub 0}W{sub 0} approach and the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation are very well-suited to describe the electronic structure and the optical properties of various transparent conducting oxides in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  16. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  17. LEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    of architectural historical heritage. Geometry of a heritage building Describing the geometry of a buildingLEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS Santiago Sanchez-Beitia, Javier Barrallo is the first phase of a heritage restoration work. A precise geometric model must be conceptually simple

  18. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  19. PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

  20. The effect of electronegative difference on the electronic structure and visible light photocatalytic activity of N-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} by first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Dongqiu; Huang Xiaowei; Tian Baoli; Zhou Shaomin; Li Yuncai; Du Zuliang [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of electronegative difference between nitrogen and oxygen on electronic properties of N-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} has been studied using first-principles calculations. The results indicate that the valence band maximum (VBM) shifts to high energy by 0.27 eV and the band gap states composed of N 2p, O 2p, and Ti 3d states are formed through the three states entering into the gap after N doping. The interactions of three states widen and delocalize the band gap states. The raised VBM and the wide band gap states can improve the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  1. The calculation of differential cross sections, polarization factions, electron-impact coherence parameters and fine-structure-effect spin-polarization functions for the electron-impact excitation of neon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartwright, D.C.; Csanak, G.; Machado, L.E.; Meneses, G.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used for the calculation of cross sections (DCSs), polarization fractions, a complete set of electron-impact coherence parameters, and fine-structure-effect spin-polarizations for the 1S{sub 0}-3P{sub 0,1,2} excitation of Ne. Results will be reported for E = 20, 25, 30, 50, 80, 100 and 120 eV incident electron energies and will be compared with available experimental data.

  2. Multiple Team Membership: A Theoretical Model of its Effects on Productivity and Learning for Individuals, Teams, and Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael Boyer

    While organizations strive to manage the time and attention of workers effectively, the practice of asking workers to contribute to multiple teams simultaneously can result in the opposite. We present a model of the effects ...

  3. Affect and Engagement in Game-Based Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    at regulating their affective experiences during learning [6]. For example, students who are focused on learning Abstract--The link between affect and student learning has been the subject of increasing attention with learning while negative states such as boredom and frustration have the opposite effect. Student engagement

  4. Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sklar, Elizabeth

    Using simulation to model and understand group learning Maartje Spoelstra Dept of Computer Science for agents acting in a simulated learning environment. Varying parameter values can change the learning in a simulation that we can use to gain insights into the design of effective learning environments. Here, we

  5. The Effects of Land-Use Regulation on the Price of Housing: What Do We Know? What Can We Learn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to S housing can price development licenses to requireany real effect on prices, development patterns, or growth

  6. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  7. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating

  8. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY A LEARNING TOOL By a complete supply chain #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply

  9. Memory Systems in Sequence Learning Many sequence learning studies have discordant results on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    Memory Systems in Sequence Learning · Many sequence learning studies have discordant results on the effect explicit sequence knowledge has on the learning and expression of motor sequences. Motor Skill Expertise · Motor skill expertise utilizes both the explicit declarative knowledge of the sequence

  10. REEDMULTIMEDIA LEARNING Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    REEDMULTIMEDIA LEARNING Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning Stephen K. Reed Center overview of cognitive architectures that can form a theoretical foundation for designing multimedia operations. Architectures that are relevant to multimedia learning include Paivio's dual coding theory

  11. Webinar: Using the RTU Comparison Calculator to Justify High-Efficiency Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Rooftop Unit (RTU) Campaign is working with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update its RTU Comparison Calculator (RTUCC). Join this webinar to learn how contractors...

  12. The effect of an internal versus external focus of attention on the learning of a tennis backhand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, Melinda Dianne

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the external focus condition produced higher accuracy scores in acquisition, retention, and transfer. In Experiment 2, movement form was evaluated in addition to the accuracy of the shots. We also examined the effects of attentional focus on individuals...

  13. Application of functional learning to ATPG and design verification for combinational circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Rajarshim

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to detect faults and in detecting redundant faults. Learning techniques have also been effectively applied to the problem of design verification for combinational circuits. This paper presents Functional Learning, a new method of learning, based...

  14. Animal-Assisted Literacy Instruction for Students With Identified Learning Disabilities: Examining the Effects of Incorporating a Therapy Dog into Guided Oral Reading Sessions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treat, Wendy Abigail

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singleton, C. (2005). Dyslexia and oral reading errors.Greaney, K. (2010). Defining dyslexia. Journal of LearningA for more information). Dyslexia: According to Tunmer &

  15. LEARNING... INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    in black and white/ double-sided. To set up a Google Cloud Printer to connect to printers in the LibraryYOUR LIBRARY YOUR LEARNING... YOUR INFORMATION SERVICES YOUR RESOURCES... GOOGLE CLOUD PRINT You can use Google Cloud Print to print from your Chromebook, phone, tablet and Google Apps. PLEASE NOTE

  16. Deadend driven learning 3 Daniel Frost and Rina Dechter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dechter, Rina

    that learning can speed up backjumping when using either a fixed or dynamic variable order­ ing. However the effectiveness of learning for speeding up the solution of constraint satisfaction problems. It extends previous in this paper is to study the effect of learn­ ing in speeding up the solution of constraint prob­ lems

  17. The role of BDNF in spinal learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huie, John Russell

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Instrumental training has been shown to provide a number of beneficial effects. The instrumental training regimen produces a lasting effect that enables learning when subjects are later tested with a more difficult response criterion. Similarly, instrumental...

  18. Construction and Analysis of Educational Tests Using Abductive Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    Construction and Analysis of Educational Tests Using Abductive Machine Learning El-Sayed M. El a novel approach that uses abductive network modeling to automatically identify the most accuracy. Abductive machine learning automatically selects only effective model inputs and builds

  19. Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Project Learning What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? How can you fulfill the requirements the initial Lessons Learned Plan after KDP A and incorporate into the Preliminary Project Plan; Hold a PaL after KDP D/launch, review and submit lessons · Consolidate all Lessons Learned into a Final Lessons

  20. Effectiveness of Employing Multimedia Principles in The Design of Computer-Based Math Tutorials for Students with Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanitkar, Anjali Shridhar

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    to work independently, it is important to control the reading level. If a student is unable to read the information provided in the mathematic presentation of skills and concepts, the learner is prevented from benefiting from the math instruction...), special education teachers, and multimedia/technology experts in reviewing the alignment of 7 tutorial content with the specified standard, appropriateness of instruction, and effectiveness of the animations and graphics. Research questions...

  1. Learning Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Patrick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Version 5.0 of the Java 2 Standard Edition SDK is the most important upgrade since Java first appeared a decade ago. With Java 5.0, you'll not only find substantial changes in the platform, but to the language itself-something that developers of Java took five years to complete. The main goal of Java 5.0 is to make it easier for you to develop safe, powerful code, but none of these improvements makes Java any easier to learn, even if you've programmed with Java for years. And that means our bestselling hands-on tutorial takes on even greater significance. Learning Java is the most widely sou

  2. Learning Curve

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a fundamental human characteristic that a person engaged in a repetitive task will improve his performance over time. If data are gathered on this phenomenon, a curve representing a decrease in effort per unit for repetitive operations can be developed. This phenomenon is real and has a specific application in cost analysis, cost estimating, or profitability studies related to the examination of future costs and confidence levels in an analysis. This chapter discusses the development and application of the learning curve.

  3. User's manual for GILDA: An infinite lattice diffusion theory calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, T.T.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GILDA is a static two-dimensional diffusion theory code that performs either buckling (B[sup 2]) or k-effective (k[sub eff]) calculations for an infinite hexagonal lattice which is constructed by repeating identical seven-cell zones (one cell is one or seven identical homogenized hexes). GILDA was written by J. W. Stewart in 1973. This user's manual is intended to provide all of the information necessary to set up and execute a GILDA calculation and to interpret the output results. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the computer (VAX/VMS or IBM/MVS) and the JOSHUA system database on which the code is implemented. Users who are not familiar with the JOSHUA database are advised to consult additional references to understand the structure of JOSHUA records and data sets before turning to section 4 of this manual. Sections 2 and 3 of this manual serve as a theory document in which the basic diffusion theory and the numerical approximations behind the code are described. Section 4 describes the functions of the program's subroutines. Section 5 describes the input data and tutors the user how to set up a problem. Section 6 describes the output results and the error messages which may be encountered during execution. Users who only wish to learn how to run the code without understanding the theory can start from section 4 and use sections 2 and 3 as references. Finally, the VAX/VMS and the IBM execution command files together with sample input records are provided in the appendices at the end of this manual.

  4. Scholarship of and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    is characterized by: A clear focus on student learning. The scholarship of teaching and learning is drivenLeadership for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Improve student learning Stimulate and their students learning; many today are trying new classroom approaches in the hopes of strengthening

  5. CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

  6. CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

  7. Learning Communities Peer Mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    , focused communities in which students, staff, and faculty can learn and grow together. Intended Outcomes Experience -Student Evaluations Archive Materials -Reflections of Previous Peer Mentors -Learning Community Activities -Student Evaluation Archives -Former Mentor Contact list #12;Learning Communities Vision Statement

  8. Giant magnetoresistance calculated from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacLaren, J.M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zhang, X.G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Layer Korringa Kohn Rostoker-Coherent Potential Approximation technique was used to calculate the low temperature Giant Magnetoresistance from first principles for Co{vert_bar}Cu and permalloy{vert_bar}Cu superlattices. Our calculations predict large giant magnetoresistance ratios for Co{vert_bar}Cu and extremely large ratios for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu for current perpendicular to the layers. Mechanisms such as spin-orbit coupling which mix spin channels are expected to greatly reduce the GMR effect for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu.

  9. Waiting to learn a new use of technology: motivation source and its impact on anticipated effect, time pressure and subjective norms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loraas, Tina Marie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigated the decision process surrounding the self-regulated learning of new uses of existing technology. With firms investing up to 50% of their capital budgets on information technology (in excess of ...

  10. LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J. Anderson

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository.

  11. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES DATABASE USER MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES DATABASE USER MANUAL OIA-OCA-0002, Rev. 0 Effective Date: June Lessons Learned and Best Practices Database User Manual RECORD OF REVISION Revision Number Date Approved.............................................................. 26 #12;OIA-OCA-0002, Rev. 0 Page 4 of 26 Lessons Learned and Best Practices Database User Manual 1

  12. Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

  13. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  14. Power, status, and learning in organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunderson, J. Stuart

    This paper reviews the scholarly literature on the effects of social hierarchy—differences in power and status among organizational actors—on collective learning in organizations and groups. We begin with the observation ...

  15. Stochastic Learning and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Xiren

    space [56]. The fundamental elements of learning and optimization are two types of performanceXi-Ren Cao Stochastic Learning and Optimization - A Sensitivity-Based Approach With 119 Figures, 27 be easily identified. Therefore, learning techniques have to be utilized. A Brief Description of Learning

  16. DOE Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Lessons Learned Information Services Catches the Eye of Corporations and Educational Institutions

  17. Learning Transformations From Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching Ming

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Natural Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Learning Continuous Transformation from VideoProposed Video Coder

  18. Defeat in victory : organizational learning dysfunction in counterinsurgency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Colin F. (Colin Francis)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two puzzles dominate the study of organizational learning and counterinsurgency. First, militaries often struggle to develop effective strategies to address the problem of counterinsurgency. Second, their strategic performance ...

  19. Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0

  20. SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculator Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator Argonne's Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator is a simple tool that small business owners can use to quickly...

  1. University of California Irvine Distance Learning Center Page 1 of 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    the students to practice what they are learning. Finally, no course would be complete without a method or practice what they are learning A means of evaluating how well students achieved learning objectives limitations, but with good course design and effective use of the distance learning course platform

  2. The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Charles Beyer

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

  3. Lessons Learned | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lessons Learned Lessons Learned The Department of Energy utilizes project management lessons learned (PMLL) in the execution of DOE capital asset projects to improve current and...

  4. Failure Analysis of a Complex Learning Framework Incorporating Multi-Modal and Semi-Supervised Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Machine learning is used in many applications, from machine vision to speech recognition to decision support systems, and is used to test applications. However, though much has been done to evaluate the performance of machine learning algorithms, little has been done to verify the algorithms or examine their failure modes. Moreover, complex learning frameworks often require stepping beyond black box evaluation to distinguish between errors based on natural limits on learning and errors that arise from mistakes in implementation. We present a conceptual architecture, failure model and taxonomy, and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a semi-supervised, multi-modal learning system, and provide specific examples from its use in a radiological analysis assistant system. The goal of the research described in this paper is to provide a foundation from which dependability analysis of systems using semi-supervised, multi-modal learning can be conducted. The methods presented provide a first step towards that overall goal.

