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1

Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Inclusion of the names of the products or companies does not indicate a claim of ownership by IGI Global be performed on either physical or virtual manipulatives, but virtual manipu- latives exist in idealized provide illustrations. INTRODUCTION In his preface to The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning Mayer

Gallo, Linda C.

2

EFFECT e-learning courses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EFFECT e-learning courses EFFECT e-learning courses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EFFECT e-learning courses Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Cost: Free Language: English References: EFFECT e-learning courses[1] The EFFECT Model is an Excel-based, bottom-up, engineering style model designed to support open and transparent modeling and comparison of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions growth for a range of development scenarios. The EFFECT Model focuses on sectors that contribute to and are expected to

3

Generic effective source for scalar self-force calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A leading approach to the modelling of extreme mass ratio inspirals involves the treatment of the smaller mass as a point particle and the computation of a regularized self-force acting on that particle. In turn, this computation requires knowledge of the regularized retarded field generated by the particle. A direct calculation of this regularized field may be achieved by replacing the point particle with an effective source and solving directly a wave equation for the regularized field. This has the advantage that all quantities are finite and require no further regularization. In this work, we present a method for computing an effective source which is finite and continuous everywhere, and which is valid for a scalar point particle in arbitrary geodesic motion in an arbitrary background spacetime. We explain in detail various technical and practical considerations that underlie its use in several numerical self-force calculations. We consider as examples the cases of a particle in a circular orbit about Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes, and also the case of a particle following a generic time-like geodesic about a highly spinning Kerr black hole. We provide numerical C code for computing an effective source for various orbital configurations about Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes.

Barry Wardell; Ian Vega; Jonathan Thornburg; Peter Diener

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Model calculations of the hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the atomic hydrogen + disilane reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model calculations of the hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the atomic hydrogen + disilane reaction ...

I. Safarik; T. L. Pollock; O. P. Strausz

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The effect of dimensional preference on paired-associate learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF DIMENSIONAL PREFERENCE ON PAIRED-ASSOCIATE LEARNING A Th sis by DAYID HENRY GILL Submitted to the Graduate Co'liege of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MA TER OF SCIENCE August... 1970 Major Subject: Psychology THE EFFECT OF DIMENSIONAL PREFERENCE ON PAIRED-ASSOCIATE LEARNING A Thesis by DAVID HENRY GILL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman o Committee a Lo Member) of o pe t~ent Member August 1970 ADSTRACT...

Gill, David Henry

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY LEARNING IN DIFFERENTLY STRUCTURED CLASSROOM SCRIPTS: EFFECTS ON HELP-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: EFFECTS ON HELP- SEEKING PROCESSES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES This is a post-print of an article submitted). Computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning and classroom scripts: Effects on help-seeking processes-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning in Differently Structured Classroom Scripts: Effects on Help-Seeking Processes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

E-companion to: Rahmandad: Effect of Delays on Complexity of Organizational Learning Electronic Companion for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-companion to: Rahmandad: Effect of Delays on Complexity of Organizational Learning 1 Electronic Companion for: Effect of Delays on Complexity of Organizational Learning Hazhir Rahmandad, hazhir@vt.edu 1: Effect of Delays on Complexity of Organizational Learning 2 An example would elaborate the workings

Rahmandad, Hazhir

9

The effects of various approximations on electron-electron scattering calculations in QCLs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of various approximations on electron-electron scattering calculations in QCLs Philip which are sometimes ignored in calculating electron-electron scattering rates. These effects include depends on the effects of electron transport. Electron-electron scattering is an essential mechanism

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

10

Effects of d-electrons in pseudopotential screened-exchange density functional calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of d-electrons in pseudopotential screened-exchange density functional calculations-conservation condition on the PP's guarantees that the net electron density in PP calculations inside the core-radius agrees with the electron density in all-electron (AE) calculations and, at the same time

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

11

Multiconfigurational nuclear-electronic orbital approach: Incorporation of nuclear quantum effects in electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in electronic structure calculations Simon P. Webb, Tzvetelin Iordanov, and Sharon Hammes-Schiffera) Department 26 March 2002; accepted 30 May 2002 The nuclear-electronic orbital NEO method for the calculation are that nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the electronic structure calculation, the Born

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

12

Effects of d-electrons in pseudopotential screened-exchange density functional calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of d-electrons in pseudopotential screened-exchange density functional calculations conservation condition on the PP's guarantees that the net electron density in PP calculation inside the core-radius agree with the electron density in the all-electron (AE) calculations and, at the same time

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

13

Single machine scheduling problems under the effects of nonlinear deterioration and time-dependent learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Job deterioration and machine learning co-exist in various real life scheduling settings. This paper studies several single machine scheduling problems under the joint effect of nonlinear job deterioration and time-dependent learning. We assume that ... Keywords: Deteriorating jobs, Scheduling, Time-dependent learning effect

M. Duran Toksar?; Daniel Oron; Ertan GüNer

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Just-in-time approach to learning: Arguing the case for cost-effective Knowledge Dissemination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this challenge and contribute cost-effectively to organizational learning by helping them: (a) create organizational settings associated to the concept of just-in-time learning and uniview. For the purposeJust-in-time approach to learning: Arguing the case for cost-effective Knowledge Dissemination M

15

Solvent effects on the electronic state of monolignol radicals as predicted by molecular orbital calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spin and charge densities in three monolignol radicals were computed using the UB3LYP/6-31G* method of molecular orbital calculation. As well, the effects of solvents were simulated by using an SCI-PCM mod...

Mikiji Shigematsu; Hiroshi Masamoto

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Use of Effective Nuclear Charge (r) Calculations to Illustrate the Relative Energies of ns and (n - 1)d Orbitals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Use of Effective Nuclear Charge (r) Calculations to Illustrate the Relative Energies of ns and (n - 1)d Orbitals ... The Use of Effective Nuclear Charge (r) Calculations to Illustrate the Relative Energies of ns and (n - 1)d Orbitals ...

Christina Poth Brink

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A collaborative learning lesson from using effective information technology combinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of the effectiveness of the use of IT system combinations on logistics firms’ performances. This study used market basket analysis to identify the information technology packages used by logistics firms. A total of 181 major international logistics service providers are used as the samples of this study. The research findings provide strong empirical evidence that leading logistics firms running the most frequently used combinations of IT systems clearly outperformed those forgoing these combinations and their use of information technology is rated much better than others. This study is the first to use market basket analysis to examine the impact of the IT combinations logistics companies are using on firm performance. It identifies the information technology packages most frequently used by major international logistics firms, and then analyzes the impact these combinations have on the organizational performances of the companies. Also, the effects of collaborative learning can be gained if effective information technology combinations can be implemented.

Yen-Chun Jim Wu; Tse-Ping Dong; Chan-Lan Chang; Ya-Chun Liao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effects of Tasks and Glosses on L2 Incidental Vocabulary Learning: Meta-analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigated the effects of output stimulus tasks and glosses on L2 incidental vocabulary learning. Two meta-analytic studies were conducted. The first was intended to provide a systematic statistical synthesis of the effects of output...

Huang, Shu-Fen

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ab Initio EFFECTIVE CORE POTENTIALS INCLUDING RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS. V. S.C.F. CALCULATIONS WITH w-w COUPLING INCLUDING RESULTS FOR Au2+, TlH, PbS, AND PbSe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects in electronic structure calculations of moleculessymmetry. Electronic structure calculations for Au 2 +, T£H,

Lee, Yoon S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Calculation of $P_ and $T_ odd effects in $"" sup 205_TIF including electron correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method and codes for two-step correlation calculation of heavy-atom molecules have been developed, employing the generalized relativistic effective core potential and relativistic coupled cluster (RCC) methods at the first step, followed by nonvariational one-center restoration of proper four-component spinors in the heavy cores. Electron correlation is included for the first time in an ab initio calculation of the interaction of the permanent P,T-odd proton electric dipole moment with the internal electromagnetic field in a molecule. The calculation is performed for the ground state of TlF at the experimental equilibrium, R_e=2.0844 A, and at R=2.1 A, with spin-orbit and correlation effects included by RCC. Calculated results with single cluster amplitudes only are in good agreement (3% and 1%) with recent Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) values of the magnetic parameter M; the larger differences occurring between present and DHF volume parameter (X) values, as well as between the two DHF calculations, are explained. Inclusion of electron correlation by GRECP/RCC with single and double excitations has a major effect on the P,T-odd parameters, decreasing M by 17% and X by 22%.

A. N. Petrov; N. S. Mosyagin; T. A. Isaev; A. V. Titov; V. F. Ezhov; E. Eliav; U. Kaldor

2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cost-effective conservation: calculating biodiversity and logging trade-offs in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Cost-effective conservation: calculating biodiversity and logging trade-offs in Southeast and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Keywords Biodiversity conservation; birds-off between economic interests and biodiversity conservation. Here, we provide an empirical examination

Vermont, University of

22

The Effects of Task Dimensionality, Endpoint Deviation, Throughput Calculation, and Experiment Design on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Task Dimensionality, Endpoint Deviation, Throughput Calculation, and Experiment Design on Pointing Measures and Models Jacob O. Wobbrock, Kristen Shinohara and Alex Jansen and Fitts' law models in general are invariant to task dimensionality (1-D vs. 2-D), whether univariate (SDx

Anderson, Richard

23

EFFECTS OF SENSORI-MOTOR LEARNING ON MELODY PROCESSING ACROSS DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SENSORI-MOTOR LEARNING ON MELODY PROCESSING ACROSS DEVELOPMENT Elizabeth M. WAKEFIELD Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to determine how these melodies are subsequently processed. Results demonstrated in some music education techniques. KEYWORDS: fMRI, visual-motor learning, music, MTG Perception

James, Karin Harman

24

On the role of the effective interaction in quasi-elastic electron scattering calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role played by the effective residual interaction in the transverse nuclear response for quasi-free electron scattering is discussed. The analysis is done by comparing different calculations performed in the Random--Phase Approximation and Ring Approximation frameworks. The importance of the exchange terms in this energy region is investigated and the changes on the nuclear responses due to the modification of the interaction are evaluated. The calculated quasi-elastic responses show clear indication of their sensibility to the details of the interaction and this imposes the necessity of a more careful study of the role of the different channels of the interaction in this excitation region.

Eduardo Bauer; Antonio M. Lallena

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2004-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effectiveness of Concept Maps in Learning from a Computer-Based Instructional Video Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two different concept mapping methods - learner-generated and expert-generated concept mapping - in computer-based video learning. The students’ attitudes toward the use...

Vural, Omer

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessing the Effect of Students’ Perceptions on Benefits Received from Participation in Service-Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS ON BENEFITS RECEIVED FROM PARTICIPATION IN SERVICE-LEARNING A Thesis by TESSA MARING GOOLSBY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Sociology ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS ON BENEFITS RECEIVED FROM PARTICIPATION IN SERVICE-LEARNING A Thesis by TESSA...

Goolsby, Tessa Maring

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Magnetoimpedance effect at the high frequency range for the thin film geometry: Numerical calculation and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetoimpedance effect is a versatile tool to investigate ferromagnetic materials, revealing aspects on the fundamental physics associated to magnetization dynamics, broadband magnetic properties, important issues for current and emerging technological applications for magnetic sensors, as well as insights on ferromagnetic resonance effect at non-saturated magnetic states. Here, we perform a theoretical and experimental investigation of the magnetoimpedance effect for the thin film geometry in a wide frequency range. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoimpedance for single layered, multilayered or exchange biased systems from an approach that considers a magnetic permeability model for planar geometry and the appropriate magnetic free energy density for each structure. From numerical calculations and experimental results found in literature, we analyze the magnetoimpedance behavior, and discuss the main features and advantages of each structure. To test the robustness of the approach, we directly compare theoretical results with experimental magnetoimpedance measurements obtained in a wide range of frequencies for an exchange biased multilayered film. Thus, we provide experimental evidence to confirm the validity of the theoretical approach employed to describe the magnetoimpedance in ferromagnetic films, revealed by the good agreement between numerical calculations and experimental results.

M. A. Corrêa; F. Bohn; R. B. da Silva; R. L. Sommer

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

Combining data mining and machine learning for effective user profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the automatic design of methods for detecting fraudulent behavior. Much of the design is accomplished using a series of machine learning methods. In particular, we combine data mining and constructive induction with more standard machine learning techniques to design methods for detecting fraudulent usage of cellular telephones based on profiling customer behavior. Specifically, we use a rule-learning program to uncover indicators of fraudulent behavior from a large database of cellular calls. These indicators are used to create profilers, which then serve as features to a system that combines evidence from multiple profilers to generate high-confidence alarms. Experiments indicate that this automatic approach performs nearly as well as the best hand-tuned methods for detecting fraud.

Fawcett, T.; Provost, F. [NYNEX Science and Technology, White Plains, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Learners’ Attitudes toward the Effectiveness of Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) in L2 Listening Comprehension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Keegan (2003) believes that M (mobile)-learning will provide the future of learning. MALL (Mobile Assisted Language Learning) has just started to move learners and teachers out of the classroom setting into the real world. Using mobile phones, teachers can provide a rich learning environment for learners, although there are still issues that must be considered before they can reach their full potential. Various researches suggest that collaborative speaking and listening skills can be successfully done by mobile phone capabilities. It can be argued that M-learning involves the use of any portable learning materials, including audiobooks, audio-cassettes, audio-CDs, and any portable radios and DVD players. Trifanova et al. (2004, p.3) define mobile devices as “… any device that is small, autonomous and unobtrusive enough to accompany us in every moment”. This research aimed to investigate Iranian EFL learner's attitudes toward the effectiveness of Mobile Assisted Language Learning on their Listening comprehension. The first research question concerns a comparison of the effect of cell-phone based audiobooks versus its traditional counterpart that is CD – ROM/audio cassette based audiobooks, and the second deals with the investigation of Iranian EFL learners’ attitudes toward the technology, to that end MALL questionnaire was distributed to the experimental group, following up interviews with some participants. The results of this study indicated that the experimental group receiving instruction through cell-phone based audiobooks outperformed the control group on their listening comprehension.

Ali Sorayyaei Azar; Hassan Nasiri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Transverse space charge effect calculation in the Synergia accelerator modeling toolkit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a transverse space charge effect calculation algorithm, developed in the context of accelerator modeling toolkit Synergia. The introduction to the space charge problem and the Synergia modeling toolkit short description are given. The developed algorithm is explained and the implementation is described in detail. As a result of this work a new space charge solver was developed and integrated into the Synergia toolkit. The solver showed correct results in comparison to existing Synergia solvers and delivered better performance in the regime where it is applicable.

Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; /Fermilab

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Training effect on the second language learning for young learners using computer-assisted language learning system: Quantitative consideration on relationship among speech perception of the second language, learning experience and amounts of learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longitudinal training experiment was conducted in order to examine the relation between the perceptual ability of English as a foreign language and amount of learning experiences beyond schools targeting Japanese elementary school students. Over four hundred students among the 3rd grade through 6th grade participated in this study. Three hundred and thirty-two students of them had learning experience beyond school and the other 134 students did not. Students spent approximately 10 h of individualized computer-based training that focused on intensive auditory input. The result of t-test showed that the scores of the group of students who have previous learning experience exceeded the scores of the students in the other group at the beginning; however at the end of the period it revealed from the result of ANOVA that students without learning experience before starting learning English at school improved their sensitivity on perception of English syllable and some phonemes much more than the experienced. These results suggest that the appropriate perception training utilizing the auditory input is effective in cultivation of aural comprehension. Implications for foreign language education for young learners will be discussed. [Work supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) 23730832 Japan.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Calculation of conversion factors for effective dose for various interventional radiology procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide dose-area-product (DAP) to effective dose (E) conversion factors for complete interventional procedures, based on in-the-field clinical measurements of DAP values and using tabulated E/DAP conversion factors for single projections available from the literature. Methods: Nine types of interventional procedures were performed on 84 patients with two angiographic systems. Different calibration curves (with and without patient table attenuation) were calculated for each DAP meter. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were recorded in-the-field for each projection and for all patients, and a conversion factor linking DAP and effective doses was derived for each complete procedure making use of published, Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors for single static projections. Results: Fluoroscopy time and DAP values for the lowest-dose procedure (biliary drainage) were approximately 3-fold and 13-fold lower, respectively, than those for the highest-dose examination (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, TIPS). Median E/DAP conversion factors from 0.12 (abdominal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty) to 0.25 (Nephrostomy) mSvGy{sup -1} cm{sup -2} were obtained and good correlations between E and DAP were found for all procedures, with R{sup 2} coefficients ranging from 0.80 (abdominal angiography) to 0.99 (biliary stent insertion, Nephrostomy and TIPS). The DAP values obtained in this study showed general consistency with the values provided in the literature and median E values ranged from 4.0 mSv (biliary drainage) to 49.6 mSv (TIPS). Conclusions: Values of E/DAP conversion factors were derived for each procedure from a comprehensive analysis of projection and dosimetric data: they could provide a good evaluation for the stochastic effects. These results can be obtained by means of a close cooperation between different interventional professionals involved in patient care and dose optimization.

Compagnone, Gaetano; Giampalma, Emanuela; Domenichelli, Sara; Renzulli, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of the embolization material in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reported in the literature that the material used in an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can attenuate the radiation beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) up to 10% to 15%. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric impact of this attenuating material in the SRS treatment of embolized AVMs, using Monte Carlo simulations assuming clinical conditions. A commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation engine was used to recalculate the dose distribution of 20 AVMs previously planned with a pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Dose distributions were compared using the following metrics: average, minimal and maximum dose of AVM, and 2D gamma index. The effect in the obliteration rate was investigated using radiobiological models. It was found that the dosimetric impact of the embolization material is less than 1.0 Gy in the prescription dose to the AVM for the 20 cases studied. The impact in the obliteration rate is less than 4.0%. There is reported evidence in the literature that embolized AVMs treated with SRS have low obliteration rates. This work shows that there are dosimetric implications that should be considered in the final treatment decisions for embolized AVMs.

Galván de la Cruz, Olga Olinca [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel, E-mail: jlarraga@innn.edu.mx [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Celis, Miguel Angel [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Time dependence of the paramagnetic Meissner effect: Comparison between model calculations and experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental results of the temperature, field, and time dependence of the magnetization in high-temperature superconductors displaying the paramagnetic Meissner effect are compared with numerical results from model calculations. In experiments the relaxation rate of the zero-field-cooled magnetization exhibits novel field-dependent properties and the field-cooled magnetization is found to increase with time. A model based on an ensemble of superconducting loops, each loop containing an ordinary Josephson junction or a ? junction, is shown to be able to account for most of the experimental results. The time-dependent magnetization is explained by thermally activated flipping of spontaneous orbital magnetic moments, a dynamical process which is fundamentally different from the flux-creep phenomenon usually observed in type-II superconductors.

J. Magnusson; J.-O. Andersson; M. Björnander; P. Nordblad; P. Svedlindh

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

3D calculation of Tucson-Melbourne 3NF effect in triton binding energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an application of the new realistic three-dimensional (3D) formalism reported recently for three-nucleon (3N) bound states, an attempt is made to study the effect of three-nucleon forces (3NFs) in triton binding energy in a non partial wave (PW) approach. The spin-isospin dependent 3N Faddeev integral equations with the inclusion of 3NFs, which are formulated as function of vector Jacobi momenta, specifically the magnitudes of the momenta and the angle between them, are solved with Bonn-B and Tucson-Melbourne NN and 3N forces in operator forms which can be incorporated in our 3D formalism. The comparison with numerical results in both, novel 3D and standard PW schemes, shows that non PW calculations avoid the very involved angular momentum algebra occurring for the permutations and transformations and it is more efficient and less cumbersome for considering the 3NF.

M. R. Hadizadeh; L. Tomio; S. Bayegan

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Calculation of the Ostriker-Vishniac Effect in Cold Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new derivation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy spectrum from the Ostriker-Vishniac effect for an open, flat, or closed Universe, and calculate the anisotropy expected in cold dark-matter (CDM) models. We provide simple semi-analytic fitting formulas for the Vishniac power spectrum that can be used to evaluate the expected anisotropy in CDM models for any arbitrary ionization history. In a flat Universe, CDM models normalized to cluster abundances produce rms temperature anisotropies of 0.8--2.4 $\\mu$K on arcminute angular scales for a constant ionization fraction of unity, whereas an ionization fraction of 0.2 yields rms anisotropies of 0.3--0.8 $\\mu$K. In an open and/or high-baryon-density Universe, the level of anisotropy is somewhat higher. The signal in some of these models may be detectable with planned interferometry experiments. The damping of the acoustic peaks in the primary-anisotropy spectrum at degree angular scales depends primarily on the optical depth and only secondarily on the epoch of reionization. On the other hand, the amplitude of Ostriker-Vishniac anisotropies depends sensitively on the epoch of reionization. Therefore, when combined with the estimate of the reionization optical depth provided by maps of degree-scale anisotropies, the Ostriker-Vishniac effect can provide a unique probe of the epoch of reionization.

A. H. Jaffe; M. Kamionkowski

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Class Noise Handling for Effective Cost-Sensitive Learning by Cost-Guided  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Class Noise Handling for Effective Cost-Sensitive Learning by Cost-Guided Iterative Classification, and related areas has produced a wide variety of algorithms for cost-sensitive (CS) classification, where instead of maximizing the classification accuracy, minimizing the misclassification cost becomes

Wu, Xindong

39

The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Extracting E Versus K Effective Band Structure from Supercell Calculations on Alloys and Impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercell approach to defects and alloys has circumvented the limitations of those methods that insist on using artificially high symmetry, yet this step usually comes at the cost of abandoning the language of E versus k band dispersion. Here we describe a computational method that maps the energy eigenvalues obtained from large supercell calculations into an effective band structure (EBS) and recovers an approximate E(k) for alloys. Making use of supercells allows one to model a random alloy A{sub 1-x}B{sub x}C by occupying the sites A and B via a coin-toss procedure, affording many different local environments (polymorphic description) to occur. We present the formalism and implementation details of the method and apply it to study the evolution of the impurity band appearing in the dilute GaN:P alloy. We go beyond the perfectly random case, realizing that many alloys may have nonrandom microstructures, and investigate how their formation is reflected in the EBS. It turns out that the EBS is extremely sensitive in determining the critical disorder level for which delocalized states start to appear in the intermediate band. In addition, the EBS allows us to identify the role played by atomic relaxation in the positioning of the impurity levels.

Popescu, V.; Zunger, A.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Linear muffin-tin-orbital and k?p calculations of effective masses and band structure of semiconducting diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of semiconducting diamond is calculated by the scalar-relativistic linear muffin-tin-orbital method within the local-density approximation. Information about matrix elements, effective masses, and Luttinger parameters is extracted by comparison with k?p calculations. An extended 16×16 k?p calculation is performed using the parameters above as input so as to obtain the detailed band structure of the higher valence and lower conduction band states around the ? point in the (110) direction.

M. Willatzen; M. Cardona; N. E. Christensen

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effect of fractures on reserve calculations as determined by petrology: Birthright field, Hopkins County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Birthright field in Hopkins County, Texas, produces oil and gas from Jurassic carbonate grainstone deposits of the upper Smackover Formation. The field was discovered in 1965 by the drilling of the Schneider and Corey 1 E.M. Strode well. This well initially tested 491 BOPD from a 34-ft interval at 9,519 ft. The field has an oil-water contact at subsea 9,090 ft and a gas-oil contact at subsea 8,980 ft. Ten wells were originally drilled in the 800-ac field, but only six oil and one gas wells were put on production. The estimated in-place reserves in 1969 were 6.4 million bbl oil, 1.3 million bbl condensate, and 14.97 bcf gas, with an estimated primary recovery of 22%. The total cumulative oil production to 1986 was 3.19 million bbl oil. The grainstones of the producing interval are composed of ooids, pisoids, pelecypod fragments, grapestones, and fecal pellets. This shallow marine bar deposit has been extensively leached and cemented. Fracturing and brecciation have taken place causing many grains to be broken and sheared. Many grains have been coated by early diagenetic fibrous rim cement indicative of leaching in vadose and phreatic conditions. These conditions have caused significant variations in the structural conditions and sizes of the coated grains. Anhydrite and sparry calcite have subsequently filled many of the pores, especially below the oil-water contact. It is though that these factors may have affected actual recoverable reserves, and that petrology can be an effective tool in reservoir evaluation, especially where recovered reserves are greater than had been initially calculated.

Mitchell-Tapping, H.J. (GeoResearch International, Dallas, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cockpit learning in power distant cockpits: The interaction effect of pilot's interdependence and inclination to teamwork in airline industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cockpit learning is an essential feature of flying profession, but it may be hampered by power distance in the cockpit due to captain/co-pilot subordination. Speaking-up to the captain may be difficult for some co-pilots but not speaking-up resulted in numerous aircraft accidents. This research examines cockpit learning among airline pilots and assumes that power distance reduces cockpit learning whereas pilot's interdependence and pilot's inclination towards teamwork can counter balance it. The study develops a short cockpit-learning-scale and validates it through a stratified sample of 231 pilots chosen from British Airways, Pakistan International Airline and Saudi Arabian Airline. Data analysis indicated a strong negative influence of power distance on cockpit learning, and significant interaction effect of pilot's interdependence and pilot's inclination towards teamwork. Together, the findings suggest that pilot's interdependence and inclination towards teamwork significantly minimize the negative influence of power distance on cockpit learning.

Muhammad Aftab Alam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effect of electronic topological transitions on the calculations of some Zn and Fe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the detailed ab initio calculations of electronic structure for hcp-zinc and bcc-ferromagnetic iron, we made an attempt to study a scale of anomalies emerging in the calculations of elastic properties of these crystals as functions of pressure, and determine a relation between these anomalies and electronic topological transitions. Our calculations give grounds to believe that an electronic topological transition in itself is not a cause of significant anomalies in elastic properties of crystals but is, probably, an indicator of rearrangement of the crystal energy spectrum: an indicator which is not even always present. In some cases such rearrangement can cause significant anomalies in elastic and other properties of the crystal.

G V Sin'ko; N A Smirnov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Relative Effectiveness of Positive Interdependence and Group Processing on Student Achievement, Interaction, and Attitude in Online Cooperative Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of positive interdependence and group processing on student achievement, interaction, and attitude in online cooperative learning. All of the participants, 144 college students...

Nam, Chang Woo

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Calculation of Doublet Capture Rate for Muon Capture in Deuterium within Chiral Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The doublet capture rate of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant d^R (c_D), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton beta-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of the doublet capture rates show a rather large spread for the used values of the d^R. Precise measurement of the doublet capture rate in the future will not only help to constrain the value of d^R, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant d^R will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

J. Adam, Jr.; M. Tater; E. Truhlik; E. Epelbaum; R. Machleidt; P. Ricci

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Calculation of two-photon exchange effects for $?$ production in electron-proton collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an evaluation of a two-photon exchange correction to the cross section for unpolarized $\\Delta$ isobar production in electron-proton collisions, using a relativistic, crossing symmetric and gauge invariant approach. The calculated box and crossed-box diagrams include nucleon and $\\Delta$ intermediate states. We find a relation between the angular nonlinearity of the two-photon exchange contribution and the value of the $\\gamma \\Delta \\Delta$ coupling constant.

S. Kondratyuk; P. G. Blunden

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electronic and elastic properties of Sr2RuO4 with pressure effects by first principles calculation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, electronic and elastic properties along with the pressure effects of the unconventional superconductor Sr2RuO4 are investigated by first principles calculation. Band structure calculation reveals that Sr2RuO4 is a weak metal. The characteristic of the band structure has also been analyzed. The calculated elastic constants reproduce the experimental data well. Analyses disclose that Sr2RuO4 is mechanically stable but anisotropic. The calculated Debye temperature 475.0 K is in good agreement with the experimental results. Surveys of the pressure effect on the lattice constants reveal that the a axis is less compressible than the c axis, as found in the experiment. Further investigations illustrate that Sr2RuO4 is mechanically stable up to 50 GPa till the elastic constant C44 fails to meet the mechanical stability criterion. The pressure-dependent elastic parameters are also investigated to know their behaviors under pressure. In addition, the bonding properties of Sr2RuO4 at 0 GPa and 50 GPa are analyzed to explain its elastic behavior under pressure.

Xi-Ping Hao; Hong-Ling Cui; Zhen-Long Lv; Guang-Fu Ji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Image reconstruction and the effect on dose calculation for hip prostheses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High atomic number inserts, such as hip prostheses and dental fillings, cause streak artifacts on computed tomography (CT) images when filtered back-projection (FBP) methods are used. These streak artifacts severely degrade our ability to differentiate the tumor volume. Also, incorrect Hounsfield numbers yield incorrect electron density information that may lead to erroneous dose calculations, and, as a result, compromise clinical outcomes. The aim of this research was to evaluate the dosimetric consequences of artifacts during radiotherapy planning of a prostate patient containing a hip prosthesis. The CT numbers corresponding to an iron prosthesis were inserted into the right femoral head of an existing CT image set. This artifact-free image was used as the standard image set. CT projections through the image set formed the sinogram, from which filtered back projection and iterative deblurring methods were used to create reconstructed image sets. These reconstructed image sets contained artifacts. Prostate treatment plans were then calculated using a Monte Carlo system for the standard and reconstructed CT image sets. Close to the prosthesis, the CT numbers between the reconstructed and standard image sets differed substantially. However, because the CT number differences covered only a small area, the dose distributions on the reconstructed and standard image sets were not significantly different. The dose-volume histograms for the prostate, rectum, and bladder were virtually identical. Our results indicate that even though CT image artifacts restrict our ability to differentiate tumors and critical structures, the dose distributions for a prostate plan containing a hip prosthesis, calculated on both artifact-free image sets and image sets containing artifacts, are not significantly different.

Keall, Paul J.; Chock, Leah B.; Jeraj, Robert; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Mohan, Radhe

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

The effectiveness of using the calculated braking current for longitudinal differential protection of 110 - 750 kV shunt reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of the function of effective current braking of the longitudinal differential protection of shunt reactors to offset current surges, which enables the sensitivity of differential protection to be increased when there are short circuits with low damage currents, is considered. It is shown that the use of the calculated braking characteristic enables the reliability of offset protection from transients to be increased when the reactor is connected, which is accompanied by the flow of asymmetric currents containing an aperiodic component.

Vdovin, S. A. [JSC 'E and E' (Russian Federation); Shalimov, A. S. [LLC Selekt Co. (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Calculation on the Self-field of a Point Charge and the Unruh Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the context of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, Hacyan and Sarmiento defined the vacuum stress-energy tensor with respect to the accelerated observer. They calculated it for uniform acceleration and circular motion, and derived that the rotating observer perceives a flux. Mane related the flux to synchrotron radiation. In order to investigate the relation between the vacuum stress and bremsstrahlung, we estimate the stress-energy tensor of the electromagnetic field generated by a point charge, at the position of the charge. We use the retarded field as a self-field of the point charge. Therefore the tensor diverges if we evaluate it as it is. Hence we remove the divergent contributions by using the expansion of the tensor in powers of the distance from the point charge. Finally, we take an average for the angular dependence of the expansion. We calculate it for the case of uniform acceleration and circular motion, and it is found that the order of the vacuum stress multiplied by $\\pi\\alpha$ ($\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ is the fine structure constant) is equal to that of the self-stress. In the Appendix, we give another trial approach with a similar result.

T. Hirayama; T. Hara

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

A technique for calculating the effective thermal resistance of steel stud walls for code compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Canada`s Model National Energy Codes for Houses and for Buildings contain prescriptive requirements in the form of minimum thermal characteristics of envelope assemblies, including steel stud walls. To assist in the uniform enforcement of these requirements, it was necessary for the codes to prescribe acceptable methods of calculating the thermal resistance of steel and assemblies. The ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals proposes a simple method for predicting the thermal performance of stud walls, which is based on a weighted average of the values predicted by isothermal planes and parallel path calculation methods. The thermal resistance of 2440 mm x 2440 mm (8 ft x 8 ft) wall specimens, with 92 mm (3-5/8 in.) steel studs, was measured in a series of guarded hot box tests. Two stud gauges were evaluated, as well as two stud spacings, with one wood-based and three insulating sheathings. The measurements demonstrated that a weighting of 2:1 (isothermal planes:parallel path) provided an/ accurate prediction of the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 406 mm (16 in.) o.c., but that a 1:1 weighting best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 610 mm (24 in.) o.c. These results applied to walls with wood-based sheathing directly applied to the studs, whether or not the walls had insulating sheathing. Finally, the measurements demonstrated that an intermediate weighting of 3:2 best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with insulating sheathing installed directly onto the studs, i.e., without intermediate structural sheathing.

Brown, W.C.; Swinton, M.C.; Haysom, J.C. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analysis of drilling fluid rheology and tool joint effect to reduce errors in hydraulics calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

325 Temperature ?F Plastic Viscosity, cp 2000 psi 4000 psi 6000 psi 8000 psi 10000 psi Fig. 3.4?Effect of pressure and temperature on plastic viscosity (from Bogot? Technical Center... 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 g (sec-1) tttt,(lbf/100 ft 2 ) Fig. 4.1?Newtonian fluid rheogram. 26 To estimate viscosity in field units (cp) we have to convert by the following equation: m =47880m/100...

Viloria Ochoa, Marilyn

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alignment of energy levels in dye/semiconductor interfaces by GW calculations: Effects due to coadsorption of solvent molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells is tightly linked to the relative energy level alignment of its constituents. In this paper the electronic properties of a model of dye-sensitized solar cell are studied by accurate first-principle calculations taking into account many-body effects beyond density-functional theory. The cell model includes one layer of co-adsorbed solvent (water or acetonitrile) molecules. Solvent molecules induce an upwards energy shift in the TiO2 bands; such a shift is larger in the case of acetonitrile. The accurate determination of the energy levels allows the theoretical estimation of the maximum attainable open circuit voltage (Voc).

Carla Verdi; Edoardo Mosconi; Filippo De Angelis; Margherita Marsili; P. Umari

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ab-initio calculation of the electronic and optical excitations in polythiophene: effects of intra- and interchain screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an calculation of the electronic and optical excitations of an isolated polythiophene chain as well as of bulk polythiophene. We use the GW approximation for the electronic self-energy and include excitonic effects by solving the electron-hole Bethe-Salpeter equation. The inclusion of interchain screening in the case of bulk polythiophene drastically reduces both the quasi-particle band gap and the exciton binding energies, but the optical gap is hardly affected. This finding is relevant for conjugated polymers in general.

J. -W. van der Horst; P. A. Bobbert; M. A. J. Michels; G. Brocks; P. J. Kelly

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

The effects of particle dynamics on the calculation of bulk stress in granular media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Expressions for bulk stress within a granular material in a dynamic setting are reviewed and explicitly derived for assemblies of three dimensional arbitrary shaped particles. By employing classical continuum and rigid body mechanics, the mean stress tensor for a single particle is separated into three distinct components; the familiar Love–Webber formula describing the direct effect of contacts, a component due to the net unbalanced moment arising from contact and a symmetric term due to the centripetal acceleration of material within the particle. A case is made that the latter term be ignored without exception when determining bulk stress within an assembly of particles. In the absence of this centripetal term an important observation is made regarding the nature of the symmetry in the stress tensor for certain types of particles; in the case of particles with cubic symmetry, the effects of dynamics on the bulk stress in an assembly is captured by an entirely skew-symmetric tensor. In this situation, it is recognised that the symmetric part of the Love–Webber formula is all that is required for defining the mean stress tensor within an assembly – regardless of the dynamics of the system.

A.L. Smith; C.M. Wensrich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fast and Effective Kernels for Relational Learning from Texts Alessandro Moschitti MOSCHITTI@DIT.UNITN.IT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the question are retrieved Appearing in Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Machine Learning and provide an optimization for its computation which greatly reduces the learning and testing time. Our and Question An- swering. 1. Introduction Statistical relational learning is a wide research area that includes

Moschitti, Alessandro

58

Writing an Effective Resume During this hour-long session, participants will learn tips and tricks for writing an effective resume that will grab a potential employer's attention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Writing an Effective Resume During this hour-long session, participants will learn tips and tricks for writing an effective resume that will grab a potential employer's attention and that they can use during Center, 337 Keeny Hall September 17 | 4:00 p.m. | Career Center, 337 Keeny Hall Resume Walk-Ins After

Selmic, Sandra

59

Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC/sup 2/-2.

Hwang, R.N.; Toppel, B.J.; Henryson, H. II

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cost-guided Class Noise Handling for Effective Cost-sensitive Learning Xingquan Zhu and Xindong Wu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

297 Cost-guided Class Noise Handling for Effective Cost-sensitive Learning Xingquan Zhu and Xindong of algorithms for cost- sensitive (CS) classification, where instead of maximizing the classification accuracy, minimizing the misclassification cost becomes the objective. However, these methods assume that training sets

Wu, Xindong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hispanic Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Learning Communities: A Case Study of First-Year University Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2008 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction HISPANIC STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES: A... Approved by: Chair of Committee, Patrick Slattery Committee Members, Elizabeth Foster Robert Hall Juan Lira Head of Department, Dennie Smith December 2008 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction...

Kazen, Hayley D.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method to calculate resistance of high-speed displacement ship taking the effect of dynamic sinkage and trim and fluid viscosity into account  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is presented to calculate the resistance of a high-speed displacement ship taking the effect of sinkage and trim and viscosity of ... mesh being used, the position of a ship is updated by the motion of “

Chao-bang Yao ???; Wen-cai Dong ???

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Effect of the Recovery Act on the River Corridor Closure Project: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary report provides a high-level lessons learned by WCH of the impact to its project performance. The context is limited to the WCH project alone.

Mackay, S. M.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Numerical calculation of dynamical friction in electron cooling systems, including magnetic field perturbations and finite time effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The orders-of-magnitude higher luminosities required by future electron-ion collider concepts require a dissipative force to counteract the numerous factors acting to gradually increase the phase space volume of relativistic ion beams. High-energy electron cooling systems could provide the necessary dissipation via dynamical friction, but will have to be designed for new parameter regimes. It is expected that magnetic field errors, finite interaction time and other effects will reduce the dynamical friction and hence increase the cooling time, so improved understanding of the underlying dynamics is important. We present a generalized form of the classical field-free friction force equation, which conveniently captures some of these effects. Previous work (Bell et al 2008 J. Comput. Phys. 227 8714) shows both numerical and conceptual subtleties associated with undersampling of strong collisions, and we present a rigorous mathematical treatment of such difficulties, based on the use of a modified Pareto distribution for the electron-ion impact parameters. We also present a very efficient numerical algorithm for calculating the dynamical friction on a single ion in the field free case. For the case of arbitrary magnetic field errors, we present numerical simulation results, showing agreement with our generalized friction force formula.

Sobol, A.V.; Fedotov, A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bell, G.I.; Litvinenko, V.

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Effectiveness of Knowledge Building through Computer Supported Collaborative Learning among Elementary Students: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the third phase of a research project on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) involving students from 81 schools in Hong Kong and mainland China working on the topic of environmental protection. Instead of capturing an ... Keywords: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, Elementary Students, Knowledge Building

Wing Cheung Alex Tse; Fong Lok Lee; Yong Ou

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Characterization of classroom noise and noise control techniques and their effect on speech comprehension while learning.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classrooms have been shown to be prone to elevated occupied noise levels that reduce speech comprehension and inhibit learning. This presentation discusses a current study that includes three parts: (1) the characterization of masking invoked by noise commonly found in today’s classrooms (2) the formulation of a metric that intends to associate masking risk to noise features and (3) the attempt to quantify any increase in speech comprehension resulting from interior acoustic designs that aspire to reduce noise in occupied classrooms. Calibrated recordings made during classroom activities in 9 schools are post processed to allow noisecharacteristics to be rated based on attributes related to the noise source or type duration rate of recurrence spectra level envelope and peak energy. Binaural and monaural recordings are compared. Speech to noise ratios are statistically weighted over various time frames and activities in an attempt to refine reproducibility among different activities. All recordings were made in occupied rooms both before and after the various treatments were integrated. The results suggest that there are misconceptions in the literature in terms of today’s classroom design trends and a few novel principles emerged as being highly effective.

Sooch SanSouci; Line Guerra; Dick Campbell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cr II: A THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR OPTICALLY ALLOWED TRANSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the complicated iron-peak ion Cr II. We consider specifically the allowed lines for transitions from the 3d {sup 5} and 3d {sup 4}4s even parity configuration states to the 3d {sup 4}4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of R-Matrix packages, RMATRX II, which have recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects, were used to compute the collision cross sections. A total of 108 LS{pi}/280 J{pi} levels from the basis configurations 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, and 3d {sup 4}4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target including all doublet, quartet, and sextet terms. Configuration interaction and correlation effects were carefully considered by the inclusion of seven more configurations and a pseudo-corrector 4d-bar type orbital. The 10 configurations incorporated into the Cr II model thus listed are 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4p {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d{sup 4}4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4s4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4p4d-bar, and 3d{sup 3}4d-bar{sup 2}, constituting the largest Cr II target model considered to date in a scattering calculation. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed for a wide range of electron temperatures 2000-100,000 K which are astrophysically significant. Care has been taken to ensure that the partial wave contributions to the collision strengths for these allowed lines have converged with 'top-up' from the Burgess-Tully sum rule incorporated. Comparisons are made with the results of Bautista et al. and significant differences are found for some of the optically allowed lines considered.

Wasson, I. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P., E-mail: iwasson01@qub.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The effects the use of manipulatives and cooperative learning has on complex fraction skill level of fifth graders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE EFFECTS THE USE OF MANIPULATIVES AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING HAS ON COMPLEX FRACTION SKILL LEVEL OF FIFTH GRADERS A Thesis by LINDA SUSAN KRATZ... OF THE VERSA-TILE CASE. APPENDIX F APPENDIX G SAMPLE OF A VERSA-TILE WORKSHEET. . . . . . . 44 CHECKLIST FOR CLASSROOM PLACEMENT. . . . . . 45 VITA . 46 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Mean Scores for the Groups on the Pretest, Posttest, and Test...

Kratz, Linda Susan

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Templating Effects on the Mineralization of Layered Inorganic Compounds:? (1) Density Functional Calculations of the Formation of Single-Layered Magnesium Hydroxide as a Brucite Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Templating Effects on the Mineralization of Layered Inorganic Compounds:? (1) Density Functional Calculations of the Formation of Single-Layered Magnesium Hydroxide as a Brucite Model ... This work aims at understanding the formation and stability of a layered structure of brucite mineral [Mg(OH)2] via density functional calculations. ... It has been confirmed that this polymerization reaction leads spontaneously to a planar cluster, which is regarded as a part of the brucite layer. ...

Hisako Sato; Akihiro Morita; Kanta Ono; Haruyuki Nakano; Noboru Wakabayashi; Akihiko Yamagishi

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

The effect of service-learning in developing leadership life skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-making power and responsibility for consequences; 3) A broad context for learning and service; and 4) Recognition of young people's experience, knowledge, and skills (Des Marais, Yang, & Farzanehkia, 2000). Previous research confirms that involvement in out... as adults. For young people, the best approach is to develop leadership in real situations, rather than in the classroom. "We have found that service-learning!s the most powerful approach in youth leadership development" (Des Marais, Yang, & Farzanehkia...

Stafford, Jill Renee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

2012 UC Berkeley Learning and Development Initiative Center for Organizational Development and Workforce Effectiveness (COrWE) Updated 3/15/12 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 UC Berkeley Learning and Development Initiative Center for Organizational Development administrative efficiency so we can better support UC Berkeley's academic excellence. To support Operational Excellence, during 2012, the Center for Organizational and Workforce Effectiveness (COrWE), in cooperation

Doudna, Jennifer A.

72

A Self-regulated Learning Intervention for Developmental Mathematics Students at a Community College: Effects of Study Journals on Achievement and Study Habits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluate the effects of self-regulated learning interventions for college students. The review revealed a shortage of rigorous achievement-based research in authentic settings. This study evaluated a study-journaling intervention for developmental...

Travis, Jennifer Lynn

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Controlled study on the effectiveness of multimedia learning modules for teaching mechanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the impact of using multimedia learning modules (MLM) on the learning of students enrolled in introductory physics courses at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. One hundred fifty-nine students were randomly registered in two sections of an introductory mechanics course, one of which featured the MLMs. Both sections had the same instructor, participated in class discussions on identical topics, and used the same problem-solving examples. The students in the multimedia group outperformed the students who did not experience the MLMs in a final course examination and across identical discussion questions.

Homeyra R. Sadaghiani

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

A general technology adoption model of solar photovoltaic under feed-in tariff policy incorporating learning and network effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is now a plethora of renewable energy policy instruments to support the adoption of renewable energy technology and the generation of renewable electricity. Different ways to characterize such policies have included whether these policies are Price driven or Quota (Quantity) driven generation based or capacity driven etc. All such incentive-based policies (vs. Command and control policies) attempt to correct market failure of under supply of renewable energy. This paper uses a technology adoption approach to study the feed-in tariff policy for the photovoltaic (PV) technology. We developed a general economic model to study the adoption incentive for smaller system under a feed-in tariff regime. The model incorporates both the learning effect of system cost and a negative network externality effect inherent in the feed-in tariff policy. The latter is due to that nonadopters would need to contribute to payment for adopters' electricity generation. Using numerical methods we demonstrated that the feed-in tariff model has the potential to exhibit bandwagon or accelerated adoption effects. Cost learning is key to contributing to this but network effects would serve to dampen it. Our model seems to able to explain the rapid growth pattern in PV systems installation capacity and generation in Germany during the growth period of 1999–2003. We explore some policy implications of the model and suggest future research directions.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Line coupling effects in the isotropic Raman spectra of N{sub 2}: A quantum calculation at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present quantum calculations of the relaxation matrix for the Q branch of N{sub 2} at room temperature using a recently proposed N{sub 2}-N{sub 2} rigid rotor potential. Close coupling calculations were complemented by coupled states studies at high energies and provide about 10?200 two-body state-to state cross sections from which the needed one-body cross-sections may be obtained. For such temperatures, convergence has to be thoroughly analyzed since such conditions are close to the limit of current computational feasibility. This has been done using complementary calculations based on the energy corrected sudden formalism. Agreement of these quantum predictions with experimental data is good, but the main goal of this work is to provide a benchmark relaxation matrix for testing more approximate methods which remain of a great utility for complex molecular systems at room (and higher) temperatures.

Thibault, Franck, E-mail: franck.thibault@univ-rennes1.fr [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes I, Campus de Beaulieu, Bât. 11B, F-35042 Rennes (France)] [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes I, Campus de Beaulieu, Bât. 11B, F-35042 Rennes (France); Boulet, Christian [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR CNRS 8214, Université Paris-Sud 11, Campus d’Orsay, Bât. 350, F-91405 Orsay (France)] [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR CNRS 8214, Université Paris-Sud 11, Campus d’Orsay, Bât. 350, F-91405 Orsay (France); Ma, Qiancheng [NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University 2880 Broadway, New York, New York 10025 (United States)] [NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University 2880 Broadway, New York, New York 10025 (United States)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electronic structure calculations of positron lifetimes in SiC: Self-consistent schemes and relaxation effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present electronic structure calculations of positron lifetimes in various neutral and negative monovacancies in 3C and 6H silicon carbide. Self-consistent positron lifetime calculation schemes were used and full defect relaxation due to the creation of the vacancy and the presence of the positron was considered. Formation energies of the various possible charges of the defects were also calculated to predict their detectability in PAS. Lifetimes between 170 ps and 195 ps for VC and between 222 ps and 227 ps for \\{VSi\\} were obtained. Based on these results we propose new interpretations of the experimental PAS signals observed in n-type 3C and 6H-SiC samples.

J. Wiktor; G. Jomard; M. Bertolus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of acute sleep deprivation on motor and reversal learning in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sleep supports the formation of a variety of declarative and non-declarative memories, and sleep deprivation often impairs these types of memories. In human subjects, natural sleep either during a nap or overnight leads to long-lasting improvements in visuomotor and fine motor tasks, but rodent models recapitulating these findings have been scarce. Here we present evidence that 5 h of acute sleep deprivation impairs mouse skilled reach learning compared to a matched period of ad libitum sleep. In sleeping mice, the duration of total sleep time during the 5 h of sleep opportunity or during the first bout of sleep did not correlate with ultimate gain in motor performance. In addition, we observed that reversal learning during the skilled reaching task was also affected by sleep deprivation. Consistent with this observation, 5 h of sleep deprivation also impaired reversal learning in the water-based Y-maze. In conclusion, acute sleep deprivation negatively impacts subsequent motor and reversal learning and memory.

Andrew W. Varga; Mihwa Kang; Priyanka V. Ramesh; Eric Klann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Continual Learning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE.

79

Green function approach for the ab initio calculation of the optical and magneto-optical properties of solids:??Accounting for dynamical many-body effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach for the calculation of the optical and magneto-optical properties of solids based on the one-particle Green function is introduced in the framework of the linear muffin-tin orbital method. The approach keeps all advantages of the more accurate Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker scheme as the possibility to account for many-body effects in terms of the nonlocal energy dependent self-energy but is numerically much more efficient. Application of various proposed model self-energies for the calculation of the optical properties of bulk Ni and Fe demonstrates the great potential of the new scheme.

A. Perlov, S. Chadov, and H. Ebert

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Effects of a holistic rapid-learning system on the success rate of third grade at risk math students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Najor Subject: Curriculum and Instruction EFFECTS OF A HOLISTIC' RAPID-LEARNING STSTEM ON THE SUCCESS RATE OF THIRD GRADE AT RISK MATH STUDENTS A Thesis by SUSAN MARI E BAUMANN Approved... AND RECONNENDATIONS 29 29 33 34 35 Introduction. Discussion. Conclusions Recommendations REFERENCES 35 35 39 40 41 VITA 45 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Summary of the population Used in Both Groups. 17 The Scaled Scores from TEAMS and NAT 6 for Both...