  5. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  6. Incorporating Learning Styles in a Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Nathan

    they think and learn. Roschelle and Teasley focus more on the nature of interaction in collaborative learning a specific problem. Student reading groups for language learning courses are an example of learning groupsIncorporating Learning Styles in a Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Model Shuangyan Liua

  7. Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Project Learning I. What are the "Lessons Learned" requirements? II. How of a Lessons Learned Plan · Project Learning Processes · Timeline of Project Learning Ac;5/4/2012 11 #12;Timeline of AcYviYes · Review lessons learned from other relevant

  8. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Roy, Subinit [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block AF, Sector 1, Kolkata- 700 064 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  9. Waiting to learn a new use of technology: motivation source and its impact on anticipated effect, time pressure and subjective norms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loraas, Tina Marie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WAITING TO LEARN A NEW USE OF TECHNOLOGY: MOTIVATION SOURCE AND ITS IMPACT ON ANTICIPATED AFFECT, TIME PRESSURE AND SUBJECTIVE NORMS A Dissertation by TINA MARIE LORAAS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... PRESSURE AND SUBJECTIVE NORMS A Dissertation by TINA MARIE LORAAS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

  11. Cycle Track Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing

  12. Learning poisson binomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    We consider a basic problem in unsupervised learning: learning an unknown Poisson Binomial Distribution. A Poisson Binomial Distribution (PBD) over {0,1,...,n} is the distribution of a sum of n independent Bernoulli random ...

  13. What is Continual Learning?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE. Employee development in any organization and at any level is never ending.

  14. Specific Learning Difficulties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs) A guide for tutors Enabling Services Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Contents Dyslexia Support ............................................................................................................ 3 Recognising students with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties................. 4

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

  16. Machine LearningMachine Learning Stephen Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Stephen D.

    represents if-then rules num-of-wheelsnon-truck hauls-cargo relative-height truck yesno non-truck non-truck about trucks & combines Memorizes: But will he recognize others? #12;1/21/2004 Stephen Scott, Univ is MachineAgain, what is Machine Learning?Learning? Given several labeled examples of a concept ­ E.g. trucks

  17. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  18. SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning Internships Volunteer & Service-Learning Field Work quite broad, although the offerings are more limited than the programs in the general section. Teaching the programs with experiential learning opportunities offered by SUNY campuses. These listings give just

  19. Learning to change, changing to learn : district conditions for organizational learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Victor Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are each focused on student learning. ” By their reports,2011). The focused theme of students learning continues and

  20. Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougan, A D; Blair, S

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL turned in 5 Declaration Line Items (DLI's) in 2006. Of these, one was declared completed. We made some changes to streamline our process from 2005, used less money, time and fewer team members. This report is a description of what changes we made in 2006 and what we learned. Many of our core review team had changed from last year, including our Laboratory Director, the Facility safety and security representatives, our Division Leader, and the OPSEC Committee Chair. We were able to hand out an AP Manual to some of them, and briefed all newcomers to the AP process. We first went to the OPSEC Committee and explained what the Additional Protocol process would be for 2006 and solicited their help in locating declarable projects. We utilized the 'three questions' from the AP meeting last year. LLNL has no single place to locate all projects at the laboratory. We talked to Resource Managers and key Managers in the Energy and Environment Directorate and in the Nonproliferation Homeland and International Security Directorate to find applicable projects. We also talked to the Principal Investigators who had projects last year. We reviewed a list of CRADA's and LDRD projects given to us by the Laboratory Site Office. Talking to the PI's proved difficult because of vacation or travel schedules. We were never able to locate one PI in town. Fortunately, collateral information allowed us to screen out his project. We had no problems in downloading new versions of the DWA and DDA. It was helpful for both Steve Blair and Arden Dougan to have write privileges. During the time we were working on the project, we had to tag-team the work to allow for travel and vacation schedules. We had some difficulty locating an 'activities block' in the software. This was mentioned as something we needed to fix from our 2005 declaration. Evidently the Activities Block has been removed from the current version of the software. We also had trouble finding the DLI Detail Report, which we included in our signature process last year. This report had been inadvertently omitted from the version of the software we used. We typed our own version of the Detail Report and the package was sent to signature. The final software was not available in time to include the DLI Report. We streamlined our review process for the Technical and Security Reviews by sending one letter to each entity instead of getting separate approvals from the subordinates, then getting an approval from the lead reviewer. The Review process took 20 days, far shorter than the 6 weeks it required last year. It will be difficult to shorten the process much more. One of our projects had associated laboratory work at NIF. This required many discussions with NIF management during the review process and before their paperwork came to them for signature since they were not aware of the Additional Protocol.

  1. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  2. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  3. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  4. Instrumental learning within the spinal cord: further examination of the deficit observed following noncontingent shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crown, Eric Daniel

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    events that cannot be controlled (noncontingent events) has a deleterious effect on instrumental learning, much like exposure to inescapable shock affects escape/avoidance learning in intact animals. Experiment 1 showed that noncontingent tailshock has...

  5. Application of functional learning to ATPG and design verification for combinational circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Rajarshim

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, learning-based techniques have been proposed as an efficient alternative to the traditional branch-and-bound techniques for test generation. The learning techniques have been shown to be extremely effective in ...

  6. Clinical Continuing Professional Education in Dental Hygiene Practice Using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Harold Alonso

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how learning is facilitated in a dental hygiene clinical continuing education course designed using Kolb’s experiential learning model. This study assessed the effectiveness of an experiential...

  7. Statistical Learning Theory of Protein Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrated statistical learning and simulation approach tomolecular simulation, using statistical learning theory tomolecular simulation and statistical learning theory of

  8. RESEARCH REPORT Test-Potentiated Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Kathleen

    RESEARCH REPORT Test-Potentiated Learning: Distinguishing Between Direct and Indirect Effects of Tests Kathleen M. Arnold and Kathleen B. McDermott Washington University in St. Louis The facilitative effect of retrieval practice, or testing, on the probability of later retrieval has been the focus

  9. Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular...

  10. Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: March 20, 2015 FY 2016 February 2015 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

  11. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

  12. www.usask.ca/learning_charter OurLearningVision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    other institutions of learning. Our students undertake programs of many different types and durations types: Discovery,Knowledge, Integrity,Skills, and Citizenship. Core Learning Goals · Apply critical1 www.usask.ca/learning_charter OurLearningVision The University of Saskatchewan Learning Charter

  13. Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S{sub 1} state of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. II. The S{sub 1} rovibrational manifold and the effects of isomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changala, P. Bryan, E-mail: bryan.changala@colorado.edu; Baraban, Joshua H.; Field, Robert W. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Merer, Anthony J. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced dimension variational calculations have been performed for the rovibrational level structure of the S{sub 1} state of acetylene. The state exhibits an unusually complicated level structure, for various reasons. First, the potential energy surface has two accessible conformers, trans and cis. The cis conformer lies about 2700 cm{sup ?1} above the trans, and the barrier to cis-trans isomerization lies about 5000 cm{sup ?1} above the trans minimum. The trans vibrations ?{sub 4} (torsion) and ?{sub 6} (asym. bend) interact very strongly by Darling-Dennison and Coriolis resonances, such that their combination levels and overtones form polyads with unexpected structures. Both conformers exhibit very large x{sub 36} cross-anharmonicity since the pathway to isomerization is a combination of ?{sub 6} and ?{sub 3} (sym. bend). Near the isomerization barrier, the vibrational levels show an even-odd K-staggering of their rotational levels as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier. The present calculations address all of these complications, and reproduce the observed K-structures of the bending and C–C stretching levels with good qualitative accuracy. It is expected that they will assist with the assignment of the irregular patterns near the isomerization barrier.

  14. Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

  15. Machine Learning: Foundations and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-David, Shai

    with accident prevention systems that are built using machine learning algorithms. Machine learning is also to us). Machine learning tools are concerned with endowing programs with the ability to "learn if the learning process succeeded or failed? The second goal of this book is to present several key machine

  16. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  17. FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

  18. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  19. Designing for Learning: Multiplayer Digital Game Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supercharged! : learning physics with digital simulationsimulations, computer games, and pedagogy in e-learning andlearning environment based on the blending microworlds, simulations,

  20. reprinted from Learning through Multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    reprinted from Learning through Multimedia Roy D. Pea Institute for Research on Learning #12;Learning through Multimedia Roy D. Pea Institute for Research on writinguniteswritersandreaders.Society might come to regard multimedia literacy as essential as writing is today

  1. Essays on social learning, cooperation, asset markets and human capital 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, James

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first chapter, I examine the effect of social learning on social norms of cooperation. To this end I develop an 'anti-social learning' game. This is a dynamic social dilemma in which all agents know how to cooperate ...

  2. Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data Shui Huang2 , Jing Li2 Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques provide great potentials for effective diagnosis of Alzheimer. In this paper, we consider the problem of learning functional brain connectivity from neuroimaging, which holds

  3. Random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes use a sequence of pseudorandom numbers to sample from probability distributions. A common practice is to start each source particle a predetermined number of random numbers up the pseudorandom number sequence. This number of random numbers skipped between each source particles the random number stride, S. Consequently, the jth source particle always starts with the j{center dot}Sth random number providing correlated sampling'' between similar calculations. A new machine-portable random number generator has been written for the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP providing user's control of the random number stride. First the new MCNP random number generator algorithm will be described and then the effects of varying the stride will be presented. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on [Fe4S4]2+Clusters: Effects of H-bonding and Structural Distortion on Covalency and SpinTopology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, A.; Roche, C.L.; Walters, M.A.; Hodgson, K.O.; B., Hedman; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of a hydrogen-bonded elongated [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sup 2+} cube is reported. The data show that this synthetic cube is less covalent than a normal compressed cube with no hydrogen bonding. DFT calculations reveal that the observed difference in electronic structure has significant contributions from both the cluster distortion and from hydrogen bonding. The elongated and compressed Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4} structures are found to have different spin topologies (i.e., orientation of the delocalized Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} subclusters which are antiferromagnetically coupled to each other). It is suggested that the H-bonding interaction with the counterion does not contribute to the cluster elongation. A magneto-structural correlation is developed for the Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4} cube that is used to identify the redoxactive Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} subclusters in active sites of HiPIP and ferredoxin proteins involving these clusters.

  5. Optimization Online - Enclosing Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Xunkai

    2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 20, 2007 ... Abstract: This report introduces a new machine learning paradigm called enclosing machine learning for data mining. This novel method ...

  6. Treat Teaching as Learned Profession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen Duffy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Difference ACCORD UC/ Treat Teaching as Learned ProfessionPublic Policy Series PB-009-1104 Treat Teaching as Learned

  7. Towards more human-like concept learning in machines : compositionality, causality, and learning-to-learn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Brenden M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    People can learn a new concept almost perfectly from just a single example, yet machine learning algorithms typically require hundreds or thousands of examples to perform similarly. People can also use their learned concepts ...

  8. The Learning Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As a 4-H volunteer, you have tremendous influence in determining the learning that takes place within your 4-H club or group. Adult volunteers also have the task of making the learning experiences attractive to young people. Here are some important...

  9. Residential Learning University Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

  10. The effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction in a horticultural plant identification course 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbett, Mona Rae

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the variables. The computer then organizes the information, performs rapid and accurate calculations, and produces results for the student. 14 Other instructional purposes include using computer applications designed to facilitate the management... it into a high school chemistry class. They found that, although CAI was not as effective in teaching chemistry, it was important for motivating the students to learn. In some instances some students "had to be restrained from running to the computer...