Baumann, Susan Marie

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The effects of individual differences on e-learning users’ behaviour in developing countries: A structural equation model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of our study is to (1) empirically investigate the factors that affect the acceptance and use of e-learning in Lebanon, and (2) investigate the role of a set of individual differences as moderators (e.g., age, gender, experience, educational level) in an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A quantitative methodology approach was adopted in this study. To test the hypothesized research model, data was collected from 569 undergraduate and postgraduate students studying in Lebanon via questionnaire. The collected data were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) technique based on AMOS methods in conjunction with multi-group analysis. The result revealed that perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEOU), subjective norms (SN) and Quality of Work Life (QWL) positively affect students’ behavioural intention (BI). We also found that experience moderates the relationship between PEOU, PU and SN on e-learning use intention, and that age difference moderates the effects of PEOU, SN and QWL on BI. In addition, educational level moderates the effects of PEOU, SN on BI, and gender moderates the effects of PU, SN and QWL on BI. Contrary to expectations, a moderating role of age on the relationship between PU and BI was not found. Similarly, gender was not found to affect the relationship between PEOU and BI, and educational level did not moderate the relationship between PU or QWL and BI. In light of these findings, implications to both theory and practice are discussed.

Ali Tarhini; Kate Hone; Xiaohui Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

When humans form media and media form humans: An experimental study examining the effects different digital media have on the learning outcomes of students who have different learning styles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......based upon identical material. For example...identical. The diagrams were presented on...combination Sound + Diagrams gave significant...compensating strategies for handling text. These findings...general using text and diagrams is more effective...the e-learning materials used in this study......

J.L. Alty; A. Al-Sharrah; N. Beacham

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effects of maternally exposed coloring food additives on receptor expressions related to learning and memory in rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exposure to artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) has been implicated in the induction and severity of some childhood behavioral and learning disabilities. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACHRs) are thought to be effective in the learning and memory-generating process. In this study, we investigated the effects of intrauterine exposure to \\{AFCAs\\} on subunit concentrations of \\{NMDARs\\} and nAChRs isoforms in rats. We administered a mixture of \\{AFCAs\\} (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation. The concentration of NR2A and NR2B subunits and nAChR ?7, ?4?2 isoforms in their offspring’s hippocampi were measured by Western Blotting. Expressions of NR2B and nAChR ?2 were significantly increased (17% and 6.70%, respectively), whereas expression of nAChR ?4 was significantly decreased (5.67%) in male experimental group compared to the male control group (p < 0.05). In the female experimental group, \\{AFCAs\\} caused a 14% decrease in NR2B expression when compared to the female control group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that exposure to \\{AFCAs\\} during the fetal period may lead to alterations in expressions of \\{NMDARs\\} and nAChRs in adulthood. These alterations were different between male and female genders.

Betul Mermi Ceyhan; Fatih Gultekin; Duygu Kumbul Doguc; Esin Kulac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Atomistic Calculations of the Effect of Minor Actinides on Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of UO{sub 2{+-}x}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team will examine how the incorporation of actinide species important for mixed oxide (MOX) and other advanced fuel designs impacts thermodynamic quantities of the host UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel and how Pu, Np, Cm and Am influence oxygen mobility. In many cases, the experimental data is either insufficient or missing. For example, in the case of pure NpO2, there is essentially no experimental data on the hyperstoichiometric form it is not even known if hyperstoichiometry NpO{sub 2{+-}x} is stable. The team will employ atomistic modeling tools to calculate these quantities

Chaitanya Deo; Davis Adnersson; Corbett Battaile; Blas uberuaga

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Spin-free Dirac-Coulomb calculations augmented with a perturbative treatment of spin-orbit effects at the Hartree-Fock level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A perturbative approach to compute second-order spin-orbit (SO) corrections to a spin-free Dirac-Coulomb Hartree-Fock (SFDC-HF) calculation is suggested. The proposed scheme treats the difference between the DC and SFDC Hamiltonian as perturbation and exploits analytic second-derivative techniques. In addition, a cost-effective scheme for incorporating relativistic effects in high-accuracy calculations is suggested consisting of a SFDC coupled-cluster treatment augmented by perturbative SO corrections obtained at the HF level. Benchmark calculations for the hydrogen halides HX, X = F-At as well as the coinage-metal fluorides CuF, AgF, and AuF demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed perturbative treatment of SO effects on energies and electrical properties in comparison with the more rigorous full DC treatment. Furthermore, we present, as an application of our scheme, results for the electrical properties of AuF and XeAuF.

Cheng, Lan, E-mail: chenglanster@gmail.com [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Stopkowicz, Stella, E-mail: stella.stopkowicz@kjemi.uio.no [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)] [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: gauss@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modelling of steady-state fluid flow in 3D fractured isotropic porous media: Application to effective permeability calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial applications such as: underground radioactive waste repositories, natural oil/gas recovery, geological CO2 storage, geothermal energy, etc. However, determining effective permeability for fractured and geotechnical engineers. Effective continuum is a simple and efficient approach to study the macroscopic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Effect of pressure on the atomic and electronic structure of enstatite MgSiO3: Ab initio calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation results for the effect of pressure on the atomic and electronic structure of MgSiO3 are presented. They are in good agreement with experimental data. It is shown that, when the pressure rises from 0 to...

A. N. Chibisov

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The effects of experiential learning with an emphasis on reflective writing on deep-level processing of agricultural leadership students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are instrumental in the development of students. Experiential learning, and, more importantly, reflective writing are important components of college instructors? repertoires. Learning is not complete without proper reflection. The purpose of this study...

Moore, Copie D.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydrogen Insertion Effects on the Electronic Structure of Equiatomic MgNi Traced by ab initio Calculations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydrogen Insertion Effects on the Electronic Structure of Equiatomic MgNi Traced by ab initio-xxx / Received October 18, 2012. Doi: 10.5560/ ZNB.2012-xxx For equiatomic MgNi which can be hydrogenated up to the composition MgNiH1.6 at an absorption/desorption temperature of 200 °C, the effects of hydrogen are approached

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Local Linear Learned Image Processing Pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The local linear learned (L3) algorithm is presented that simultaneously performs the demosaicking, denoising, and color transform calculations of an image processing pipeline for a...

Lansel, Steven; Wandell, Brian

91

Effect of flow topology on the calculation of two-phase frictional multipliers in uniformly heated flow of R-134a in a rectangular duct  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-phase frictional multipliers for SUVA R-134a flowing in a rectangular duct (with D{sub H} = 4.8 mm) have been measured for three nominal system pressures (0.88, 1.34 and 2.34 MPa) and four nominal mass fluxes (510, 1020 and 1740, 2040 kg/m{sup 2}/s) under uniform heat flux conditions. The data is compared with adiabatic data previously taken at similar flow conditions, as well as with several classical multiplier correlations. The comparisons reveal a strong effect of pressure and mass flux on the flow topology and, by extension, a large effect on the calculation of acceleration and frictional pressure drop components. For this fluid and this geometry, entrainment and fluid separation is enhanced at higher pressures and mass flux such that most of the liquid exists in the test section edges and as dispersed droplets in the core. For these cases, the classical simplified approach to calculate acceleration pressure drop fails to adequately predict the acceleration component and leads to erroneous calculations of frictional pressure drop from the measured total pressure drop. Best estimates of the true acceleration component are given, based on void profiles measured with a gamma densitometer system, comparisons to the adiabatic data, and recasting the data in terms of the total pressure drop multiplier as a function of the Martinelli parameter, X{sub tt}. (author)

Vassallo, Peter; Kevin Cope, W.; Smith, Walter C. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

MA 16020 -- CALCULATOR POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 16020 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

OwenDavis

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calculation of single-beam two-photon absorption rate of lanthanides: Effective operator method and perturbative expansion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbative contributions to single-beam two-photon transition rates may be divided into two types. The first, involving low-energy intermediate states, require a high-order perturbation treatment, or an exact diagonalization. The other, involving high-energy intermediate states, only require a low-order perturbation treatment. We show how to partition the effective transition operator into two terms, corresponding to these two types, in such a way that a many-body perturbation expansion may be generated that obeys the linked cluster theorem and has a simple diagrammatic representation.

Duan, C.-K.; Ruan Gang; Reid, Michael F. [Institute of Applied Physics and College of Electronic Engineering, Chongqing University of Post and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Institute of Applied Physics and College of Electronic Engineering, Chongqing University of Post and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Putting the Testing Effect to the Test. Why and When is Testing effective for Learning in Secondary School.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this doctoral thesis the testing effect is investigated among secondary school students. It includes 5 different studies. Dirkx, K. J. H. (2014, 11 April).… (more)

Dirkx, Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic moments and transitions in A{<=}9 nuclei including meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic moments and transitions are reported for A{<=}9 nuclei. The realistic Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Illinois-7 three-nucleon potentials are used to generate the nuclear wave functions. Contributions of two-body meson-exchange current (MEC) operators are included for magnetic moments and M1 transitions. The MEC operators have been derived in both a standard nuclear physics approach and a chiral effective field theory formulation with pions and nucleons including up to one-loop corrections. The two-body MEC contributions provide significant corrections and lead to very good agreement with experiment. Their effect is particularly pronounced in the A=9, T=3/2 systems, in which they provide up to ~20% (~40%) of the total predicted value for the {sup 9}Li ({sup 9}C) magnetic moment.

Saori Pastore, S.C. Pieper, Rocco Schiavilla, Robert Wiringa

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

INFORMATION SECURITY ATTACK TREE MODELING An Effective Approach for Enhancing Student Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the engineering principle of Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). The main goal of this principle, the project plan can be created more realistically. FMEA techniques [1] help to identify failure potential

98

Effects of environmental stability and demonstrator age on social learning of food preferences by young Norway rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

online 25 August 2004; MS. number: A9636) We used socially learned food preferences of Norway rats. However, food choices of rats that were moved daily from one cage to another and fed at unpredictable learning of food preferences by Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, a species that has served for several

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

99

Audio taped explanations of freshman experimental calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have found audio tapes to be effective replacements for live, in-lab explanations of experimental calculations.

Aline M. Harrison

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable.

Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

How Do Calculators Calculate? Helmut Knaust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not convert numbers to base 2. They use a binary-coded decimal (BCD) system instead. Calculators can only

Knaust, Helmut

102

The effect of an internal versus external focus of attention on the learning of a tennis backhand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study examined the influence of instructions regarding the performer's attentional focus on the learning of a tennis backhand stroke. In two experiments, one group of participants was instructed to focus on their movement pattern, i...

Maddox, Melinda Dianne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ab initio calculations in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis: I. Methanol to gasoline with ZSM-5. II. Carbonyl ligand effects on metal-metal bonds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is composed of two studies in catalysis. The first is an exploration, using computational techniques, of the mechanism for the first carbon-carbon bond formation in the methanol to gasoline (MTG) reaction. The second is a study of the factors important to the understanding of ligand effects on metal-metal bonds, and in particular, to metal clusters. Three possibilities were considered as ways to activate a carbon in the MTG process prior to formation of C2 or higher hydrocarbons. These were a free radical mechanism, a surface ylide mechanism, and a possible defect site which might lead to steric crowding of CH[sub 2] groups. Although the free radical mechanism was found to be thermodynamically within the parameters of the MTG process, it contained a high transition state. Consideration of the molecules available prior to hydrocarbon build-up and their specific electronic structure, led to the view that the available carbon atoms (methanol, dimethyl ether, etc.) were unlikely to be activated by a free radical intermediate. The surface-stabilized ylide which has been proposed as an intermediate by many was studied to determine if in fact the ylide was stabilized. The total energy of the ylide was compared to that of the naked site on the zeolite and free methylene. Free methylene ranged, depending on the geometry of the ylide, between 50 and 80 kcal more stable. These numbers are qualitatively correct, but more electron correlation would have to be incorporated in the calculation to get an accurate value for the destabilization. Starting from a defect site, two CH[sub 2] groups were each attached to two oxygen atoms. It was thought that two CH[sub 2] groups would take up considerably more space than either than original Al atom or the four hydrogens. Molecular Mechanics calculations showed the zeolite to be sufficiently flexible to prevent crowding of the CH[sub 2]'s.

Miller, A.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Interactions between learning and decision making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantify the effects of learning and decision making on each other in three parts. In the first part, we look at how knowledge about decision making can influence learning. Let the decision cost be the amount spent by ...

Tulabandhula, Theja

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Large scale electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We formulate the Kohn-Sham density functional theory in terms of nonorthogonal, localized orbitals. Within this formulation we introduce a simple and effective method to localize the orbitals. Our approach leads to a plane-wave-based algorithm for total energy calculations whose computational complexity is of O(N), where N is the number of electrons. This opens the way to calculations of unprecedented scale. Our method appears to be of general character and applicable in other contexts such as quantum chemical or projected quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

Giulia Galli and Michele Parrinello

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

107

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China 2050 Pathways Calculator China 2050 Pathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: China 2050 Pathways Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: China's Energy Research Institute (ERI), UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Low-carbon plans/TNAs/NAMAs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: china-en.2050calculator.net/pathways/111011011011101101011010111101101 Country: China OpenEI Keyword(s): International Eastern Asia Language: English References: Global Energy Governance Reform, 3 October 2012[1]

108

The effectiveness of simulated robots for supporting the learning of introductory programming: A multi-case case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support a variety of sensors (such as light, sound and colour) and a range of actuators such as motors. Other physical robots have also been used to support the learning of programming including the Scribbler (Cowden et al., 2012), Arduino (Martin...

Major, L.; Kyriacou, T.; Brereton, P.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

Rambaut, Andrew

110

R-value Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Wall Systems Advanced Wall Systems ORNL Home ASTM Testing BEP Home Related Sites Work With Us Advanced Wall Systems Home Interactive Calculators New Whole Wall R-value Calculators As A Part Of The ORNL Material Database For Whole Building Energy Simulations These calculators are replacing the old Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator. These new versions of the calculator contain many new features and are part of the newly developed Interactive Envelope Materials Database for Whole-Building Energy Simulation Programs. The simple version of the Whole Wall R-value calculator is now available for use. This calculator is similar to the previous Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator and does not require any downloads from the user. However, it was updated to allow calculations for fourteen wall details

111

Learning and Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Learning and Development Learning and Development Learning and Development Learning Programs Read more Tools & Technologies Read more Performance-Based Culture Read more Products & Services Read more DOE Virtual University Read more The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is the Department's corporate resource for talent development. It provides competency-based programs, services, tools, and strategies to ensure the Department's employees possess the breadth of skills they need in order to successfully accomplish the mission of the Department. We promote talent development through value-added, needs-based, corporate training and development activities. Our goal is to achieve efficient, effective learning and development through evaluation and continuous process improvement efforts.

112

Comparison between the measured and calculated reactivity in measuring the effectiveness of the emergency protection at the stage of physical start-up of unit no. 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents comparisons between the effectiveness of the emergency protection under both stationary and nonstationary formulations calculated with the use of the RADUGA-7.5 package and experimental data obtained in measuring the 'weight' of the emergency protection in the process of physical start-up of the VVER-1000 reactor of unit no. 3 of the Kalinin NPP. On the basis of the results obtained, recommendations are given on comparing the measured and calculated reactivity and parameters determined by using its value.

Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A., E-mail: rshevchenko@secnrs.ru; Shevchenko, S. A. [Scientific and Engineering Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Learning by Learning To Communicate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human intelligence is a product of cooperation among many different specialists. Much of this cooperation must be learned, but we do not yet have a mechanism that explains how this might happen for the "high-level" agile ...

Beal, Jacob

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

An Examination of the Effects of the Texas Farm Bureau Mobile Learning Barn Agricultural Education Program on Youth's Perceptions and Knowledge of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farm Bureau Mobile Learning Barn, strive to educate youth about the importance of agriculture. This study documented the agricultural perceptions and knowledge of youth who attended the Texas Farm Bureau Mobile Learning Barn agricultural education...

Howard, Joni Leigh

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

ARM - Heat Index Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Heat Index Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative...

116

ARM - Wind Chill Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Wind Chill Calculations Wind Chill is the apparent temperature felt on the exposed human...

117

Effect of boron and gadolinium concentration on the calculated neutron multiplication factor of U(3)O/sub 2/ fuel pins in optimum geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The KENO-Va improved Monte Carlo criticality program is used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for TMI-U2 fuel compositions in a variety of configurations and to display parametric regions giving rise to maximum reactivity contributions. The lattice pitch of UO/sub 2/ fuel pins producing a maximum k/sub eff/ is determined as a function of boron concentrations in the coolant for infinite and finite systems. The characteristics of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-coolant mixtures of interest to modeling the rubble region of the core are presented. Several disrupted core configurations are calculated and comparisons made. The results should be useful to proposed defueling of the TMI-U2 reactor.

Thomas, J.T.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Metal-ion Complexation Effects in C 1s-NEXAFS Spectra of Carboxylic Acids—Evidence by Quantum Chemical Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous systematic C 1s-NEXAFS studies carried out for humic acid (HA) loaded with polyvalent metal cations (Mn+) reveal spectral features which were postulated to result from metal ion complexation: a strong decrease of the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition intensity and the appearance of a new absorption feature at slightly lower energy adjacent to the carboxyl resonance. Although spectroscopic results for the Mn+-PAA (polyacrylic acid) system (selected as model for structurally ill-defined HA) reveal the same spectral features, evidence by an independent approach for interpretation of these features is desirable. It is well established that quantum chemical calculations are capable of reproducing transition features in C 1s core excitation spectra of small organic molecules, e.g., acetate, which is chosen here as a fragment containing the complexing group to model the macromolecular HA and PAA systems. In this study, the RI-ADC(2) approach, as implemented in the TURBOMOLE program package, is applied to calculate vertical core excitation spectra of various metal acetates and the acetate anion. An energy shift (?f) between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition of the acetate anion and various metal cation acetates is established. Calculated shifts are very similar to the experimentally observed values for the energy difference between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO peak and the absorption feature appearing after metal ion complexation in Mn+-PAA/PAA. According to our computations, structural changes of the acetate complexes (e.g., the O-CeO bond angle) compared to the free acetate anion are predominantly responsible for the spectral changes observed upon metal ion complexation.

Armbruster, M.; Schimmelpfennig, B; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Denecke, M; Klenze, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges ?5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ?mol{sup ?1}) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ?mol{sup ?1}). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pK{sub a} and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning.

Rocklin, Gabriel J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550, USA and Biophysics Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550 (United States)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550, USA and Biophysics Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, 1700 4th St., San Francisco, California 94143-2550 (United States); Mobley, David L. [Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemistry, University of California Irvine, 147 Bison Modular, Building 515, Irvine, California 92697-0001, USA and Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States)] [Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemistry, University of California Irvine, 147 Bison Modular, Building 515, Irvine, California 92697-0001, USA and Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States); Dill, Ken A. [Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, 5252 Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-0001 (United States)] [Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, 5252 Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-0001 (United States); Hünenberger, Philippe H., E-mail: phil@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Transformative Higher Education Teaching and Learning: Using Social Media in a Team-based Learning Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media to enhance teaching and learning in a team-based learning environment involving large classes. The use of digital technology via Facebook, enhanced team-based learning outside the classroom, complementing face-to-face lessons. Students were also exposed to several student-centered learning mechanisms including poster presentations and expert forums in an effort to provide them with a more holistic learning experience. The theoretical framework of the study is based on the educational theories of constructivism and social learning. The students” learning experience and motivation was assessed through content analysis of their reflective portfolios and their Facebook postings. The results clearly showed the positive impact that team-based strategy had on the students” learning experience and motivation. Facebook was indeed perceived as an innovative and effective tool in a student-centered learning environment that enriched students” educational experiences, increasing the relevance of the subject matter and encouraging students to collaborate effectively with their peers and faculty. From the perspective of the educator, the use of Facebook in a team-based pedagogy setting significantly enhanced the teaching and learning process as it allowed the educator to tap into the digital learning styles of the students and provided innovative ways of involving and motivating students in the learning process.

R. Ratneswary V.Rasiah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Get Widget Code...

123

Calculating polynomial runtime properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Affine size-change analysis has been used for termination analysis of eager functional programming languages. The same style of analysis is also capable of compactly recording and calculating other properties of programs, including their runtime, maximum ...

Hugh Anderson; Siau-Cheng Khoo; Stefan Andrei; Beatrice Luca

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A cost-effective backward Lagrangian method for simulation of pollutant formation in gas turbine combustors by post-processing of complex 3D calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A backward Lagrangian Monte Carlo modelling is proposed to calculate by post-processing the PDF of the thermo-chemical parameters of complex turbulent reactive flows simulated with a simple turbulent combustion model. PDF's of minor species such as pollutant species (NOx, soot, unburnt hydrocarbons...) can be easily obtained as long as these species have no significant influence on the main features of the flow. A numerical validation and an example of application of the method to a real burner are presented. If the number of points where information is sought is limited the cost of the method in terms of CPU time is very low and the statistical error can be perfectly controlled. With a first application to a semi-technical scale combustor producing soot the method has been proved very promising for the prediction of pollutant in complex turbulent reactive flows of gas turbine combustors.

Francis Dupoirieux; Nicolas Bertier; Aymeric Boucher; Pascale Gilbank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Learning Curve  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

It is a fundamental human characteristic that a person engaged in a repetitive task will improve his performance over time. If data are gathered on this phenomenon, a curve representing a decrease in effort per unit for repetitive operations can be developed. This phenomenon is real and has a specific application in cost analysis, cost estimating, or profitability studies related to the examination of future costs and confidence levels in an analysis. This chapter discusses the development and application of the learning curve.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Relativistic density-functional theory with the optimized effective potential and self-interaction correction: Application to atomic structure calculations ,,Z 2106...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic density-functional theory with the optimized effective potential and self, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 Received 30 July 1997 We present a self-interaction-free relativistic density-functional-2947 98 06201-5 PACS number s : 31.15.Ew, 32.10.Hq, 71.15.Rf I. INTRODUCTION In recent years, the density-functional

Chu, Shih-I

129

Method for calculating the effects of a dynamic entity interacting with poly(dT-dA)?poly(dT-dA): A dynamic enhancer-repressor action  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Green-function technique is used to study the interbase H-bond stretch poly(dT-dA)?poly(dT-dA) (where dT is deoxythymine and dA is deoxyadenine) when an effective enzyme is attached to the helix. Four different one-hydrogen-bond attachment points are studied, and two different two-atom attachment points are studied. The enzyme attachments are allowed to oscillate at an unassumed resonant frequency associated with a thermally activated enzyme. This is equivalent in the Green-function formalism to a physical simulation of a simple enzyme attachment to a large DNA helix. The frequency dependence of hydrogen-bond thermal mean motion seems to be a key to the distinction between a dynamic repressor and enhancer action. The response is enhanced interbase hydrogen-bond-stretch amplitude when the effective enzyme attachment to the helix in poly(dT-dA)?poly(dT-dA) is oscillating at frequencies that are near the interbase breathing mode of the helix. When the effective enzyme attachment is oscillating at frequencies far removed from the breathing mode of the helix, the response is usually repressed interbase hydrogen-bond stretch. Spectral density therefore may be a signature of protein enhancer or repressor action. A two-attachment effective enzyme is simulated, and it is shown that it can be approximated by the two individual one-point attachments if the force constant attaching them is small.

R. Beger and E. W. Prohofsky

1991-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ensemble effects on ethylene dehydrogenation on PdAu(001) surfaces investigated with first-principles calculations and nudged-elastic-band simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ensemble effects on ethylene dehydrogenation on PdAu(001) surfaces investigated with first on adsorption and dehydrogenation of ethylene on PdAu 001 bimetallic surfaces are systematically investigated that ethylene dehydrogenation is inhabited under ambient reaction temperature on the most popular second

Gong, Xingao

131

TVDG LET Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator TVDG LET Calculator This program calculates the Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target. Select the Target Material from the dropdown list. Select the Ion Specie from the dropdown list. Enter the Total Ion Energy in the text box. This is equal to the Atomic Mass times the Energy/Nucleon. Click the 'Calculate' button or press the 'Enter' key. The Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target will be returned. Select your Target from the list Air Aluminum Oxide Carbon Copper Gallium Arsenide Gold Polyester Polyethylene Silicon Silicon Dioxide Skin Soda Lime Glass Sodium Iodide Water Select your Ion from the list

132

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

133

Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

Lazarine, Alexis D

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

first Quarter fy 2013 first Quarter fy 2013 march 1, 2013; Issue no. 74 NEPA Lessons Learned March 2013 1 Sharing DOE's NEPA Success Stories A primary purpose of DOE's Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR), which chronicles the Department's NEPA activities, is to disseminate successful approaches for NEPA compliance. LLQR provides a platform for NEPA Document Managers and other preparers of an environmental impact statement (EIS) or environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate their experience and share lessons learned within the DOE NEPA Community. Information is solicited through a Lessons Learned Questionnaire. Members of the document preparation team for each completed EIS and EA are asked to rate the effectiveness of the NEPA process in terms of protection of the environment and influence on decisionmaking, and

135

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

4 - Universal Design of learning spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter explores the concept of Universal Design with respect to learning spaces: effective library design, construction and renovation within the context of understanding how we learn, create and apply new knowledge. The changing nature of the iCommons within learning space design is the “new normal,” providing a deeper understanding of the impact of physical environments on teaching and learning. The successful project combines the design of both group and individual study spaces along with innovative cost- effective solutions. Current trends in information literacy and general classroom design focus on flexibility in meeting the various learning styles of students. By exploring the evolving iCommons concept, driven by curricula, assessment strategies and research, information learning spaces can be designed to be used to their fullest potential.