  11. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  12. Mary Whitton_SIGGRAPH09 1 Lessons Learned from Ten Years of Studies of Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Mary Whitton_SIGGRAPH09 1 Lessons Learned from Ten Years of Studies of Virtual Environments User lessons the Effective Virtual Environments (EVE) research team learned while doing a dozen or more studies and lessons learned by another, cross-disciplinary team in the Distributed nanoManipulator project

  13. TOWSON'S PHYSTEC COURSE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, YEARS 1 AND 2: RESULTS AND LESSONS LEARNED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandifer, Cody

    TOWSON'S PHYSTEC COURSE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, YEARS 1 AND 2: RESULTS AND LESSONS LEARNED Cody. Lastly, the project team has learned numerous lessons about large-scale course reform with respect to include lessons learned by the project team about effective course structure, different forms of inquiry

  14. October--November 2003's space weather and operations lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    October--November 2003's space weather and operations lessons learned L. P. Barbieri and R. E experience and lessons learned widely among both developing and operating missions, and to uniformly apply: space weather, operations, lessons learned, best practices, environmental effects Citation: Barbieri, L

  15. Simulation with Learning Agents Erol Gelenbe, Fellow IEEE, Esin Seref, Zhiguang Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelenbe, Erol

    Simulation with Learning Agents Erol Gelenbe, Fellow IEEE, Esin S¸eref, Zhiguang Xu School,esin,zgxu¢ @cs.ucf.edu March 29, 2001 Abstract We propose that learning agents be incorporated into simulation that goal based learning may be used effectively used in this context. An example simulation is presented

  16. Active Preference Learning with Discrete Choice Data Anonymous Author(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Freitas, Nando

    Abstract We propose an active learning algorithm that learns a continuous valuation model from discrete improvement at each query without accurately modelling the entire valuation sur- face, which would demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm compared to related active learning methods. We also embed

  17. Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change Nicol F. Bernardi,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malfait, Nicole

    Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change Nicolò F. Bernardi,1,2 Mohammad Darainy,1, Darainy M, Bricolo E, Ostry DJ. Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change. J Neurophysiol 110 of others has been shown to affect motor learning, but does it have effects on sensory systems as well

  18. Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    179D DOE Calculator EERE Building Technologies Office 179D DOE Calculator Printable Version Bookmark and Share What is the 179D federal tax deduction? Section 179D of the...

  19. Calculator Tips for TI-30XA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen Davis

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

  20. A Self-regulated Learning Intervention for Developmental Mathematics Students at a Community College: Effects of Study Journals on Achievement and Study Habits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis, Jennifer Lynn

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis had two phases: propensity score matching to strategically trim the groups so they had similar distributions of starting characteristics, and logistic regression to estimate the intervention’s effect on binary variables representing course success...

  1. An Examination of the Effects of the Texas Farm Bureau Mobile Learning Barn Agricultural Education Program on Youth's Perceptions and Knowledge of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Joni Leigh

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture impacts the lives of individuals daily and many people do not realize the effect it has on our society. In efforts to educate people and strive for a more agricultural literate society, agricultural education programs, such as the Texas...

  2. IN-DRIFT MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES MODEL VALIDATION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Jolley

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN M09909SPAMINGl.003 using its replacement DTN M00106SPAIDMO 1.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 200 1) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  3. Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development 105 Learning Strategies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    of success (Gu, 1994, 2003a; Moir & Nation, 2002). Largely two types of learning outcome measures have beenLearning Strategies for Vocabulary Development 105 Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development of changes in vocabulary learning strategies and how these changes are related to vocabulary development. One

  4. Perceptual learning: learning to see Dov Sagi and David Tanne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagi, Dov

    the existence of two types of learning, fast (binocular) and slow (monocular). The slow phase requiresPerceptual learning: learning to see Dov Sagi and David Tanne The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Perceptual learning in vision has been found to be highly specific for simple stimulus

  5. e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    e-Learning Seoul National University e-Teaching & Learning http://etl.snu.ac.kr #12;about eTL eTL ? eTL(e-Teaching & Learning) , , , , . e , , , , , , , , , (, ) , SSO(Single Sign On) , , #12;e-Teaching & Learning System 4 1. Moodle Moodle Modular Object

  6. Distance learning meets Open Source Future-oriented Distance Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -learning on college level. One of the main problems is that study material as well as concepts have to be transformed component of the Open Source movement. Key words: distance learning, open source 1. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS of each semester. 2. THE CORE PROBLEM WHEN USING E-LEARNING-TOOLS IN DISTANCE LEARNING Most people

  7. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  8. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  9. Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

  10. A summary of lessons learned at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crimi, F.P.; Mullee, G.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the lessons learned from a management perspective during decommissioning. The lessons learned are presented in a chronological sequence during the life of the project up to the present time. The careful analysis of the lessons learned and the implementation of corresponding actions have contributed toward improving the effectiveness of decommissioning as time progresses. The lessons learned should be helpful in planning future decommissioning projects.

  11. Learning During Stressful Times Tracey J. Shors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shors, Tracey J.

    profound effects on our cognitive and motor abilities, from those that could be construed as adaptive be that stress impairs learning--or does it? In this review, I describe some basic trends in studies that have; Seligman and Maier 1967). Those that were exposed to the same amount of shock, but had control over it

  12. User`s manual for GILDA: An infinite lattice diffusion theory calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, T.T.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GILDA is a static two-dimensional diffusion theory code that performs either buckling (B{sup 2}) or k-effective (k{sub eff}) calculations for an infinite hexagonal lattice which is constructed by repeating identical seven-cell zones (one cell is one or seven identical homogenized hexes). GILDA was written by J. W. Stewart in 1973. This user`s manual is intended to provide all of the information necessary to set up and execute a GILDA calculation and to interpret the output results. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the computer (VAX/VMS or IBM/MVS) and the JOSHUA system database on which the code is implemented. Users who are not familiar with the JOSHUA database are advised to consult additional references to understand the structure of JOSHUA records and data sets before turning to section 4 of this manual. Sections 2 and 3 of this manual serve as a theory document in which the basic diffusion theory and the numerical approximations behind the code are described. Section 4 describes the functions of the program`s subroutines. Section 5 describes the input data and tutors the user how to set up a problem. Section 6 describes the output results and the error messages which may be encountered during execution. Users who only wish to learn how to run the code without understanding the theory can start from section 4 and use sections 2 and 3 as references. Finally, the VAX/VMS and the IBM execution command files together with sample input records are provided in the appendices at the end of this manual.

  13. Calculation of burnup of a black neutron absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yudkevich, M. S., E-mail: umark@adis.vver.kiae.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure of calculation of burnup of fuel and strong neutron absorber in a nuclear reactor is described. The method proposed here makes it possible to avoid difficulties associated with heterogeneous blocking of the absorption cross section. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by an example.

  14. BLENDED AND ONLINE LEARNING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    ) "Flipped classroom" - focus on active learning and enhanced student engagement in the classroom #12;First dissatisfied with student learning experience #12;Blended Learning Initiative Large, first-year courses student engagement improve student learning outcomes improve knowledge retention #12;Framework for Blended

  15. FACULTY GUIDE Service-Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    ?.............................................................. 5 Benefits of Service-Learning..................................... 5 Types of Experiential LearningFACULTY GUIDE to Service-Learning University of Massachuse s Lowell 20132014 #12;2 WELCOME Dear Colleague, Thank you for taking the time to read this introductory guide to service- learning

  16. Time series association learning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Papcun, George J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic input is recognized from inferred articulatory movements output by a learned relationship between training acoustic waveforms and articulatory movements. The inferred movements are compared with template patterns prepared from training movements when the relationship was learned to regenerate an acoustic recognition. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic articulatory relationships are learned by a neural network. Subsequent input acoustic patterns then generate the inferred articulatory movements for use with the templates. Articulatory movement data may be supplemented with characteristic acoustic information, e.g. relative power and high frequency data, to improve template recognition.

  17. ESTIMATING THE UNCERTAINTY IN REACTIVITY ACCIDENT NEUTRONIC CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIAMOND,D.J.; YANG,C.Y.; ARONSON,A.L.

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green's Function method.

  18. Estimating the uncertainty in reactivity accident neutronic calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.; Yang, C.Y.; Aronson, A.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green`s Function method.

  19. ATA injector-gun calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, A.C.

    1981-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ATA is a pulsed, 50 ns 10 KA, 50 MeV linear induction electron accelerator at LLNL. The ETA could be used as an injector for ATA. However the possibility of building a new injector gun for ATA, raised the question as to what changes from the ETA gun in electrode dimensions or potentials, if any, should be considered. In this report the EBQ code results for the four electrode configurations are reviewed and an attempt is made to determine the geometrical scaling laws appropriate to these ETA type gun geometries. Comparison of these scaling laws will be made to ETA operation. The characteristic operating curves for these geometries will also be presented and the effect of washer position determined. It will be shown that emittance growth will impose a limitation on beam current for a given anode potential before the virtual cathode limit is reached.

  20. Benchmark calculations for elastic fermion-dimer scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahin Bour; H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present continuum and lattice calculations for elastic scattering between a fermion and a bound dimer in the shallow binding limit. For the continuum calculation we use the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian (STM) integral equation to determine the scattering length and effective range parameter to high precision. For the lattice calculation we use the finite-volume method of L\\"uscher. We take into account topological finite-volume corrections to the dimer binding energy which depend on the momentum of the dimer. After subtracting these effects, we find from the lattice calculation kappa a_fd = 1.174(9) and kappa r_fd = -0.029(13). These results agree well with the continuum values kappa a_fd = 1.17907(1) and kappa r_fd = -0.0383(3) obtained from the STM equation. We discuss applications to cold atomic Fermi gases, deuteron-neutron scattering in the spin-quartet channel, and lattice calculations of scattering for nuclei and hadronic molecules at finite volume.

  1. Calculation of size for bound-state constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislaw D. Glazek

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

  2. A Cognitive Approach to Student-Centered e-Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Like traditional classroom instruction, distance/electronic learning (e-Learning) derives from largely behaviorist computer-based instruction paradigms that tend to reflect passive training philosophies. Over the past thirty years, more flexible, student-centered classroom teaching methods have been advocated based on the concepts of ''discovery'' learning and ''active'' learning; student-centered approaches are likewise encouraged in the development of e-Learning applications. Nevertheless, many e-Learning applications that employ state-of-the art multimedia technology in which students interact with simulations, animations, video, and sounds still fail to meet their expected training potential. Implementation of multimedia-based training features may give the impression of engaging the student in more active forms of learning, but sophisticated use of multimedia features does not necessarily produce the desired effect. This paper briefly reviews some general guidelines for applying cognitive science principles to development of student-centered e-Learning applications and describes a cognitive approach to e-Learning development that is being undertaken for the US Army.

  3. Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    reproduces the isotope effect. The heat capacity in the liquid D2O has been calculated to be 10% higher than important in the liquid phase. In fact, in many systems, the heat capacity has an isotope effect, whichCalculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics

  4. Computers for Learning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through Executive Order 12999, the Computers for Learning Program was established to provide Federal agencies a quick and easy system for donating excess and surplus computer equipment to schools...

  5. Experiments in service learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

  6. Robot learning [TC Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russell Louis

    Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

  7. Learning Innate Face Preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newborn humans preferentially orient to face-like patterns at birth, but months of experience with faces is required for full face processing abilities to develop. Several models have been proposed for how the interaction of genetic and evironmental influences can explain this data. These models generally assume that the brain areas responsible for newborn orienting responses are not capable of learning and are physically separate from those that later learn from real faces. However, it has been difficult to reconcile these models with recent discoveries of face learning in newborns and young infants. We propose a general mechanism by which genetically specified and environmentdriven preferences can coexist in the same visual areas. In particular, newborn face orienting may be the result of prenatal exposure of a learning system to internally generated input patterns, such as those found in PGO waves during REM sleep. Simulating this process with the HLISSOM biological model of the visual system, we demonstrate that the combination of learning and internal patterns is an efficient way to specify and develop circuitry for face perception. This prenatal learning can account for the newborn preferences for schematic and photographic images of faces, providing a computational explanation for how genetic influences interact with experience to construct a complex adaptive system.

  8. Equation calculates activated carbon's capacity for adsorbing pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption on activated carbon is an effective method for removing volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants from gases. A new, simple equation has been developed for calculating activated carbon's adsorption capacity as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The correlation shows good agreement with experimental results. Results from the equation are applicable for conditions commonly encountered in air pollution control techniques (25 C, 1 atm). The only input parameters needed are VOC concentrations and a table of correlation coefficients for 292 C[sub 8]-C[sub 14] compounds. The table is suitable for rapid engineering usage with a personal computer or hand calculator.

  9. A Parallel Orbital-Updating Approach for Electronic Structure Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Dai; Xingao Gong; Aihui Zhou; Jinwei Zhu

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose an orbital iteration based parallel approach for electronic structure calculations. This approach is based on our understanding of the single-particle equations of independent particles that move in an effective potential. With this new approach, the solution of the single-particle equation is reduced to some solutions of independent linear algebraic systems and a small scale algebraic problem. It is demonstrated by our numerical experiments that this new approach is quite efficient for full-potential calculations for a class of molecular systems.