Gail M. Staines

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Course info Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course info Machine Learning Real life problems Lecture 1: Machine Learning Problem Qinfeng (Javen) Shi 28 July 2014 Intro. to Stats. Machine Learning COMP SCI 4401/7401 Qinfeng (Javen) Shi Lecture 1: Machine Learning Problem #12;Course info Machine Learning Real life problems Table of Contents I 1 Course

Shi, Qinfeng "Javen"

138

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

139

Calculation of direct and indirect excitons in GaAs?Ga1?xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells: The effects of in-plane magnetic fields and growth-direction electric fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variational procedure, in the effective-mass and parabolic-band approximations, is used in order to investigate the effects of crossed electric and magnetic fields on the exciton states in GaAs?Ga1?xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells. Calculations are performed for double quantum wells under applied magnetic fields parallel to the layers and electric fields in the growth direction. The exciton envelope wave function is obtained through a variational procedure using a hydrogenic 1s-like wave function and an expansion in a complete set of trigonometric functions for the electron and hole wave functions. We take into account intersubband mixing brought about by the Coulomb interaction of electron-hole pairs in double quantum wells and present a detailed analysis of the properties of direct and indirect exciton states in these systems. The present study clearly reveals anticrossing effects on the dispersion with applied voltage (or growth-direction electric field) of the photoluminescence peaks associated with direct and indirect excitons. Calculated results are found in good agreement with available experimental measurements on the photoluminescence peak position associated with direct and indirect excitons in GaAs-Ga1?xAlxAs double quantum wells under growth-direction applied electric fields or under applied in-plane magnetic fields.

M. de Dios-Leyva, C. A. Duque, and L. E. Oliveira

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Steep Slope Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Steep Slope Calculator Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating Savings for Residential Roofs with Non-Black Surfaces Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Click to see Data for All 243 Locations Roof Inputs: R-value(Btu-in/(hr ft2 oF):

142

Webinar: Using the RTU Comparison Calculator to Justify High-Efficiency Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Rooftop Unit (RTU) Campaign is working with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update its RTU Comparison Calculator (RTUCC). Join this webinar to learn how contractors...

143

WINDExchange: Learn About Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Learn About Wind Learn about how wind energy generates power; where the best wind resources are; how you can own, host, partner...

144

Jobs Calculator | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Jobs Calculator Jobs Calculator owipjobscalculatorv11-0.xls More Documents & Publications bbanxxxxxxxpmcprogressreport2y12qx.xlsx Job Counting Guidelines Title...

145

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Using Q-Learning with Experimental Validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach is effective. This work is a part of the efforts toward building a cognitive radio network testbed-learning [9], [10] is one of the algorithms in the reinforcement learning family of machine learning selection without negotiations among secondary users for multi-user and multi-channel CR systems. Both

Qiu, Robert Caiming

147

DOE Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Lessons Learned Information Services Catches the Eye of Corporations and Educational Institutions

148

LEARN TO EAT COUNSELLING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARN TO EAT HEALTHILY COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS) #12;Eating healthily much caffeine (coffee, energy drinks) ­ Eating foods with poor nutritional value (sugary, high and energy drinks, can also have a negative effect on mental performance and productivity, as well as have

Viglas, Anastasios

149

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantum Learning Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel notion of a quantum learning machine for automatically controlling quantum coherence and for developing quantum algorithms. A quantum learning machine can be trained to learn a certain task with no a priori knowledge on its algorithm. As an example, it is demonstrated that the quantum learning machine learns Deutsch's task and finds itself a quantum algorithm, that is different from but equivalent to the original one.

Jeongho Bang; James Lim; M. S. Kim; Jinhyoung Lee

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Air-change effectiveness: theory and calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eds) Proceedings of Healthy Buildings/IAQ ’97, Washington,eds) Proceedings of Healthy Buildings/ IAQ ’97, Washington,

Federspiel, Clifford C

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

-Learning: A Robotics Oriented Reinforcement Learning Josep M. Porta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Learning: A Robotics Oriented Reinforcement Learning Algorithm Josep M. Porta Institut de Robotica Oriented Reinforcement Learning Algorithm Josep M. Porta Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (UPC

Portland State University

153

Active Learning in Persistent Surveillance UAV Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of many complex UAV decision-making problems can be extremely sensitive to small errors in the model parameters. One way of mitigating this sensitivity is by designing algorithms that more effectively learn ...

Redding, Joshua

154

On the consistent definition of spin–orbit effects calculated by relativistic effective core potentials with one-electron spin–orbit operators: Comparison of spin–orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH 3 , PbH 2 , and PbH 4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spin–orbit effects for Tl TlH TlH 3 PbH 2 and PbH 4 are evaluated by two-component calculations using several relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) with one-electron spin–orbit operators. The used RECPs are shape-consistent RECPs derived by Wildman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 107 9975 (1997)] and three sets of energy-consistent (or adjusted) RECPs published by Schwerdtfeger et al. [Phys. Scr. 36 453 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 90 762 (1989)] Küchle et al. [Mol. Phys. 74 1245 (1991)] and Leininger et al. [Chem. Phys. 217 19 (1997)]. The shape-consistent RECP results are in very good agreement with the Küchle et al. energy-consistent RECP results for all the molecules studied here and all-electron results for TlH. The RECPs of Schwerdtfeger et al. and Leininger et al. seem to provide qualitatively different spin–orbit effects. If one defines spin-free RECP as the potential average of the corresponding two-component RECP all RECPs give very similar spin–orbit effects for all the cases. Most of the discrepancies of molecular spin–orbit effects among various RECPs reported in the literature may originate from different definitions of RECPs with or without a spin–orbit term and not from the inherent difference in spin–orbit operators.

Young-Kyu Han; Cheolbeom Bae; Yoon Sup Lee

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

BTRIC - Tools & Calculators - ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculators Calculators Attic Radiant Barrier Calculator Low-Slope Roof Calculator for Commercial Buildings (6/05) - estimates annual energy cost savings Moisture Control for Low-Slope Roofing (5/04) - determine if a roof design needs a vapor retarder or if the roofing system can be modified to enhance its tolerance for small leaks Modified Zone Method Roof Savings Calculator (12/12) - for commerical and residential buildings using whole-building energy simulations Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculator (6/06) Steep-Slope Roof Calculator on Residential Buildings (6/05) - estimate annual energy cost savings Whole-Wall R-Value Calculator 2.0 (10/06) ZIP-Code R-Value Recommendation Calculator (1/08) Roofs/Attics Attic Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet (Jan 2011) Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Fact Sheet

156

Peer Exchange Calls Inspire New Lessons Learned Greatest Hits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A new “Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls” resource summarizes top takeaways shared by Better Buildings Residential Network members, from tips to collaborating with utilities to cost-effective...

157

Team learning center design principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spreadsheet Based Scaling Calculations and Membrane Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many membrane element manufacturers provide a computer program to aid buyers in the use of their elements. However, to date there are few examples of fully integrated public domain software available for calculating reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. The Total Flux and Scaling Program (TFSP), written for Excel 97 and above, provides designers and operators new tools to predict membrane system performance, including scaling and fouling parameters, for a wide variety of membrane system configurations and feedwaters. The TFSP development was funded under EPA contract 9C-R193-NTSX. It is freely downloadable at www.reverseosmosis.com/download/TFSP.zip. TFSP includes detailed calculations of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. Of special significance, the program provides scaling calculations for mineral species not normally addressed in commercial programs, including aluminum, iron, and phosphate species. In addition, ASTM calculations for common species such as calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}{times}2H{sub 2}O), BaSO{sub 4}, SrSO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}, and LSI are also provided. Scaling calculations in commercial membrane design programs are normally limited to the common minerals and typically follow basic ASTM methods, which are for the most part graphical approaches adapted to curves. In TFSP, the scaling calculations for the less common minerals use subsets of the USGS PHREEQE and WATEQ4F databases and use the same general calculational approach as PHREEQE and WATEQ4F. The activities of ion complexes are calculated iteratively. Complexes that are unlikely to form in significant concentration were eliminated to simplify the calculations. The calculation provides the distribution of ions and ion complexes that is used to calculate an effective ion product ''Q.'' The effective ion product is then compared to temperature adjusted solubility products (Ksp's) of solids in order to calculate a Saturation Index (SI) for each solid of interest. The SI is expressed as a log value (log(Q) - log(Ksp)) where positive values indicate potential scaling conditions. As this is an unprotected spreadsheet, the methodology is plainly visible to and readily modified by the user.

Wolfe, T D; Bourcier, W L; Speth, T F

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Professional Development and Learning Management Come learn with us @ www.cuny.edu/training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professional Development and Learning Management Come learn with us @ www.cuny.edu/training CUNY into a single column, and effectively utilize the five most common functions. June 14, 1:30 - 4:30 PM MSEXCEL headings to create easy to read reports. TECHNOLOGY MONTH! NEW!NEW! REGISTRATION: To register, go to www

Qiu, Weigang

160

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Web-based learning: an empirical analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Web-Based Learning (WBL) and training have become popular among academic institutions and companies. It has led to a widespread debate over whether technology-based learning alone will be a sufficient approach in the future or whether technology will simply complement traditional methods of learning. This debate has led to several studies on the application and effectiveness of WBL and its pros and cons with regard to effectiveness in teaching and learning. An empirical analysis was conducted with the help of data collected using a standard questionnaire from students in Hong Kong universities. The objective of this research was to investigate the extent to which WBL is popular and effective in Hong Kong. The results of the literature survey and empirical analysis helped to identify the barriers to and critical success factors in the successful application of WBL, and to develop a generic framework for WBL that could be useful in other environments. A summary of findings and conclusions are presented.

A. Gunasekaran; E.W.T. Ngai

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Workplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workplace Learning & Development (WL&D) promotes employee and organizational growth, developmentWorkplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst 303 Goodell Amherst, MA 01003 Workplace Learning workshops to ALL UMass Amherst staff and faculty members. * Fall 2014 Programs Workplace Learning

Mountziaris, T. J.

164

Collaborative learning in software development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fields such as software process improvement, team research, organizational learning, organization scienceCollaborative learning in software development: An investigation of characteristics, prerequisites and Technology #12;[ii] Abstract Collaborative learning integrates individual and collective learning

Langseth, Helge

165

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning DD2431 ¨Orjan Ekeberg Oct­Dec, 2008 What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition A Hypothetical Project What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition

Kjellström, Hedvig

166

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning DD2431 ¨Orjan Ekeberg Oct­Dec, 2007 What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition A Hypothetical Project What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition

Kjellström, Hedvig

167

LIFE SKILLS GAINED THROUGH ORAL PRESENTATIONS One of the most common fears among adults is speaking in public. Youth and adults who learn to effectively speak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in education and employment on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation and federal laws. BUL880 (4-H#27511) Tips #6 Getting Your Message Across with Posters describes factors to consider when using and creating posters for a presentation. Learn to determine if using a poster

O'Laughlin, Jay

168

The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

Black, Charles Beyer

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only October 8, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable fluid type? Water Steam What fuel is used? Gas Oil How many boilers will you purchase? unit(s) Performance Factors Existing What is the capacity of the existing boiler? MBtu/hr* What is the thermal efficiency of the existing boiler? % Et New What is the capacity of the new boiler?

170

2050 Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 Calculator 0 Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2050 Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United Kingdom Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, Economic Development, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Multi-model Integration, Multi-sector Impact Evaluation, Solar, Wind Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Analysis Tools, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet, Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.gov.uk/2050-pathways-analysis Country: United Kingdom Web Application Link: 2050-calculator-tool.decc.gov.uk/pathways/1111111111111111111111111111

171

Learning From Snapshot Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples are a powerful tool for teaching both humans and computers.In order to learn from examples, however, a student must first extractthe examples from its stream of perception. Snapshot learning is ageneral approach ...

Beal, Jacob

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Learning and risk aversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

Oyarzun, Carlos

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

174

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

175

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and Methodology Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

176

Woods for Learning Strategy Woods for Learning Strategy | 32 | Woods for Learning Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategy Woods for Learning #12;Woods for Learning Strategy Woods for Learning Strategy | 32 | Woods for Learning Strategy Foreword We want our young people to be successful learners, confident the use of woods for learning. Woodlands provide a rich resource for a range of learning opportunities

177

Global nuclear-structure calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wavelets in electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional wavelet analysis is employed to develop a new formalism for electronic structure calculations. The wavelet formalism provides a systematically improvable and tractable description of electronic wave functions and overcomes limitations of conventional basis expansions. The potential power of the wavelet formalism for ab initio electronic structure calculations is demonstrated by a calculation of 1s states for all the naturally occurring nuclei on the periodic table and the interaction energies of the hydrogen molecule ion.

K. Cho, T. A. Arias, J. D. Joannopoulos, and Pui K. Lam

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Clinical Continuing Professional Education in Dental Hygiene Practice Using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how learning is facilitated in a dental hygiene clinical continuing education course designed using Kolb’s experiential learning model. This study assessed the effectiveness of an experiential...

Henson, Harold Alonso

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Application of functional learning to ATPG and design verification for combinational circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, learning-based techniques have been proposed as an efficient alternative to the traditional branch-and-bound techniques for test generation. The learning techniques have been shown to be extremely effective in finding test vectors for hard...

Mukherjee, Rajarshim

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complimentary copy. Redistribution subject to AIP license or copyright, see http:php.aip.orgphpcopyright.jsp are sizable. The same approach can be used in other appli-...

182

Learning Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Programs Programs Learning Programs Learning Programs Our learning programs help DOE employees grow and develop across a wide range of skills in a variety of disciplines. Training and development activities are designed to help employees fulfill the DOE mission through education, performance improvement and knowledge management. DOE's corporate learning programs address a continuum of knowledge and experience from entry-level to senior executives and represent a major commitment by DOE in its talent development. Whether it is in traditional classroom-learning, online-learning, distance-learning, or blended learning options, we are committed to meeting the Department's talent development goals. Learning Programs Leadership Development Career Development Technical & Professional

183

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: CEQ Effectiveness Study CEQ Handbook on Cumulative Effects DOE Sites Enhancing Public Participation in EAs Stockpile Stewardship and Management ROD Issued EIS Distribution: Coordination with Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs EPA EIS Rating System Results of EA Quality Review DOE NEPA Web as Research Tool Litigation Updates DOE NEPA Process Data Misused GC to Provide Administrative Record Guidance Questions and Answers on Supplement Analyses First Quarter FY 1997 Lessons Learned Questionnaire Results, including EIS and EA Cost and Time reports Lessons Learned Quarterly Report

184

Early Lessons Learned  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Deploying a 100Gbps Network Steve Cotter Dept Head, Energy Sciences Network May 4, 2011 Enterprise Innovation Symposium Atlanta, GA Lawrence Berkeley National...

185

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and...

186

SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculator Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator Argonne's Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator is a simple tool that small business owners can use to quickly...

187

Fusion calculations with the Skyrme interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect on nuclear dynamics of using various parametrizations of the Skyrme potential is studied. In particular, fusion cross sections for the light system O16 + Mg24 are calculated for the interactions Skyrme II, Skyrme III, Skyrme IV, Skyrme V, and Skyrme VI. The interaction Skyrme III is shown to increase significantly the fusion cross section. An angular momentum window for fusion is observed to occur for Ec.m.?70 MeV.NUCLEAR REACTIONS O16(Mg24,x) in time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. Effect of nuclear interaction on fusion cross section.

S. J. Krieger and M. S. Weiss

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

AHR 3/16/06 Equilibrium Flux Surface Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preserved, with no flattening in edge stochastic region. · Assume zero net current (00 = 0). #12;#12;2 AHR 31 AHR 3/16/06 Equilibrium Flux Surface Calculations for W7AS and NCSX A. Reiman1, M. Zarnstorff1, D resonant magnetic field near plasma edge. Coil calculated to have little effect on rotational transform

Hudson, Stuart

189

Precision Calculations of Atoms with Few Valence Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precision Calculations of Atoms with Few Valence Electrons M. G. KOZLOV Petersburg Nuclear Physics words: atoms; effective Hamiltonian; pair equations; precision calculation; valence electron for valence electrons of an atom. The low-energy part of atomic spectrum is found by solving the eigenvalue

Kozlov, Mikhail G

190

Cycle Track Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing driveways & low-volume streets Signalized intersections #12;Trend in kilometers cycled per year

Bertini, Robert L.

191

The Learning Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a 4-H volunteer, you have tremendous influence in determining the learning that takes place within your 4-H club or group. Adult volunteers also have the task of making the learning experiences attractive to young people. Here are some important...

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Learn More about Fusion & Lasers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the road. Glossary Don't...

193

Embedding Learning Strategies into the Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and evaluation #12;Learning About Learning #12;Learning About Learning Highlight organizational skillsEmbedding Learning Strategies into the Curriculum VI VI AN FA YOWSKI BRENDA KOLLER Academic Success Centre UNBC CTLT Brown Bag Lunch October 23, 2013 #12;Learning About Learning Why embed learning

Northern British Columbia, University of

194

EXPERIENCES IN NEW CNC LEARNING INNOVATIONS MARAVELAKIS Emmanuel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIENCES IN NEW CNC LEARNING INNOVATIONS MARAVELAKIS Emmanuel1 , YALDIZ Süleyman2 , SAHIN Mehmet learning innovations in CNC training. The evolution of CNC machine technology and continuous developments in CNC programming, produce an increasing demand for an effective, user-friendly and innovative training

Aristomenis, Antoniadis

195

Student Learning Commons Annual Report 2008/09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Commons Annual Report 2008/09 Elaine Fairey Introduction · The Student students in their academic pursuits, with a focus on providing writing and learning support services, Student Services, and many other campus groups. · SLC programs are provided using a highly effective

196

MFTF-B performance calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we document the operating scenario models and calculations as they exist and comment on those aspects of the models where performance is sensitive to the assumptions that are made. We also focus on areas where improvements need to be made in the mathematical descriptions of phenomena, work which is in progress. To illustrate the process of calculating performance, and to be very specific in our documentation, part 2 of this report contains the complete equations and sequence of calculations used to determine parameters for the MARS mode of operation in MFTF-B. Values for all variables for a particular set of input parameters are also given there. The point design so described is typical, but should be viewed as a snapshot in time of our ongoing estimations and predictions of performance.

Thomassen, K.I.; Jong, R.A.

1982-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator (for Office Properties) Agency/Company /Organization: ENERGY STAR Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=comm_real_estate.building_upgrade_value The Building Upgrade Value Calculator allows practitioners to analyze the

198

A nondiagrammatic calculation of the Rho parameter from heavy fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple nondiagrammatic evaluation of the nondecoupling effect of heavy fermions on the Veltman's Rho parameter is presented in detail. This calculation is based on the path integral approach, the electroweak chiral Lagrangian formalism, and the Schwinger proper time method.

Hong-Hao Zhang

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

Efficient modeling techniques for atomistic-based electronic density calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an effective combination of various modeling and numerical techniques for enabling fast large-scale first-principle electronic density calculations. A real-space mesh technique framework is...

Deyin Zhang; Eric Polizzi

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

ACE Learning Series - Adoption, Compliance, and Enforcement | Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Center Resource Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators ACE Learning Series - Adoption, Compliance, and Enforcement ACE Learning Series Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our environment and economy are impacted. Building energy codes and standards provide an effective response. The Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) designed the ACE Learning Series for those in the building industry having the greatest potential to influence the adoption of and compliance with building energy codes and standards. The Learning Series consists of:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Welcome to the 36th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the July 2003 NEPA Community Meeting in this issue. Also, please note that the cumulative index, a useful reference tool, is printed in this issue. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Included in this issue: DOE NEPA Community Gauges Progress In Its Continuing Pursuit of Excellence Floodplain and Wetland Regulations Effective September 26, 2003 NEPA Community Meeting Highlights Metrics Show Progress In Meeting Goals Getting from Here to There Lessons Learned Along the Way e-Government Approaches to EIS Distribution Procedures Evolving for Sensitive Information

202

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electronic-structure calculations in adaptive coordinates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plane-wave method for electronic-structure calculations is reformulated in generalized curvilinear coordinates. This introduces a new set of basis functions that depend continuously on a coordinate transformation, and can adapt themselves to represent optimally the solutions of the Schrödinger equation. As a consequence, the effective plane-wave energy cutoff is allowed to vary in the unit cell in an unbiased way. The efficiency of this method is demonstrated in the calculation of the equilibrium structures of the CO and H2O molecules using the local-density approximation of density-functional theory, and norm-conserving, nonlocal pseudopotentials. The easy evaluation of forces on all degrees of freedom makes the method suitable for ab initio molecular-dynamics applications.

François Gygi

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve Community Service by 4-H Project Area Development #12;New Hampshire 4-H Community Service by Project Area Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve that their service also relate to that project. This publication contains suggested service projects related

New Hampshire, University of

205

Case{based Meta Learning: Sustained Learning supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case{based Meta Learning: Sustained Learning supported by a Dynamically Biased Version Space Jacky{recognized that in practical in- ductive learning systems the search for a concept must be heavily biased. In addi- tion is sustained learn- ing, allowing transfer from known tasks to new ones. Previous work on dynamic bias has

Baltes, Jacky

206

Can doxastic agents learn? On the temporal structure of learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, modifying the informativeness of the incoming data and changing the conditions of success of the learning

Amsterdam, University of

207

A Collaborative Learning Design Environment to Integrate Practice and Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to integrate organizational activities to solve practical problem with intel lect of type A, and learningA Collaborative Learning Design Environment to Integrate Practice and Learning based@jaist.ac.jp Abstract. The integration of practice and learning is a key to cultivation of or ganizational capability

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

208

Serious Games Go Informal: A Museum-Centric Perspective on Intelligent Game-Based Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORLDS is a prototype game-based learning environment about environmental sustainability designed. Intelligent game-based learning environments show considerable promise for creating effective and engaging-based learning environments has focused on formal education settings and training. However, intelligent game

Young, R. Michael

209

Enhancing co-design reliability by inter-organizational learning and loose coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing co-design reliability by inter- organizational learning and loose coupling concepts Colin and their potential outcomes (in terms of organizational learning, cooperative effect and consequences). We propose-design reliability model, organizational learning, loose coupling, informal cooperative practices, self

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Time series association learning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic input is recognized from inferred articulatory movements output by a learned relationship between training acoustic waveforms and articulatory movements. The inferred movements are compared with template patterns prepared from training movements when the relationship was learned to regenerate an acoustic recognition. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic articulatory relationships are learned by a neural network. Subsequent input acoustic patterns then generate the inferred articulatory movements for use with the templates. Articulatory movement data may be supplemented with characteristic acoustic information, e.g. relative power and high frequency data, to improve template recognition.

Papcun, George J. (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

212

NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports This document contains a compilation of NEPA "success stories" that were featured in DOE Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports (LLQRs). Feature articles in LLQR have described how the NEPA process provided an organized structure for making some of the Department's most complex decisions. NEPA reviews have resulted in significant project cost savings through informed decision making. Some articles have highlighted ways in which the NEPA process improved environmental outcomes, such as by identifying better alternatives or more effective mitigation. Some articles have put the spotlight on procedural success, such as effective public

213

Medical image classification with multiple kernel learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, medical images are generated by hospitals and medical centers rapidly. The large volume of medical image data produces a strong need to effective medical image retrieval. The visual characteristic of medical image, such as modality, anatomical ... Keywords: feature fusion, image classification, medical imaging, multiple kernel learning

Hong Wu; Hao Zhang; Chao Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Compliant mechanism learning toolkit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns a toolkit designed to assist in learning the behavior of complaint mechanisms. In the design of complaint mechanisms, increasingly complicated designs behave in ways that are harder to intuitively ...

Allard, Nicholas (Nicholas A.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Robot learning [TC Spotlight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

Tedrake, Russell Louis

216

Learning Autodesk Inventor 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Learn Autodesk Inventor 2010in this full-color Official Training Guide This Official Training Guide from Autodesk is the perfect resource for beginners or professionals seeking training or preparing for certification in Autodesk's Inventor 3D mechanical ...

Autodesk Official Training Guide

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Computers for Learning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through Executive Order 12999, the Computers for Learning Program was established to provide Federal agencies a quick and easy system for donating excess and surplus computer equipment to schools...

218

Learning About Magnets!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Learning About Name A magnet is a material or object that creates a magnetic fi eld. This fi eld is invisible, but it creates a...

219

Experiments in service learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Criticality Calculations for Step?2 GPHS Modules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Multi?Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version referred to as the Step?2 GPHS Module has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of 238 Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step?2 version. The Monte Carlo N?Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand the configuration is extremely sub?critical; k eff is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close?spaced stack to approach criticality ( k eff ?=?1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Ronald J. Lipinski; Danielle L. Hensen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Live, Learn and Thrive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Live, Learn and Thrive RGBI team award presented at NMSU ceremony by Danielle Supercinski Rio Grande Basin Initiative (RGBI) participants received the Team Award from New Mexico State University (NMSU) on April 21, 2005, during the NMSU Live..., Learn and Thrive awards convocation. New Mexico efforts are led by Craig Runyan, coordinator for NMSU project efforts, and assisted by Leeann DeMouche. Runyan, DeMouche and 40 other members of the RGBI received this award for demonstrating...