  10. Formative Assessment, Equity, and Opportunity to Learn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilberg, Soleste

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inquiry focused on student learning, and to explore theirinquiry focused on student learning, and (c) how this workinquiry focused on student learning. Interrelatedly, there

  11. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience Program. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICESUpon receipt of a Lessons Learned/Best Practices Feedbackreview disseminated Lessons Learned/Best Practices Briefings

  12. Unsupervised Learning of Object Descriptors and Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Xingyao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported Experiments A New Experiment on Human Learning ofof previous experiments on human chunk learning, along withnew psychophysical experiment, where human observers learned

  13. Multimedia-Video for Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, Kah Hean; Wee, Loo Kang; Tan, Ching

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multimedia engages an audience through a combination of text, audio, still images, animation, video, or interactivity-based content formats. Along this vein, free platforms have been seen to allow budding enthusiasts to create multimedia content. For example, Google sites (Wee, 2012b) offer creative opportunities in website development that enable text insertion, still image, video and animation embedding, along with audio and hyper-interactive links to simulations (Christian & Esquembre, 2012; Wee, 2013; Wee, Goh, & Chew, 2013; Wee, Goh, & Lim, 2013; Wee, Lee, Chew, Wong, & Tan, 2015). This chapter focuses on the video aspect of multimedia, which can be positioned as a component to any effective self-paced on-line lesson that would be available anytime, anywhere via computer or mobile devices. The multimedia video approach aims to help users overcome barriers in creating engaging, effective and meaningful content (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008) for teaching and learning in an online envi...

  14. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  15. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  16. What is the GREET Fleet Footprint Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on...

  17. Cooling airflow design calculations for UFAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    written permission. Cooling Airflow Design Calculations form) height. Table 2: Design cooling airflow performance fortool predictions of UFAD cooling airflow rates and associ-

  18. Calculators and Science and Engineering Calculus Occasionally ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-10-51T23:59:59.000Z

    on examinations and quizzes. These courses do spend some class time discussing the use of graphing calculators, and some of the pitfalls into which graphing ...

  19. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation Of Chemical...

  20. Filter diagonalization of shell-model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo 101-8425 (Japan); Kaneko, Kazunari [Department of Physics, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Tetsuya [Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method of filter diagonalization for shell-model calculations. This method is based on the Sakurai and Sugiura (SS) method, but extended with the help of the shifted complex orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method. A salient feature of this method is that it can calculate eigenvalues and eigenstates in a given energy interval. We show that this method can be an alternative to the Lanczos method for calculating ground and excited states, as well as spectral strength functions. With an application to the M-scheme shell-model calculations we demonstrate that several inherent problems in the widely used Lanczos method can be removed or reduced.

  1. SPREADSHEET DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT FOR SATURATION TEMPERATURE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JO J

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the methodology for determining the saturation temperature in waste tanks. The saturation temperature is used to calculate neutral buoyancy ratio.

  2. Calculating Plutonium and Praseodymium Structural Transformations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculating Plutonium and Praseodymium Structural Transformations A newly-developed hybrid computational method has computed, for the first time, plutonium's exotic crystal...

  3. Monte Carlo reactor calculation with substantially reduced number of cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M. J.; Joo, H. G. [Seoul National Univ., 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. [Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Smith, K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Monte Carlo (MC) eigenvalue calculation scheme that substantially reduces the number of cycles is introduced with the aid of coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) formulation. First, it is confirmed in terms of pin power errors that using extremely many particles resulting in short active cycles is beneficial even in the conventional MC scheme although wasted operations in inactive cycles cannot be reduced with more particles. A CMFD-assisted MC scheme is introduced as an effort to reduce the number of inactive cycles and the fast convergence behavior and reduced inter-cycle effect of the CMFD assisted MC calculation is investigated in detail. As a practical means of providing a good initial fission source distribution, an assembly based few-group condensation and homogenization scheme is introduced and it is shown that efficient MC eigenvalue calculations with fewer than 20 total cycles (including inactive cycles) are possible for large power reactor problems. (authors)

  4. Overview of TRAC-PD2 assessment calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waterman, M E

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of Transient Reactor Analysis Code Version PD2 (TRAC-PD2) calculations performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is presented in this report as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRCs) overall assessment program of TRAC-PD2. The calculated and measured parameters summarized in this report are break mass flow rate, primary coolant system pressure, reactor core flow rates, and fuel rod cladding temperatures. The data were obtained from seven tests that were performed at two test facilities. The tests were conducted to study the various aspects of cold leg break transients, including the effects of large and small beaks, and core reflood phenomena. User experience gained from the various calculations is also summarized. 42 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Use of the Hebb-Williams closed-field maze to determine learning ability in yearling horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, Cynthia Ann

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ve fillies whi ch had never before been used on any learning study were compared. After a 10-day adjustment and training period, horses were presented a new problem each day for 12 days and were given eight trials on each problem. The following... learning parameters were calculated: (1) total excess entry scores (TExES), (2) rapi dity of learning score (XR), the percent of total excess entries occurring during the first four trials of each problem; (3) error elimination score (EES...

  6. Learning with online constraints : shifting concepts and active learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteleoni, Claire E. (Claire Elizabeth), 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many practical problems such as forecasting, real-time decision making, streaming data applications, and resource-constrained learning, can be modeled as learning with online constraints. This thesis is concerned with ...

  7. Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations YUE SHI,1 CHUANJIE WU,2 JAY W Acceptance Ratio method. We have compared two approaches to derive the atomic multipoles from quantum mechanical calculations: one directly from the new distributed multipole analysis and the other involving

  8. Calculating Highly Oscillatory Integrals by Quadrature Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thapa, Krishna 1989-

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    are found by requiring Z b a m (x) sin(!x)dx = 2 +2X i= wim (xi) The calculation of the wi therefore hinges on calculating the moments R b a x nei!g(x)dx. Unlike traditional approximation methods, the accuracy of the function increases...

  9. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  10. First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

  11. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  12. AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

  13. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  14. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  15. Adding a Learning Module -1 Adding a Learning Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Items focused on a specific subject that students can navigate at their own pace. For example or No for Enforce Sequential Viewing for the Learning Module. Selecting Yes will require students to view the Learning Module within a Table of Contents, which students can also use to navigate through the Learning

  16. : Abduction, Learning. A System for Learning Abductive Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dix, Juergen

    f g Keywords Abstract : Abduction, Learning. 1 A System for Learning Abductive Logic Programs Ferrara, Italy We present the system LAP for learning abductive logic programs from examples and from a background abductive theory. A new type of induction problem has been defined as an extension

  17. Language and Learning in the Digital Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rama, Paul S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projects examine the types of learning that occur thoughis even possible, this type of learning into schools? To

  18. Feedback in Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning and Second Language Acquisition: A study of its effect on the acquisition of French past tense aspect using an Intelligent Language Tutoring System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Ruth Mary

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions surrounding the impact of feedback in response to learner error are of interest in the fields of both Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning (ICALL). Current ...

  19. The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned Plus Past and Future Challenges Presented to: Portland State Corridor **Trucked around Corridor but leaves or enters Southern California by rail. #12;Lessons Learned

  20. Discrimination learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeates, B. F

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science DISCRIMINATION LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by B. F. Yeates Approved as to styIe aod content by: ~C airman oi . , Ommlttec. g ~liemoer Pe comber 1 S76 ABSTRACT Discrimination Learning in Horses (December 1976) B. F. Yeates, B. S. , Texas... was subsequently given 7 days discrimination training on each of' three different stimuli in three successive periods. Ti percert correct response" vtas used to measure period, stimuli and horse efforts. iiean percentages for the three periods were 42? 51. 9...

  1. Reactivity impact of delayed neutron spectra on MCNP calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Werner, C.J.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new features in MCNP4C, the latest version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code, include the capability to sample from delayed as well as prompt fission emission spectra. Previous versions of MCNP all have sampled exclusively from prompt spectra. Delayed neutrons typically account for <1% of all neutrons emitted from fission, but the emission spectra for delayed neutrons are somewhat softer than those for prompt neutrons. Because of the softer spectrum, delayed neutrons are less likely to leak from the system, and they also are less likely to cause fission in isotopes that have an effective threshold for fission (e.g., {sup 238}U and {sup 240}Pu). Consequently, the inclusion of delayed neutron spectra can have a small but significant effect on reactivity calculations. This study performs MCNP4C calculations for a series of established benchmarks and quantifies the reactivity impact of the delayed neutron spectra.

  2. Modeling the spacing effect in sequential category Hongjing Lu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuille, Alan L.

    are found not only in human learning, but also in various types of learning in other species, including ratsModeling the spacing effect in sequential category learning Hongjing Lu Department of Psychology@stat.ucla.edu Abstract We develop a Bayesian sequential model for category learning. The sequential model updates two

  3. How Minds Work Memories and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    & Learning 7 Types of Human Learning Requiring Distinct Mechanisms · Perceptual learning ­ Identify1 How Minds Work Memories and Learning Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;How Minds Work: Memory & Learning 2 Human Learning

  4. On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  5. Cluster-model calculations of exotic decays from heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, B.; Merchant, A.C.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cluster model employing a local, effective cluster-core potential is used to investigate exotic decay from heavy nuclei as a quantum tunneling phenomenon within a semiclassical approximation. Excellent agreement with all reported experimental measurements of the decay widths for /sup 14/C and /sup 24/Ne emission is obtained. As an added bonus, the width for alpha particle emission from /sup 212/Po is also calculated in good agreement with experiment.

  6. Century Learning through Apple Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    21st Century Learning through Apple Technology July 4 ­ 5, 2013 This exciting institute will appeal to educators who wish to enhance their teaching in support of 21st century learning using Apple technology. This institute begins with a keynote address that looks at how new technologies can enhance 21st century learning

  7. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    problems 20 2.3.1 Classes 20 2.3.2 Types of classi cation problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Li`ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Course;#12;APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li#12;ege

  8. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    .3.2 Types of classification problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2.3.4 Decision or classificationApplied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Liâ??ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Courseâ??e'' #12; #12; APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li

  9. Evolution, Learning & Information Brian Skyrms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    SIGNALS Evolution, Learning & Information Brian Skyrms #12;Signals: Evolution, Learning. The Flow of Information 4. Evolution 5. Evolution in Lewis Signaling Games 6. Deception 7. Learning 8 of evolution by differential reproduction and natural variation. In particular we use models of replicator

  10. Hybrid Machine Learning Princeton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    : Learn an apprentice policy !A such that V(!A) # V(!E) where the value function V(!) is unknown. Expert policy !E Apprentice policy !A Learning algorithm #12;Apprenticeship Learning !! Our contribution: New apprentice policy than existing algorithms. #12;Assumptions !! Definition: Let µ(!) be the feature vector

  11. Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Samuel Lane

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrected values for the b 's are best cal- i culated by multiplying (b. /d ) by (d. ) The compositions for each component in the vapor and liquid streams leaving plate j are calculated by use of the following equations. ('i/ i)ca ( i)co y. ji c Z (v... . . /b. ) (b. ) ji i ca i co i=1 , f a j x N+1 C (47-b) A temperature profile may be calculated by making either bubble or dew point calculations based on the compositions obtained by use of Equations (46) and (47). The specified distillate rate must...

  12. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Calculated structures and fluoride affinities for fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, M.

    1986-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that SCF-MO calculations provide good estimates of the energies of the processes MF/sub n/ ..-->.. M/sup n+/ + nF/sup -/ where M/sup n+/ is an ion of a first- or second-row element in a closed-shell or s/sup 2/ configuration. The fluoride ion affinities are then calculated for a number of molecules and ions. Where comparison with experiment is possible, the agreement is generally good when allowance is made for experimental uncertainties. In favorable cases, accurate heats of formation may be calculated from fluoride affinities.

  14. Calculation of external dose from distributed source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a relatively simple calculational method, called the point kernel method (Fo68), for estimating external dose from distributed sources that emit photon or electron radiations. The principles of the point kernel method are emphasized, rather than the presentation of extensive sets of calculations or tables of numerical results. A few calculations are presented for simple source geometries as illustrations of the method, and references and descriptions are provided for other caluclations in the literature. This paper also describes exposure situations for which the point kernel method is not appropriate and other, more complex, methods must be used, but these methods are not discussed in any detail.

  15. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  16. INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

  17. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of $K\\alpha$ transition energies in beryllium-like argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations have been performed for the energy levels of the low-lying and core-excited states of beryllium-like argon, Ar$^{14+}$. These calculations include the one-loop QED effects as obtained by two different methods, the screening-potential approach as well as the model QED operator approach. The calculations are supplemented by a systematic estimation of uncertainties of theoretical predictions.