Supercinski, Danielle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Learning to Recognize Critical Cells in Document Tables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning to Recognize Critical Cells in Document Tables Nicola Di Mauro1,2 , Stefano Ferilli1, to provide more effective results #12;2 Nicola Di Mauro, Stefano Ferilli, and Floriana Esposito the automatic

Di Mauro, Nicola

227

Sequencing computer-assisted learning of transformations of trigonometric functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......their trigonometric reasoning prior to participating in an innovative program. 2.2 Technology-assisted learning devices Some...Student achievement effects of technology-supported remediation of understanding of fractions. Int. J. Math. Edu. Sci......

John A. Ross; Catherine D. Bruce; Timothy M. Sibbald

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Memory Dynamics in Cross-Situational Statistical Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect in young children’s memory and category induction.F. (1977). Infant recognition memory: Studies in forgetting.Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 38, 246-254. doi:

Vlach, Haley Amelia Heublein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Calculation Theory of Uniform Distribution in Cleanroom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculation of the dust concentration is the core of the design calculation for cleanroom. The theoretical calculation in this chapter is ... the assumption that particles are uniformly distributed in cleanroom.

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NONLINEAR APPROXIMATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NONLINEAR APPROXIMATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE CALCULATIONS G. BEYLKIN AND T. S. HAUT Abstract. We present a new method for electronic structure calculations based on novel algorithms for nonlinear numerical calculus suitable for electronic structure calculations. For any spatial orbital

Beylkin, Gregory

231

Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations M. Barrault a,b,*, E. Cance method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi- empirical and density functional theory electronic structure calculations A molecular system is composed of N electrons, modelled quantum

Hager, William

232

Electronic Structure Calculations on Helical Conducting Polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Structure Calculations on Helical Conducting Polymers ... Therefore, we select the B3LYP/6-31G* methodology to calculate the oligomers. ... Table 3 shows several calculated parameters. ...

Juan D. Ripoll; Andrei Serna; Doris Guerra; Albeiro Restrepo

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

A case study of using eye tracking techniques to evaluate the usability of e-learning courses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Usability is an important quality indicator for interactive IT products, such as e-learning courses, and can directly impact learning effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. In this study, we use eye tracking method together with traditional interviewing ...

Mingzhuo Liu; Zhiting Zhu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

How Selective is Social Learning in Dolphins?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L. (2007). Social learning and innovation are positivelyor experiences), innovation, and social learning. Bouchard,2003). Social learning: Promoter or inhibitor of innovation?

Kuczaj II, Stan A.; Yeater, Deirdre; Highfill, Lauren

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lessons Learned Database | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Lessons Learned Database Login Welcome to the Lessons Learned site, the premier Web tool for online information sharing regarding Lessons Learned issues. Please login to...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoidance learning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 40 Effective Reinforcement Learning for Mobile Robots Summary: policy (for cor- ridor following) or constant (for obstacle...

237

The promotion of domestic grid-connected photovoltaic electricity production through social learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An effective social learning process which enhances public understanding of photovoltaic installations in residential dwellings and the economic instruments used by governments to encourage investment in this ...

Greg Hampton; Simon Eckermann

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dynamical Collective Calculation of Supernova Neutrino Signals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first calculations with three flavors of collective and shock wave effects for neutrino propagation in core-collapse supernovae using hydrodynamical density profiles and the S matrix formalism. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of multiple resonances upon the time signal of positrons in supernova observatories. A specific signature is found for the inverted hierarchy and a large third neutrino mixing angle and we predict, in this case, a dearth of lower energy positrons in Cherenkov detectors midway through the neutrino signal and the simultaneous revelation of valuable information about the original fluxes. We show that this feature is also observable with current generation neutrino detectors at the level of several sigmas.

Gava, Jerome; Kneller, James; Volpe, Cristina; McLaughlin, G. C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: October 6, 2014 FY 2016 September 2014 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

240

Quasiparticle lifetimes in magnesium clusters modeled by self-consistent GW? calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasiparticle (QP) lifetimes in magnesium clusters are calculated using many-body Green's-function theory. We analyze the effect of the self-consistency of the one-particle Green's function G on the calculations and ...

He, Yi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effects of structure distortion on optical phonon properties of crystalline beta-BaTeMo{sub 2}O{sub 9}—A novel nonlinear optical material: Infrared and Raman spectra as well as first-principles calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared dielectric property of monoclinic BaTeMo{sub 2}O{sub 9} single crystals is studied by polarized IR reflectance spectra from 20 to 1800?cm{sup ?1}. Based on the modified Lorentz model, the frequencies, strengths, and dampings of TO modes as well as the orientations of the dipole momenta are determined, agreeing well with Raman spectra and results from First-principles calculation. The observed modes are visually assigned to the specific atoms' motions in the primitive cell based on the theory calculations. A large shift of the internal modes of the anion groups relative to free anion co-ordination polyhedra is observed, which can be used to indicate the distortions of co-ordination polyhedra related to the nonlinear optical properties. Further, the experimental results of the strengths of the oscillators support the elimination and splitting of degenerate modes in free regular polyhedrons. These results offer a way to evaluate the nonlinear optical properties by use of traditional IR reflectivity spectra.

Zhou, S. T.; Huang, Y.; Qiu, W. Y.; Li, Y. L.; He, S. M.; Zhang, B., E-mail: bozhang@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Chen, X. S., E-mail: bozhang@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Lu, W., E-mail: bozhang@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Lab for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Zhang, J. J.; Tao, X. T. [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shangdong University, 27 South Shanda Road, Jinan, Shangdong 250100 (China)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Equations shorten pipe collapse calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The API suggests collapse pressure equations for long, perfectly round, steel oil field casing, tubing, drill pipe, and line pipe. Operating and service company engineers can substitute two pipe collapse pressure equations for the 12 API equations now in general use. The shorthand results are almost the same as those from the API equations. The shorthand method has the additional advantage of allowing units from any measurement system. The API equations restrict calculations to US units only. The equation box lists the API (Equations 1--12) and the shorthand (Equations 13--14) equations. The API equations are based on work started shortly after the turn of the century.

Avakov, V.A. [Halliburton Energy Services, Duncan, OK (United States)

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comparison of plasma focus calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple model for the current history of plasma focus experiments is presented. The presence of a leak current which does not pass through the plasma sheath is allowed. Results are found to compare quite well with those of much more sophisticated two?dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations. For the Frascati experiment which has detailed current measurements computed results do not agree with experimentally derived values. A reasonable match for the total current in the Frascati experiment can be found by lowering the leak current. Both total and leak current can be matched if a mass loss from the run?down region is allowed.

Peter G. Eltgroth

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Website: www.gtz.de/en/themen/umwelt-infrastruktur/abfall/30026.htm References: GHG Calculator for Waste Management[1] Waste Management - GTZ Website[2] Logo: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management The necessity to reduce greenhouse gases and thus mitigate climate change is accepted worldwide. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, waste management causes a great part of the national greenhouse gas production, because landfills produce methane which has a particularly strong effect on climate change. Therefore, it is essential to minimize

245

EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/climateleaders/index.html Cost: Free The EPA Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) is designed to develop an annual GHG inventory based on the EPA Climate Leaders Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol. Overview The EPA Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) is designed to develop

246

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

247

Semi-Supervised Learning Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Brendan J. Frey Learning in Graphical Models, Michael I. Jordan Causation, Prediction, and Search, second Kandola John Lafferty Zoubin Ghahramani Many graph-based semi-supervised learning methods can be viewed

Lafferty, John

248

CRAD, Lessons Learned Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Assessment Plan Lessons Learned Assessment Plan CRAD, Lessons Learned Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

249

CRAD, Lessons Learned Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Assessment Plan Lessons Learned Assessment Plan CRAD, Lessons Learned Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

250

Relativistic calculations of electronic states of TeH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relativistic configuration interaction calculations of five ?–? states [3/2 1/2 1/2(II) 3/2(II) 5/2] of TeH are carried out. Comparison calculations of the 2? and 4? ?–s states are also carried out with the objective of understanding the effect of spin–orbit interaction on the electronic states of TeH. These calculations enable assignment of some of the experimentally observed spectra. The 1/2(II) 3/2(II) and 5/2 states exhibit interesting avoided crossings.

K. Balasubramanian; Ming Han; M. Z. Liao

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Anticipated Fiscal Policy and Adaptive Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

budget and bonds are in zero net supply so that ? t = gt, and bt?1 = 0. Hence, bt in Section 2 may be interpreted as lending to other households and this must equal zero in equilibrium. Before considering the learning scenario, we consider what happens... with less than fully rational expectations However, in their approach agents know the full structural economic model and are impeded by calculation costs. 2 edge of the overall structure of the economy remains incomplete. More specifically, we consider a...

Evans, George W; Honkapohja, Seppo; Kaushik, Mitra

252

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued December 3, 2013 - 3:18pm Addthis The 77th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process was issued on December 2, 2013. This issue of Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) examines positive outcomes of the NEPA process. Featured articles include a review by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance of nearly 400 excerpts from questionnaire responses published in LLQR during the past 10 years regarding the usefulness and effectiveness of the NEPA process. An overwhelming majority of the questionnaire responses describe positive outcomes and illustrate that we can produce high quality documents that enhance the Department's decisionmaking and help protect the environment.

253

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Welcome to the 35th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to include in this issue three new mini-guidance articles. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: Responding to Comments Is Work, But It Makes the NEPA Process Work DOE NEPA Meeting in July Mini-guidance: Multiple RODs Offer Flexibility Effective and Efficient EIS Distribution Keep the Public Informed When EIS Plans Change DOE Updates Public Participation Policy Observations on Annual NEPA Planning Summaries DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Guidance Issued Not Meeting CAA Requirements Can Cause Delays Floodplain and Wetland Regulations Update

254

CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

Rubin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND LEARNING WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change and Learning Within Organizations". In Dynamics of organizational societies : Models, theories to organizational learning. This approach defines learning, culture, structure and behavior at the individual and organizational level. When organizations, as synthetic agents learn important organizational behaviors emerge

Sadeh, Norman M.

256

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

257

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Hampshire 4-H Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve Community Service Projects All good community for learning. This publication contains a list of suggested service projects and ideas for expanding the system works. Mindy Turner, New Mexico 4-H Youth Development Specialist November 2006 #12;New Hampshire 4

New Hampshire, University of

258

1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Design by Autonomous Learning Design by Autonomous Learning: Modeling Environment for Design Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007, Australia Email: {prabhakar, gjsmith}@socs.uts.edu.au 1. Design by Autonomous Learning An important area of expertise robots can provide is design of artefacts in physical

Prabhakar, Sattiraju

259

Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers January 16, 2014 - 4:19pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the calculator assumptions and definitions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement How many chillers will you purchase? Performance Factors Existing What is the existing design condition? Full Load Partial Load What is the cooling capacity of the existing chiller? tons What is the full-load efficiency of the existing chiller? EER What is the partial-load efficiency of the existing chiller? EER New What is the new design condition? Full Load Partial Load

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

262

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reliability Reliability U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 2007 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Joe Paladino October 29, 2007 Approach for Calculating OE Benefits Challenges * Established benefits methodologies (e.g., NEMS and MARKAL) do not address some of the major benefits that OE's program will provide (e.g. reliability). * Much of OE's program is about transforming the way the T&D infrastructure operates rather than replacing components: - Some technologies need a high penetration or must be deployed as an entire system to yield benefits (e.g. PMUs or Distribution Automation). - Some programs within OE are not developing "widgets" that can be easily counted. - OE is developing tools/methodologies or funding demonstrations that

263

Power Line Calculator for DOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Line Calculator (PLC) for DOS, version 1.0, is a program that describes the electrical characteristics of a transmission or distribution system given user-defined input. This input may consist of a combination of operating currents and phases, symmetric components, power factor, and real or reactive power. The program also allows the user to designate whether currents are present on the system neutral or in the ground. The PLC assumes that any value entered by the user remains fixed (e.g., phase current, power factor), and for underdetermined systems, basic default assumptions are incorporated: the power factor is held at or near 1.0, the net phase current is kept at or near zero, and the phase conductor currents are kept balanced. The program operates under PC/MS-DOS version 3.3 or later, and the output is available in both tabular and graphic formats.

Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Continual Learning | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Continual Learning Continual Learning Continual Learning Continual Learning Workshops Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE. The purpose of Continual Learning is to improve the professional development of our federal workforce. In an effort to support this initiative, HC-20 offers 3 instructional workshops, located under additional information, to assist employees and supervisors with employee development. These workshops are full of helpful tips and tricks for identifying low cost/no cost training, creating a high-quality IDP and assist supervisors with their responsibilities with employee development. Employees and supervisor are encouraged to attend these workshops and let us (HC-20) help you as we promote a learning

265

What Police Learn From Lawsuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please do not Copy or Cite What Police Learn From LawsuitsPlease do not Copy or Cite What Police Learn From Lawsuitsdata as comprehensive as what is gathered by plaintiffs’

Schwartz, Joanna C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Download presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar "National...

267

Century Learning through Apple Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21st Century Learning through Apple Technology July 4 ­ 5, 2013 This exciting institute will appeal to educators who wish to enhance their teaching in support of 21st century learning using Apple technology. This institute begins with a keynote address that looks at how new technologies can enhance 21st century learning

268

Predictive calculations to assess the long-term effect of cementitious materials on the pH and solubility of uranium(VI) in a shallow land disposal environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One proposed method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal is to mix the radioactive waste streams with cement, place the mixture in steel barrels, and dispose of the barrels in near-surface unsaturated sediments. Cement or concrete is frequently used in burial grounds, because cement porewaters are buffered at high pH values and lanthanides and actinides; are very insoluble in highly alkaline environments. Therefore, leaching of these contaminants from the combined cement/low-level radioactive waste streams will at least initially be retarded. The calculations performed in this study demonstrate that the pH of cement porewaters will be maintained at a value greater than 10 for 10,000 years under Hanford specific hydrogeochemical conditions. Ten thousand years is the period generally studied in longterm performance assessments per regulatory guidance. The concentrations of dissolved hexavalent uranium [U(VI)], the valence form of dissolved U usually present in oxidizing surface and groundwaters, are also constrained by the high pH and predicted solution compositions over the 10,000-year period, which is favorable from a long-term performance perspective.

Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second Quarter fy 2013 Second Quarter fy 2013 June 3, 2013; Issue no. 75 NEPA Lessons Learned June 2013 1 (continued on page 4) Coordination and Substitution: Effective Options for Integrating NEPA and NHPA Section 106 The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) jointly issued a handbook in early March aimed at improving the integration of the Section 106 consultation process under the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and NEPA review. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 anticipates that benefits will include maximizing staff resources, avoiding duplication of effort, facilitating coordinated public participation, and making better informed decisions. The handbook describes the options of "coordination"

270

Electronic band?shape calculations in ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vibronic nature of the lowest energy electronic absorption and of the lowest energy photoelectron spectrum of NH3 are investigated theoretically. Two?dimensional Franck–Condon factor calculations are performed and theoretical spectra are constructed including the effect of vibronic linewidth. The comparison of the experimental with theoretical spectra computed under various assumptions leads to several conclusions. The conspicuous continuum underlying the ??? transition is seen to arise from the overlapping tails of vibronic line shapes. There is no need to attribute the continuum to a second electronic transition. The ?1 N–H stretching mode is excited in both the electronic absorption and photoelectron spectrum. The ? state of NH3 may be able to support two quanta of ?1. The planar NH3 + ion has a N–H bond longer than in the ground state NH3 by about 0.06 Å.

Phaedon Avouris; A. R. Rossi; A. C. Albrecht

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Calculable Toy Model of the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent discussions of the string-theory landscape, we propose field-theoretic realizations of models with large numbers of vacua. These models contain multiple U(1) gauge groups, and can be interpreted as deconstructed versions of higher-dimensional gauge theory models with fluxes in the compact space. We find that the vacuum structure of these models is very rich, defined by parameter-space regions with different classes of stable vacua separated by boundaries. This allows us to explicitly calculate physical quantities such as the supersymmetry-breaking scale, the presence or absence of R-symmetries, and probabilities of stable versus unstable vacua. Furthermore, we find that this landscape picture evolves with energy, allowing vacua to undergo phase transitions as they cross the boundaries between different regions in the landscape. We also demonstrate that supergravity effects are crucial in order to stabilize most of these vacua, and in order to allow the possibility of cancelling the cosmological constant.

Keith R. Dienes; Emilian Dudas; Tony Gherghetta

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Active collaborative permutation learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of Collaborative Permutation Recovery, i.e. recovering multiple permutations over objects (e.g. preference rankings over different options) from limited pairwise comparisons. We tackle both the problem of how to recover multiple ... Keywords: active learning, collaborative ranking, matrix factorization

Jialei Wang, Nathan Srebro, James Evans

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Bayesian learning in bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . 8 II.2.2. Historical Pathways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 II.2.3. Gene Class Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 II.3. Bayesian Learning for Microarrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 II.3.1. BLM1... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 II.3.2. BLM2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 II.3.3. BLM3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 II.3.4. Posterior Computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 II.3.5. False Discovery Analysis...

Gold, David L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Learning Xamarin Studio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Learn how to build high-performance native applications using the power of Xamarin Studio Who This Book Is ForThis book is intended for .NET developers with any level of experience and who are interested in building native applications without the hassle ...

William Smith

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Lunch & Learn Cost Sharing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lunch & Learn Cost Sharing #12;Today's Agenda Policy Procedures OMNI Child Budget Setup Transactions in OMNI FACET Common Issues #12;Cost Sharing Policy http://www.research.fsu.edu/contractsgra nts ­ Not quantified ­ Do not have to account for and report #12;Cost Sharing Procedures http

McQuade, D. Tyler

276

Learning, Memory, & Attention Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COGS 101B: Learning, Memory, & Attention · Welcome! · Instructor ­ Dr. Coulson ­ Email: coulson Attention ­ Divided Attention ­ Automaticity ­ Attentional Capture · Immediate Memory ­ Sensory Memory ­ Short-Term Memory ­ Working Memory · Long-Term Memory ­ Levels of Processing ­ Memory Systems

Coulson, Seana

277

Learning teamwork behaviors approach: learning by observation meets case-based planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Learning collaborative behaviors is an essential part of multi agent systems. One of the suitable techniques for learning collaborative behaviors is observational learning. This paper describes a hybrid method for learning teamwork behaviors from an ... Keywords: case-based planning, collaborative behavior, learning collaborative behaviors, multi agent learning, observational learning, soccer, teamwork

Banafsheh Rekabdar; Bita Shadgar; Alireza Osareh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mediated resonance effect of the vanadium 3d states on phase stability in the Al8V5 ?-brass studied by first-principles FLAPW and LMTO-ASA electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism for the stability of the Al8V5?-brass containing 52 atoms in its cubic unit cell has been investigated by means of first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) and linearized muffin-tin orbital-atomic sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA) electronic structure calculations. The LMTO-ASA identified a deep valley at 0.5eV above the Fermi level in its density of states (DOS) as arising from orbital hybridizations between V 3d and Al 3p states. On the other hand, the FLAPW revealed the V 3d states mediated resonance of electrons with different sets of lattice planes. The resonance involved is found to be substantial not only at ?G?2=18 or {330} and {411} zones but also at those in the range 14??G?2?30. A comparison with the electronic structure of the CsCl-type AlV compound proved that the V 3d states mediated resonance occurs only in Al8V5 but not in AlV compound. The V 3d states mediated resonance is proved to result in a significant suppression of the sp-partial DOS over the energy range from the Fermi level up to +2.2eV. A gain in the electronic energy has been attributed to the formation of highly condensed bonding states below the Fermi level, again caused by the V 3d states mediated resonance. It is also proposed that the Al8V5 is stabilized at e?a=1.94 rather than 21?13 as is expected from the Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule.

U. Mizutani; R. Asahi; H. Sato; T. Takeuchi

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident response calculations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

effect of such variables needs to be calculated... in many countries. The majority of bicycle-motor vehicle (BMV) accidents occur at intersections. In order... to reduce the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transition-phase calculation of a large, heterogeneous-core LMFBR. [SIMMER-II calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanistic calculation of a complete transition-phase sequence for a large heterogeneous core LMFBR has been performed using SIMMER-II. Recriticalities occurred as the disruption progressed through a series of different subphases. The number and severity of recriticalities was directly related to the timing and scale of fuel removal and coherence of material motion. The energetics associated with transition-phase are not yet resolved but the understanding of the characteristics of disruption and the effects of uncertainties has been extended significantly.

Luck, L.B.; Bell, C.R.; Asprey, M.W.; DeVault, G.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A comparison of material balance calculations based on equilibrium ratios with Schilthuis balance calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Liquid Phases for Assumed Initial Volume of 3, 900, 000, 000 Barrels. 31 ABSTRACT The theory of the material balance based on equihbrium ratios is described. The Kelley-Snyder field is described and a calculation of oil in place by the Schilthuis...& noglectbag the pres?ace of a water drive might ~ the high value of 4x 000, 000?000 barrels, and would if included, briag this value mox's into line with the others, Any water drive that would cause such effects would have to be from a limited aquifer...

Clanton, John L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Linear Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linear Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang) allocation time in the materials science category [1]. DFT codes can be used to calculate the electronic theory (DFT) calculations for large systems. This method cancels out the artificial boundary effects

284

Quantum Chemical Calculations of the Influence of Anchor-Cum-Spacer Groups on Femtosecond Electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Chemical Calculations of the Influence of Anchor-Cum-Spacer Groups on Femtosecond Electron) cluster calculations. Approximate effective electronic coupling strengths for the heterogeneous electron-transfer interaction have been extracted from the calculated electronic structures and are used to estimate femtosecond

Goddard III, William A.

285

Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/vehicles/natural_gas_calculator.html Determine the costs to acquire and use a Natural Gas Vehicle (Honda Civic GX) as compared to a conventional vehicle.

286

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Flexible Fuel Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/progs/cost_anal.php?0/E85 Calculate the cost to drive a flex-fueled vehicle (one that can run on either E85 Ethanol or gasoline) on each fuel type.

287

A variational calculation of the trapping rate in thermal barriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variational calculation of the trapping rate and trapped-ion density in thermal barriers is presented. The effects of diffusion in energy as well as pitch-angle scattering are retained. The variational formulation uses the actual trapped/passing boundary in velocity space. The boundary condition is that the trapped-ion distribution function match the passing-ion distribution function, which is taken to be a Maxwellian, on the boundary. The results compare well with the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck code calculations by Futch and LoDestro. The CPU time for a variational calculation is less than 0.1 s using the CRAY-I computer, while a typical Fokker-Planck code calculation takes 10–20 min.

X.Z. Li; G.A. Emmert

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Calculator Tips for TI-30XA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

Owen Davis

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spherical Target Temperature by Extended CFAST Calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature at the surface of a spherical target made of polyethylene during a room fire. The current calculation is separated into 2 steps: (1) CFAST code calculation--Calculate the air temperature; radiation flux to the target from the fire, surrounding air, and walls; convection flux; and target temperature. (2) Extended model calculation--Calculate the temperature of the target sphere taking into account the density, heat capacity, heat conductivity, and the spherical geometry of the target by solving the coupled finite difference equations. The second step calculation utilizes the air temperature and radiation flux determined by the CFAST code calculation in the first step.

Ma, C W

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Duct Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Duct Calculator Duct Calculator Duct Calculator logo. Provides access to duct calculation and sizing capabilities either as a standalone Windows program or from within the Autodesk Building Mechanical, the new HVAC-oriented version of AutoCAD. Based on the engineering data and procedures outlined in the ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook Calculation Methods, Duct Calculator features an advanced and fully interactive user interface. Slide controls for air flow, velocity, friction and duct size provide real-time, interactive feedback; as you spin one, the others dynamically respond in real time. When used with Autodesk Building Mechanical, Duct Calculator streamlines the design process by automatically re-sizing whole branches of ductwork. Screen Shots Keywords duct-sizing, design, engineering, calculation

291

Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Vehicle Cost Calculator[1] Logo: Vehicle Cost Calculator Calculate the total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Overview This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate

292

WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

Howarth, S.M.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Calculations of Hf -electron affinity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations of Hf - electron affinity and photodetachment partial cross sections Lin Pan. PHYS. B 2009 #12;Calculations of Hf - electron affinity and photodetachment partial cross sections 2 1 the replacements, the subshells that are not occupied in #12;Calculations of Hf - electron affinity

Beck, Donald R.