  18. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg Wilson

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  19. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Greg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  20. Reflecting to learn mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating reflective practice and writing to learn mathematics (WTLM) in order ... concern or interest as well as potential explanations for and solutions to ..... teacher, I know I need to be universally good in both language and numbers. ... The PSMTs' reflections also revealed that completing the prompts encouraged them to.

  1. Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be ...

  2. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  3. Available Energy Calculations for Process Engineers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, A. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief reviews of available energy and of the application of available energy analysis to chemical processes are given. Two alternative methods for performing available energy calculations are discussed and contrasted. The first method relies...

  4. Signal probability calculations using partial functional manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodavarti, Ravishankar

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALCULATIONS IV THE CUTTING ALGORITHM 14 V RESULTS 17 VI CONCLUSIONS . . REFERENCES APPENDIX A 32 35 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Characteristic table of all ISCAS combinational benchmarks II Number of ambiguous lines using the single best ordering... heuristics can be used to generate orderings, in a few cpu seconds [17]. These heuristics have a very low cost of generation, as compared to that of the best ordering. Iterative OPDD calculations with difFerent variable orderings were made, and the best...

  5. Calculator programs for pipe stress engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, K.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains a collection of programs for solving a wide variety of stress problems using both the TI-59 and HP-41CV calculators. Each program is prefaced with a description of the problem to be solved, nomenclature, code restrictions and program limitations. Solutions are explained analytically and then followed by the complete program listing, documentation and checklists. Topics include calculations for pipewall thickness, pressure vessel analysis, reinforcement pads, allowable span, vibration, stress, and two-anchor piping systems.

  6. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  7. Calculation of rotordynamic forces on labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensel, Steve John

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis STEVE JOHN HENSEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by STEVE JOHN HENSEL Approved as to style snd content by: David Rhode (Chairman of Committee) Erian Baskharone Leel and Garison (Member) +, gg, W. D...

  8. A comparison algorithm to check LTSA Layer 1 and SCORM compliance in e-Learning sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Souvik; Banerjee, Nilanjan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of e-Learning is largely dependent on the impact of its multimedia aided learning content on the learner over the hyper media. The e-Learning portals with different proportion of multimedia elements have different impact on the learner, as there is lack of standardization. The Learning Technology System Architecture (LTSA) Layer 1 deals with the effect of environment on the learner. From an information technology perspective it specifies learner interaction from the environment to the learner via multimedia content. Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCROM) is a collection of standards and specifications for content of web-based e-learning and specifies how JavaScript API can be used to integrate content development. In this paper an examination is made on the design features of interactive multimedia components of the learning packages by creating an algorithm which will give a comparative study of multimedia component used by different learning packages. The resultant graph as output helps...

  9. Association and Abstraction in Sequential Learning:“What is Learned?” Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Stephen B.; Doyle, Karen E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    serial-pattern learning; our SPAM simulations simply testedwalk" simulation model of multiple-pattern learning in ain rat serial pattern learning. In two simulation studies (

  10. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources a significant effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 15

  11. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.0 pounds

  12. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.5 pounds

  13. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

  14. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 84 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

  15. A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

  16. Student Success Effective Seminar Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    See over Student Success Effective Seminar Participation Seminars are effective learning experiences as students learn more from talking and listening to each other than they do from listening to keep the conversation going, focused, and inclusive. Confidentiality and Respectful Behaviour o

  17. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of0/2002Effects of

  18. Cost-effective Lighting Retrofits: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, M. D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in cramped fixtures. Those who replace lamps are often more likely to replace failed integral units with cheap incandescents again, while with component-type units they tend to replace the failed fluorescent lamp only. - Where incandescent lamps are on a... fixtures, 9 and 13 watt quad tubes may not start in freezing weather. Twin 9be lamps of similar wattages may be a better ioice. Power factor can be quite low on some lagnetic ballasted products, while total ~rmonic distortion can be high on some...

  19. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identifying with most types of learning styles. © 2014others prefer re?ective types of learning opportuni- ties,learning style. Types of Learning Styles Kolb depicts

  20. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  1. Robotics for Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toh, Dennis; Lim, Matthew; Wee, Loo Kang; Ong, Matthew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teaching Robotics is about empowering students to create and configure robotics devices and program computers to nurture in students the skill sets necessary to play an active role in society. The robot in Figure 1 focuses on the design of scaffolds and physical assembly methods, coupled with a computer logic program to make that makes it move or behave in a very precise (remote controlled or autonomous) manner. This enables students to investigate, explore and refine the program to affect the robots. The Robotics approach takes into account the increasing popularity of Computer Science and the learning by doing (Schank, Berman, & Macpherson, 1999) approach to solve complex problems and use computers meaningfully in learning (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Jonassen, Howland, Marra, & Crismond, 2008). In Singapore, teachers and students in Woodlands Ring Secondary and Rulang Primary have incorporated robotics to varying extents into formal and informal curricula. In addition, other less expensive ...

  2. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  3. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

  4. Dose calculations for severe LWR accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margulies, T.S.; Martin, J.A. Jr.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a set of precalculated doses based on a set of postulated accident releases and intended for use in emergency planning and emergency response. Doses were calculated for the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident categories of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) using the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) code. Whole body and thyroid doses are presented for a selected set of weather cases. For each weather case these calculations were performed for various times and distances including three different dose pathways - cloud (plume) shine, ground shine and inhalation. During an emergency this information can be useful since it is immediately available for projecting offsite radiological doses based on reactor accident sequence information in the absence of plant measurements of emission rates (source terms). It can be used for emergency drill scenario development as well.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Lynn; J. Carlson; E. Epelbaum; S. Gandolfi; A. Gezerlis; A. Schwenk

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first Green's function Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei with nuclear interactions derived from chiral effective field theory up to next-to-next-to-leading order. Up to this order, the interactions can be constructed in a local form and are therefore amenable to quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We demonstrate a systematic improvement with each order for the binding energies of $A=3$ and $A=4$ systems. We also carry out the first few-body tests to study perturbative expansions of chiral potentials at different orders, finding that higher-order corrections are more perturbative for softer interactions. Our results confirm the necessity of a three-body force for correct reproduction of experimental binding energies and radii, and pave the way for studying few- and many-nucleon systems using quantum Monte Carlo methods with chiral interactions.

  6. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  7. Performance of Learning Disabled High School Students on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnden, G. Mack; Meyen, Edward L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seems warranted in light of its potential impact on job oppor­ tunities for the learning disabled. The ASVAB consists of 10 power and 2 speed tests requiri ng a total administration time of three hours. The three sub tests (Hord Knowledge, Arithmetic... fc:ir Research in Learning Disabilities 1980 . Regan, M. & Deshler, D. D. Inservice training as preparation for vocational education to provide effective learn i ng enviroment for special needs students. Journal of Career Devel opment, in press...

  8. Learning planar ising models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jason K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netrapalli, Praneeth [STUDENT UT AUSTIN

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 30 different (j{sup {prime}}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

  10. Calculation method for safe ?* in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Herr, W; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One way of increasing the peak luminosity in the LHC is to decrease the beam size at the interaction points by squeezing to smaller values of ?*. The LHC is now in a regime where safety and stability determines the limit on ?*, as opposed to traditional optics limits. In this paper, we derive a calculation model to determine the safe ?*-values based on collimator settings and operational stability of the LHC. This model was used to calculate the settings for the LHC run in 2011. It was found that ?* could be decreased from 3.5 m to 1.5 m, which has now successfully been put into operation.

  11. Nonperturbative calculations in light-front QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabysheva, Sophia S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812 (United States)

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods of light-front quantization and Pauli-Villars regularization are applied to a nonperturbative calculation of the dressed-electron state in quantum electrodynamics. This is intended as a test of the methods in a gauge theory, as a precursor to possible methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics. The electron state is truncated to include at most two photons and no positrons in the Fock basis, and the wave functions of the dressed state are used to compute the electrons's anomalous magnetic moment. A choice of regularization that preserves the chiral symmetry of the massless limit is critical for the success of the calculation.

  12. Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hahn; S. Heinemeyer; F. von der Pahlen; H. Rzehak; C. Schappacher

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

  13. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  14. A PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, H.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH ACommittee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalcula- tion of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,

  15. Automating large-scale LEMUF calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picard, R.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand material unaccounted for (MUFs) and, in some cases, to comply with formal regulatory requirements, many facilities are paying increasing attention to software for MUF evaluation. Activities related to improving understanding of MUFs are generic (including the identification, by name, of individual measured values and individual special nuclear material (SNM) items in a data base, and the handling of a wide variety of accounting problems) as well as facility-specific (including interfacing a facility's data base to a computational engine and subsequent uses of that engine). Los Alamos efforts to develop a practical engine are reviewed and some of the lessons learned during that development are described in this paper.

  16. Preference Learning Johannes Furnkranz, Eyke Hullermeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    types of prediction problems, the learning from/of preferences has recently received a lot of attention in the machine learning literature. Like other types of complex learning tasks, preference learning deviates provide a systematic exposition of different types of preference learning problems nor a comprehensive

  17. Benefits of multisensory learning Ladan Shams1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shams, Ladan B.

    of learning? Acquiring this skill can involve many types of learning and here we focus on aspectsBenefits of multisensory learning Ladan Shams1 and Aaron R. Seitz2 1 Department of Psychology, Riverside, CA 92521, USA Studies of learning, and in particular perceptual learning, have focused

  18. Organizational scenarios for the use of learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects Henry Hermans and Fred de Vries October 2006 Learning objects in practice 2 #12;Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects page 2 of 22 Colophon Organizational scenario's for the use of learning objects Learning objects in practice 2

  19. Oberseminar -ICP Temperature Calculation for Tribological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    and passing to third parties. 0 #12;Overview Where to calculate the heat: diesel injection pump First focus: journal bearings DS/ETI2 Vortrag 24.01.05.tex 24.01.05 c Robert Bosch GmbH reserves all rights even;Approach Some assessments: Heat diffuses 30µm in diesel in the time of one rotation of the shaft

  20. New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

  1. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  2. Calculation of a coaxial microwave torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Kossyi, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation); Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters of an equilibrium microwave discharge in an atmospheric-pressure argon flow in a coaxial waveguide with a truncated inner electrode are calculated numerically by using a self-consistent two-dimensional MHD model. The results obtained agree satisfactorily with the experimental data.

  3. Damien Allain Ingnieur recherche, dveloppement, calcul scientifique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 5 articles publiés. · Administration du parc de machines de calculs Linux. 01/2003­03/2003 Ingénieur données, la réparation de code source en C/C++, de téléchargement de patch et de conversion d'image pour

  4. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  5. 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT April 2005 CEC-300 on net system power [Senate Bill 1305, (Sher), Chapter 796, Statute of 1997]1 . Net system power in California. Net system power plays a role in California's retail disclosure program, which requires every

  6. Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 of 20 Problem A+ Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in Every person's blood has 2 markers in a particular ABO blood type for that person. Combination ABO Blood Type AA A AB AB AO A BB B BO B OO O Likewise, every person has two alleles for the blood Rh factor, represented by the characters + and -. Someone who

  7. Program performs vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, V.L.

    1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A program designed for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV or 41C calculators solves basic vapor-liquid equilibrium problems, including figuring the dewpoint, bubblepoint, and equilibrium flash. The algorithm uses W.C. Edmister's method for predicting ideal-solution K values.

  8. FIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    energy losses have prevented the experimental demonstration of net fusion energy production fromFIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT M. KOTSCHENREUTHER, W. DORLAND, Q.P. LIU Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States of America G.W. HAMMETT, M

  9. NEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    their learning, both in and out of class. Simulations, learning games, threaded discussions, and videoNEW E-LEARNING SERVICES BASED ON MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: UBI-LEARN PROJECT Mona Laroussi 1'Ascq cedex - France KEYWORDS: Mobile learning, Ubiquitous learning, Wireless technology Abstract Ubiquitous

  10. Metafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    via discovery, educational simulations, social learning techniques, collaborative learning toolsMetafora: A Web-Based Platform for Learning to Learn Together in Science and Mathematics Toby as an emerging pedagogy for supporting Learning to Learn Together in science and mathematics education. Our goal

  11. Learning Tiny Theories Tim Menzies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    Learning Tiny Theories Tim Menzies , Rajesh Gunnalan , Kalaivani Appukutty , Amarnath Srinivasan Engineering, University of British Columbia, Canada {gunnalan|avani|amarnath}@csee

  12. Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schoen,,,

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

  13. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  14. Envelope calculations for a low temperature neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Robert Paul

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with distance inward from the surface R for all three star models S, I and II at effective temperature Te = 10 K 34 Density-pressure dependence for the Model S star at different values of Te 35 Envelope calculation traces in the opacity-density plane... )] (20) Similarly a relation between p and T can be found 64v GN~ uH() a+1 1 a+1 ~a+ 3 r L k 4-b+aJ 0 (21) Inserting this back into the energy transport equation (13) gives the radial dependence of the temperature (22) (23) where R is the surface...