294

CSCL@Work Chapter Regional Learning in Software Industries CSCL@Networking -Regional Learning in Software Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

learning across organizational boundaries. Keywords Regional Learning, Software Industry, Networks learning across organizational boundaries. Keywords Regional Learning, Software Industry, Networks1 CSCL@Work ­ Chapter Regional Learning in Software Industries CSCL@Networking - Regional Learning

295

UC Berkley Green Jobs Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UC Berkley Green Jobs Calculator UC Berkley Green Jobs Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UC Berkeley Green Jobs Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: UC Berkeley Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Phase: Create a Vision, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

296

NEPA Lessons Learned Questionnaire  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Learned Questionnaire Learned Questionnaire Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance U.S. Department of Energy Preface Your timely completion of this questionnaire will aid the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance in meeting its responsibility to foster continuing improvement of the Department of Energy's National Environmental Policy Act process. In accordance with DOE Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, NEPA Document Managers and NEPA Compliance Officers should fill out a questionnaire (separately or jointly) as soon as possible after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA). Other document preparation team members are encouraged to also submit a questionnaire. The questionnaire is designed to structure your responses, but you should feel free to attach a statement describing

297

Robotics for Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teaching Robotics is about empowering students to create and configure robotics devices and program computers to nurture in students the skill sets necessary to play an active role in society. The robot in Figure 1 focuses on the design of scaffolds and physical assembly methods, coupled with a computer logic program to make that makes it move or behave in a very precise (remote controlled or autonomous) manner. This enables students to investigate, explore and refine the program to affect the robots. The Robotics approach takes into account the increasing popularity of Computer Science and the learning by doing (Schank, Berman, & Macpherson, 1999) approach to solve complex problems and use computers meaningfully in learning (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Jonassen, Howland, Marra, & Crismond, 2008). In Singapore, teachers and students in Woodlands Ring Secondary and Rulang Primary have incorporated robotics to varying extents into formal and informal curricula. In addition, other less expensive ...

Toh, Dennis; Lim, Matthew; Wee, Loo Kang; Ong, Matthew

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Learning About Magnets!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Learning About Name A magnet is a material or object that creates a magnetic fi eld. This fi eld is invisible, but it creates a force that can "attract" or "repel" other magnets and magnetic materials, like iron or nickel. What is a Magnet? This bar magnet is a permanent magnet. Permanent magnets can be found in the Earth as rocks and metals. Magnets have

299

Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Energy Calculator Distributed Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Distributed Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Apps for Energy Challenge Participant Sector: Energy Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: distributedenergycalculator.com/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Challenge Generated, Green Button Apps Language: English References: Apps for Energy[1] The Distributed Energy Calculator allows you to explore the potential energy savings for your community using Solar, Small Wind or Microturbines. The Distributed Energy Calculator allows you to explore the potential energy savings for your community using Solar, Small Wind or Microturbines. You can upload Green Button Data to compare your utility energy costs to

300

Definition: Interchange Distribution Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution Calculator Distribution Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Interchange Distribution Calculator The mechanism used by Reliability Coordinators in the Eastern Interconnection to calculate the distribution of Interchange Transactions over specific Flowgates. It includes a database of all Interchange Transactions and a matrix of the Distribution Factors for the Eastern Interconnection.[1] Related Terms Reliability Coordinator, Interchange Transaction References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Interchange_Distribution_Calculator&oldid=480261" Categories: Definitions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Learning planar ising models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

Johnson, Jason K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netrapalli, Praneeth [STUDENT UT AUSTIN

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wind energy calculated from SAR and scatterometer satellite data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Offshore wind resources estimated from SAR · On WASP · Wind indexing based on scatterometer · Wake effects footprint 62 m footprint Wind field maps from SAR are valid for 10 m height #12;7 Slide no. 62 m 10 m Upwind1 Slide no. 4 Wind energy calculated from SAR and scatterometer satellite data Charlotte Bay

303

Calculations of helically symmetric equilibria with PIES D. Monticello  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations of helically symmetric equilibria with PIES D. Monticello Collaborators: A. Reiman, S. Hudson Outline: 1) PIES algorithm 2) PIES convergence a) Temporal convergence b) m, n, k convergence 3) Effects of a model bootstrap current 4) Future plans #12;#12;PIES "Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver

Hudson, Stuart

304

Chalmers Climate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chalmers Climate Calculator Chalmers Climate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Chalmers Climate Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Chalmers University of Technology Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: dhcp2-pc011134.fy.chalmers.se Cost: Free Chalmers Climate Calculator Screenshot References: Chalmers Climate Calculator[1] Logo: Chalmers Climate Calculator " In the Chalmers Climate Calculator the user can decide on when and how fast emissions of CO2 are reduced and what this emissions scenario implies in terms of CO2 concentration and global average surface temperature change. The climate sensitivity and the net aerosol forcing in year 2005

305

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Quadrupole, and Sextupole Magnets using POISSON Ro be rt J. La ri<::::R~ i. September 10, 1985 Introduction LS-32 The computer program POISSON was used to calculate the dipole, quadru- pole, and sextupole magnets of the 6 GeV electron storage ring. A trinagular mesh must first be generated by LATTICE. The triangle size is varied over the "universe" at the discretion of the user. This note describes a series of test calculations that were made to help the user decide on the size of the mesh to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular mesh used to calculate a "perfect" dipole magnet is shown in

306

Calculation of size for bound-state constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

Stanislaw D. Glazek

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Organizational scenarios for the use of learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects Henry Hermans and Fred de Vries October 2006 Learning objects in practice 2 #12;Organizational scenarios for the use of learning objects page 2 of 22 Colophon Organizational scenario's for the use of learning objects Learning objects in practice 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1995 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 1995 September 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1995 This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between April 1 and June 30, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during January 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. The report includes a Question and Answer section as well as guidance on selected topics. REPORT CONTENTS: NEPA Document Preparation Times NEPA Cost Data NEPA Document Content The Document Preparation Process Effectiveness of the NEPA Process Other Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Questions and Answers EISs Completed 3rd Quarter FY 1995 EAs Completed 3rd Quarter FY 1995

309

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Will Be Ready to Use Soon! CEQ Initiative on NEPA Implementation DOE Submits Comments on CEQ Environmental Justice Guidance NEPA Order to Be Reissued with Conforming Changes DOE Sued on Stockpile Stewardship and Waste Management PEISs Effective NEPA Hearings Bob Strickler and Linda Thurston Retire Reminder about Stakeholder Notification Litigation Updates New Executive Order on Protecting Children from Environmental Risks Annual NEPA Planning Summaries What's New with Electronic NEPA Questionnaire Results Other Completed EIS-Related Documents

310

Learning Center | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contact education@anl.gov Celebrating Computer Science Join Argonne Ed in exploring solar energy throughout September and October. Learn about the amazing reseach Argonne is doing...

311

Effect of gis learning on spatial ability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#0;?#0;? Data management (topology) #0;?#0;? Geocoding (Georeferencing) #0;?#0;? Classifying spatial data (e.g., dot map, choropleth map) #0;?#0;? Searching for patterns (e.g., distribution, network, hierarchy) #0;?#0;? Analyzing...

Lee, Jong Won

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4He? + H2 -> 4He?? + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quantum statistical calculation of cluster abundances in hot dense matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cluster abundances are calculated from a quantum statistical approach taking into account in-medium corrections. For arbitrary cluster size the self-energy and Pauli blocking shifts are considered. Exploratory calculations are performed for symmetric matter at temperature $T=5$ MeV and baryon density $\\varrho=0.0156$ fm$^{-3}$ to be compared with the solar element distribution. It is shown that the abundances of weakly bound nuclei with mass number $4effects.

Gerd Ropke

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Variational calculation of the trapping rate in thermal barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variational calculation of the trapping rate and trapped ion density in thermal barriers is presented. The effects of diffusion in energy as well as pitch angle scattering are retained. The variational formulation uses the actual trapped-passing boundary in velocity space. The boundary condition is that the trapped ion distribution function matches the passing ion distribution function, which is taken to be a Maxwellian, on the boundary. The results compare well with two-dimensional Fokker-Planck code calculations by Futch and LoDestro.

Li, X.Z.; Emmert, G.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Computers for Communication, Not Calculation: Media as a Motivation and Context for Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education finds itself in a sorry state. While students are more in need of computational skills than ever creations. The results have been dramatic. 120 students enrolled, 2/3 female, and only three students implies not only consumption, but also creation. Reading alone does not constitute our traditional notion

Guzdial, Mark

316

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mobile Learning Initiative (MLI) Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Campus Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Mobile Learning Initiative (MLI) Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Campus Climate Assessment.............................................................................................................................. 30 A. Demographics of 2012 Faculty Mobile Computing Survey Respondents B. Demographics of 2011 and 2012 Student Mobile Computing Survey Respondents C. Example Faculty Comments from Open-Ended Feedback D

Barrash, Warren

319

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008 Call for Nominations: Provost's Prize for Teaching with Technology Eligibility: Candidates must be a tenure-track or non's Prize for Teaching with Technology will be awarded to up to two recipients. Each recipient will receive

Southern California, University of

320

Learning by Learning To Communicate Jacob Stuart Michael Beal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning by Learning To Communicate by Jacob Stuart Michael Beal S.B., Massachusetts Institute To Communicate by Jacob Stuart Michael Beal Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer of my work than I expect. Jean and Jon Beal, my

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

USAID Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: USAID Carbon Calculator This tool allows users to systematically estimate the CO2 benefits and consequent climate impacts of agriculture, forestry and other land use...

322

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

323

Hybrid Car Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

compare hybrid electric (HEV) and conventional vehicles. The calculator includes purchase price, fuel costs, repair and maintenance costs, resale value, and applicable tax...

324

Ab initio calculation of the Hoyle state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the hydrogen burning of stars heavier than our sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle [1] as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago [2,3], nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy. These lattice simulations provide insight into the structure of this unique state and new clues as to the amount of fine-tuning needed in nature for the production of carbon in stars.

Evgeny Epelbaum; Hermann Krebs; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Lessons Learned  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Lessons Home Lessons Learned Database Lessons Learned The Berkeley Lab Lessons Learned Program is managed by the Office of Contract Assurance (OCA). It was developed to help the Laboratory community learn from our mistakes (and the mistakes of others) so that we don't repeat them. Through various sources, we identify events such as accidents, mishaps and near misses and translate them into corrective actions to prevent their recurrence. The ultimate goal of the Lessons Learned Program is to continually improve our performance on an ongoing basis. This is one of the central tenets of the Laboratory's assurance program. We use several different sources of information for our Lessons Learned Program. These include: The Lessons Learned database. Use the Lessons Learned database to enter Lessons Learned and Best Practices, and to view the Lessons Learned Library.

326

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

327

REUSABLE LEARNING OBJECTS (RLOs) INSTRUCTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Water Science Department, University of Florida, 2181 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110290, Gainesville, FL: An Reusable Learning Object (RLO) is a small digital learning unit that can be reused, scaled, and shared be selected from the following disciplines: Environmental sciences (including soil, water, climate, policy

Ma, Lena

328

Learning Outcomes Food Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the long-term sustainability of Oregon's food processing industry · Provide service to the professionLearning Outcomes Food Science & Technology Oregon State University The Department's Learning of the Department of Food Science & Technology at Oregon State University is to serve food technologists, food

Escher, Christine

329

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

California at Los Angeles, University of

330

E-learning? Technology enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/15/2010 1 E-learning? Technology enhanced teaching and learning in symbol-based disciplines? Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 2 #12;9/15/2010 2 An Example: Make t the subject 2 3 Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 3 HMS111 An Example: Make t the subject 2

Loch, Birgit

331

Cybersecurity Online Learning (COL) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

with a .mil or .gov address. The Cybersecurity Online Learning (COL) is a free web-based, online learning program offering both live and recorded cybersecurity training...

332

Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to {plus minus} 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n{degrees} 19 proposed by BNFL, and to {plus minus} 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n{degrees} 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P{sub IC} method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for {sup 238}U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)); Whitesides, G.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Climate, Land Focus Area: Forestry Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/urban-forests/ctcc/ Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator[1] Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator is the only tool approved by the Climate Action Reserve's Urban Forest Project Protocol for quantifying carbon dioxide sequestration from GHG tree planting projects. The CTCC is programmed in an Excel spreadsheet and provides carbon-related information

334

Campus Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Campus Carbon Calculator Campus Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Campus Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.cleanair-coolplanet.org/toolkit/inv-calculator.php The Campus Carbon Calculator(tm), Version 6.4, is now available for download. Version 6.4 includes new features, updates and corrections - including greatly expanded projection and solutions modules, designed to aid schools that have completed greenhouse gas inventories in developing long term, comprehensive climate action plans based on those inventories. The new modules facilitate analysis of carbon reduction options, determining project payback times, net present value, cost per ton reduced,

335

Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Calculation of Geophysical Induction Effects Using Surface Integrals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the integral was expressed in terms of elementary functions and hence can be evaluated...resistivity p = po(l+ E cos0), determined electric currents systems induced in the shell...considered here is that of determining the electric currents, and associated magnetic field......

B. A. Hobbs

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Appearance Learning by Adaptive Kalman Filters for FLIR Tracking Vijay Venkataraman, Guoliang Fan, Xin Fan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appearance Learning by Adaptive Kalman Filters for FLIR Tracking Vijay Venkataraman, Guoliang Fan the challenging issue of target tracking and appearance learning in Forward Looking In- frared (FLIR) sequences existing methods and experiments on the AMCOM FLIR dataset validate its effectiveness. 1. Introduction

Fan, Guoliang

338

Handling Ambiguity via Input-Output Kernel Learning Xinxing Xu Ivor W. Tsang Dong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Data ambiguities exist in many data mining and machine learning applications the effectiveness of our proposed IOKL framework. Keywords-Group Multiple Kernel Learning; Input-Output Kernel

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

339

Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Implementing intra-organizational learning:: A phased-model approach supported by intranet technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The learning organization has been heralded as a proactive structure to address the amount and rate of change facing businesses today. A learning culture provides managers with the information and analyses necessary to modify their organizations to satisfy both internal and external stakeholders. Information technology has been identified as an enabler of organizational learning, yet it is insufficient in and of itself. Furthermore, the specific mechanisms to bring about learning in an organizational context have not yet been well articulated. This paper explores a phased-model implementation of learning in an organization and an intranet as the supporting information technology infrastructure that is most effective in creating and maintaining such a learning environment.

Michael Harvey; Jonathan Palmer; Cheri Speier

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Dataset Summary Description The calculator provides information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives you a chance to make your own assumptions and calculate your own cost estimates. This interactive web-based tool allows users to estimate the cost of illness due to specific foodborne pathogens. The updated ERS cost estimate for Shiga-toxin producing E. coli O157 (STEC O157) was added to the Calculator in spring, 2008. Calculator users can now review and change the assumptions behind the ERS cost estimates for either STEC O157 or Salmonella. The assumptions that can be modified include the annual number of cases, the distribution of cases by severity, the use or costs of medical care, the amount or value of time lost from work, the costs of premature death, and the disutility costs for nonfatal cases. Users can also update the cost estimate for inflation for any year from 1997 to 2007.

342

Learning About Saving Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE/GO-10095-070 DOE/GO-10095-070 FS 218 January 1995 ENERGY EFFICIENCY Learning About AND RENEWABLE Saving Energy CLEARINGHOUSE ENERGY What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. It can come in the forms of heat and light. There are two types of energy: working energy and stored energy. Stored energy becomes working energy when we use it. You eat food for energy. Then your body stores the energy until you need it. When you work and play, your stored energy becomes working energy. We use energy every day. We use it to grow our food, warm and cool our homes, make our electricity, run our cars, and make products like clothes and toys. It is a very important part of our lives. Most of the time, we use stored energy for fuel. Burning fuel sets the stored energy free in the form

343

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

Finley Jr., Russell L.

344

Nueva School Hillside Learning Complex  

High Performance Buildings Database

Hillsborough, CA Founded in 1967, the Nueva School is a private K-8 school serving 370 students. The school's mission is to inspire passion for lifelong learning, foster social acuity, and develop each child's imaginative mind, enabling students to learn how to make choices that will benefit the world. The Hillside Learning Complex includes three buildings-a library and media center, a student center, and a classroom building with administrative offices, seven classrooms, and an R&D lab-which are organized around a central plaza. The classroom building serves only the fifth through eighth grades.

345

Auxiliary basis expansions for large-scale electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large-scale electronic structure calculations. Yousung Jungcost of electronic structure calculations is to employIntroduction. Electronic structure calculations are normally

Jung, Yousung; Sodt, Alexander; Gill, Peter W.M.; Head-Gordon, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Utility Energy Service Contracts - Lessons Learned  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Service Contracts-Lessons Learned Service Contracts-Lessons Learned Utility Energy Services Contracts Lessons Learned Water Conservation Negotiating Financing Lowering Finance Rates Utility Energy Service Contracts-Lessons Learned 2 -- FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................................3 Financing Utility Energy Services Contracts ..........................................................................................................................3 Understanding Financing Factors ...........................................................................................................................................3

347

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010 Elaine Fairey, Director, Student Learning Commons Lynn delivery 4. Space 5. Internal relations 6. External relations Introduction The Student Learning Commons (SLC) was created in response to the report on Student Learning Support Services (October 2004

348

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty What is the SFU Student Learning Commons? The Student Learning Commons (SLC), is an academic learning centre which provides peer-based assistance with library reference, computer assistance, and other student academic support services. SLC programs

349

Optimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright University of Wisconsin-Madison NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 Stephen Wright (UW-Madison) Optimization in Machine Learning NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 in machine learning. Stephen Wright (UW-Madison) Optimization in Machine Learning NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 2

Wright, Steve

350

Utility Energy Service Contracts - Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Service Contracts-Lessons Learned Service Contracts-Lessons Learned Utility Energy Services Contracts Lessons Learned Water Conservation Negotiating Financing Lowering Finance Rates Utility Energy Service Contracts-Lessons Learned 2 -- FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................................3 Financing Utility Energy Services Contracts ..........................................................................................................................3 Understanding Financing Factors ...........................................................................................................................................3

351

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

352

Extensions To Standard Hold Time Calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper extends existing methods of calculating the hold time for a fire extinguishing gas in an enclosure to cover mechanical HVAC systems and wide descending interfaces, and compares ... the sharp descending ...

J. Dewsbury; R. A. Whiteley

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be applied to initial regression...

Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Energy-level calculation through perturbation theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for analytical calculation of energy levels using perturbation theory is developed. Convergence of the perturbation theory directly follows from the method itself. An example of this method is given for the anharmonic oscillator.

Biswanath Rath

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Modern methods of electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this Chapter we shall consider methods that are currently widely used for calculating the electronic structure of solids. Essentially, there are two groups of methods. The methods of the first group are bui...

Lev Kantorovich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

What is the GREET Fleet Footprint Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

GREET Fleet Calculator can estimate petroleum and carbon GREET Fleet Calculator can estimate petroleum and carbon footprints of both on-road vehicles and off-road equipment. What is the GREET Fleet Footprint Calculator? As early adopters of new vehicle technologies, fleets are vital to the success of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on the AFVs that will best help them meet a variety of organizational goals and legal requirements, including reducing their petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, the United States imports nearly half of its oil. 1 Because the United States uses about 70% of its oil for transportation, decreasing petroleum consumption in vehicles can substantially

357

Individual differences in gameplay and learning: a narrative-centered learning perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Narrative-centered learning environments are an important class of educational games that situate learning within rich story contexts. The work presented in this paper investigates individual differences in gameplay and learning during student interactions ... Keywords: empirical evaluation, engagement, game-based learning, narrative-centered learning environments

Jonathan P. Rowe; Lucy R. Shores; Bradford W. Mott; James C. Lester

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Learning How to Learn Lean Construction Concepts and Principles Proceedings IGLC-7 411  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on adult education and organizational learning. Some approaches to improve learning processes on Lean organizational learning, and experimentation with action and reflection on action. KEY WORDS Concepts, lean construction, learning, organizational learning. 1 MSc, Senior Lecturer at Universidade Estadual de Londrina

Tommelein, Iris D.

359

Hartree-Fock calculations of nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartree-Fock calculations pertaining to the determination of nuclear binding energies throughout the whole chart of nuclides are reviewed. Such an approach is compared with other methods. Main techniques in use are shortly presented. Advantages and drawbacks of these calculations are also discussed with a special emphasis on the extrapolation towards nuclei far from the stability valley. Finally, a discussion of some selected results from light to superheavy nuclei, is given.

Quentin, P

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY 4 A I4 COLLEGE QF TEXAS USE OF COMPUTERS FOB MULTICOMPONENT DISTILLATION CALCULATIONS A Thesis By Samuel Lane Sullivan Jr, Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1959 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering USE OF COMPUTERS FOR NULTICOMPONENT DISTILLATION CALCULATIONS A Thesis By Samuel Lane Sullivan Jr. Approved as to style and content by: Chairman...

Sullivan, Samuel Lane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Universal basis sets for electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of a ’’universal’’ basis set for electronic structure calculations is explored by presenting energy results obtained when basis sets are transferred from one atom to another. The calculations are performed using the diagrammatic techniques of many?body perturbation theory. A single universal basis set is shown to give uniformly accurate descriptions of the matrix Hartree–Fock and correlation energies of the He Be and Ne atoms.

David M. Silver; Stephen Wilson

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Calculator programs for pipe stress engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains a collection of programs for solving a wide variety of stress problems using both the TI-59 and HP-41CV calculators. Each program is prefaced with a description of the problem to be solved, nomenclature, code restrictions and program limitations. Solutions are explained analytically and then followed by the complete program listing, documentation and checklists. Topics include calculations for pipewall thickness, pressure vessel analysis, reinforcement pads, allowable span, vibration, stress, and two-anchor piping systems.

Morgan, K.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Calculator program speeds rod pump design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations with explicit intermediate negative energy states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculation we include explicit negative-energy states in the two-body propagator. This is achieved by using the Gross spectator-equation, modified by medium effects. Qualitatively our results compare well with other RBHF calculations. In some details significant differences occur, e.g, our equation of state is stiffer and the momentum dependence of the self-energy components is stronger than found in a reference calculation without intermediate negative energy states.

F. de Jong; H. Lenske

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Gameful learning as a way of being  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a variation on game-based learning, we propose the concept of 'gameful learning' as a framework that encourages improvisation, playfulness, and social interaction, and which takes into account the unique contingencies of individual people and specific content. We describe gameful learning in terms of three elements: attitude, identity, and ignorance. Three cases of gameful learning are examined across diverse learning environments: a fourth grade science class studying matter, a secondary world history class studying the Middle Ages, and an educational technology graduate programme. Cross-case analysis reveals how gameful learning elements relate to attitudes of agency and social necessity, becoming a game designer, and embracing ignorance for learning.

Jeremiah I. Holden; Jeff Kupperman; Aviva Dorfman; Tim Saunders; Amanda Pratt; Pagan MacKay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Lessons Learned Quarterly Report DOE's NEPA Lessons Learned Program was initiated in 1994 to foster continuous improvement in NEPA compliance by measuring DOE NEPA performance and gathering information learned through NEPA experience. The Program collects and publishes time and cost metrics to help DOE objectively focus on controlling these aspects of its NEPA compliance, and disseminates information broadly relevant to NEPA implementation, such guidance on public participation and interagency coordination procedures. The keystone of DOE's NEPA Lessons Learned Program is the Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR). The LLQR is produced as a means of disseminating NEPA program metrics, along with related guidance, case studies, analysis,

367

Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

Kelsey Iv, Charles T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prinja, Anil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lessons Learned Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Database Lessons Learned Database Lessons Learned Database The DOE Corporate Lessons Learned Database provides a central clearinghouse that allows ready access to and communication about collected information on a timely, unimpeded basis by all DOE elements. The database is used to collect and share lessons learned and best practices pertaining to all DOE activities Lessons Learned Database Login Welcome to the Lessons Learned site, the premier Web tool for online information sharing regarding Lessons Learned issues. Please login to access your profile, search the database, or submit a new Lesson Learned. User Log In: If you have already received your log in credentials for the DOE Lessons Learned system click here to log in. Create New Account: We do not allow anonymous access to this site. You must register for an

369

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Post-Training Support for Learning Technology Sam Snoddy, Jr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post-Training Support for Learning Technology Sam Snoddy, Jr. Cloudcroft Schools P.O. Box 198 the effects of post-training support, we studied the introduction of new gradebook software in a public high school. The school's 108 faculty members received training on the software, and approximately half

Novick, David G.

371

Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by scientists and policymakers as a major threat to marine ecosystems, with dramatic effects on biodiversity1 Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program Invasive Species are infiltrators means of invasive species introductions and spread to new locations. Module 4: Marine Issues Sunshine

Miami, University of

372

Garden-Based Learning for Improved Livelihoods and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

children have been orphaned by AIDS. School gardens have the potential to strengthen school children and family understanding of nutrition needs. Junior Farmer Field and Life Schools (JFFLS) are also emerging as an effective tool in several countries to address the learning and livelihood needs of out-of- school youth

Pawlowski, Wojtek

373

Lessons Learned | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Ecosystem Management Team » Lessons Learned Services » Ecosystem Management Team » Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Ecosystem Managment February 28, 2008 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned February 28, 2008 The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites December 31, 2007 Revegetation of the Rocky Flats Site December 31, 2007 Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site January 31, 2007 Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover June 5, 2006 Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results December 31, 2002 Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site December 31, 2001 Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site, Lowman,

374

: Computer Aided Learning in Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAL2 : Computer Aided Learning in Computer Architecture Laboratory JOVAN DJORDJEVIC,1 BOSKO NIKOLIC,1 TANJA BOROZAN,1 ALEKSANDAR MILENKOVIC´ 2 1 Computer Engineering Department, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia 2 Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Milenkovi, Aleksandar

375

NEPA Lessons Learned, September 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 1 5 1 Register through the DOE NEPA Conference Web site at www.NEPA35.org National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Third Quarter FY 2005 September 1, 2005; Issue No. 44 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS To observe the 35th anniversary of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environment, Safety

376

Ways to Help Children Learn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that fail. If you say, ?I?ve told you a thousand times,? try a new method. a73 Set a bad example. If you slap children, that?s what they learn. a73 Offer a choice if there really is not one. a73 Expect children to sit for long periods of time. a73 Ignore... your children. a73 Expect too much. E-134 12-01 Ways to Help Children Learn ...