  15. Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu; Peters, Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems ...

  16. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

  17. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjing Lu; Randall R. Rojas; Tom Beckers; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2 shows simulations of learning of weight for cue A (a previous simulation of sequential learning based on thesimulations are in good agreement with experimental findings. Keywords: Bayesian inference; model selection; sequential causal learning;

  18. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 38th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

  19. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 39th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned.

  20. Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008 Call for Nominations: Provost's Prize for Teaching with Technology Eligibility: Candidates must be a tenure-track or non's Prize for Teaching with Technology will be awarded to up to two recipients. Each recipient will receive

  1. Team Leader, Learning for Livelihoods Commonwealth of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Country Collaborators; Ajaga Nji; Collins Osei; Reuben Aggor; Edward Badu; Geoffrey Kironchi; Adewale Adekunle; Adeolu Ayanwale; Morolake Adekunle; Moses Ubaru; Aliyageen Alghali; Bob Conteh; Edwin Momoh; Camilius Sanga; Ayubu Jacob Churi; Siza Tumbo; Krishna Alluri; Rainer Zachmann; Anthony Youdeowei; Savithri Swaminathan

    Moses Tenywa, Bernard Fungo, Mungule Chikoye and Martin KaongaThe Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government to encourage the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies.

  2. APRIL: Active Preference-learning based Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    behaviors (section 2). Resuming the preference-based policy learning (Ppl) approach [2], the con- tribution of the present paper is to extend Ppl along the lines of active learning, in order to minimize the number Bayesian approaches hardly scale up to large-dimensional continuous spaces. Secondly, the Ppl setting

  3. Instinct and Learning Synergy in Simulated Foraging Using a Neural Network Thomas E. Portegys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portegys, Thomas E.

    Instinct and Learning Synergy in Simulated Foraging Using a Neural Network Thomas E. Portegys simple animals learn, and is therefore a useful approach to simulating them. The way this works and experience are shown to form a potent combination to achieve effective foraging in a simulated environment

  4. Learning Qualitative Relations in Physics with Law Encoding Diagrams Peter C-H. Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Peter

    Learning Qualitative Relations in Physics with Law Encoding Diagrams Peter C-H. Cheng ESRC Centre that evaluates the effectiveness of Law Encoding Diagrams (LEDs) for learning qualitative relations in the domain of elastic colli- sions in physics. A LED is a representation that captures the laws or important relations

  5. Search Techniques for Fourier-Based Learning Adam Drake and Dan Ventura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    Search Techniques for Fourier-Based Learning Adam Drake and Dan Ventura Computer Science Department Brigham Young University {acd2,ventura}@cs.byu.edu Abstract Fourier-based learning algorithms rely-based algorithms have also been effectively applied in real-world settings [Drake and Ventura, 2005; Kargupta et al

  6. Exact-to-precision generalized perturbation for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State University, 911 Oval Dr., Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript extends the exact-to-precision generalized perturbation theory (E{sub P}GPT), introduced previously, to neutron transport calculation whereby previous developments focused on neutron diffusion calculation only. The E{sub P}GPT collectively denotes new developments in generalized perturbation theory (GPT) that place premium on computational efficiency and defendable accuracy in order to render GPT a standard analysis tool in routine design and safety reactor calculations. EPGPT constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original neutron transport model for subsequent engineering analysis, e.g. functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross sections in terms of various core conditions, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the state variable (i.e. neutron angular flux) by projection onto an active subspace. Confining the state variations to the active subspace allows one to construct a small number of what is referred to as the 'active' responses which are solely dependent on the physics model rather than on the responses of interest, the number of input parameters, or the number of points in the state phase space. (authors)

  7. WIPP Benchmark calculations with the large strain SPECTROM codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, G.D.; DeVries, K.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides calculational results from the updated Lagrangian structural finite-element programs SPECTROM-32 and SPECTROM-333 for the purpose of qualifying these codes to perform analyses of structural situations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results are presented for the Second WIPP Benchmark (Benchmark II) Problems and for a simplified heated room problem used in a parallel design calculation study. The Benchmark II problems consist of an isothermal room problem and a heated room problem. The stratigraphy involves 27 distinct geologic layers including ten clay seams of which four are modeled as frictionless sliding interfaces. The analyses of the Benchmark II problems consider a 10-year simulation period. The evaluation of nine structural codes used in the Benchmark II problems shows that inclusion of finite-strain effects is not as significant as observed for the simplified heated room problem, and a variety of finite-strain and small-strain formulations produced similar results. The simplified heated room problem provides stratigraphic complexity equivalent to the Benchmark II problems but neglects sliding along the clay seams. The simplified heated problem does, however, provide a calculational check case where the small strain-formulation produced room closures about 20 percent greater than those obtained using finite-strain formulations. A discussion is given of each of the solved problems, and the computational results are compared with available published results. In general, the results of the two SPECTROM large strain codes compare favorably with results from other codes used to solve the problems.

  8. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  9. NEPA Lessons Learned Questionnaire

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of theTechno-economicOctober 2013 -DepartmentLessons Learned

  10. Homeokinesis A new principle to back up evolution with learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learning #12 space required Homeokinesis 8 September 2008 Different types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learningDifferent types of learning #12;· So far, only fairly simple successful examples, e

  11. Category and Perceptual Learning in Subjects with Treated Wilson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    many similarities. In both types of learning, observers arebetween different types of category and perceptual learning.

  12. Validation of Dose Calculation Codes for Clearance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Wirendal, B.; Bjerler, J.; Studsvik; Teunckens, L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Various international and national bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have put forward proposals or guidance documents to regulate the ''clearance'' from regulatory control of very low level radioactive material, in order to allow its recycling as a material management practice. All these proposals are based on predicted scenarios for subsequent utilization of the released materials. The calculation models used in these scenarios tend to utilize conservative data regarding exposure times and dose uptake as well as other assumptions as a safeguard against uncertainties. None of these models has ever been validated by comparison with the actual real life practice of recycling. An international project was organized in order to validate some of the assumptions made in these calculation models, and, thereby, better assess the radiological consequences of recycling on a practical large scale.

  13. HP-41 Calculates Dykstra-Parsons permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, B.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new program for the HP-41 programmable calculator has been written which will calculate the often used Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation factor, V. No longer must numerous individual permeability values be plotted on log probability paper as a first step in determining V. Input is simply these same permeability values selected at equal spacing along the interval in question. For most core analysis this spacing will be 1 ft. This program is labeled ''KVAR'' (for permeability variation) and is listed here, along with its bar code for those with optical wands. It requires only nine registers for program storage (since it uses HP built-in statistical functions) and eight registers for data storage. Also, it can be stored on one track of the standard two-track magnetic card. Data entry is terminated by entering ''O''. Lastly, it will run with or without a printer.

  14. Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

  15. Analytic calculation of properties of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Siopsis; Jason Therrien

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate analytically properties of holographic superconductors in the probe limit. We analyze the range $1/2 3/2$. We also obtain the frequency dependence of the conductivity by solving analytically the wave equation of electromagnetic perturbations. We show that the real part of the DC conductivity behaves as $e^{-\\Delta_g /T}$ and estimate the gap $\\Delta_g$ analytically. Our results are in good agreement with numerical results.

  16. Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

  17. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  18. Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

  19. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The DOE/NREL Approach (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document compiles lessons learned and provides a step-by-step process for implementing effective policy assistance.

  1. E-learning? Technology enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loch, Birgit

    9/15/2010 1 E-learning? Technology enhanced teaching and learning in symbol-based disciplines? Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 2 #12;9/15/2010 2 An Example: Make t the subject 2 3 Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 3 HMS111 An Example: Make t the subject 2

  2. Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck Computer Engineering Group Faculty of Technology Bielefeld-521-106-6440 mail: wschenck@ti.uni-bielefeld.de Abstract This paper focuses on adaptive motor control in the kinematic domain. Several motor learning strategies from the literature are adopted to kinematic problems

  3. Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

  4. Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  5. Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

  6. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  7. NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for DOE Nuclear Facilities NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of...

  8. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and properties of ZrSiO4 polymorphs. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and...

  9. Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads During this webinar, Building America Research Team IBACOS...

  10. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ...

  11. Specification of a multilevel model for an individualized didactic planning: case of learning to read

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Specification of a multilevel model for an individualized didactic planning: case of learning approaches (Macroscopic, Mesoscopic and microscopic), to arrive at an individualized didactic planning. We of working session; the second level is concerned by the calculation of sequence of didactic situations types

  12. Design Calculations For APS Safety Shutters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at rest and in flight, Moliere multiple scattering, Moller and Bhabha scattering, Compton scattering, pair production, photoelectric effect, and continuous energy loss by...

  13. Scaffolding middle school students' content knowledge and ill-structured problem solving in a problem-based hypermedia learning environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulu, Saniye Tugba

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on two areas under the overarching theme of the effects of domain-general and domain-specific scaffolds with different levels of support, continuous or faded. First, the study investigated the effects of scaffolds on learning...

  14. Excited state contamination in nucleon structure calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Green; Stefan Krieg; John Negele; Andrew Pochinsky; Sergey Syritsyn

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the sources of systematic error in nucleon structure calculations is contamination from unwanted excited states. In order to measure this systematic error, we vary the operator insertion time and source-sink separation independently. We compute observables for three source-sink separations between 0.93 fm and 1.39 fm using clover-improved Wilson fermions and pion masses as low as 150 MeV. We explore the use of a two-state model fit to subtract off the contribution from excited states.

  15. Calculation of Neutral Beam Injection into SSPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Hill, D N; LoDestro, L L; McLean, H S

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SSPX spheromak experiment has achieved electron temperatures of 350eV and confinement consistent with closed magnetic surfaces. In addition, there is evidence that the experiment may be up against an operational beta limit for Ohmic heating. To test this barrier, there are firm plans to add two 0.9MW Neutral Beam (NB) sources to the experiment. A question is whether the limit is due to instability. Since the deposited Ohmic power in the core is relatively small the additional power from the beams is sufficient to significantly increase the electron temperature. Here we present results of computations that will support this contention. We have developed a new NB module to calculate the orbits of the injected fast fast-ions. The previous computation made heavy use of tokamak ordering which fails for a tight-aspect-ratio device, where B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub pol}. The model calculates the deposition from the NFREYA package [1]. The neutral from the CX deposition is assumed to be ionized in place, a high-density approximation. The fast ions are then assumed to fill a constant angular momentum orbit. And finally, the fast ions immediately assume the form of a dragged down distribution. Transfer rates are then calculated from this distribution function [2]. The differential times are computed from the orbit times and the particle weights in each flux zone (the sampling bin) are proportional to the time spent in the zone. From this information the flux-surface-averaged profiles are obtained and fed into the appropriate transport equation. This procedure is clearly approximate, but accurate enough to help guide experiments. A major advantage is speed: 5000 particles can be processed in under 4s on our fastest LINUX box. This speed adds flexibility by enabling a ''large'' number of predictive studies. Similar approximations, without the accurate orbit calculation presented here, had some success comparing with experiment and TRANSP [3]. Since our procedure does not have multiple CX and relies on disparate time scales, more detailed understanding requires a ''complete'' NB package such as the NUBEAM [4] module, which follows injected fast ions along with their generations until they enter the main thermal distribution.

  16. Calculator program trilogy characterizes comingled gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, R.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of programs has been developed for the HP-41CV that allows a quicker and more accurate approach to commingled stream calculations. This avoids the margin of error that the representative method introduces. The alpha-numeric capability of the HP-41CV will prompt for the inputs of an 11-component stream. The program series comprises: gas analysis; gas gathering/gas analysis; and flash vaporization. Each of these programs has its stand-alone use; but their true worth is in their integrated capability.

  17. Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

  18. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R.; Hanson, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF. In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 30%. 7 refs.