Warren, Judith L.

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Calculation method for electricity end-use for residential lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of the electricity demand for different electrical appliances in households is very important in the work to reduce electricity use in households. Metering of end-uses is expensive and time consuming and therefore other methods for calculation of end-use electricity can be very useful. This paper presents a method to calculate the electricity used for lighting in households based on regression analysis of daily electricity consumption, out-door temperatures and the length of daylight at the same time and location. The method is illustrated with analyses of 45 Norwegian households. The electricity use for lighting in an average Norwegian household is calculated to 1050 kWh/year or 6% of total electricity use. The results are comparable to metering results of lighting in other studies in the Nordic countries. The methodology can also be used to compensate for the seasonal effect when metering electricity for lighting less than a year. When smart meters are more commonly available, the possible adaption of this method will increase, and the need for end-use demand calculations will still be present.

Eva Rosenberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Center of pressure calculations for a bent-axis vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bent-axis maneuvering vehicles provide a unique type of control for a variety of supersonic and hypersonic missions. Unfortunately, large hinge moments, incomplete pitching moment predictions, and a misunderstanding of corresponding center of pressure calculations have prevented their application. A procedure is presented for the efficient design of bent-axis vehicles given an adequate understanding of origins of pitching moment effects. In particular,sources of pitching moment contributions will be described including not only normal force, but inviscid axial force and viscous effects as well. Off-centerline center of pressure effects are first reviewed for symmetric hypersonic sphere-cone configurations. Next the effects of the bent-axis geometry are considered where axial force, acting on the deflected tail section, can generate significant pitching moment components. The unique relationship between hinge moments and pitching moments for the bent-axis class of vehicles is discussed. 15 refs.

Rutledge, W.H.; Polansky, G.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.5 pounds

380

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.0 pounds

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources a significant effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 15

382

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

383

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 84 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

384

A Study of Listening Diversity and Speaking for English Learning with Mobile Device Supports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposed a mobile learning system supporting listening diversity and speaking and investigates its effect ... classes with stimulating their motivation to speak and listen by mobile devices. Therefore,...

Wu-Yuin Hwang; Sheng-Yi Wu; Jia-Han Su

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Learning with invisible others: Perceptions of online presence and their relationship to cognitive and affective learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Russo, T., & Benson, S. (2005). Learning with Invisible Others: Perceptions of Online Presence and their Relationship to Cognitive and Affective Learning, Educational Technology & Society, 8 (1), 54-62. Learning with Invisible Others...

Russo, Tracy; Benson, Spencer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An integrated e-learning system for simulation-based instruction of anaesthesia machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Not all learners learn in the same way and at the same rate. Learners' learning styles that reflect their cognitive abilities vary in known ways; some prefer the traditional text-based or oral presentation of content, while others learn more easily in a visual or kinaesthetic instruction style. Simulation has been shown to be an effective way of teaching abstract concept, principle and process in many application domains. In this paper, we have developed reusable, interactive, simulation-based learning objects and designed and implemented an e-learning system called Gator E-learning System (GELS), to deliver the learning objects to learners in an interactive, adaptive and flexible manner. GELS integrates a web-based Virtual Anaesthesia Machine (VAM) Simulation System and a Collaborative and Dynamic E-learning Service System (CoDESS) for the purpose of teaching medical personnel the functions and operations of anaesthesia machines as well the preuse check of anaesthesia machines in a simulation-based learning environment.

Sanghyun S. Jeon; Gilliean Lee; Samsun (Sem) Lampotang; Stanley Y.W. Su

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The DOE/NREL Approach (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document compiles lessons learned and provides a step-by-step process for implementing effective policy assistance.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday memos DOE Chief Learning Officer's and DVU Program Manager's Birthday memos DOE Chief Learning Officer's DVU Birthday...

391

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer...

392

Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

179D DOE Calculator 179D DOE Calculator EERE » Building Technologies Office » 179D DOE Calculator Printable Version Bookmark and Share What is the 179D federal tax deduction? Section 179D of the Federal Tax Code provides a tax deduction for energy efficiency improvements to commercial buildings. A building may qualify for a tax deduction under Section 179D not to exceed $1.80/ft² for whole building performance or $0.60/ft² for a partially qualifying property for envelope, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), or lighting improvements. In addition, a building may qualify with a reduced installed lighting power under the interim lighting rule. Energy simulations are required to show compliance with the energy and power cost savings requirements. View more detailed information.

393

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas S. Sereno, Suk H. Kim 1.0 Abstract Time-varying magnetic fields of magnets in booster accelerators induce substantial eddy currents in the vacuum chambers. The eddy currents in turn act to produce various multi- pole fields that act on the beam. These fields must be taken into account when doing a lat- tice design. In the APS booster, the relatively long dipole magnets (3 meters) are linearly ramped to accelerate the injected 325 MeV beam to 7 GeV. Substantial dipole and sextu- pole fields are generated in the elliptical vacuum chamber from the induced eddy currents. In this note, formulas for the induced dipole and sextupole fields are derived for elliptical and rectangular vacuum chambers for a time-varying dipole field. A discussion is given

394

Refinement of synchroton spectral tip calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Refinements in the computing techniques were performed in the calculation of transition rates to the ground and first excited states in magnetic bremsstrahlung via the use of exact matrix elements. The above calculations were carried out to double precision on a UNIVAC 1108 computer as was the calculation of transition rates to the second excited state. Empirical formulas are given for the transition rates from arbitrary upper states to the ground state, first excited state, and the second excited state for arbitrary magnetic field strengths. In addition the relative probabilities of transitions from level three to the remaining three lower levels is investigated in detail in the vicinity of the quantum-mechanical critical field, and the spectral tip structure for an electron in state n?1 is viewed in this high-field regime.

D. White

1978-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Practice Greenhealth Sector: Climate User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.eichealth.org/ Cost: Free Related Tools UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool Global Relationship Assessment to Protect the Environment (GRAPE) World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An online tool based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of health impacts of power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury, this tool estimates premature deaths, chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, and more, by kWh/year.

396

Tissue Heterogeneity in IMRT Dose Calculation for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the {gamma} function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the {Gamma} analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable.

Pasciuti, Katia, E-mail: ka.pasciuti@libero.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Roma (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina [Division of Radiotherapy, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned Workshop: Oak Ridge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Learned Learned Oak Ridge Presenter: Sue Cange EM ARRA BEST PRACTICES and LESSONS LEARNED WORKSHOP Waste Management Symposium Phoenix, AZ www.em.doe.gov 1 March 1, 2012 Oak Ridge Overview of Best Practice or Opportunity pp y Working closely together, the Y-12 Site M&O Contractor, the ORO Reservation disposal cell, DOE-EM, and the Regulators crafted a technically defensible, yet very cost effective characterization program in an effort to rapidly D&D two buildings that were part of the Y-12 ARRA scope. This characterization program should serve DOE-EM well as a new scope s c a ac e a o p og a s ou d se e O e as a e characterization model for disposal of extremely low-level, low risk facilities in the on- reservation disposal cell. Benefit (actual or anticipated) Benefit (actual or anticipated)

398

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1995 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 1995 December 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1995 This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between July 1 and September 30, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during January 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. Included in this issue: NEPA Document Preparation Times NEPA Cost Date NEPA Document Content The Document Preparation Process Effectiveness of the NEPA Process Other Lessons Learned Feature Stories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Supplemental EIS Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility EIS Updates from the Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance The Need for Consistency in Accident Analyses

399

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS Tools for the NEPA Practitioner CEQ Cooperating Agency Report NEPA Office Summer Interns Transitions Appeals Court Upholds BELLA EA Using Social Media for NEPA NNSA Webcast SPD SEIS Hearing EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results

400

Sequential Covariance Calculation for Exoplanet Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct imaging of exoplanets involves the extraction of very faint signals from highly noisy data sets, with noise that often exhibits significant spatial, spectral and temporal correlations. As a results, a large number of post-processing algorithms have been developed in order to optimally decorrelate the signal from the noise. In this paper, we explore four such closely related algorithms, all of which depend heavily on the calculation of covariances between large data sets of imaging data. We discuss the similarities and differences between these methods, and demonstrate how the use sequential calculation techniques can significantly improve their computational efficiencies.

Savransky, Dmitry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

Hahn, T; von der Pahlen, F; Rzehak, H; Schappacher, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

T. Hahn; S. Heinemeyer; F. von der Pahlen; H. Rzehak; C. Schappacher

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Automated calculations for multi-leg processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The search for signals of new physics at the forthcoming LHC experiments involves the analysis of final states characterised by a high number of hadronic jets or identified particles. Precise theoretical predictions for these processes require the computation of scattering amplitudes with a large number of external particles and beyond leading order in perturbation theory. The complexity of a calculation grows with the number of internal loops as well as with the number of external legs. Automatisation of at least next-to-leading order calculations for LHC processes is therefore a timely task. I will discuss various approaches.

Stefan Weinzierl

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electronic Spectra and Molecular?Orbital Calculations of Dioxazines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An iterative extended Hückel molecular?orbital calculation for the ??electron system has been carried out to interpret the electronic spectra of dioxazines. The absorption peaks in the visible have been identified as the transitions from the highest occupied orbital to the lowest empty one. It is found that the orbital energy difference contributes only about one?third of the transition energy the rest coming from the difference in the electronic repulsion energies of the ground and the excited states. The spectra in concentrated sulfuric acid solution can be interpreted as that of a diprotonated molecule. By assuming that the effective core charges of the nitrogen atoms to which the protons are attached are increased from 1 to about 1.5 proton charge it is possible to account for the observed red shift of the band in the visible region. The calculated transition frequencies in the visible as well as in the uv are in good agreement with the observed ones.

I. Chen; M. Lardon; L. Weinberger

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Calculation of the cross section for top quark production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors summarize calculations of the cross section for top quark production at hadron colliders within the context of perturbative quantum chromodynamics, including resummation of the effects of initial-state soft gluon radiation to all orders in the strong coupling strength. In their approach they resume the universal leading-logarithm contributions, and they restrict the calculation to the region of phase space that is demonstrably perturbative. They compare the approach with other methods. They present predictions of the physical cross section as a function of the top quark mass in proton-antiproton reactions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 and 2.0 TeV, and they discuss estimated uncertainties.

Berger, E.L.; Contopanagos, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). High Energy Physics Div.

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel, so the carbon dioxide released in the reformation process adds to the greenhouse effect. Hydrogen has very high energy for its weight, but very low energy for its...

407

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost?effectiveness ratio (CER) is a calculation that summarizes the intervention's net cost and effectiveness. The three types of CER are: the average cost?effectiveness ratio (ACER), the marginal cost?...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Piñon Ridge Property in western Montrose County, Colorado. The Piñon Ridge Mill includesURANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PI�ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Submitted To: Energy Fuels Resources Corporation 44 Union Boulevard, Suite 600 Lakewood, Colorado 80228

409

Brueckner calculations in harmonic oscillator basis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The binding energy (b.e.), r.m.s. radius and charge form factor of the4He nucleus are calculated for the Hamada-Johnston potential using the method developed in part I of this study. The single-particle spectrum ...

J. Blank

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

CALCULATION OF ION ENERGY-DEPOSITION SPECTRA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATION OF ION ENERGY-DEPOSITION SPECTRA IN SILICON, LITHIUM-FLUORIDE, BORON, AND BORON CARBIDE by J.K. Shultis and D.S. McGregor Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 55606 published as Report 299 ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION College

Shultis, J. Kenneth

411

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

Program performs vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program designed for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV or 41C calculators solves basic vapor-liquid equilibrium problems, including figuring the dewpoint, bubblepoint, and equilibrium flash. The algorithm uses W.C. Edmister's method for predicting ideal-solution K values.

Rice, V.L.

1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cool Roof Calculator Cool Roof Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cool Roof Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/facts/CoolCalcEnergy.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Electronic stopping?power calculations for heavy ions in semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model for ion stopping in semiconductors which considers separate stopping contributions from valence and core electrons and explicitly includes the effect of the gap has been used to calculate the electronic stopping power of energetic B P and As in Si Ge GaAs and CdTe for projectile energies 10 keV–100 MeV. Account was taken of the partially stripped incident ions by means of the effective charge. There is good agreement at low ion velocity with Lindhard and Scharff’s [J. Lindhard and M. Scharff Phys. Rev. 1 2 4 128 (1961)] values which for heavy ions do not depend on effective charge theory as well as with the semiempirical curves at energies E?0.2 MeV/nucleon where they can be compared.

S. G. Elkomoss; A. Pape; S. Unamuno

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Lessons Learned from Safety Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MONTEBURNS is a Monte-Carlo depletion routine utilizing MCNP and ORIGEN 2.2. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP transport calculation, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculation in ORIGEN or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of a multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 25.5 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of results do not. The standard deviation at each burnup step was consistent between fission product isotopes as expected, while the uranium isotopes created some unique results. The variation in the quantity of uranium was small enough that, from the reaction rate MCNP tally, round off error occurred producing a set of repeated results with slight variation. Statistical analyses were performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for several isotopes and the k-effective results. While the isotopes failed to reject the null hypothesis of being normally distributed, the {chi}{sup 2} statistic grew through the steps in the k-effective test. The null hypothesis was rejected in the later steps. These results suggest, for a high accuracy solution, MCNP cell material quantities less than 100 grams and greater kcode parameters are needed to minimize uncertainty propagation and minimize round off effects.

Nichols, T.; Sternat, M.; Charlton, W.

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Knowledge management and learning in the organizational context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

63 Knowledge management and learning in the organizational context Albena Antonova, Elissaveta and explicit knowledge, considers organizational learning and knowledge workers specifics. In the centre management, learning, organizational learning 1. THE KNOWLEDGE DIMENSIONS The concepts and nature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Shell-model calculations of one-hole states in the nuclei of A=41-43  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The one-hole states of A=41-43 nuclei are calculated with a model space spanning the (f72p32)n (d32s12)-1 configurations. The two-body effective interaction is assumed to be the modified surface-delta type. Energy spectra and spectroscopic factors are calculated and compared with the observed values. Satisfactory results are obtained.NUCLEAR STRUCTURE A=41-43, calculated effective interaction, energy spectra, spectroscopic factors.

D. S. Chuu; C. S. Han; S. T. Hsieh; M. M. King Yen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

C.E. Sanders

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Calculation of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double electron capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double electron capture on $^{152}$Gd, $^{164}$Er and $^{180}$W nuclei. Recent precise mass measurements for these nuclei have shown a large resonance enhancement factor that makes them the most promising candidates for observing this decay mode. We use an advanced energy density functional method which includes beyond mean-field effects such as symmetry restoration and shape mixing. Our calculations reproduce experimental charge radii and $B(E2)$ values predicting a large deformation for all these nuclei. This fact reduces significantly the values of the NMEs leading to half-lives larger than $10^{29}$ years for the three candidates.

Tomas R. Rodriguez; Gabriel Martinez-Pinedo

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ab initio calculations of surface phase diagrams of silica polymorphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present first-principle calculations of structural and electronic properties of several ?-quartz and ?-cristobalite surfaces. The effect of hydrogen passivation is investigated and it is demonstrated that in addition to significantly reducing the surface energy, hydrogen dramatically changes the surface phase diagram. We identify stability fields for single species surface termination and demonstrate that controlling the chemical environment allows a certain degree of process control of the surface termination and properties important in modern technology such as atomic layer deposition of high-k dielectrics and silicon on insulator.

Evgueni Chagarov; Alexander A. Demkov; James B. Adams

2005-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Integrated Biorefinery Lessons Learned and Best Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding I: Integrated Biorefinery (Lessons Learned and Best Practices) Integrated Biorefinery Lessons Learned and Best Practices Glenn Doyle, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

424

DOE Lessons Learned | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

All DOE sites are encouraged to provide their Lessons Learned to the DOE Community via a Web-based form available on the DOE Lessons Learned database registration page. NOTE:...

425

Learning strategies and performance in organizational teams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) shows that vicarious learning is positively associated with performance. I argue that vicarious team learning is an under-explored dimension of what makes teams and organizations competitive. The chapter concludes ...

Bresman, Henrik M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The segmentation problem in morphology learning Christopher D. Manning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

learning Christopher D. Manning (1998) The segmentation problem in morphology learning. In D.M.W. Powers

427

Multigroup calculations using VIM: A user's guide to ISOVIM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo calculations have long been used to benchmark more a mate approximate solution methods for reactor physics problems. The power of VIM (ref 1) lies partly in the detailed geometrical representations incorporating the (generally) curved surfaces of combinatorial geometry, and partly in the fine energy detail of pointwise cross sections which are independent of the neutron spectrum. When differences arise between Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations, the question arises, is the error in the multigroup cross sections, in the treatment of transport effects, or in the mesh-based treatment of space in the deterministic calculation The answers may not be obvious, but may be identified by combining the exact geometry capability of VIM with the multigroup formalism. We can now run VIM in a multigroup mode by producing special VIM Material files which contain point-wise data describing multigroup data with histograms. This forces VIM to solve the multigroup problem with only three small code modifications. P[sub N] scattering is simulated with the usual tabulated angular distributions with 20 equally-sized scattering angle cosine meshes. This document describes the VIM multigroup capability, the procedures for generating multigroup cross sections for VIM, and their use. The multigroup cross section generating code, ISOVIM, is described, and benchmark testing is documented.

Blomquist, R.N.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Distributed Learning versus Information Sharing in the Smart Grid: A Learning Game Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Learning versus Information Sharing in the Smart Grid: A Learning Game Approach Hélène.bedo@orange.com Abstract In this article, the smart grid is modeled as a decentralized and hierarchical network, made: Distributed Learning; Information; Regret; Learning Game Theory 1 Introduction Smart grids are networks

429

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search 1 / 20 Learning Inadmissible Heuristics During Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search ­ 1 / 20 Learning Inadmissible Heuristics During Search Jordan Thayer, Austin Dionne, and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ajv2, ruml at cs.unh.edu With thanks to NSF Grant s Motivation Learning Performance Conclusions Backup Slides Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search ­ 2 / 20

Ruml, Wheeler

430

TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS by Alice Armstrong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS by Alice Armstrong Master of Science, August Science of The George Washington University certifies that Alice Armstrong has passed the Final of the dissertation. TACTIC-BASED LEARNING FOR COLLECTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS Alice Armstrong Dissertation Research

Armstrong, Alice

431

Learning about social threats in RS Learning biases underlying individual differences in sensitivity to social rejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning about social threats in RS 1 Learning biases underlying individual differences. Ochsner, Department of Psychology, Columbia University Running Head: Learning about social threats in RS University, Northwest Science Bldg 290, Cambridge, MA 0213. #12;Learning about social threats in RS 2

Ochsner, Kevin

432

How to Calculate Molecular Column Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

Mangum, Jeffrey G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Calculation of source terms for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The source terms estimated for NUREG-1150 are generally based on the Source Term Code Package (STCP), but the actual source term calculations used in computing risk are performed by much smaller codes which are specific to each plant. This was done because the method of estimating the uncertainty in risk for NUREG-1150 requires hundreds of source term calculations for each accident sequence. This is clearly impossible with a large, detailed code like the STCP. The small plant-specific codes are based on simple algorithms and utilize adjustable parameters. The values of the parameters appearing in these codes are derived from the available STCP results. To determine the uncertainty in the estimation of the source terms, these parameters were varied as specified by an expert review group. This method was used to account for the uncertainties in the STCP results and the uncertainties in phenomena not considered by the STCP.

Breeding, R.J.; Williams, D.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Amos, C.N.; Helton, J.C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We provide a status report on the calculation of the Equation of State (EoS) of QCD at finite temperature using lattice QCD. Most of the discussion will focus on comparison of recent results obtained by the HotQCD and Wuppertal-Budapest collaborations. We will show that very significant progress has been made towards obtaining high precision results over the temperature range of T = 150-700 MeV. The various sources of systematic uncertainties will be discussed and the differences between the two calculations highlighted. Our final conclusion is that these lattice results of EoS are precise enough to be used in the phenomenological analysis of heavy ion experiments at RHIC and LHC.

Gupta, Rajan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CFD calculations of S809 aerodynamic characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state, two-dimensional CFD calculations were made for the S809 laminar-flow, wind-turbine airfoil using the commercial code CFD-ACE. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8 m x 1.25 m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to-turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-{epsilon} model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned (Olinger)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned WorkshopWaste Management SymposiumPhoenix, AZMarch 1, 2012.

437

Webinar: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar, "National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status," originally presented on February 6, 2012.

438

EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned (Johnson)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned WorkshopWaste Management SymposiumPhoenix, AZMarch 1, 2012.

439

EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned (Sites)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned WorkshopWaste Management SymposiumPhoenix, AZMarch 1, 2012.

440

Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Calculation of nuclear masses using image reconstruction techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been developed to calculate and predict nuclear masses over the last 70 years. The accuracy of the present state-of-the-art nuclear mass models is impressive, because these quantities can be calculated with an average 0.05 % precision. However this precision level is still insufficient to deal with nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, especially r-process ones. Different approaches exist to calculate nuclear masses, ranging from the simple Bethe-Weizsaecker Liquid Drop Formula (LDM) to the sophisticated Finite Range Droplet Model calculations or the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliuvob techniques from first principles, using Skyrme or Gogny parametrizations of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Here we suggest a new method to calculate this fundamental property of the atomic nucleus, using a completely phenomenological point of view. Our method is based in the analysis of the differences between measured masses and LDM predictions, which contains information related to those ingredients not taken into account in the LDM formula, such as shell closures, nuclear deformations and residual nuclear interactions. The differences are arranged in a two dimensional plot which can be viewed as an incomplete image of the full chart of nuclides, equivalent to a product of the full image and a binary mask. In order to remove the distortions produced by this mask we employ an algorithm, well known in astronomy, used to remove artificial effects present in the astrophysical images collected through telescopes. This algorithm is called the CLEAN method. It is one of a number of methods which exists to deconvolve undesirable effects in images and to extrapolate or reconstruct missing parts in them. By using the CLEAN method we can fit measured masses with an r.m.s error of less than 100 keV. We have performed several checks and concluded that its utilization must be carried out carefully in order to obtain reliable results in the zone of unknown masses between the driplines. We also outline potential applications of the present approach.

Barea, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J. G.; Lopez, J. C.; Morales, I.; Mendoza, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, V. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Ising Models, Boltzmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari 1 Ising Models, Boltzmann Machines, Deep Belief Networks Sargur Srihari srihari@cedar.buffalo.edu #12;Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Topics · Ising Model · Boltzmann · Metric MRF 2 #12;Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Ising Model · Earliest Markov network model

443

Online learning processes artificial neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On­line learning processes in artificial neural networks Tom M. Heskes Bert Kappen Department, The Netherlands. Abstract We study on­line learning processes in artificial neural networks from a general point. Elsevier, pages 199-- 233. #12; On­line learning processes in artificial neural networks 1 1 Introduction 1

Heskes, Tom

444

Design Approaches in Technology-Enhanced Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design Approaches in Technology-Enhanced Learning Yishay Mor* and Niall Winters Institute of Education, University of London, UK Design is critical to the successful development of any interactive learning environment (ILE). Moreover, in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) the design process requires

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Title of Document | 1 UC Learning Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title of Document | 1 UC Learning Center Table of Contents Introduction to the UC Learning Center ......................................................................................................................................19 #12;Title of Document | 2 Last updated 6/30/10 Introduction to the UC Learning Center The UC. It is recommended that only supported browsers be used for eCourses to ensure proper tracking of completions. Plug

Gleeson, Joseph G.

446

Learning Object Behaviour Models Neil Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Object Behaviour Models by Neil Johnson Submitted in accordance with the requirements in the following articles: N. Johnson and D. Hogg. ``Learning the Distribution of Object Trajectories for Event 1995. N. Johnson and D. Hogg. ``Learning the distribution of object trajectories for event recognition

Hogg, David

447

Lack of Interference in Long-Term Memory for Socially Learned Food Preferences in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lack of Interference in Long-Term Memory for Socially Learned Food Preferences in Rats (Rattus had no measurable effect on rats' socially learned food preferences. The stability of socially-identifying cues that either come from particles of recently eaten food clinging to the fur of a rat or escape from

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

448

Accurate potential energy curve of the LiH{sup +} molecule calculated with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Very accurate calculations of the ground-state potential energy curve (PEC) of the LiH{sup +} ion performed with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers are presented. The variational method is employed. The calculations involve optimization of nonlinear exponential parameters of the Gaussians performed with the aid of the analytical first derivatives of the energy determined with respect to the parameters. The diagonal adiabatic correction is also calculated for each PEC point. The PEC is then used to calculate the vibrational energies of the system. In that calculation, the non-adiabatic effects are accounted for by using an effective vibrational mass obtained by the minimization of the difference between the vibrational energies obtained from the calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation was not assumed and the results of the present calculations.

Tung, Wei-Cheng; Adamowicz, Ludwik, E-mail: ludwik@u.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Control Dewar Subcooler Heat Exchanger Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculations done to size the control dewar subcooler were done to obtain a sufficient subcooler size based on some conservative assumptions. The final subcooler design proposed in the design report will work even better because (1) It has more tubing length, and (2) will have already subcooled liquid at the inlet due to the transfer line design. The subcooler design described in the 'Design Report of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab D0 Detector Upgrade' is the final design proposed. A short description of this design follows. The subcooler is constructed of 0.50-inch OD copper tubing with 1.0-inch diameter fins. It has ten and one half spirals at a 11.375-inch centerline diameter to provide 31 feet of tubing length. The liquid helium supply for the solenoid flows through the subcooler and then is expanded through a J-T valve. The subcooler spirals are immersed in the return two phase helium process stream. The return stream is directed over the finned tubing by an annulus created by a 10-inch pipe inside a 12-inch pipe. The transfer line from the refrigerator to the control dewar is constructed such that the liquid helium supply tube is in the refrigerator return stream, thereby subcooling the liquid up to the point where the u-tubes connect the transfer line to the control dewar. The subcooler within the control dewar will remove the heat picked up in the helium supply u-tube/bayonets. The attached subcooler/heat exchanger calculations were done neglecting any subcooling in the transfer line. All heat picked up in the transfer line from the refrigerator storage dewar to the control dewar is absorbed by the supply stream. The subcooler was sized such that the two phase supply fluid is subcooled at 1.7 atm pressure and when expanded through a JT valve to 1.45 atm pressure it is at a saturated liquid state. The calculations apply during steady state operation and at a flow rate of 16 g/s. The analysis of the heat exchanger was broken into two parts relating to the heat transfer mode taking place. The first part is considered the condensing part in which the helium supply stream is changed from two phase fluid to one phase liquid. The second part is the subcooling part where the liquid temperature is lowered, i.e.. subcooled. A summary of the calculations and results appears on the next page. The raw calculations follow the summary.

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thick-Restart Lanczos Method for Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t h o d for electronic structure calculation. Phys. Rev. B,Large scale electronic structure calculations using them e t h o d for electronic structure calculations K, W u A ,

Wu, Kesheng; Simon, Horst D.; Wang, L.-W.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Learning and Evolution Stefano Nolfi*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools employed by evolutionary biology and biology in general. From an engineering point of view variability. Learning, instead, is a set of modifications taking place within each single individual during lifetime, such as physical development, neural maturation, and synaptic plasticity. Finally, whereas

Cottrell, Garrison W.

452

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Degree Program: Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering 1) Students will have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2) Students will have the ability to design and conduct

Raja, Anita

453

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Outcomes College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Degree Program: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 1) Students will have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2) Students will have the ability to design and conduct

Raja, Anita

454

Learning Windows Ibraheem A. Alhashim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They suggest using a trainable classifier to learn a distance function that improves their fitting procedure. However, they do not implement such classifier and relay on a heuristic derived from their experimentation to ground truth of 744 windows from 40 test images. We will use a subset of the database they used for our

Zhang, Richard "Hao"

455

Cognitive Neuroscience Learning and Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Slide 1 Cognitive Neuroscience PSYC 685 Learning and Memory Raja Parasuraman WorkingWorking MemoryMemory SelectiveSelective AttentionAttention Slide 2 Overview Short term, working, and long-term memory The medial temporal lobe/prefrontal cortex memory system Amnesia Implicit memory Slide 3

Parasuraman, Raja

456

Assessment of students’ learning styles preferences in the faculty of science, Tishreen University, Syria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stating the way in which a learner begins to concentrate on, processes, absorbs, and retains new and difficult educational situation or problem is expected to assist the learner in the development of effective study strategies. Knowing students learning preferences will help lecturers to better design learning materials and teaching styles. The research aims to find out the learning preferences of students in the faculty of science in Tishreen University, the differences in learning styles or preferences between male and female students and between departments in the science faculty. Ninety-seven first year and second year students from four departments participated in the survey. Non-parametric procedures were used to test the research questions. In the evaluation of the differences of learning styles or preferences among departments, the Kruskal-Wallis test, was used as a non-parametric method. This effectively tested the hypothesis of equal distributions of three or more independent samples. Results show that the students prefer different learning styles: Visual/Verbal, Audio/Verbal, Visual/Non Verbal and Tactile/ Kinesthetic. A finding of significant difference indicated that the two samples of females and males differed on the variable of interest. There are very few significant differences among departments. The paper discusses the findings and the implications to designing of instruction in higher education. It will conclude with recommendations to lecturers to accommodate their teaching styles so that it is compatible with their students learning styles and preferences.

Abdullatif Ismail; Raja Maznah Raja Hussain; Shahrir Jamaluddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Calculations on the Electronic Excited States of Ureas and Oligoureas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculations on the Electronic Excited States of Ureas and Oligoureas ... Much effort has been put into developing methods to calculate the CD spectra of polypeptides, from Moffitt's original calculation of the spectrum of the ?-helix10 to recent studies based on ab initio calculations. ... The energies of the first three transitions from our calculations are close to those calculated with the CCR(3)/daug-cc-pVTZ method. ...

Mark T. Oakley; Gilles Guichard; Jonathan D. Hirst

2007-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

Selection of minimum earthquake intensity in calculating pipe failure probabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a piping reliability analysis, it is sometimes necessary to specify a minimum ground motion intensity, usually the peak acceleration, below which the ground motions are not considered as earthquakes and, hence, are neglected. The calculated probability of failure of a piping system is dependent on this selected minimum earthquake intensity chosen for the analysis. A study was conducted to determine the effects of the minimum earthquake intensity on the probability of pipe failure. The results indicated that the probability of failure of the piping system is not very sensitive to the variations of the selected minimum peak ground acceleration. However, it does have significant effects on various scenarios that make up the system failure.

Lo, T.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

January 30, 2008, New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directions Directions in Learning at DOE: Building a DOE University System FTCP Teleconference January 30, 2008 Dr. Jeff T.H. Pon Chief Human Capital Officer U.S. DOE 1 Mission Critical Function Needed Competencies Assess and/or Certify Possession of Competencies Training & Development Programs Aligned with Competencies IDP To Improve Performance and Close Competency Gaps Mission & Strategic Goals DOE is Implementing a Competency- Centric Learning Framework The DOE Competency Framework Enables Strategic Alignment of Learning & Development Systems to Strategic Goals 2 U = Universal Competencies: universal competencies needed by every individual to be effective in today's work environment. Examples may include: *Resolving Conflict *Emotional Intelligence *Team Skills

460

Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Calculator (Transit, Fuel) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel) AgencyCompany Organization: Publictransportation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "learning effects calculation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

462

First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and properties of ZrSiO4 polymorphs. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and...

463

Calculation of Job Creation Through DOE Recovery Act Funding...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Calculation of Job Creation Through DOE Recovery Act Funding Calculation of Job Creation Through DOE Recovery Act Funding U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy...

464

Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

PC-SAFT parameters from ab initio calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We use highly accurate ab initio calculations of binding enthalpies and entropies of gas phase clusters of alcohols to demonstrate how they can be used to obtain association parameters for PC-SAFT. The thermochemical results demonstrate that cooperativity effects and state dependent cluster distributions cause a strongly varying average enthalpy and entropy per bond as function of temperature and density for alcohols. In contrast to this, the two association parameters of PC-SAFT lead to density independent bond enthalpy and entropy and are thus effective parameters. Therefore, we choose to compute the cluster distribution at a universal state point and show that the thus obtained association parameters can be used to reduce the number of adjustable parameters from 5 to 3 with only a marginal loss of accuracy for most of the studied systems, and even an estimation of thermodynamic properties without adjusted parameters is possible. The ab initio calculations suggest that the 2B association scheme is more appropriate for 1-alkanols than the 3B one.

Muhammad Umer; Katja Albers; Gabriele Sadowski; Kai Leonhard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

FIESTA 2: parallelizeable multiloop numerical calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The program FIESTA has been completely rewritten. Now it can be used not only as a tool to evaluate Feynman integrals numerically, but also to expand Feynman integrals automatically in limits of momenta and masses with the use of sector decompositions and Mellin-Barnes representations. Other important improvements to the code are complete parallelization (even to multiple computers), high-precision arithmetics (allowing to calculate integrals which were undoable before), new integrators and Speer sectors as a strategy, the possibility to evaluate more general parametric integrals.

Smirnov, A V; Tentyukov, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

FIESTA 2: parallelizeable multiloop numerical calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The program FIESTA has been completely rewritten. Now it can be used not only as a tool to evaluate Feynman integrals numerically, but also to expand Feynman integrals automatically in limits of momenta and masses with the use of sector decompositions and Mellin-Barnes representations. Other important improvements to the code are complete parallelization (even to multiple computers), high-precision arithmetics (allowing to calculate integrals which were undoable before), new integrators and Speer sectors as a strategy, the possibility to evaluate more general parametric integrals.

A. V. Smirnov; V. A. Smirnov; M. Tentyukov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Multi-Fuel Boiler Efficiency Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to calculate the heat losses, a complete stack analysis is required. In 1956 when Buna's paper was published, stack analysis was done by Orsat analysis which gave the composition of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen. Nitrogen was assumed to make... up the difference. It was known that sulfur dioxide (if present) would be absorbed with carbon dioxide. Table 2 shows the components in the stack gas and the analysis of the combustion air. The total analysis of the stack gas is estimated by a...

Likins, M. R., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Calculator program trilogy characterizes comingled gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of programs has been developed for the HP-41CV that allows a quicker and more accurate approach to commingled stream calculations. This avoids the margin of error that the representative method introduces. The alpha-numeric capability of the HP-41CV will prompt for the inputs of an 11-component stream. The program series comprises: gas analysis; gas gathering/gas analysis; and flash vaporization. Each of these programs has its stand-alone use; but their true worth is in their integrated capability.

Flowers, R.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Agency/Company /Organization: Federal Energy Management Program Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/technologies/eep_eccalculators.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-and-cost-savings-calculators-e Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance

471

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1997  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decisionmakers Decisionmakers States/Local Governm ents Agencies Academ icians Congress Framers of NEPA Drafters of CEQ Regs Native Am erican Tribes La wyers NGOs/ Citizen Groups Businesses Council on Environmental Quality NEPA Effectiveness Study Partners continued next page -- Improved Implementation Needed -- -- DOE Leadership Highlighted -- CEQ Study: NEPA a "Success" Overall National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED For First Quarter FY 1997 March 3, 1997 The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued in January the results of its extensive study on the effectiveness of the National Environmental Policy Act during the statute's 25-year history. From the cover letter by CEQ Chair Kathleen McGinty to its four short appendices, the 50-page booklet entitled The National Environmental

472

Lessons Learned: NREL Village Power Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Program Power Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Lessons Learned: NREL Village Power Program Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Solar, - Solar Pv, Wind Phase Bring the Right People Together, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, "Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise As Needed" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 7/1/1998

473

%POWER: A SIMPLE MACRO FOR POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS Kristin R. Latour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%POWER: A SIMPLE MACRO FOR POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS Kristin R. Latour Abstract Statisticians often desire to investigate the power of statistical effect tests, or to estimate the sample size required to provide a significant effect test. This paper describes the macro POWER which provides

Friendly, Michael

474

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Lessons Learned  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Wind Powering America's lessons learned series highlights multiple aspects of the wind industry, giving participants an opportunity to share their experience with interested parties. Here you will find lessons learned for 2013. August 12, 2013 Re-Powering a Wind Farm: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned Neil Habig, senior developer at Iberdrola Renewables; Don Bain, president of Aeropower Services; and Mark Jacobson, senior project leader at NREL and former director of business development at Invenergy LLC share the following lessons learned regarding the re-powering of wind farms. July 01, 2013 KidWind Project and Wind Education in the Classroom: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned Dan Whisler, a 29-year environmental science instructor at Sterling High

475

A Collaborative-learning Support Function to Harness Organizational Intellectual Synergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Collaborative-learning Support Function to Harness Organizational Intellectual Synergy Hiroyuki of organizational activities. Then, it roughly outlines Kfarm while focusing on collaborative learning support, workplace learning, life-long learning, organizational learning, collaborative learning and so on, refer

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

476

Non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the lowest vibrational energy of HD including relativistic corrections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we report variational calculations of the two lowest vibrational states of the HD molecule within the framework that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The nonrelativistic energies of the states were corrected for the relativistic effects of the order of ?2 (where ?=1c), calculated as expectation values of the operators representing these effects with the nonrelativistic non-BO wave functions. The non-BO wave functions were expanded in terms of the one-center explicitly correlated Gaussian functions multiplied by even powers of the internuclear distance. The v=0?1 transition energy obtained in the calculations is compared with the previous calculations, as well as with the transition frequency obtained from the experimental spectra. The comparison shows the need to include corrections higher than second order in ? to further improve the agreement between the theory and the experiment.

Monika Stanke; Sergiy Bubin; Marcin Molski; Ludwik Adamowicz

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

Method for calculating strontium sulfate solubility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a method of predicting the tendency of brines to deposit strontium sulfate scale. Strontium sulfate solubility product constants were determined in the laboratory at temperatures of 50, 75, 122 and 156/sup 0/F and ionic strengths of sodium chloride solutions from 0.1 to 5.25. Solid strontium sulfate was prepared and tagged with radioactive sulfur-35. Excess of this strontium sulfate was added to the sodium chloride solutions and shaken at the various temperatures until equilibrium was reached. The filtrate was analyzed for sulfate ion using a liquid scintillation counter and for strontium ion using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The solubility products were expressed graphically as K/sub sp/ versus ionic strength at various temperatures. A series of synthetic brines containing various amounts of sodium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and chloride ions was prepared. The solubilities of strontium sulfate in these brines were calculated using the known ionic strengths and solubility data obtained from the experiments with the sodium chloride solutions. These calculated values were compared with actual values determined in the same manner as those from the sodium chloride values.

Fletcher, G.E.; French, T.R.; Collins, A.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Calculations of composition boundaries of saturated phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program for the HP-41CV calculator is presented for calculating the equilibrium composition boundaries of pairs of saturating solids, liquids, or a combination of a solid and liquid. The activity coefficients must be represented in the form ln ..gamma../sub 1/ = (b/sub h//T - b/sub s/)x/sub 2//sup 2/ + (c/sub h//T - c/sub x/)x/sub 2//sup 3/ where h refers to an enthalpy contribution and s refers to an excess entropy contribution. For solid-liquid equilibria, enthalpies and entropies of fusion are required. For all equilibria, provision is made for use of hypothetical standard states such as the Henry's Law standard states. For example, in treating solid solutions of molybdenum in face-centered cubic metals such as Ni, Rh, or Pt, it is sometimes convenient to use a hypothetical fcc standard state of Mo which represents the limiting Henry's Law behavior of Mo in the fcc metal and has much different properties than a real fcc molybdenum solid.

Brewer, L.; Hahn, S.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Preventing xenon oscillations in Monte Carlo burnup calculations by enforcing equilibrium xenon distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Existing Monte Carlo burnup codes suffer from instabilities caused by spatial xenon oscillations. These oscillations can be prevented by forcing equilibrium between the neutron flux and saturated xenon distribution. The equilibrium calculation can be integrated to Monte Carlo neutronics, which provides a simple and lightweight solution that can be used with any of the existing burnup calculation algorithms. The stabilizing effect of this approach, as well as its limitations are demonstrated using the reactor physics code Serpent.

A.E. Isotalo; J. Leppänen; J. Dufek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Entanglement as Measure of Electron-Electron Correlation in Quantum Chemistry Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In quantum chemistry calculations, the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the Hartree-Fock limit energy and the exact solution of the nonrelativistic Schrodinger equation. With this definition, the electron correlation effects are not directly observable. In this report, we show that the entanglement can be used as an alternative measure of the electron correlation in quantum chemistry calculations. Entanglement is directly observable and it is one of the most striking properties of quantum mechanics. As an example we calculate the entanglement for He atom and H2 molecule with different basis sets.

Zhen Huang; Sabre Kais

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of AFeO2 (A = Ag, Cu) within GGA Calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of AFeO2 (A = Ag, Cu) within GGA Calculations ... The electronic structure of delafossite type oxides AFeO2 (A = Ag, Cu) has been calculated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the local spin density approximation (LSDA), Perdew?Burke?Ernzerhof (PBE-GGA), and Engel?Vosko (EV-GGA) generalized-gradient approximations. ... The effective Hubbard U, Ueff, has been derived on the basis of an ab initio constraint calculation and by comparison with X-ray emission spectra. ...

Khuong P. Ong; Kewu Bai; Peter Blaha; Ping Wu

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

483

Calculation of large ion densities under HVdc transmission lines by the finite difference method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A calculation method for large ion densities (charged aerosols) under HVdc transmission lines was developed considering both the charging mechanism of aerosols by small ions and the drifting process by wind. Large ion densities calculated by this method agreed well with the ones measured under the Shiobara HVdc test line on the lateral profiles at ground level up to about 70m downwind from the line. Measured values decreased more quickly than calculated ones farther downwind from the line. Considering the effect of point discharge from ground cover (earth corona) improved the agreement in the farther downwind region.

Suda, Tomotaka; Sunaga, Yoshitaka [Central Research Institute of Electrical Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)] [Central Research Institute of Electrical Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Entanglement and electron correlation in quantum chemistry calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entanglement and electron correlation in quantum chemistry calculations Z. HUANG, H. WANG and S; in final form 1 July 2006) Electron­electron correlation in quantum chemistry calculations can be analysed of electron­electron correlation in quantum chemistry calculations. In quantum chemistry calculations

Kais, Sabre

485

Robust volume calculations for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) components in Monte Carlo transport calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider a new generalized algorithm for the efficient calculation of component object volumes given their equivalent constructive solid geometry (CSG) definition. The new method relies on domain decomposition to recursively subdivide the original component into smaller pieces with volumes that can be computed analytically or stochastically, if needed. Unlike simpler brute-force approaches, the proposed decomposition scheme is guaranteed to be robust and accurate to within a user-defined tolerance. The new algorithm is also fully general and can handle any valid CSG component definition, without the need for additional input from the user. The new technique has been specifically optimized to calculate volumes of component definitions commonly found in models used for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for criticality safety and reactor analysis applications. However, the algorithm can be easily extended to any application which uses CSG representations for component objects. The paper provides a complete description of the novel volume calculation algorithm, along with a discussion of the conjectured error bounds on volumes calculated within the method. In addition, numerical results comparing the new algorithm with a standard stochastic volume calculation algorithm are presented for a series of problems spanning a range of representative component sizes and complexities. (authors)

Millman, D. L. [Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States); Griesheimer, D. P.; Nease, B. R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bertis Atomic Power Laboratory (United States); Snoeyink, J. [Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Sustain our organizational commitment to efficiency and effectiveness through careful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Top Value Sustain our organizational commitment to efficiency and effectiveness through careful. Innovate through an organizational culture that emphasizes continuous learning for our staff and utilizes

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

487

Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories + - Department of Energy National Laboratories Click on a National Laboratory to learn more. Hide...

488

Nature of the Configuration-Interaction Method in Ab Initio Calculations. I. Ne Ground State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed study of the correlation energy of Ne has been made in order to analyze the nature of the configuration-interaction (CI) method in ab initio calculations. Both the Bethe-Goldstone method of Nesbet and the total-pair-excitation-block method (TPEB) were examined. A series of calculations was made using both "atom-centered" and "shell-centered" basis sets. The most detailed calculations gave - 0.333 a.u. (88%) for the correlation energy by the TPEB method, and - 0.396 a.u. (104%) by the sum-of-the-pairs technique. The difference between these two values is mainly the so-called pair-pair interactions, which have been considered too small to be important to other investigators. A series of perturbation calculations on the triple and quadruple excitations gives ? 1.5% of the total correlation energy. A complete CI calculation with a very limited basis set was done on the p block of Ne. The results of this calculation are in agreement with our total-atom calculation, except that now the TPEB calculation gave about 98.5%, and the sum of the pairs about 115% of the complete CI result. The effect on the pair correlation energy of a unitary transformation of the outer-shell occupied self-consistent-field orbitals was also studied. Only a small difference in the results was obtained.

Tery L. Barr and Ernest R. Davidson

1970-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Savings Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

490

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

491

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

492

Learn Gapminder | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Learn Gapminder Learn Gapminder Jump to: navigation, search Gapminder.jpg Gapminder visualizations bring your data to life. Enhance your analysis within OpenEI by creating Gapminder visualizations that can easily be displayed and shared from any web browser. View other Gapminder visualizations: Gapminder Visit Gapminder to see some example datasets and visualizations. Formatting your data To get your visualization to work, you must be sure your data is formatted correctly: Here is a great Quick Guide to getting your Motion Chart, or Gapminder, to work properly. Java Coding your Visualization This java program will create the body of a Gapminder visualization code for OpenEI. For example, http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Widget:Motion_Chart_Visualizations/generalunitedstates.js.

493

NEPA Lessons Learned, June 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2004 June 2004 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Second Quarter FY 2004 June 1, 2004; Issue No. 39 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS The recent scoping meetings for the Yucca Mountain Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), using an "open house" format rather than more formal presentations, provided valuable information to the Department regarding issues of concern to the public. More than 300 persons who participated in the scoping meetings had the opportunity to engage in one-on-one dialogue with DOE representatives, discussing concerns and receiving answers to their questions. Individuals were also able to provide oral comments to a court reporter for the record. "An open and collaborative planning process is essential

494

Educational Programs Learning Lab Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne offers a variety of field trips for middle school and high school students. Bring your students to Argonne and let them experience the excitement of science first-hand, with activities that will cement basic science and engineering concepts, and introduce them to new and exciting aspects of laboratory research! During the field trip, students rotate through various hands-on science experiments and learning lab activities to learn what Argonne scientists do. About Field Trips Field trips are free. Groups must arrange their own transportation. Group size: 40-60 students. Larger groups can be accommodated with additional planning time. Field trips start at 9:45 a.m. and end at 1:00 p.m. All participants MUST wear long pants and closed-toed shoes, regardless of the weather.

495

What China Can Learn from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What China Can Learn from What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Bo Shen, Chun Chun Ni, Girish Ghatikar, Lynn Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Preprint version of proceedings of the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy's 2012 Industrial Summer Study, held in Arnhem, the Netherlands, on September 11-14, 2012. June 2012 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) of the Energy Foundation, Azure International, and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5578E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While

496

Quality Assurance Lessons Learned 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality Council Lessons Learned Quality Council Lessons Learned Vendor Supplier Deficiencies: Myers Drum Concerns at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) The Office of Packaging and Transportation, in the DOE Office of Environmental Management, issued a Safety Alert in January 12, 2010, (Issue Number: DOE/OPT/SA-01) alerting the DOE packaging and transportation community about potential failure associated with 55 and 30-gallon carbon steel drum closure rings. On January 13, 2010, HSS issued a Data Collection Sheet (DCS) to all DOE sites citing the concerns as well. Those concerns arose while contractors were performing receipt inspections on several lots of drums and drum rings received at the Hanford site and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It was determined that the drum

497

Lessons learned from RTG programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Cassini Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program, the heritage RTG design was reviewed and modified to incorporate lessons learned. Design changes were made both to resolve problems as they occurred and to correct difficulties noted in earlier missions. Topics addressed in this paper included problems experienced previously at the launch facility in attaching the pressure relief device to the generators, and the open circuit conditions that occurred at times in the resistance temperature device wiring harness. Also discussed is a problem caused by mistakes in software configuration management. How lessons learned refined the RTG design and integration with the spacecraft are discussed and the adopted solutions are described. {copyright} {ital 1998 Lockheed Martin Missles and Space, reproduced with permission.}

Reinstrom, R.M.; Cockfield, R.D. [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space, P.O. Box 8555, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Information about the Greenhouse Gas Emission Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator To estimate your CO2 emissions rates and generate the bar graph, we used the following sources and assumptions. Your CO2 Emissions Rates Tailpipe (grams CO2/mile) This is the tailpipe CO2 emissions rate for combined city and highway driving that is shown on the fuel economy and environment label for the vehicle model you selected. It is the same regardless of where you live. Total (grams CO2/mile) This includes the vehicle's tailpipe emissions and emissions associated with the production of electricity used to charge the vehicle. For plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, it also includes emissions associated with the production of gasoline. It is estimated using the sources and assumptions below, and will vary based on where you live.

499

Power Line Calculator for Windows[trademark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Line Calculator (PLC) for Windows [trademark], version 1.0, is a program that describes the electrical characteristics of a transmission or distribution system given user-defined input. This input may consist of a combination of operating currents and phases, symmetric components, power factor, and real or reactive power. The program also allows the user to designate whether currents are present on the system neutral or in the ground. The PLC assumes that any value entered by the user remains fixed (e.g., phase current, power factor), and for underdetermined systems, basic default assumptions are incorporated: the power factor is held at or near 1.0, the net phase current is kept at or near zero, and the phase conductor currents are kept balanced. The program operates through a graphical user interface provided by Microsoft[reg sign] Windows [trademark] (version 3.1 or higher required), and the output is available in both tabular and graphic formats.

Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z