  19. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R. (Department of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391 (USA)); Hanson, J.D. (Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only that information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF (Fusion Technol. {bold 10}, 179 (1986)). In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 20% even though the islands are within a factor of 2 of overlapping.

  20. Hybrid Car Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project JumpHyEnergy Systems IncCar Calculator

  1. Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilariaDirectDirectCalculator Jump to:

  2. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Exploration Technique:Illinois: EnergyRoof Calculator

  3. Post-Training Support for Learning Technology Sam Snoddy, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novick, David G.

    Post-Training Support for Learning Technology Sam Snoddy, Jr. Cloudcroft Schools P.O. Box 198 the effects of post-training support, we studied the introduction of new gradebook software in a public high school. The school's 108 faculty members received training on the software, and approximately half

  4. Learning Partially Observable Deterministic Action Models Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Eyal

    . For example, the overall time for learning STRIPS actions' effects is O(T · n). For other cases the update per- imate the representation with a k-CNF formula, yielding an overall time of O(T · nk ) for the entire, and games. Other applications, such as robotics, human-computer interfaces, and program and

  5. Learning Partially Observable Deterministic Action Models Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Eyal

    . For example, the overall time for learning STRIPS actions' effects is O(T · n). For other cases the update per approx­ imate the representation with a k­CNF formula, yielding an overall time of O(T · n k, virtual worlds, and games. Other applications, such as robotics, human­computer interfaces, and progr

  6. Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys Kenton Kirkpatrick John Valasek Aerospace Engineering Department Texas A&M University AIAA GNC Conference 21 August 2008 Honolulu;Kirkpatrick & Valasek - 5 Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Metallic Alloys used as actuators Shape Memory Effect

  7. Ch.3 Earth's Modern Atmosphere Learning Objective One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    ;Learning Objective Five: Acid Rain #12;Acid Rain "Acid rain" is a broad term referring to a mixture of wet. (US EPA) #12;The effects of acid rain Surface waters and aquatic animals Forests Automotive coatings Materials Visibility Human health #12;Acid rain damage to

  8. Deictic Pronoun Learning and Mirror Self-Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scassellati, Brian

    , the robot uses the timing of the visual feedback that results from its arm's movement. The part of the image and the ability to use the word "I" effectively are commonly seen as major milestones in a human infant definitions with sensory patterns in- stead of pragmatic roles. Here, a robot learns the usage of the words "I

  9. Calculation of large ion densities under HVdc transmission lines by the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suda, Tomotaka; Sunaga, Yoshitaka [Central Research Institute of Electrical Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)] [Central Research Institute of Electrical Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calculation method for large ion densities (charged aerosols) under HVdc transmission lines was developed considering both the charging mechanism of aerosols by small ions and the drifting process by wind. Large ion densities calculated by this method agreed well with the ones measured under the Shiobara HVdc test line on the lateral profiles at ground level up to about 70m downwind from the line. Measured values decreased more quickly than calculated ones farther downwind from the line. Considering the effect of point discharge from ground cover (earth corona) improved the agreement in the farther downwind region.

  10. Learning at the level of the spinal cord: the role of associative and nonassociative mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joynes, Robin Lee

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of Pavlovian conditioning has long been used to study the underlying neural mechanisms of learning. Prior studies have shown that a CS (CS+) that has been paired with an aversive US elicits antinociception. A similar effect has been...

  11. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diercksen, B.H.F. [Max-Planck-Institut Fuer Astrophysik, Muenchen (Germany); Karelson, M. [Univ. of Tartu (Estonia); Tamm, T. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H{sub 3}O{sup +}(H2O){sub 4}, OH{sup {minus}}(H2O){sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}(H2O){sub 4}, and Hal{sup {minus}}(H2O){sub 4}, where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied.

  12. Calculations of composition boundaries of saturated phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, L.; Hahn, S.

    1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A program for the HP-41CV calculator is presented for calculating the equilibrium composition boundaries of pairs of saturating solids, liquids, or a combination of a solid and liquid. The activity coefficients must be represented in the form ln ..gamma../sub 1/ = (b/sub h//T - b/sub s/)x/sub 2//sup 2/ + (c/sub h//T - c/sub x/)x/sub 2//sup 3/ where h refers to an enthalpy contribution and s refers to an excess entropy contribution. For solid-liquid equilibria, enthalpies and entropies of fusion are required. For all equilibria, provision is made for use of hypothetical standard states such as the Henry's Law standard states. For example, in treating solid solutions of molybdenum in face-centered cubic metals such as Ni, Rh, or Pt, it is sometimes convenient to use a hypothetical fcc standard state of Mo which represents the limiting Henry's Law behavior of Mo in the fcc metal and has much different properties than a real fcc molybdenum solid.

  13. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170?000?cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  14. Iteratively extending time horizon reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    - Belgium y Research Fellow FNRS, #3; Postdoctoral Researcher FNRS Abstract. Reinforcement learning aims

  15. Team Based Learning (TBL) Scott Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Team Based Learning (TBL) Bill Brown Scott Bryant Susan Dana MSU College of Business #12;Agenda · Overview of Team Based Learning (TBL) · RATs! · Team Learning Exercises · Graded Work Product · Challenges with TBL · Q & A #12;Overview of Team Based Learning · Comprehensive teaching strategy to enable active

  16. Nonparametric Bayesian Policy Priors for Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi-Velez, Finale P.

    We consider reinforcement learning in partially observable domains where the agent can query an expert for

  17. Session 3280 Why Bother Learning about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 3280 Why Bother Learning about Learning Styles and Psychological Types? Teresa Larkin instruction is designed with learning styles in mind 1 - 3 . The adoption of any type of new teaching and and psychological types will be addressed. A brief overview of two learning style models and assessment instruments

  18. Preference Learning Johannes Furnkranz, Eyke Hullermeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hüllermeier, Eyke

    with novel types of prediction problems, the learning from/of preferences has recently received a lot of attention in the machine learning literature. Just as other types of complex learning tasks, preference or the type of information provided as an input to the learning system. Needless to say, this short article

  19. Learning and Memory Eric R. Kandel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Nachum

    and memory we are interested in several questions. What are the major forms of P.1228 learning? What types of information about the environment are learned most easily? Do different types of learning give riseBack 62 Learning and Memory Eric R. Kandel Irving Kupfermann Susan Iversen BEHAVIOR IS THE RESULT

  20. Foundations for a New Science of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complex learning. In computer simulations, starting the learn- ing process with a low-resolution sensoryFoundations for a New Science of Learning Andrew N. Meltzoff,1,2,3 * Patricia K. Kuhl,1,3,4 Javier Movellan,5,6 Terrence J. Sejnowski5,6,7,8 Human learning is distinguished by the range and complexity

  1. E ective Neuronal Learning with Ine ective Hebbian Learning Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    ; Palm & Sommer, 1996) derived the learn- ing rule that maximizes the network memory capacity, and showed of papers (Palm & Sommer, 1988; Palm, 1992; Palm & Sommer, 1996), Palm and Sommer have further studied

  2. Implementing Learning Design to support web-based learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA. UK. ** Educational Technology Expertise Centre (OTEC), Open Expertise Centre (OTEC) at the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL), who produced a Learning Design

  3. Learning with Online Constraints: Shifting Concepts and Active Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteleoni, Claire E.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many practical problems such as forecasting, real-time decisionmaking, streaming data applications, and resource-constrainedlearning, can be modeled as learning with online constraints. Thisthesis is concerned with analyzing ...

  4. Assessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    need to be student-focused rather than instructor-focused. Focus on the learning resulting fromAssessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on quizzes should be linked to our learning objectives. To properly assess student learning, you need to know what

  5. 1Building virtual learning communities and the learning of mathematics teacher student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    1 1Building virtual learning communities and the learning of mathematics teacher student Salvador of learning for student teachers. Firstly, I shall describe the characteristics of the design of learning trajectories in a video-based learning environment focusing on the exploration of mathematics teaching to help

  6. Promoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as incompatible. This is due to the origins of both types of learning environments which, when consideredPromoting Self Directed Learning 1 Running head: PROMOTING SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Promoting Self Directed Learning in Simulation Based Discovery Learning Environments through Intelligent Support Koen

  7. Learning to be different: acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc

    skills for multiple prey types. (3) The learning curve for acquiring new foraging skills is acceleratingLearning to be different: acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental Question: How does the ability to improve foraging skills by learning, and to transfer that learned

  8. ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION IN COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Duška; Martin Barták; František Drkal; Jan Hensen

    equation in cooling load calculations. The performance of nine different procedures (the four methods and

  9. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  10. Multiclass learning with simplex coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroueh, Youssef

    In this paper we discuss a novel framework for multiclass learning, defined by a suitable coding/decoding strategy, namely the simplex coding, that allows us to generalize to multiple classes a relaxation approach commonly ...

  11. Learning in the labor market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a collection of three independent essays that study the implication of learning on labor mobility, labor supply, wage distribution, wage dynamics, and allocations of workers under different assumptions about ...

  12. SPANISH STUDIES Program Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SPANISH STUDIES Program Learning Outcomes 1. Students will achieve advanced language proficiency in Spanish: they will have the ability to narrate language and literacy skills in Spanish: Students will acquire a foundation

  13. Learning task-specific similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakhnarovich, Gregory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The right measure of similarity between examples is important in many areas of computer science. In particular it is a critical component in example-based learning methods. Similarity is commonly defined in terms of a ...

  14. Social Learning in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberson, PJ

    This paper analyzes a model of social learning in a social network. Agents decide whether or not to adopt a new technology with unknown payoffs based on their prior beliefs and the experiences of their neighbors in the ...

  15. RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING Live on-campus in 2014-15 and participate in a unique as part of a residential community in Arroyo Vista! Open to all undergraduate students with 2-3 years

  16. Learning Outcomes Author: Paul Surgenor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 #12;Learning Outcomes "On completion of this [module/programme] students will be able to..." Biggs alignment (Biggs, 2002). Outcomes should also address a variety of cognitive levels, ensuring that students

  17. Enhancing the Engineering Curriculum: Defining Discovery Learning at Marquette University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurka, Mark L.

    learning is a form of student-centered learning in which the focus shifts from the teacher to the learn, student-centered learning, active learning. I. INTRODUCTION The College of Engineering at Marquette forms of experiential learning. Other schools include student-centered learning methods, such as active

  18. Calculating LHC Tuning Knobs using Various Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittmer, W; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC due to the asymmetric lattice and common beam pipe through the triplet magnets. To control and change the beta-functions quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the socalled “tuning knobs” for the IP beta functions. We compare the performance of such knobs calculated by different methods: (1) matching in MAD, (2) inversion of the response matrix and singular value decomposition inversion and conditioning and (3) conditioning the response matrix by multidimensional minimization using an Adapted Moore Penrose Method.

  19. Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. [STEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A code for calculating ultrasonic fields has been developed by revisng the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. This code may be used in a wide variety of situations in which a detailed knowledge of a propagating wave field is required. Among the potential used are: interpretation of pulse-echo or pitch-catch ultrasonic signals in complicated geometries; ultrasonic transducer modeling and characterization; optimization and evaluation of transducer design; optimization and reliability of inspection procedures; investigation of the response of different types of reflectors; flaw modeling; and general theoretical acoustics. The code is described, and its limitations and potential are discussed. A discussion of the required input and of the general procedures for running the code is presented. Three sample problems illustrate the input and the use of the code.

  20. On the calculation of mutual information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Tyrone E.

    1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as follows: (1) d Yt Zt dt + dBt, where the n-dimensional process Z is independent of the n-dimensional standard Brownian motion B, [0, 1], Yo =- 0 and (2) f,f ZTt Zt dP dr< where the superscript T denotes transpose. We wish to calculate the amount... was supported by the United States Air Force under Grant AF-AFOSR 814-66. 215 D ow nl oa de d 09 /1 0/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a...

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the equation of state of neutron matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfi, S.; Illarionov, A. Yu.; Schmidt, K. E.; Pederiva, F.; Fantoni, S. [International School for Advanced Studies, SISSA Via Beirut 2/4 I-34014 Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy) and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Trento (Italy); International School for Advanced Studies, SISSA Via Beirut 2/4 I-34014 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste, Italy and INFM DEMOCRITOS National Simulation Center, Via Beirut 2/4 I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculated the equation of state of neutron matter at zero temperature by means of the auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) method combined with a fixed-phase approximation. The calculation of the energy was carried out by simulating up to 114 neutrons in a periodic box. Special attention was given to reducing finite-size effects at the energy evaluation by adding to the interaction the effect due to the truncation of the simulation box, and by performing several simulations using different numbers of neutrons. The finite-size effects due to kinetic energy were also checked by employing the twist-averaged boundary conditions. We considered a realistic nuclear Hamiltonian containing modern two- and three-body interactions of the Argonne and Urbana family. The equation of state can be used to compare and calibrate other many-body calculations and to predict properties of neutron stars.

  2. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Criticality Safety Group

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  3. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Rule-Based Learning Explains Visual Perceptual Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stanley

    ). Alternatively, Mollon and Danilova (1996) hypothesized that learning occurs at a central site, but what learning hypoth- esis (Mollon and Danilova, 1996), the complete location transfer of learning indicates

  4. LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) The Learning and Organizational Change concentration helps you explore how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) CURRICULUM The Learning and Organizational Change change through learning and organizational design. The assessment, design and implementation of knowledge-based systems, involving people, technology and organizational structures and culture are a particular strength

  5. Improve Claus simulation by integrating kinetic limitations into equilibrium calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, T.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since all existing Claus simulators are based on equilibrium calculations, it is not surprising that the simulation results, including the overall sulfur yield, air to acid gas ratio, and stream compositions are somewhat different from the plant data. One method for improving the simulation is to consider the kinetic limitations in the Claus reactions. This has been accomplished in this work by integrating kinetic considerations into equilibrium calculations. Kinetic limitations have been introduced in both the Claus reaction furnace and the catalytic converters. An interactive computer program SULPLT Version 3 was written to implement the proposed modifications. The computer program was used to simulate the Claus furnace, catalytic converters, and the effect of air to acid gas ratio on sulfur recovery to check against literature data. Three Claus plants for which data exist have also been simulated. The results show that the proposed model predicts sulfur recovery, sulfur emission, optimal air to acid gas ratio, and various stream compositions more accurately than the equilibrium model. The proposed model appears to be valid, reliable, and applicable over a wide range of operating conditions (acid gas feeds ranging from 13% to 95% H/sub 2/S with different levels of impurities). The methodology developed in this study should be applicable to any reaction systems where kinetic limitations are important but where equilibrium still prevails.

  6. Microcomputer aided calculations of parameters for spray dryer operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, J.T.; Gyorke, D.F.; Pennline, H.W.; Drummond, C.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a series of practical microcomputer programs that can be used as a tool by engineers and researchers working with spray dryers for combustion process effluent control. The microcomputer programs calculate flue gas composition (CO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, and SO/sub 2/) from the composition of the fuel. The residence time of the flue gas in a spray dryer can be estimated, and using values provided by the user for the flow of water and absorbent slurry in the spray dryer, the program recalculates the flue gas composition and heat capacity at the exit of the spray dryer without accounting for any SO/sub 2/ removal that could occur in the spray dryer. From these values and the system pressure, the dew point and flue gas temperature at the spray dryer exit are calculated, providing the approach to saturation resulting from this choice of operating parameters. This computer code would enable a process engineer to quickly evaluate effects of important process parameters, such as flue gas temperature at the inlet to the spray dryer, atomizer water feed rate, and absorbent slurry concentration and feed rate, on the operation of a spray dryer.

  7. Coupled-channels calculations of $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion data for $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O are analyzed by coupled-channels calculations. It is shown that the calculated cross sections are sensitive to the couplings to the $2^+$ and $3^-$ excitation channels even at low energies, where these channels are closed. The sensitivity to the ion-ion potential is investigated by applying a conventional Woods-Saxon potential and the M3Y+repulsion potential, consisting of the M3Y double-folding potential and a repulsive term that simulates the effect of the nuclear incompressibility. The best overall fit to the data is obtained with a M3Y+repulsion potential which produces a shallow potential in the entrance channel. The stepwise increase in measured fusion cross sections at high energies is also consistent with such a shallow potential. The steps are correlated with overcoming the barriers for the angular momenta $L$ = 12, 14, 16, and 18. To improve the fit to the low-energy data requires a shallower potential and this causes a even stronger hindrance of fusion at low energies. It is therefore difficult, based on the existing fusion data, to make an accurate extrapolation to energies that are of interest to astrophysics.

  8. Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The DOE/NREL Approach (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document compiles lessons learned and provides a step-by-step process for implementing effective policy assistance.

  9. Effective Mentoring Rebecca Vandiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Effective Mentoring Rebecca Vandiver 9 October 2006 #12;I. RESPONSIBILITIES OF A MENTOR #12;WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A MENTOR?? · Mentors... ­ offer continuing guidance and support ­ are willing's performance "Effective mentoring can be learned, but not taught. Good mentors discover their own objectives

  10. Age Related Changes in Motion Perception and Perceptual Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Jeffrey Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple stimuli after training. This type of learning differsfrom other types of learning in that it is hypothesized toin the other type of stimuli, transfer of learning between

  11. Learning in human-dolphin interactions at zoological facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeney, Diane L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expectations and the types of learning. Potential physicalevidence of multiple types of learning. In the spate ofis taken, multiple types of learning, beyond knowledge gain

  12. Psychology and Aging Normal Aging and the Dissociable Prototype Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    -based and information-integration classification learning (Ashby & Mad- dox, 2005). Recent research suggests & Mad- dox, 2004). Another important type of classification learning is prototype learning (Homa

  13. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

  14. Learning style impact on knowledge gains in human patient simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinnick, MA; Woo, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the preference for simulation as a learning style. Singap.of high- ?delity simulation-based learning: a case reportdelity simulation: does it correlate with learning styles?

  15. associative learning performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance Tsodyks, Misha 7 & Investigating Learning Deficits Associated with Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: An artificial grammar learning task was used to define two learning...

  16. avoidance learning paradigm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    across learning trials corresponded to sigmoid curves that could 33 Developmental dyslexia and implicit learning in childhood: evidence using the artificial grammar learning...

  17. association learning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 4 & Investigating Learning Deficits Associated with Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: An artificial grammar learning task was used to define two learning...

  18. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Calls Fall 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer...

  19. Learning how to play Nash, potential games and alternating ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... of the most important topic is how do players learn to play Nash equilibria (Chen and Gazzale [17]). Learning dynamics include Bayesian learning, ...

  20. Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas S. Sereno, Suk H. Kim 1.0 Abstract Time-varying magnetic fields-current-induced multipole fields from higher multipole magnets (quadrupole, sextupole, etc.). Finally, transient effects

  1. National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James B. Beddow

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary The energy development assumptions identified in the Department of Energy's position paper, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, projected an exploding demand for wind energy-related workforce development. These primary assumptions drove a secondary set of assumptions that early stage wind industry workforce development and training paradigms would need to undergo significant change if the workforce needs were to be met. The current training practice and culture within the wind industry is driven by a relatively small number of experts with deep field experience and knowledge. The current training methodology is dominated by face-to-face, classroom based, instructor present training. Given these assumptions and learning paradigms, the purpose of the National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative was to determine the feasibility of developing online learning strategies and products focused on training wind technicians. The initial project scope centered on (1) identifying resources that would be needed for development of subject matter and course design/delivery strategies for industry-based (non-academic) training, and (2) development of an appropriate Learning Management System (LMS). As the project unfolded, the initial scope was expanded to include development of learning products and the addition of an academic-based training partner. The core partners included two training entities, industry-based Airstreams Renewables and academic-based Lake Area Technical Institute. A third partner, Vision Video Interactive, Inc. provided technology-based learning platforms (hardware and software). The revised scope yielded an expanded set of results beyond the initial expectation. Eight learning modules were developed for the industry-based Electrical Safety course. These modules were subsequently redesigned and repurposed for test application in an academic setting. Software and hardware developments during the project's timeframe enabled redesign providing for student access through the use of tablet devices such as iPads. Early prototype Learning Management Systems (LMS) featuring more student-centric access and interfaces with emerging social media were developed and utilized during the testing applications. The project also produced soft results involving cross learning between and among the partners regarding subject matter expertise, online learning pedagogy, and eLearning technology-based platforms. The partners believe that the most significant, overarching accomplishment of the project was the development and implementation of goals, activities, and outcomes that significantly exceeded those proposed in the initial grant application submitted in 2009. Key specific accomplishments include: (1) development of a set of 8 online learning modules addressing electrical safety as it relates to the work of wind technicians; (3) development of a flexible, open-ended Learning Management System (LMS): (3) creation of a robust body of learning (knowledge, experience, skills, and relationships). Project leaders have concluded that there is substantial resource equity that could be leverage and recommend that it be carried forward to pursue a Next Stage Opportunity relating to development of an online core curriculum for institute and community college energy workforce development programs.

  2. Recent PQCD calculations of heavy quark production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitev, I

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of a recent study of heavy quark production and attenuation in cold nuclear matter. In p+p collisions, we investigate the relative contribution of partonic sub-processes to $D$ meson production and $D$ meson-triggered inclusive di-hadrons to lowest order in perturbative QCD. While gluon fusion dominates the creation of large angle $D\\bar{D}$ pairs, charm on light parton scattering determines the yield of single inclusive $D$ mesons. The distinctly different non-perturbative fragmentation of $c$ quarks into $D$ mesons versus the fragmentation of quarks and gluons into light hadrons results in a strong transverse momentum dependence of anticharm content of the away-side charm-triggered jet. In p+A reactions, we calculate and resum the coherent nuclear-enhanced power corrections from the final-state partonic scattering in the medium. We find that single and double inclusive open charm production can be suppressed as much as the yield of neutral pions from dynamical high-twist shadowing. ...

  3. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation, and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA.

  4. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of thermal mass, ceiling insulation and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate energy/cost savings between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft Irwin, CA.

  5. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  6. animals evolution effectiveness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the interesting effect of multiple types of explanatory behaviors on both affective perception and learning performance. James C. Lester; Sharolyn A. Converse; Susan E....

  7. Sustain our organizational commitment to efficiency and effectiveness through careful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Top Value Sustain our organizational commitment to efficiency and effectiveness through careful. Innovate through an organizational culture that emphasizes continuous learning for our staff and utilizes

  8. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  9. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  10. Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call February 26, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  11. Application of RAD-BCG calculator to Hanford's 300 area shoreline characterization dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Patton, Gene W.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RAD-BCG Calculator. The RAD-BCG Calculator, a computer program that uses an Excel® spreadsheet and Visual Basic® software, showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RAD-BCG-Calculator’s site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the program’s kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RAD-BCG Calculator results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  12. "Collaborative Project: Developing a tutorial approach to enhance student learning of intermediate mechanics" Project Summary p. 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    secondary science teachers, and future engineers who take these courses must create an effective bridge. Materials will address specific difficulties students have when learning the physics. Having the materials. documented improvements in student attitudes toward science, the endeavor of learning science, and the roles

  13. TDHF fusion calculations for spherical+deformed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a formalism to carry out TDHF calculations of fusion cross sections for spherical + deformed nuclei. The procedure incorporates the dynamic alignment of the deformed nucleus into the calculation of the fusion cross section. The alignment results from multiple E2/E4 Coulomb excitation of the ground state rotational band. Implications for TDHF fusion calculations are discussed. TDHF calculations are done in an unrestricted three-dimensional geometry using modern Skyrme force parametrizations.

  14. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of energy levels of core-excited states in lithium-like ions: argon through krypton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of energy levels of core-excited states of lithium-like ions is presented. Quantum electrodynamic, nuclear recoil, and frequency-dependent Breit corrections are included in the calculation. The approach is consistently applied for calculating all $n=2$ core-excited states for all lithium-like ions starting from argon ($Z = 18$) and ending with krypton ($Z = 36$). The results obtained are supplemented with systematical estimations of calculation errors and omitted effects.

  15. Recap Lecture 1 Concepts of Supervised Learning (SL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

    ) Main types of Supervised Learning Classification Novelty detection Regression 3 Classification Learning (SL) Classification algorithms Supervised Learning definition revisit Main types of Supervised Learning Classification Novelty detection Regression Main types of SL We have (input, correct output

  16. Arts-Infused Learning in Middle Level Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorimer, Maureen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rich portrait of the types of learning and learning outcomesuncovered the types of arts-infused learning, along with thetypes of activities) and quality of arts-infused learning (

  17. STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

  18. The melting lines of model systems calculated from coexistence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    rapidly as a function of the potential cutoff, indicating that long-range corrections to the free energies of the solid and liquid phases very nearly cancel. This approach provides an alternative to traditional methods them. Tradition- ally, these calculations have been made using free energy calculations: by calculating

  19. Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort....

  20. Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort....