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1

Type B Accident Investigation of the Mineral Oil Leak Discovered on January 8, 2001, Resulting in Property Damage at the Atlas Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Acting Chief Operating Officer for Defense Programs, Ralph E. Erickson.

2

Guidelines for Setting up a Reflux Condenser Water leaks from a reflux condenser can destroy years of research data and cause thousands of dollars of damage to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for Setting up a Reflux Condenser Water leaks from a reflux condenser can destroy years. To help prevent this common accident, wire or clamp all hose connections, secure the condenser outlet tubes into the inlet and outlet of the condenser. After fitting the tubes into the condenser (a

Brody, James P.

3

Leak detection/verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Assessment of light water reactor fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of LWR fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident and comments on the adequacy of the present USNRC design requirements. Results from early SPERT tests are reviewed and compared with results from recent computer simulations and PBF tests. A progression of fuel rod and cladding damage events is presented. High strain rate deformation of relatively cool irradiated cladding early in the transient may result in fracture at a radial average peak fuel enthalpy of approximately 140 cal/g UO/sub 2/. Volume expansion of previously irradiated fuel upon melting may cause deformation and rupture of the cladding, and coolant channel blockage at higher peak enthalpies.

MacDonald, P.E.; Seiffert, S.L.; Martinson, Z.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Owen, D.E.; Fukuda, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Best Management Practice #3: Distribution System Audits, Leak...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Leaks in distribution systems are caused by a number of factors, including pipe corrosion, high system pressure, construction disturbances, frost damage, damaged joints, and...

7

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W. [and others] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY ACCIDENT REPORT FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY ACCIDENT REPORT FORM Whenever a University vehicle sustains damage of any kind, or is involved in an accident which results in personal injury or property damage, this accident that this form is for University Use Only and is not meant to supersede the official state accident report form

Shahriar, Selim

10

Design and fabrication of a maneuverable robot for in-pipe leak detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaks in pipelines have been causing a significant amount of financial losses and serious damages to the community and the environment. The recent development of in-pipe leak detection technologies at Massachusetts Institute ...

Wu, You, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It discusses how pressure/flow controllers, variable speed and variable displacement compressors, automation, and addressing critical plant pressures allow plant personnel to lower the header pressure, which eliminates artificial demand and controls the leak...

Beals, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Across Washington, DC Robert B. Jackson,,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Across Washington, DC Robert B. Jackson,,, * Adrian Down, Nathan G increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic

Jackson, Robert B.

13

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D. [Reliability and Performance Associates (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Improved gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, F.E. Jr.

1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, Jr., Frank E. (Aurora, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Unavoidable Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

463. _____. 1987. Economic Analysis of Accident Law. _____.2005. “Liability for Accidents”, NBER Working Paper No.possibility is that the accident wasn’t under the defendant’

Grady, Mark F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Detecting Air Leaks | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZoneEnergyDetecting Air Leaks

20

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Rapid communication Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid communication Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston Nathan G. Phillips a of methane (CH4) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH4 leaks extraction and pipeline transmission are the largest human-derived source of emissions (EPA, 2012). However

Jackson, Robert B.

25

Sensitive hydrogen leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Aspects of leak detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

225-B Pool Cell 5 Liner Leak Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the actions taken to confirm and respond to a very small (0.046 ml/min) leak in the stainless steel liner of Hanford`s Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) storage pool cell 5 in Building 225-B. Manual level measurements confirmed a consistent weekly accumulation of 0.46 liters of water in the leak detection grid sump below the pool cell 5 liner. Video inspections and samples point to the capsule storage pool as the source of the water. The present leak rate corresponds to a decrease of only 0.002 inches per week in the pool cell water level, and consequently does not threaten any catastrophic loss of pool cell shielding and cooling water. The configuration of the pool cell liner, sump system, and associated risers will limit the short-term consequences of even a total liner breach to a loss of 1 inch in pool cell level. The small amount of demineralized pool cell water which has been in contact with the concrete structure is not enough to cause significant structural damage. However, ongoing water-concrete interaction increases. The pool cell leak detection sump instrumentation will be modified to improve monitoring of the leak rate in the future. Weekly manual sump level measurements continue in the interim. Contingency plans are in place to relocate the pool cell 5 capsules if the leak worsens.

Rasmussen, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analysis of SX farm leak histories -- Historical leak model (HLM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report uses readily available historical information to better define the volume, chemical composition, and Cs-137/Sr-90 amounts for leaks that have occurred in the past for tanks SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112. In particular a Historical Leak Model (HLM) is developed that is a month by month reconciliation of tank levels, fill records, and calculated boil-off rates for these tanks. The HLM analysis is an independent leak estimate that reconstructs the tank thermal histories thereby deriving each tank`s evaporative volume loss and by difference, its unaccounted losses as well. The HLM analysis was meant to demonstrate the viability of its approach, not necessarily to establish the HLM leak estimates as being definitive. Past leak estimates for these tanks have invariably resorted to soil wetting arguments but the extent of soil contaminated by each leak has always been highly uncertain. There is also a great deal of uncertainty with the HLM that was not quantified in this report, but will be addressed later. These four tanks (among others) were used from 1956 to 1975 for storage of high-level waste from the Redox process at Hanford. During their operation, tank waste temperatures were often as high as 150 C (300 F), but were more typically around 130 C. The primary tank cooling was by evaporation of tank waste and therefore periodic replacement of lost volume with water was necessary to maintain each tank`s inventory. This active reflux of waste resulted in very substantial turnovers in tank inventory as well as significant structural degradation of these tanks. As a result of the loss of structural integrity, each of these tanks leaked during their active periods of operation. Unfortunately, the large turnover in tank volume associated with their reflux cooling has made a determination of leak volumes very difficult. During much of these tanks operational histories, inventory losses because of evaporative cooling could have effectively masked any volume loss due to leak. However, careful comparison with reported tank levels during certain periods clearly show unaccounted volume losses for many tanks. As a result of the HLM analysis, SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112 all show clear evidence of unaccounted volume losses during the period 1958 to 1975. Likewise, the HLM does not show similar unaccounted volume losses for tank SX-105, a tank with no reported leak history, verifying that the HLM is consistent with SX-105 not leaking. These unaccounted volume losses establish the leak start date and rate, and when propagated over time show that SX-108 lost 203 kgal followed by SX-109 at 111. SX-111 at 55, and SX-112 at 44 kgal.0664 These leak volumes represent maximum or upper bounds estimates of each leak and are in total volume about six times the previous leak estimates.

Fredenburg, E.A.

1998-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Geology INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Approved as to sty)e and content by: P. A, Domenico (Chair of Committee) jj K. W. Brown (Member) C. C Mathewson (Member) J. H. S ng Head...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Accident Investigations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and activities.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Accident Investigations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at Department of Energy (DOE) operations and sites; to improve the environment, safety and health for DOE, contractors, and the public; and to prevent the recurrence of such accidents. Chg 2, 4-26-96

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Accident Investigations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at Department of Energy (DOE) operations and sites; to improve the environment , safety and health for DOE, contractors, and the public; and to prevent the recurrence of such accidents. Chg 1, 10-26-95. Cancels parts of DOE 5484.1

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Accuracy of Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensing for Use in Leak Detection of Subsea Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsea pipeline is shown in figure 1. This oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico was widely publicized and resulted in both environmental damage and losses to the pipeline operator. The need for accurate and reliable leak detection systems is great... which has a lower frequency than the original signal. Similarly the Anti-Stokes component describes backscattered light with higher frequency. Raman scattering can be understood as the absorption or emission of quanta of energy as the material changes...

Madabhushi, S.; Elshafie, M. Z. E. B.; Haigh, S. K.

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

HEY, B.E.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

accident management programme: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ACCIDENT FIRE POLLUTION "NEAR MISS immediately after the occurrence. 3 Material damage or pollution Total volume of mercury spillage was approximately 200 ml. Of that volume,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

accident management programmes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ACCIDENT FIRE POLLUTION "NEAR MISS immediately after the occurrence. 3 Material damage or pollution Total volume of mercury spillage was approximately 200 ml. Of that volume,...

42

UWO Vehicle ACCIDENT REPORTING FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UWO Vehicle ­ ACCIDENT REPORTING FORM To be completed at the scene. (Important: Do not admit liability or discuss any settlement.) If there are personal injuries or severe damage to the vehicle, call 911. If vehicle is drivable and if it's safe to do so, pull to the side of road away from traffic. Put

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

43

CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver D E P A R T M E N T O F A D M I N I S T R Address City State Zip For what purpose was car being used at time of accident? Has damage been repaired signals did you give? Other Driver? Who investigated? Who Cited and Why? Describe Accident CONTINUE

Tullos, Desiree

44

Saving Money with Air and Gas Leak Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncorrected air leaks and gas leaks cost your businesses time and money as well as being environmentally unfriendly. ? Air Leak Surveys ? Nitrogen Leak Surveys ? Gas Leak Survey (H2, O2, Natural Gas) ? Steam Leak Surveys ? Steam Trap Surveys ? Safe... costly problems ? Are caused by dozens, perhaps hundreds of hard to pinpoint outflows which are caused by vibrations and a corrosive atmosphere. ?We can find your leaks in areas that that would be unnoticed and undetected to the human ear ? Details...

Woodruff, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Leak detection on an ethylene pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model-based leak detection system has been in operation on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline from Antwerp to Jemeppe on Sambre since 1989. The leak detection system, which is the commercial product PLDS of Modisette Associations, Inc., was originally installed by the supplier. Since 1991, all system maintenance and configuration changes have been done by Solvay et Cie personnel. Many leak tests have been performed, and adjustments have been made in the configuration and the automatic tuning parameters. The leak detection system is currently able to detect leaks of 2 tonnes/hour in 11 minutes with accurate location. Larger leaks are detected in about 2 minutes. Leaks between 0.5 and 1 tonne per hour are detected after several hours. (The nominal mass flow in the pipeline is 15 tonnes/hour, with large fluctuations.) Leaks smaller than 0.5 tonnes per hour are not detected, with the alarm thresholds set at levels to avoid false alarms. The major inaccuracies of the leak detection system appear to be associated with the ethylene temperatures.

Hamande, A.; Condacse, V.; Modisette, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Accident Procedure Outline the procedures for accidents involving University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned by U-M are covered by the U-M self insurance program administered by Risk Management. Procedure 1. An accident is defined as any incident that causes damage to people or property. 2. In the event. 4. If the accident causes personal injury to the driver, occupants and/or pedestrian, contact Risk

Kirschner, Denise

48

Leak checker data logging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Leak checker data logging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

Gannon, Jeffrey C. (Arlington, TX); Payne, John J. (Waterman, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Saving Money with Steam Leak and Steam Trap Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sonic equipment. o Having uncorrected steam leaks and faulty traps cost your businesses time and money as well as being environmentally unfriendly. SERVICES ? Air Leak Surveys ? Nitrogen Leak Surveys ?Gas Leak Survey (H2, O2, Natural Gas) ? Steam Leak... productivity ? Processing efficiency ?Provide recommendations for improvement ?Stop profit loss by conserving wasted energy Undetected Steam leaks ? Rob efficiency in manufacturing and processing ? Lose millions of dollars annually ? Add up to very costly...

Woodruff, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs)”. Submitted to theCalifornia’s Underground Storage Tank Program”. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks” by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Structural aspects of the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 26, 1986 the world's worst nuclear power plant accident occurred at the Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the USSR. This paper presents a discussion of the design of the Chernobyl Power Plant, the sequence of events that led to the accident and the damage caused by the resulting explosion. The structural design features that contributed to the accident and resulting damage will be highlighted. Photographs and sketches obtained from various worldwide news agencies will be shown to try and gain a perspective of the extent of the damage. The aftermath, clean-up, and current situation will be discussed and the important lessons learned for the structural engineer will be presented. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Adversaries and Information Leaks Geoffrey Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adversaries and Information Leaks (Tutorial) Geoffrey Smith School of Computing and Information-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008 #12;384 G. Smith ­ The program c has direct access to the sensitive information

Smith, Geoffrey

55

Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Medford, G.T. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for carbon dioxide geologic sequestration protecting the sources of potable water.

Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Leak Testing and Implications of Operations to Locate Leak Horizons at West Hackberry Well 108  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana has historically experienced casing leaks. Numerous West Hackberry oil storage caverns have wells exhibiting communication between the interior 10 3/4 x 20-inch (oil) annulus and the ''outer cemented'' 20 x 26-inch annulus. Well 108 in Cavern 108 exhibits this behavior. It is thought that one, if not the primary, cause of this communication is casing thread leaks at the 20-inch casing joints combined with microannuli along the cement casing interfaces and other cracks/flaws in the cemented 20 x 26-inch annulus. An operation consisting of a series of nitrogen leak tests, similar to cavern integrity tests, was performed on Cavern 108 in an effort to determine the leak horizons and to see if these leak horizons coincided with those of casing joints. Certain leaky, threaded casing joints were identified between 400 and 1500 feet. A new leak detection procedure was developed as a result of this test, and this methodology for identifying and interpreting such casing joint leaks is presented in this report. Analysis of the test data showed that individual joint leaks could be successfully identified, but not without some degree of ambiguity. This ambiguity is attributed to changes in the fluid content of the leak path (nitrogen forcing out oil) and possibly to very plausible changes in characteristics of the flow path during the test. These changes dominated the test response and made the identification of individual leak horizons difficult. One consequence of concern from the testing was a progressive increase in the leak rate measured during testing due to nitrogen cleaning small amounts of oil out of the leak paths and very likely due to the changes of the leak path during the flow test. Therefore, careful consideration must be given before attempting similar tests. Although such leaks have caused no known environmental or economic problems to date, the leaks may be significant because of the potential for future problems. To mitigate future problems, some repair scenarios are discussed including injection of sealants.

SATTLER, ALLAN R.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; PIECHOCKI, ALAN

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hypothetical Reactor Accident Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- W 4 DfcSkoollo Rise-R-427 CARNSORE: Hypothetical Reactor Accident Study O. Walmod-Larsen, N. O: HYPOTHETICAL REACTOR ACCIDENT STUDY O. Walmod-Larsen, N.O. Jensen, L. Kristensen, A. Heide, K.L. Nedergård, P-basis accident and a series of hypothetical core-melt accidents to a 600 MWe reactor are de- scribed

59

EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

Azarian, G. [Framatome ANP SAS, Tour Areva, Place de la Coupole 92084 Paris la Defense (France); Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse, 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Stoudt, R.H. [Framatome ANP Inc. - 3315 Old Forest Rd, Lynchburgh, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name _________________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name's Title _________________________________________________________________ Date and Time of Accident accident occurred

Long, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching. (authors)

Girardot, Crystal [URS- Safety Management Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Harlow, Don [ELR Consulting Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Johnson, Jeremy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of Accident Frequencies at the Canister Storage Bldg (CSB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using simple frequency calculations and fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The following are the design basis accidents: Mechanical damage of MCO; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen deflagration; MCO external hydrogen deflagration; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Placental findings in cord accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placental findings in cord accidents. BMC Pregnancy andPlacental findings in cord accidents Mana M Parast Fromfor stillbirth. “Cord accident,” defined by obstruction of

Parast, Mana M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Accident Externality from Driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sex-Divided Mile- age, Accident, and Insurance Cost DataMandic. 2003. “The Accident Externality from Driving. ”Insurance Res. Council. accident externality from driving

Edlin, Aaron S.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Interpreting Accident Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accident statistics have often been used to support the argument that an abnormally small proportion of drivers account for a large proportion of the accidents. This paper compares statistics developed from six-year data ...

Ferreira, Joseph Jr.

67

A Road Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) NA Title of track A Road Accident Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry) Shel ko shares his experience of a serious road accident in which the truck he...

G.yu lha

68

Managing an Effective Leak Sealing Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An on-line leak sealing program is an extremely effective method of cost savings to industrial plants. The dollars a plant saves can be direct and dramatic as in an avoided system shut-down or subtle and analytical as in a long term maintenance...

Rinz, W. H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

New system pinpoints leaks in ethylene pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model-based leak detection, PLDS, developed by Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston has been operating on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline since 1989. The 6-in. pipeline extends from Antwerp to Jemeppe sur Sambre, a distance of 73.5 miles and is buried at a depth of 3 ft. with no insulation. Except for outlets to flares, located every 6 miles for test purposes, there are no injections or deliveries along the pipeline. Also, there are block valves, which are normally open, at each flare location. This paper reviews the design and testing procedures used to determine the system performance. These tests showed that the leak system was fully operational and no false alarms were caused by abrupt changes in inlet/outlet flows of the pipeline. It was confirmed that leaks larger than 2 tonnes/hr. (40 bbl/hr) are quickly detected and accurately located. Also, maximum leak detection sensitivity is 1 tonne/hr. (20 bbl/hr) with a detection time of one hour. Significant operational, configuration, and programming issues also were found during the testing program. Data showed that temperature simulations needed re-examining for improvement since accurate temperature measurements are important. This is especially true for ethylene since its density depends largely on temperature. Another finding showed the averaging period of 4 hrs. was too long and a 1 to 2 hr. interval was better.

Hamande, A. [Solvay et Cie, Jemeppe sur Sambre (Belgium); Condacse, V.; Modisette, J. [Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluating an experimental setup for pipe leak detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental setup with 4 inch inner diameter PVC pipe modules is designed to mimic a real life piping system in which to test possible leak detection mechanisms. A model leak detection mechanism is developed which ...

Garay, Luis I. (Luis Ignacio)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

acoustic leak detection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PLoS ONE 9(10): e Lawrence, Rick L. 8 Design and fabrication of a maneuverable robot for in-pipe leak detection MIT - DSpace Summary: Leaks in pipelines have been causing...

72

Group Accident Insurance Certificate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group Accident Insurance Certificate Regents of the University of New Mexico #12;#12;Life Insurance Company GROUP ACCIDENT CERTIFICATE THIS CERTIFICATE PROVIDES LIMITED COVERAGE. PLEASE READ YOUR. THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED UNDER AN ACCIDENT ONLY POLICY. IT DOES NOT PAY BENEFITS FOR LOSS CAUSED BY SICKNESS. GA

New Mexico, University of

73

Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

Washenfelder, Dennis J.

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

OHL, P.C.

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a handling by M. Gascoyne Abstract Highly-alkaline waste solutions have leaked from underground tanks mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

77

Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of NUREG-1150 and similar Probabilistic Risk Assessments in NRC and industry risk management programs is discussed. Risk management'' is more comprehensive than the commonly used term accident management.'' Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Accident motivates scholarship recipient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accident motivates scholarship recipient Leyba encourages students: apply for Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund Life-changing experience: springboard to a career in exercise,...

80

LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report.

Clinton, J.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Accident Externality from Driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a given state could a?ect accident risk and could correlateVolume on Motor-Vehicle Accidents on Two-Lane Tangents. ”Laurie. “Sex-Divided Mileage Accident and In- surance Cost

Edlin, Aaron S.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Management of vacuum leak-detection processes, standards, and calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum leak detection requires integrated management action to ensure the successful production of apparatus having required leak tightness. Implementation of properly planned, scheduled, and engineering procedures and test arrangements are an absolute necessity to prevent unexpected, impractical, technically inadequate, or unnecessarily costly incidents in leak-testing operations. The use of standard procedures, leak standards appropriate to the task, and accurate calibration systems or devices is necessary to validate the integrity of any leak-test procedure. In this paper, the need for implementing these practices is discussed using case histories of typical examples of large complex vacuum systems. Aggressive management practices are of primary importance throughout a project's life cycle to ensure the lowest cost; this includes successful leak testing of components. It should be noted that the opinions and conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the author and are not those of the Los Alamos National Laboratory or the Department of Energy.

Wilson, N.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Long-life leak standard assembly. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be baked-out in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

Basford, J.A.; Mathis, J.E.; Wright, H.C.

1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

85

Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Spevak, Lev (Highland Park, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Accident Externality from Driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to which this externality results from increases in accidentrates, accident severity or both remains unclear. Itpertains to underinsured accident costs like fatality risk.

Edlin, Aaron S.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ANNUAL MAINTENANCE AND LEAK TESTING FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide step-by-step instructions for the annual helium leak test certification and maintenance of the 9975 Shipping Package.

Trapp, D.

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting Why?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting ­ Why? Obligation to report Health Care of the accident ­ if not, the organization (i.e. the department) can be fined Obligation under Section 51, 52 happened? When did it happen? (Date, Time and Place) When was the accident/incident reported? Any

Lennard, William N.

90

INFORMAL REPORT DETECTION OF INTERSTATE LIQUIDS PIPELINE LEAKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL-65970 INFORMAL REPORT DETECTION OF INTERSTATE LIQUIDS PIPELINE LEAKS: FEASIBILITY EVALUATION R PIPELINE LEAKS: FEASIBILITY EVALUATION A Concept Paper Russell N. Dietz, Head Gunnar I. Senum Tracer with Battelle Memorial Institute and the Colonial Pipeline Company #12;ABSTRACT The approximately 200,000-mile

91

A new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considers the blowdown effect in industrial boiler operation. This adds to the efficiency of recent advancesA new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection A. M. Pertew ,1 X. Sun ,1 R. Kent in identification-based leak detection techniques of boiler steam- water systems. Keywords: Industrial Boilers, Tube

Marquez, Horacio J.

92

Imaging Gas Leaks using Schlieren Optics by Gary S. Settles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-intrusive, and capable of remote observation of leaks as small as milliliters/minute. For example, natural gas leaking. The schlieren technique is highly sensitive, non- intrusive, optical, and remote. However, since it needs only with a special schlieren arrangement that visualizes gas flows in color (Settles, International Journal of Heat

Settles, Gary S.

93

241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Improving Transportation Safety Through Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;10! Investigative Groups ·" Highway Factors & Bridge Construction ·" Bridge Design ·" Witness ·" Survival accidents. ·" Major Railroad accidents. ·" Major Pipeline accidents. ·" Major marine accidents of the U10 gusset plates, due to a design error by the bridge design firm . . . Contributing to the design

Minnesota, University of

95

Accident Response Group  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Accident resistant transport container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Proceedings of the seminar on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the seminar was to present the current state of the art in Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology development, validation, and application in an international forum. With particular emphasis on industrial applications and regulatory policies, the seminar provided an opportunity to compare approaches, experiences, and codifications developed by different countries. The seminar was organized into four topic areas: status of LBB applications; technical issues in LBB methodology; complementary requirements (leak detection and inspection); LBB assessment and margins. As a result of this seminar, an improved understanding of LBB gained through sharing of different viewpoints from different countries, permits consideration of: simplified pipe support design and possible elimination of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) mechanical consequences for specific cases; defense-in-depth type of applications without support modifications; support of safety cases for plants designed without the LOCA hypothesis. In support of these activities, better estimates of the limits to the LBB approach should follow, as well as an improvement in codifying methodologies. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Faidy, C. [ed.] [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France); Gilles, P. [ed.] [Framatome, Paris (France)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Phase 1 of this accident...

102

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Method of Measuring Exposure to Pedestrian Accident Risk.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 14, 1982, pp 397-405.Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Accident Reporting Policy Outline the policy regarding accident reporting on University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned by U-M are covered by the U-M self insurance program administered by Risk Management. Policy 1. An accident is defined as any incident that causes damage to persons or property. 2. In the glove box of every

Kirschner, Denise

105

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

allowable leak rates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A; Provot, N 2011-01-01 36 Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes, Vol. 31, No. 5, 1999 Mitochondrial Proton Leak and the Uncoupling Proteins Biology and Medicine Websites...

107

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The feasibility of electrophoretic repair of impoundment leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

finding, repairing and testing the leaks, are tedious, expensive, and dangerous to workers. Electrophoretic repair technique is an innovative, economic, and safe method to repair the leakage of impoundments. A suspension of clay particles is induced...

Han, Ji-Seok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Robot design for leak detection in water-pipe systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaks are major problem that occur in the water pipelines all around the world. Several reports indicate loss of around 20 to 30 percent of water in the distribution of water through water pipe systems. Such loss of water ...

Choi, Changrak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Design of a Novel In-Pipe Reliable Leak Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leakage is the major factor for unaccounted losses in every pipe network around the world (oil, gas, or water). In most cases, the deleterious effects associated with the occurrence of leaks may present serious economical ...

Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris

111

Accident at Creswell Colliery, Derbyshire   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER ACCIDENT AT CRESWELL COLLIERY, DERBYSHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and the circumstances attending, the accident which occurred at Creswell Colliery, Derbyshire, on the 26th September, 1950 BY ...

Bryan, Andrew

112

Predicting Worker Exposure from a Glovebox Leak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is difficult to predict immediate worker radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident. This is recognized in DOE safety analysis guidance and the reason such guidance does not call for quantitative determinations of such consequences. However, it would be useful to at least have a means of systematically and formally quantifying worker dose to be able to identify the relative risks of various processes and to provide an order-of-magnitude impression of absolute consequences. In this report, we present such a means in the form of a simple calculation model that is easily applied and generates reasonable, qualitative dose predictions. The model contains a scaling parameter whose value was deduced from extensive laboratory ventilation flow rate measurements performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over the last several years and from recent indoor radioactive contamination dispersion measurements, also at LANL. Application of the model is illustrated with the aid of two example calculations.

H. Jordan; D. J. Gordon; J. J. Whicker; D. L. Wannigman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

WHEN MODEL MEETS REALITY – A REVIEW OF SPAR LEVEL 2 MODEL AGAINST FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models are a set of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the risk of operations at U.S. nuclear power plants and provide inputs to risk informed regulatory process. A small number of SPAR Level 2 models have been developed mostly for feasibility study purpose. They extend the Level 1 models to include containment systems, group plant damage states, and model containment phenomenology and accident progression in containment event trees. A severe earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan in March 2011 and caused significant damages on the reactors in Fukushima Daiichi site. Station blackout (SBO), core damage, containment damage, hydrogen explosion, and intensive radioactivity release, which have been previous analyzed and assumed as postulated accident progression in PRA models, now occurred with various degrees in the multi-units Fukushima Daiichi site. This paper reviews and compares a typical BWR SPAR Level 2 model with the “real” accident progressions and sequences occurred in Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3. It shows that the SPAR Level 2 model is a robust PRA model that could very reasonably describe the accident progression for a real and complicated nuclear accident in the world. On the other hand, the comparison shows that the SPAR model could be enhanced by incorporating some accident characteristics for better representation of severe accident progression.

Zhegang Ma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

UNIVERSITY OF TRENTO ACCIDENT INSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNIVERSITY OF TRENTO ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY This document reflects the contractual conditions in force, though it should not be considered as a binding analysis of the coverage and, in case of accident for the purposes stated. TYPE OF COVERAGE = GROUP ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY No. = 088 00429120 COMPANY NAME

115

A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

Mohamed El-Genk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

NCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2. Accident Reporting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-2 Occupational injury - Is identified as any bodily damageNCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-1 B-2. Accident Reporting I or reasonably could result in injury, illness, or property damage. Reporting is mandatory in order that: 1

Wlodawer, Alexander

118

Electrical shock accident investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents results of the accident investigation of an electrical shock received by two subcontractor employees on May 13, 1994, at the Pinellas Plant. The direct cause of the electrical shock was worker contact with a cut ``hot`` wire and a grounded panelboard (PPA) enclosure. Workers presumed that all wires in the enclosure were dead at the time of the accident and did not perform thorough Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO). Three contributing causes were identified. First, lack of guidance in the drawing for the modification performed in 1987 allowed the PPA panel to be used as a junction box. The second contributing cause is that Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) procedures do not address multiple electrical sources in an enclosure. Finally, the workers did not consider the possibility of multiple electrical sources. The root cause of the electrical shock was the inadequacy of administrative controls, including construction requirement and LO/TO requirements, and subcontractor awareness regarding multiple electrical sources. Recommendations to prevent further reoccurrence of this type of accident include revision of ES&H Standard 2.00, Electrical Safety Program Manual, to document requirements for multiple electrical sources in a single enclosure to specify a thorough visual inspection as part of the voltage check process. In addition, the formality of LO/TO awareness training for subcontractor electricians should be increased.

Not Available

1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation Metrics Applied to Accident Tolerant Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe, reliable, and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and have yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. One of the current missions of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+). Accident tolerance became a focus within advanced LWR research upon direction from Congress following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal of ATF development is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness and economics of commercial nuclear power. Enhanced accident tolerant fuels would endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving performance during normal operations. The U.S. DOE is supporting multiple teams to investigate a number of technologies that may improve fuel system response and behavior in accident conditions, with team leadership provided by DOE national laboratories, universities, and the nuclear industry. Concepts under consideration offer both evolutionary and revolutionary changes to the current nuclear fuel system. Mature concepts will be tested in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory beginning in Summer 2014 with additional concepts being readied for insertion in fiscal year 2015. This paper provides a brief summary of the proposed evaluation process that would be used to evaluate and prioritize the candidate accident tolerant fuel concepts currently under development.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Accident Investigation of the June 17, 2012, Construction Accident...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

June 17, 2012, Construction Accident - Structural Steel Collapse at The Over pack Storage Expansion 2 at the Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Apparatus and method for detecting leaks in piping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device are disclosed for detecting the location of leaks along a wall or piping system, preferably in double-walled piping. The apparatus comprises a sniffer probe, a rigid cord such as a length of tube attached to the probe on one end and extending out of the piping with the other end, a source of pressurized air and a source of helium. The method comprises guiding the sniffer probe into the inner pipe to its distal end, purging the inner pipe with pressurized air, filling the annulus defined between the inner and outer pipe with helium, and then detecting the presence of helium within the inner pipe with the probe as is pulled back through the inner pipe. The length of the tube at the point where a leak is detected determines the location of the leak in the pipe. 2 figures.

Trapp, D.J.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Apparatus and method for detecting leaks in piping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for detecting the location of leaks along a wall or piping system, preferably in double-walled piping. The apparatus comprises a sniffer probe, a rigid cord such as a length of tube attached to the probe on one end and extending out of the piping with the other end, a source of pressurized air and a source of helium. The method comprises guiding the sniffer probe into the inner pipe to its distal end, purging the inner pipe with pressurized air, filling the annulus defined between the inner and outer pipe with helium, and then detecting the presence of helium within the inner pipe with the probe as is pulled back through the inner pipe. The length of the tube at the point where a leak is detected determines the location of the leak in the pipe.

Trapp, Donald J. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

RPP-ENV-39658 Revision 0 Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Department of Energy developed a process to reassess selected tank leak estimates (volumes and inventories), and to update single-shell tank leak and unplanned release volumes and inventory estimates as emergent field data is obtained (RPP-32681, Process to Assess Tank Farm Leaks in Support of Retrieval and Closure Planning). This process does not represent a formal tank leak assessment in accordance with procedure TFC-ENG-CHEM-D-42, “Tank Leak Assessment Process. ” This report documents reassessment of past leaks in the 241-SX Tank Farm. Tank waste loss events were reassessed for tanks 241-SX-104, 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108,

M. E. Johnson; J. G. Field; Revision Rpp-env

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh air that enters a house in a controlled manner to exhaust excess moisture and reduce odors and stuffiness. Air leakage, or infiltration, is outside air that enters a house uncontrollably through cracks

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

128

Leak Testing the DMT Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saudi Arabia field project was funded by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through a contract with Weather housing. Don't try to tighten the metal fitting on the pump housing. #12;Hard Places to Find Leaks Saudi Operator Manual Rev D page 45. March 22, 2009 Saudi Arabia Down to 450 mb, climb to 500 mb took 311 seconds

Delene, David J.

129

Methodology to quantify leaks in aerosol sampling system components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and that approach was used to measure the sealing integrity of a CAM and two kinds of filter holders. The methodology involves use of sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer gas with the device being tested operated under dynamic flow conditions. The leak rates...

Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-259 project will provide upgrades to the 2706-T/TA Facility to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. The project provides decontamination activities supporting the environmental restoration mission and waste management operations on the Hanford Site.

Carlson, T.A.

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break.

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Analysis and design of an in-pipe system for water leak detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaks are a major factor for unaccounted water losses in almost every water distribution network. Pipeline leak may result, for example, from bad workmanship or from any destructive cause, due to sudden changes of pressure, ...

Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Release and transport of fission product cesium in the TMI-2 accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the fission product cesium was released from the overheated UO/sub 2/ fuel in the TMI-2 accident. Steam that boiled away from a water pool in the bottom of the reactor vessel transported the released fission products throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS). Some fission products passed directly through a leaking valve with steam and water into the containment structure, but most deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being dissolved or resuspended when the RCS was refilled with water. A cesium transport model was developed that extended measured cesium in the RCS back to the first day of the accident. The model revealed that approx.62% of the released /sup 137/Cs deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being slowly leached and transported out of the RCS in leaked or letdown water. The leach rates from the model agreed reasonably well with those measured in the laboratory. The chemical behavior of cesium in the TMI-2 accident agreed with that observed in fission product release tests at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10/sup -7/ spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10/sup -9//mile.

McClure, J. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O. [Tractebel Energy Engineering, Brussels (Belgium)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improved geomembrane damage/leak detection through co-extrusion technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a considerable advancement in technology available for providing a barrier system in the containment and storage of waste materials. Natural soil liners several feet in thickness have been augmented by factory-produced, synthetic materials that have permeability coefficients several orders of magnitude lower than any natural soil system. To carry the systems approach one step farther, engineers use multiple layers of synthetics separated at times by layers of clay offering a redundant composite barrier to protect the groundwater. Each geosynthetic material offers its own unique contribution to the system based upon its physical characteristics. Co-extrusion -- the process of combining two or more materials into a single product, through a single process -- is now revolutionizing the liner industry.

Messmer, D.P.; Cadwallader, M. (Gundle Lining Systems, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mathematical Properties of Pump-Leak Models of Cell Volume Control and Electrolyte Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Properties of Pump-Leak Models of Cell Volume Control and Electrolyte Balance Yoichiro using pump-leak models, a system of differential algebraic equations that de- scribes the balance and stability of steady states for a general class of pump-leak models. We treat two cases. When the ion channel

Weinberger, Hans

138

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-B Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-B Tank Farm (B Farm) leak cause and locations for the 100 series leaking tank (241-B-107) identified in RPP-RPT-49089, Hanford B-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the B Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE Especially Designed for Students of insurance. Your coverage is governed by a policy of student accident and sickness insurance underwritten

Suzuki, Masatsugu

140

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE Especially Designed for International Students is governed by a policy of student accident and sickness insurance underwritten by BCS Insurance Company BCS

Suzuki, Masatsugu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief # 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout / tagout programs

142

Cell damage seen from Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 30 kilometer radius forbidden zone around the Chernobyl atomic plant serves as a sobering reminder of the world's worst nuclear accident. But for former Soviet biologists, it's also a unique natural laboratory. And one scientist, Nadejda Gulaya of Kiev's Pallaguine Institute of Biochemistry, has been doing studies that she claims offer surprising evidence of Chernobyl's after-effects. Prolonged exposure to radioactive fallout from the 1986 accident, she says, has caused damage to cell membranes in both animals and humans. For the past year, Gulaya has been comparing tissues from animals such as mink, pigs, and rodents inhabiting the Chernobyl area with those from other parts of Ukraine. Her conclusion: Exposure to radiation has, in many cases, caused alterations to membrane phospholipids. These changes, are similar to those that disrupt cellular metabolism following exposure to oxidizing free radicals. Gulaya also has preliminary data from human studies. She claims to have found similar alterations in the neurons of people who have died since being exposed to Chernobyl radiation. That leads her to speculate that the frequent psychiatric disorders may not just be from mental stress or radiophobia, but might reflect actual damage to the central nervous system.

Not Available

1992-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation technology trade study update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a revision and update to the initial report that describes various leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) technologies that can be used to support the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. This revision focuses on the improvements in the technical performance of previously identified and useful technologies, and it introduces new technologies that might prove to be useful.

HERTZEL, J.S.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

University of Pittsburgh Vehicle Accident Report Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh Vehicle Accident Report Form To be completed by the driver immediately following the accident (if medically able) and return this completed form to Fleet Services, Dept of Parking-624-1817 A. Report Date: ______/______/_______ B: Accident Data Date of accident

Sibille, Etienne

145

Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date accident treatment provided? Yes No Where Was time lost from work? Yes No If yes, how long? Could this accident have the following information as soon as it relates to your work related accident/injury/illness within 72 hours

Swaddle, John

146

Bordereau de transmission accident du travail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bordereau de transmission accident du travail Service des pensions et accidents du travail accidents du travail du CNRS Accompagné des pièces requises Nom .................................................... Prénom ........................ Matricule ...... Composition du dossier Observations Déclaration d'accident

Pouyanne, Nicolas

147

Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 k? trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

Schwartz, J. A., E-mail: jschwart@pppl.gov; Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

An Interview About an Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Length of track 0:02:32 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track An Interview About an Accident Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry) The respondent recalls how he and his... wife survived a motorcycle accident. Genre or type (i.e. epic, song, ritual) Interview Name of recorder (if different from collector) G.yu lha Date of recording December 17th 2009 Place of recording Siyuewu Village, Puxi Township, Rangtang...

G.yu lha

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique to quantify fuel damage in an LMR through analysis of delayed neutron data is presented, which is suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the SLSF and Mol 7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bauer, T.H.; Braid, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a technique is presented to quantify fuel damage in a liquid-metal reactor through fast-running computer analysis of delayed neutron data, suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the Sodium Loop Safety Facility and Mol-7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage.

Bauer, T.H.; Braiel, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Type B Accident Investigation of the July 14, 2005, Americium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2005, Americium Contamination Accident at the Sigma Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the July 14, 2005, Americium Contamination Accident...

154

The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic...

156

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 7...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 7, 2001, Burn Accident at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 9210 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the...

157

Type B Accident Investigation of the Subcontractor Employee Injuries...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Type B Accident Investigation of the Subcontractor Employee Injuries from a November 15, 2000, Fall Accident at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of...

158

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Automated Pedestrian Counting Devices Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

291. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft ProtocolEstimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol39. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol

Bu, Fanping; Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Accident, Illness and Liability Coverage Risk Management in the 4-H Youth Development Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Accident, Illness and Liability Coverage Risk Management in the 4-H Youth Development Program for injuries or damages to person or property of others (tort liability), when the volunteer is: · Working volunteer, and enrolled or listed with the Oregon State University Extension 4-H Youth Development Program

Tullos, Desiree

160

Leake County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN)Lauderhill,5. ItLea Hill,Leake County,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton StanatAccepted forEstimation of Gas Leak

162

Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-A Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-A Tank Farm (A Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-A-104 and 241-A-105) identified in RPP-ENV-37956, Hanford A and AX Farm Leak Assessment Report. This document satisfies the A Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-T Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-T Tank Farm (T Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-T-106 and 241-T-111) identified in RPP-RPT-55084, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-T Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the T Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

Shaw, Joseph A.

166

Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-U Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-U Tank Farm (U Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-U-104, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112) identified in RPP-RPT-50097, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-U Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the U-Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-C Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-C Tank Farm (C Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-C-101 and 241-C-105) identified in RPP-RPT-33418, Rev. 2, Hanford C-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the C Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105, and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10.sup.-13 atm cc s.sup.-1. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces backstreaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium.

Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}13} atm cc/s. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces back streaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium. 2 figs.

Myneni, G.R.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

T-726:Linux-2.6 privilege escalation/denial of service/information leak  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a privilege escalation, denial of service or information leak.

173

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

Whitehead, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLANKET STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE Especially Designed for the Dependents. It is not a contract of insurance. Your coverage is governed by a policy of student accident and sickness insurance

Suzuki, Masatsugu

175

RICE UNIVERSITY ACCIDENT/INJURY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICE UNIVERSITY ACCIDENT/INJURY REPORT Please Print Section A: Details of incident Injury Work Exposure to radiation Mental stress factors Noise Insect/animal bite Vehicle accident Slip

Natelson, Douglas

176

Analysis of accidents during flashing operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, 1976 Federal Highway Administration Study, 1980 San Francisco Study National Study Portland, Oregon Study Summary of Literature Review Studies 13 14 16 17 20 CHAPTER Page III. ACCIDENT ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY . 22 Study Site Location... V. SUMMARY AND FINDINGS 44 REFERENCES 48 VITA 50 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1. Groupings for Marson's Accident Analysis 2. Groupings for San Francisco Accident Analysis 3. Groupings for Portland Accident Analysis 4. Sample Sizes by Volume Ratio 5...

Obermeyer, Michael Edward

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Environmental Stigma Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contami- nation causing environmental damage cannot be seen,Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases E.in cases of environmental damage, primar- ily because it is

Johnson, E. Jean

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS: COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY IN FREEWAY REAR accident report: Happened on I-94 in downtown Minneapolis Happened during the afternoon peak period Vehicle" is a "condition or event" such that "had the condition or event been prevented...the accident would not occur

Minnesota, University of

179

The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company Group Numbers Basic Term Life - 677984 Basic by The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company. (Referred to as The Hartford or Hartford.) General from an accident, the benefit will be equal to $140,000 ($70,000 basic group term life PLUS $70

180

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE Signature 2-9-108, MCA (Statutory Coverage, in lieu-90-(4-20). CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE X Weather Conditions: ACCIDENT INFORMATION Location: Date: - - 20 Time: : .M. Driver and Risk Management ~ 1160 Research Drive Bozeman, MT 59718 ~ (406) 994-2711 Accident Form #12;OTHER

Dyer, Bill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT & SCHOLAR Accident & Sickness Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT & SCHOLAR Accident & Sickness Insurance Plan 2012-2013 Plan Eligibility an accident and sickness insurance plan for international students and scholars studying in the United States are administered by NAHGA Claim Services: National Accident & Health General Agency The information provided below

Bordenstein, Seth

182

Retrospection of Chernobyl nuclear accident for decision analysis concerning remedial actions in Ukraine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is considered the efficacy of decisions concerning remedial actions when of-site radiological monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases was absent or was not informative. There are examples of such situations in the former Soviet Union where many people have been exposed: releases of radioactive materials from 'Krasnoyarsk-26' into Enisey River, releases of radioactive materials from 'Chelabinsk-65' (the Kishtim accident), nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, the Chernobyl nuclear accident etc. If monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases is absent the decisions concerning remedial actions are usually developed on the base of permanent monitoring. However decisions of this kind may be essentially erroneous. For these cases it is proposed to make retrospection of radiological data of the early and intermediate phases of nuclear accident and to project decisions concerning remedial actions on the base of both retrospective data and permanent monitoring data. In this Report the indicated problem is considered by the example of the Chernobyl accident for Ukraine. Their of-site radiological monitoring in the early and intermediate phases was unsatisfactory. In particular, the pasture-cow-milk monitoring had not been made. All official decisions concerning dose estimations had been made on the base of measurements of {sup 137}Cs in body (40 measurements in 135 days and 55 measurements in 229 days after the Chernobyl accident). For the retrospection of radiological data of the Chernobyl accident dynamic model has been developed. This model has structure similar to the structure of Pathway model and Farmland model. Parameters of the developed model have been identified for agricultural conditions of Russia and Ukraine. By means of this model dynamics of 20 radionuclides in pathways and dynamics of doses have been estimated for the early, intermediate and late phases of the Chernobyl accident. The main results are following: - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 75-93% of Commitment Effective Dose had been formed; - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 85-90% of damage from radiation exposure had been formed. During the next 50 years (the late phase of accident) only 10-15% of damage from radiation exposure will have been formed; - Remedial actions (agricultural remedial actions as most effective) in Ukraine are intended for reduction of the damage from consumption of production which is contaminated in the late phase of accident. I.e. agricultural remedial actions have been intended for minimization only 10 % of the total damage from radiation exposure; - Medical countermeasures can minimize radiation exposure damage by an order of magnitude greater than agricultural countermeasures. - Thus, retrospection of nuclear accident has essentially changed type of remedial actions and has given a chance to increase effectiveness of spending by an order of magnitude. This example illustrates that in order to optimize remedial actions it is required to use data of retrospection of nuclear accidents in all cases when monitoring in the early and (or) intermediate phases is unsatisfactory. (author)

Georgievskiy, Vladimir [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Insitute', Kurchatov Sq., 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

185

KERENA safety concept in the context of the Fukushima accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the last three years AREVA NP and E.On KK finalized the basic design of KERENA which is a medium sized innovative boiling water reactor, based on the operational experience of German BWR nuclear power plants (NPPs). It is a generation III reactor design with a net electrical output of about 1250 MW. It combines active safety equipment of service-proven designs with new passive safety components, both safety classified. The passive systems utilize basic laws of physics, such as gravity and natural convection, enabling them to function without electric power. Even actuation of these systems is performed thanks to basic physic laws. The degree of diversity in component and system design, achieved by combining active and passive equipment, results in a very low core damage frequency. The Fukushima accident enhanced the world wide discussion about the safety of operating nuclear power plants. World wide stress tests for operating nuclear power plants are being performed embracing both natural and man made hazards. Beside the assessment of existing power plants, also new designs are analyzed regarding the system response to beyond design base accidents. KERENA's optimal combination of diversified cooling systems (active and passive) allows passing efficiently such tests, with a high level of confidence. This paper describes the passive safety components and the KERENA reactor behavior after a Fukushima like accident. (authors)

Zacharias, T.; Novotny, C.; Bielor, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

LOCA with consequential or delayed LOOP accidents: Unique issues, plant vulnerability, and CDF contributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) can cause a loss-of-offsite power (LOOP) wherein the LOOP is usually delayed by few seconds or longer. Such an accident is called LOCA with consequential LOOP, or LOCA with delayed LOOP (here, abbreviated as LOCA/LOOP). This paper analyzes the unique conditions that are associated with a LOCA/LOOP, presents a model, and quantifies its contribution to core damage frequency (CDF). The results show that the CDF contribution can be a dominant contributor to risk for certain plant designs, although boiling water reactors (BWRs) are less vulnerable than pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A highway accident involving unirradiated nuclear fuel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early morning of Dec. 16, 1991, a severe accident occurred when a passenger vehicle traveling in the wrong direction collided with a tractor trailer carrying 24 unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in 12 containers on Interstate I-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the severe accident, confirm the nature and quantity of the radioactive materials involved, and assess the physical environment to which the containers were exposed and the response of the containers and their contents. The report consists of five major sections. The first section describes the circumstances and conditions of the accident and the finding of facts. The second describes the containers, the unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies, and the tie down arrangement used for the trailer. The third describes the damage sustained during the accident to the tractor, trailer, containers, and unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The fourth evaluates the accident environment and its effects on the containers and their contents. The final section gives conclusions derived from the analysis and fact finding investigation. During this severe accident, only minor injuries occurred, and at no time was the public health and safety at risk.

Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Detection and location of leaks in district heating steam systems: Survey and review of current technology and practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a survey undertaken to identify and characterize current practices for detecting and locating leaks in district heating systems, particular steam systems. Currently used technology and practices are reviewed. In addition, the survey was used to gather information that may be important for the application of acoustic leak detection. A few examples of attempts to locate leaks in steam and hot water pipes by correlation of acoustic signals generated by the leaks are also discussed.

Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Lanham, R.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Studies into the Initial Conditions, Flow Rate, and Containment System of Oil Field Leaks in Deep Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to contain an oil leak in the field. The dome was found to have satisfactory entrapment in the designed position....

Holder, Rachel

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

Markov Model of Accident Progression at Fukushima Daiichi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake followed by a tsunami caused loss of offsite power and disabled the emergency diesel generators, leading to a prolonged station blackout at the Fukushima Daiichi site. After successful reactor trip for all operating reactors, the inability to remove decay heat over an extended period led to boil-off of the water inventory and fuel uncovery in Units 1-3. A significant amount of metal-water reaction occurred, as evidenced by the quantities of hydrogen generated that led to hydrogen explosions in the auxiliary buildings of the Units 1 & 3, and in the de-fuelled Unit 4. Although it was assumed that extensive fuel damage, including fuel melting, slumping, and relocation was likely to have occurred in the core of the affected reactors, the status of the fuel, vessel, and drywell was uncertain. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions at Fukushima Daiichi, a Markov model of the likely state of one of the reactors was constructed and executed under different assumptions regarding system performance and reliability. The Markov approach was selected for several reasons: It is a probabilistic model that provides flexibility in scenario construction and incorporates time dependence of different model states. It also readily allows for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of different failure and repair rates of cooling systems. While the analysis was motivated by a need to gain insight on the course of events for the damaged units at Fukushima Daiichi, the work reported here provides a more general analytical basis for studying and evaluating severe accident evolution over extended periods of time. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accidents.

Cuadra A.; Bari R.; Cheng, L-Y; Ginsberg, T.; Lehner, J.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, T.; Yue, M.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Leak-Tight Welding Experience from the Industrial Assembly of the LHC Cryostats at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assembly of the approximately 1700 LHC main ring cryostats at CERN involved extensive welding of cryogenic lines and vacuum vessels. More than 6 km of welding requiring leak tightness to a rate better than 1.10-9 mbar.l.s-1 on stainless steel and aluminium piping and envelopes was made, essentially by manual welding but also making use of orbital welding machines. In order to fulfil the safety regulations related to pressure vessels and to comply with the leak-tightness requirements of the vacuum systems of the machine, welds were executed according to high qualification standards and following a severe quality assurance plan. Leak detection by He mass spectrometry was extensively used. Neon leak detection was used successfully to locate leaks in the presence of helium backgrounds. This paper presents the quality assurance strategy adopted for welds and leak detection. It presents the statistics of non-conformities on welds and leaks detected throughout the entire production and the advances in the use...

Bourcey, N; Chiggiato, P; Limon, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Musso, G; Poncet, A; Parma, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Leak detection systems for uranium mill tailings impoundments with synthetic liners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated the performance of existing and alternative leak detection systems for lined uranium mill tailings ponds. Existing systems for detecting leaks at uranium mill tailings ponds investigated in this study included groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drains, and lysimeters. Three alternative systems which demonstrated the ability to locate leaks in bench-scale tests included moisture blocks, soil moisture probes, and a soil resistivity system. Several other systems in a developmental stage are described. For proper performance of leak detection systems (other than groundwater wells and lysimeters), a subgrade is required which assures lateral dispersion of a leak. Methods to enhance dispersion are discussed. Cost estimates were prepared for groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drain systems, and the three experimental systems. Based on the results of this report, it is suggested that groundwater monitoring systems be used as the primary means of leak detection. However, if a more responsive system is required due to site characteristics and groundwater quality criteria, subliner drains are applicable for ponds with uncovered liners. Leak-locating systems for ponds with covered liners require further development. Other recommendations are discussed in the report.

Myers, D.A.; Tyler, S.W.; Gutknecht, P.J.; Mitchell, D.H.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) lead causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105 and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-SX Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-SX Tank Farm (SX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114, and 241-SX-115) identified in RPP-ENV-39658, Rev. 0, Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the SX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States)

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

197

Analysis of Reactivity Induced Accident for Control Rods Ejection with Loss of Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding of the time-dependent behavior of the neutron population in nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions, is a great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In the present work, the point kinetics equations are solved numerically using stiffness confinement method (SCM). The solution is applied to the kinetics equations in the presence of different types of reactivities and is compared with different analytical solutions. This method is also used to analyze reactivity induced accidents in two reactors. The first reactor is fueled by uranium and the second is fueled by plutonium. This analysis presents the effect of negative temperature feedback with the addition positive reactivity of control rods to overcome the occurrence of control rod ejection accident and damaging of the reactor. Both power and temperature pulse following the reactivity- initiated accidents are calculated. The results are compared with previous works and satisfactory agreement is found.

Hend Mohammed El Sayed Saad; Hesham Mohammed Mohammed Mansour; Moustafa Aziz Abd El Wahab

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

Analysis of Reactivity Induced Accident for Control Rods Ejection with Loss of Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding of the time-dependent behavior of the neutron population in nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions, is a great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In the present work, the point kinetics equations are solved numerically using stiffness confinement method (SCM). The solution is applied to the kinetics equations in the presence of different types of reactivities and is compared with different analytical solutions. This method is also used to analyze reactivity induced accidents in two reactors. The first reactor is fueled by uranium and the second is fueled by plutonium. This analysis presents the effect of negative temperature feedback with the addition positive reactivity of control rods to overcome the occurrence of control rod ejection accident and damaging of the reactor. Both power and temperature pulse following the reactivity- initiated accidents are calculated. The results are compared with previous works and...

Saad, Hend Mohammed El Sayed; Wahab, Moustafa Aziz Abd El

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

S.O. Bader

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE Accident Prevention and Investigation Program | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

tools utilized in the investigation of "accidents" can be valuable in looking at leading indicators associated with our safety program, to determine the embedded precursors to...

202

Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective...

203

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the...

204

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

205

The Accident at Fukushima: What Happened?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At 2:46 PM, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in eastern Japan, people were spending an ordinary afternoon. The earthquake had a magnitude of 9.0, the fourth largest ever recorded in the world. Avery large number of aftershocks were felt after the initial earthquake. More than 100 of them had a magnitude of over 6.0. There were very few injured or dead at this point. The large earthquake caused by this enormous crustal deformation spawned a rare and enormous tsunami that crashed down 30-40 minutes later. It easily cleared the high levees, washing away cars and houses and swallowing buildings of up to three stories in height. The largest tsunami reading taken from all regions was 40 meters in height. This tsunami reached the West Coast of the United States and the Pacific coast of South America, with wave heights of over two meters. It was due to this tsunami that the disaster became one of a not imaginable scale, which saw the number of dead or missing reach about 20,000 persons. The enormous tsunami headed for 15 nuclear power plants on the Pacific coast, but 11 power plants withstood the tsunami and attained cold shutdown. The flood height of the tsunami that struck each power station ranged to a maximum of 15 meters. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units experienced the largest and the cores of three reactors suffered meltdown. As a result, more than 160,000 residents were forced to evacuate, and are still living in temporary accommodation. The main focus of this presentation is on what happened at the Fukushima Daiichi, and how station personnel responded to the accident, with considerable international support. A year after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, Japan is in the process of leveraging the lessons learned from the accident to further improve the safety of nuclear power facilities and regain the trust of society. In this connection, not only international organizations, including IAEA, and WANO, but also governmental organizations and nuclear industry representatives from various countries, have been evaluating what happened at Fukushima Daiichi. Support from many countries has contributed to successfully stabilizing the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. International cooperation is required as Japan started along the long road to decommissioning the reactors. Such cooperation with the international community would achieve the decommissioning of the damaged reactors. Finally, recovery plans by the Japanese government to decontaminate surrounding regions have been started in order to get residents back to their homes as early as possible. Looking at the world's nuclear power industry, there are currently approximately 440 reactors in operation and 60 under construction. Despite the dramatic consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe it is expected that the importance of nuclear power generation will not change in the years to come. Newly accumulated knowledge and capabilities must be passed on to the next generation. This is the duty put upon us and which is one that we must embrace.

Fujie, Takao [Japan Nuclear Technology Institute - JANTI (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Damage susceptibility tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions, 3) that x-ray induced damage rates for a common material (relatively pure PVC in this example 7,8 ) can be used to normalize different sets of XPS damage...

207

Date of Accident: _____/_____/________ Day of Week: __________________ Hour: _____:______ AM / PM TIME VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1/2 Date of Accident: _____/_____/________ Day of Week: __________________ Hour: _____:______ AM / PM TIME VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT TO BE USED BY ALL STATE AGENCIES to make immediate report of all motor vehicle accidents involving State employees, vehicles, equipment or where highways could result

Farritor, Shane

208

Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo`s structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated. 5 figures.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Further development of an in-pipe leak detection sensor's mobility platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water leakage is a major global problem and smaller sized leaks are difficult to find despite their prevalence in most water distribution systems. Previous attempts to develop a mobility platform for a sensor in use in ...

Moore, Frederick M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

Jerry Myers

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon leak detector Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the NEMO experiment Summary: problem like very small leaks between the air-facility and the radon detector. On the average the amount... mixture, it has been necessary...

213

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

40' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:15...

214

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (2 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:13...

215

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (3 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:19...

216

Thermal Imaging of Canals for Remote Detection of Leaks: Evaluation in the United Irrigation District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report summarizes our initial analysis of the potential of thermal imaging for detecting leaking canals and pipelines. Thermal imagery (video format) was obtained during a fly over of a portion of the main canal of United Irrigation District...

Huang, Yanbo; Fipps, Guy

217

U.S. strategic petroleum reserve Big Hill 114 leak analysis 2012.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses recent well integrity issues related to cavern 114 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DM Petroleum Operations, M&O contractor for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, recognized an apparent leak in Big Hill cavern well 114A in late summer, 2012, and provided written notice to the State of Texas as required by law. DM has since isolated the leak in well A with a temporary plug, and is planning on remediating both 114 A- and B-wells with liners. In this report Sandia provides an analysis of the apparent leak that includes: (i) estimated leak volume, (ii) recommendation for operating pressure to maintain in the cavern between temporary and permanent fixes for the well integrity issues, and (iii) identification of other caverns or wells at Big Hill that should be monitored closely in light of the sequence of failures there in the last several years.

Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

PLC Software Program for Leak Detector Station A1 SALW-LD-ST-A1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the software program for the programmable logic controller for the leak detector station ''SALW-LD-ST-A1''. The appendices contains a copy of the printout of the software program.

KOCH, M.R.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Risks from Past, Current, and Potential Hanford Single Shell Tank Leaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to significant delays in constructing and operating the Waste Treatment Plant, which is needed to support retrieval of waste from Hanford’s single shell tanks (SSTs), SSTs may now be required to store tank waste for two to three more decades into the future. Many SSTs were built almost 70 years ago, and all SSTs are well beyond their design lives. Recent examination of monitoring data suggests several of the tanks, which underwent interim stabilization a decade or more ago, may be leaking small amounts (perhaps 150–300 gallons per year) to the subsurface environment. A potential leak from tank T-111 is estimated to have released approximately 2,000 gallons into the subsurface. Observations of past leak events, recently published simulation results, and new simulations all suggest that recent leaks are unlikely to affect underlying groundwater above regulatory limits. However, these recent observations remind us that much larger source terms are still contained in the tanks and are also present in the vadose zone from historical intentional and unintentional releases. Recently there have been significant improvements in methods for detecting and characterizing soil moisture and contaminant releases, understanding and controlling mass-flux, and remediating deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes. To ensure extended safe storage of tank waste in SSTs, the following actions are recommended: 1) Improve capabilities for intrusion and leak detection. 2) Develop defensible conceptual models of intrusion and leak mechanisms. 3) Apply enhanced subsurface characterization methods to improve detection and quantification of moisture changes beneath tanks. 4) Maintain a flux-based assessment of past, present, and potential tank leaks to assess risks and to maintain priorities for applying mitigation actions. 5) Implement and maintain effective mitigation and remediation actions to protect groundwater resources. These actions will enable limited resources to be applied to the most beneficial actions. A systems-based approach will support extended safe storage of tank waste, reduce the risks from tank leaks, and protect human health and the environment.

Triplett, Mark B.; Watson, David J.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

A mathematical model for air brake systems in the presence of leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR AIR BRAKE SYSTEMS IN THE PRESENCE OF LEAKS A Thesis by SRIVATSAN RAMARATHNAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 2008 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR AIR BRAKE SYSTEMS IN THE PRESENCE OF LEAKS A Thesis by SRIVATSAN RAMARATHNAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Ramaratham, Srivatsan

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas leak gas leak if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material! 1. If you discover a Gas Leak, shout and check that the nearest gas isolator switch is off. 4. Evacuate the building immediately, avoiding

Hickman, Mark

222

Model based detection of hydrogen leaks in a fuel cell stack Ari Ingimundarson and Anna G. Stefanopoulou and Denise McKay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model based detection of hydrogen leaks in a fuel cell stack Ari Ingimundarson and Anna G. Stefanopoulou and Denise McKay Abstract-- Hydrogen leaks are potentially dangerous faults in fuel cell systems detection, leak detection, hydrogen leak- age. I. INTRODUCTION A common safety concern for fuel cell systems

Stefanopoulou, Anna

223

accident victims: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Every year, traffic congestion and traffic accidents have been Cho, Sung-Bae 118 The Analysis of a Friendly Fire Accident using a Systems Model of Accidents* N.G. Leveson,...

224

accident victim conduite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Every year, traffic congestion and traffic accidents have been Cho, Sung-Bae 152 The Analysis of a Friendly Fire Accident using a Systems Model of Accidents* N.G. Leveson,...

225

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (Fabrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fahrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fabrikant,

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today outside of cost, derive from excessive false positives and false negatives arising from signal drift and unstable sensor baseline; both of these problems necessitate the need for unacceptable frequent calibration.

Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

David Cist; Alan Schutz

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the effect of changes in accident pattern due to Daylight Savings Time (DST). The extension of the DST in 2007 provides a natural experiment to determine whether the number of traffic accidents is affected by shifts in hours...

Deen, Sophia 1988-

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE PLAN 01-01-2012 The Travel Accident Insurance Plan provides 24-hour Accident coverage while on Authorized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE PLAN 01-01-2012 The Travel Accident Insurance Plan provides 24-hour Accident coverage while on Authorized Business Travel. Coverage begins at the actual starting point. Please note that the Employer reserves the right to amend or terminate this Travel Accident Insurance

Johnson, Peter D.

231

The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a description of The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal. The Information Portal was created by the Idaho National Laboratory as part of joint NRC and DOE project to assess the severe accident modeling capability of the MELCOR analysis code. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal was created to collect, store, retrieve and validate information and data for use in reconstructing the Fukushima Daiichi accident. In addition to supporting the MELCOR simulations, the Portal will be the main DOE repository for all data, studies and reports related to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and accessible to researchers at diverse locations.

Shawn St. Germain; Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Type A Accident Investigation of the June 21, 2001, Drilling...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

A Accident Investigation of the June 21, 2001, Drilling Rig Operator Injury at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, August 2001 Type A Accident Investigation of the June 21,...

233

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1, 1999, Construction Injury at the Monticello Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Monticello, Utah Type B Accident...

234

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video September 20, 2013 -...

235

Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor Lift...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Lift Accident in the West Hackberry Brine Tank-14 Resulting in Injury, Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry, LA Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor...

236

ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical Management Proceedings of the Fifth International REACTS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident...

237

Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

238

accident management aids: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accident, Illness and Liability Coverage Risk Management in the 4-H Youth Development Program Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 1 Accident, Illness and...

239

Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland Accident Investigation of the June 1,...

240

Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2007, Forklift and Pedestrian Accident at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, PortsmouthPaducah Project Office Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

accident management summary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management of the Acute Radiation Syndrome 2001 flow Feed back Radiation Accident MedicalManagement COMPENDIUMCOMPENDIUM MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS...

242

AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Estimating Rear-End Accident Probabilities at Signalized Intersections: An Occurrence-Mechanism Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Rear-End Accident Probabilities at Signalized Intersections: An Occurrence intersections, rear-end accidents are frequently the predominant accident type. These accidents result from to this deceleration. This paper mathematically represents this process, by expressing accident probability

Wang, Yinhai

244

Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Influence of wetting effect at the outer surface of the pipe on increase in leak rate - experimental results and discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and computed results applicable to Leak Before Break analysis are presented. The specific area of investigation is the effect of the temperature distribution changes due to wetting of the test pipe near the crack on the increase in the crack opening area and leak rate. Two 12-inch straight pipes subjected to both internal pressure and thermal load, but not to bending load, are modelled. The leak rate was found to be very susceptible to the metal temperature of the piping. In leak rate tests, therefore, it is recommended that temperature distribution be measured precisely for a wide area.

Isozaki, Toshikuni; Shibata, Katsuyuki

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM Employee's Name: Job Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM Employee's Name: Job Title: Time employee has been in current position? How long had employee been at work prior to injury? Accident Date: Time of Accident: AM PM Overtime: Yes No Location of Accident (Be Specific): Specific Task Being Performed at Time

Jiang, Wen

248

ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 8 ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM............................................................8-13 Tables: 8-1 Accident Prevention Sign Requirements..........................8-17 8-2 Accident.......................................8-24 8-9 Accident Prevention Tags.............................................8-25 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX

US Army Corps of Engineers

249

STATE OF CALIFORNIA -DGS ORIM VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA - DGS ORIM VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT STD. 270 (REV. 2/2002c) ACCIDENT PREVIOUSLY REPORTED TO ORIM? (If Yes, give date) YES NO THIS REPORT MUST BE MAILED WITHIN 48 HOURS AFTER ACCIDENT (ACCIDENTS INVOLVING INJURY SHOULD FIRST BE CALLED OR FAXED TO ORIM AT (916) 376-5302 - CALNET 480-5302 - FAX

Ponce, V. Miguel

250

UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIV01FL02 UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS INSURED: University of Sussex ADDRESS: LOCATION: DESCRIPTION OF HOW ACCIDENT HAPPENED: PLEASE DRAW A SKETCH OF THE ACCIDENT: #12;DRIVER DETAILS: PREVIOUS ACCIDENTS: ADDRESS: VEHICLE DETAILS DATE VEHICLE PURCHASED: MAKE/MODEL: REGISTRATION: MILEAGE

Sussex, University of

251

MELCOR accident analysis for ARIES-ACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MELCOR accident analysis for ARIES-ACT Paul Humrickhouse Brad Merrill INL Fusion Safety Program progression in water-cooled fission reactors · INL has modified it for fusion; MELCOR 1.8.5 for fusion has

California at San Diego, University of

252

Review of models applicable to accident aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

Glissmeyer, J.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An Investigation of the Therac-25 Accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commission investigation of the Three Mile Island incident). The Therac-25 accidents are the most serious of the Therac-25 prob- lems have been oversimplified, with misleading omissions. In an effort to remedy this, we

Yang, Junfeng

254

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Three Mile Island accident and post-accident recovery: what did we learn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A description of the accident at Three Mile Island-2 reactor is presented. Activities related to the cleanup and decontamination of the reactor are described.

Collins, E.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the procedures and guidelines necessary for computer software configuration management activities during the operation and maintenance phases of the Saltwell Leak Detector Stations as required by HNF-PRO-309, Rev. 1, Computer Software Quality Assurance, Section 2.4, Software Configuration Management. The software configuration management plan (SCMP) integrates technical and administrative controls to establish and maintain technical consistency among requirements, physical configuration, and documentation for the Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) software during the Hanford application, operations and maintenance. This SCMP establishes the Saltwell Leak Detector Station PLC Software Baseline, status changes to that baseline, and ensures that software meets design and operational requirements and is tested in accordance with their design basis.

WHITE, K.A.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimation of Leak Rate from the Emergency Pump Well in L-Area Complex Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an estimate of the leak rate from the emergency pump well in L-basin that is to be expected during an off-normal event. This estimate is based on expected shrinkage of the engineered grout (i.e., controlled low strength material) used to fill the emergency pump well and the header pipes that provide the dominant leak path from the basin to the lower levels of the L-Area Complex. The estimate will be used to provide input into the operating safety basis to ensure that the water level in the basin will remain above a certain minimum level. The minimum basin water level is specified to ensure adequate shielding for personnel and maintain the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' concept of radiological exposure. The need for the leak rate estimation is the existence of a gap between the fill material and the header pipes, which penetrate the basin wall and would be the primary leak path in the event of a breach in those pipes. The gap between the pipe and fill material was estimated based on a full scale demonstration pour that was performed and examined. Leak tests were performed on full scale pipes as a part of this examination. Leak rates were measured to be on the order of 0.01 gallons/minute for completely filled pipe (vertically positioned) and 0.25 gallons/minute for partially filled pipe (horizontally positioned). This measurement was for water at 16 feet head pressure and with minimal corrosion or biofilm present. The effect of the grout fill on the inside surface biofilm of the pipes is the subject of a previous memorandum.

Duncan, A

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

risk_policies_accident_std_vist.doc/ac 1 Revised 07.26.13 STUDENT AND VISITOR ACCIDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risk_policies_accident_std_vist.doc/ac 1 Revised 07.26.13 STUDENT AND VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORTING: 408-924-1892 Student and Visitor Accident Reporting Guidelines These guidelines provide instructions for reporting and handling accidents or incidents that happen to students and visitors while on the San José

Su, Xiao

263

The leak resistance of 2-inch N-80 API treaded tubular connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KATIONS DISCUSSION RECOMMENDED FUTURE TESTS SAMPLE CALCULATIONS TEST E@JIPMENT Page 10 10 12 23 TKE LEAK RESISTANCE OF 2-INCH N-80 API THREADED TUBULAR CONNECTION ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1 2-INCH HJE API TUBING CONNECTION 2 KODAK CCMPARATOR 10...-UPS OF 2-INCH N-80 EUE TUBING 15 17 13 FRONTAL VIEW OF TEST TANK 14 TEST TA1K 15 PRESSURE TEST DATA SHEET 16 LONG DURATION TANK 18 19 21 22 THE LEAK RESISTANCE OF 2-INCH N-80 API ~ED TUBULAR CONNECTION INTROI3UCTION In recent years, well depths...

Weiner, Peter Douglas

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

SEVENTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 54-72 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 30 - 36 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51 – 96%. This is greater than seen to date for any packages inspected during KAC field surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress relaxation (CSR) data. These two predictive models show reasonable agreement at higher temperatures (350 – 400 ºF). However, at 300 ºF, the room temperature leak test failures to date experienced longer aging times than predicted by the CSRbased model. This suggests that extrapolations of the CSR model predictions to temperatures below 300 ºF will provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Leak test failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV O-ring fixtures.

Daugherty, W.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Efficient model-based leak detection in boiler steam-water systems Xi Sun, Tongwen Chen *, Horacio J. Marquez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient model-based leak detection in boiler steam-water systems Xi Sun, Tongwen Chen *, Horacio detection in boiler steam-water systems. The algorithm has been tested using real industrial data from Syncrude Canada, and has proven to be effective in detection of boiler tube or steam leaks; proper

Marquez, Horacio J.

266

MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

Ball, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Controlling Beaver Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beavers are important because their dams stabilize creek flow, slow runoff and create ponds. However, these same dams can negatively alter the flow of creeks. Damage prevention, control and various trapping methods are discussed in this publication....

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

268

Controlling Opossum Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage; however, their pelts can be sold only during the furbearer season and with the proper licenses. Other furbearers include beaver, otter, mink, nutria, ringtailed cat, badger, skunk, weasel, raccoon, muskrat, fox and civet cat. Homeowners...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Composite heat damage assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Philpot, H.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Powell, G.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas By David Gardner Last updated at 11:32 AM on 3rd June 2010 BP's giant oil slick was bearing down on Florida holidaymakers a year visit Florida and state leaders fear the oil will devastate a tourist industry

Belogay, Eugene A.

271

Location of Leaks in Pressure Testable Direct Burial Steam Distribution Conduits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine where the breach occurred. The breach can be detected using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas injected into the conduit. After injection, maintenance personnel walk the path of the steam line with an SF6 detector that precisely locates the leak...

Sittel, M. G.; Messock, R. K.

272

Strontium and cesium radionuclide leak detection alternatives in a capsule storage pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed to assess radionuclide leak-detection systems for use in locating a capsule leaking strontium-90 or cesium-137 into a water-filled pool. Each storage pool contains about 35,000 L of water and up to 715 capsules, each of which contains up to 150 kCi strontium-90 or 80 kCi cesium-137. Potential systems assessed included instrumental chemical analyses, radionuclide detection, visual examination, and other nondestructive nuclear-fuel examination techniques. Factors considered in the assessment include: cost, simplicity of maintenance and operation, technology availability, reliability, remote operation, sensitivity, and ability to locate an individual leaking capsule in its storage location. The study concluded that an adaption of the spent nuclear-fuel examination technique of wet sipping be considered for adaption. In the suggested approoch, samples would be taken continuously from pool water adjacent to the capsule(s) being examined for remote radiation detection. In-place capsule isolation and subsequent water sampling would confirm that a capsule was leaking radionuclides. Additional studies are needed before implementing this option. Two other techniques that show promise are ultrasonic testing and eddy-current testing.

Larson, D.E.; Crawford, T.W.; Joyce, S.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fully conservative leak-proof treatment of thin solid structures immersed in compressible fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, embedded moving solid structures. The scheme works by coupling together a high order flux-based methodFully conservative leak-proof treatment of thin solid structures immersed in compressible fluids cells and partial volumes that arise near a thin solid structure. The conservative semi

Fedkiw, Ron

274

What are the potential impacts of a leak? a) To the aquifer,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and irrigation wells, c) In the sandhills geology, d) In the Platte River valley geology, e) In southern Nebraska pollution in the sandhills region, j) Financially (How much would remediation cost?). Response by Professor that a leak from this pipeline would not be a great amount and would be localized to an area of 10's to 100's

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

275

Rigorous Simulation of Accidental Leaks from High-Pressure Storage Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nature. The released chemical can form and disperse as vapor cloud leading to fire, explosion, or toxic exposure. The resulting leak could be single phase or multiphase release, choked or non-choked. These releases could result in liquid spills, vapor...

Alisha, -

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diagnostic tools for detecting and locating leaks in the air distribution system. The tracer gas tests described are a good complement to these tools in the detection, location, and measurement of duct leakage. Testing for house infiltration once with the air...

Cummings, J. B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Supporting Documentation: Miscellaneous Reports, Letters, Memoranda, And Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains reference materials cited in RPP-ASMT -53793, Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, that were obtained from the National Archives Federal Records Repository in Seattle, Washington, or from other sources including the Hanford Site's Integrated Data Management System database (IDMS).

Engeman, J. K.; Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D. G.; Rosenkrance, C. L.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Unaccounted-for gas project. Leak Task Force. Volume 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Leak Task Force quantified unintentional gas losses (leakage and dig-ins). Results show that 1987 gas leakage accounted for less than 5% of the operating UAF.

Cowgill, R.M.; Robertson, J.L.; Grinstead, J.R.; Luttrell, D.J.; Walden, E.R.

1990-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc, Microfridges Doors and Hardware Door repair/replace Lock, latch or hinge repair, key stuck; Lost or stolen key, repair or replace Shades/Blinds Window treatment - repair or replace Washer/Dryer Washer/Dryer repair

Tennessee, University of

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident experience alarm Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, accident investigation, indoor air quality, bloodborne pathogens, chemical safety, lockout-tagout, hot work... Campus Fires 11 12 Accident Reporting 14 Employee Accidents 15...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident frequencies program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management procedures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident investigation sites Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 6 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident excursion occurring Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Geosciences 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident location analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion and Utilization ; Engineering 8 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident survival time Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 3 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

288

Creating an urban deer-vehicle accident management plan using information from a town's GIS project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN URBAN DEER-VEHICLE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT PLAN USINGincrease in deer vehicle accidents. Given the Town'sof increased deer vehicle accidents which, in the past 10

Premo, Dean B.; Rogers, Elizabeth I.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Do "Accidents" Happen? An Examination of Injury Mortality Among Maltreated Children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002;26. Garling T. Children's environments, accidents,and accident prevention: An introduction. In: Garling T,Toward a Psychology of Accident Prevention. New York: Plenum

Hornstein, Emily Putnam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A research university's rapid response to a fatal chemistry accident: Safety changes and outcomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a fatal chemistry accident: Safety changes and outcomesprogram following a chemistry accident in December 2008 thatcommunity. Since the 2008 accident at UCLA, the na- tional

Gibson, JH; Schröder, I; Wayne, NL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Large break loss-of-coolant accident analyses for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was analyzed to evaluate it's response to a spectrum of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) with potential for leading to core damage. The MELCOR severe accident analysis code (version 1.7.1) was used to evaluate the overall dynamic response of HFIR. Before conducting LOCA analyses, the steady-state thermal-hydraulic parameters evaluated by MELCOR for various loop sections were verified against steady-state operating data. Thereafter, HFIR depressurization tests were simulated to evaluate the system pressure change for a given depletion in coolant inventory. Interesting and important safety-related phenomena were observed. The current analyses (which should be considered preliminary) that occur over a period from 1 to 3 seconds do not lead to core wide fuel melting. Core fluid flashing during the initial rapid depressurization does cause fuel temperature excursions due to adiabatic-like heatup. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Taleyarkhan, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study.

Brevick, C.H. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jenkins, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Lessons learned from early criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned.

Malenfant, R.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A RECENT LASER ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A graduate student received a laser eye injury from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser beam while adjusting a polarizing beam splitter optic. The direct causes for the accident included failure to follow safe alignment practices and failure to wear the required laser eyewear protection. Underlying root causes included inadequate on-the-job training and supervision, inadequate adherence to requirements, and inadequate appreciation for dimly visible beams outside the range of 400-700nm. This paper describes how the accident occurred, discusses causes and lessons learned, and describes corrective actions being taken.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The temporal effect of traffic violations and accidents on accident occurrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in the final analysis, will make the greatest use of such research. Traffic Research Time Frame Requirements The largest statistical problem in using accident and violation conviction data is the fact that accidents are rare events, (O'Neall 1967). She... assumed to have resulted from the crash and are not included. TABLE 2 Distribution of Student Crashes Vs. Driving Convictions* Number of Accidents 1 2 2 O I M M g M M A 4109 (85. 4%) 1578 (79. 3X) 555 (72. 6%) 224 (71. 6%) 155 (63. 5...

McKemie, Martha Susan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland Fire on the Hanford Site, June 27-July 1, 2000 Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents retroperspektive individuelle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Montral Collection: Engineering 11 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident soderzhanie korotkozhivushchikh...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

304

Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft...

305

L'accident la centrale nuclaire de Quelques explications scientifiques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L'accident à la centrale nucléaire de Fukushima Quelques explications scientifiques G. Marleau, J´eal, 18 mars 2011 L'accident `a la centrale nucl´eaire de Fukushima ­ 1/29 Accident de Fukushima 1 Contenu. Commentaires finaux. ´Ecole Polytechnique de Montr´eal, 18 mars 2011 L'accident `a la centrale nucl´eaire de

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

306

Policy 3240 Accident Review Committee 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy 3240 ­ Accident Review Committee 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY University Policy Policy #3240 ACCIDENT REVIEW COMMITTEE Responsible Oversight Executive: Vice President for Administration and Finance vehicles for which ODU is responsible and the University's Accident Review Committee in the review

307

HEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE VERIFICATION ******************** TO BE COMPLETED BY STUDENT ********************  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE VERIFICATION ******************** TO BE COMPLETED BY STUDENT Services Office of the university of Florida requires that s/he has health and accident insurance with your participating in study abroad activate hold health and accident insurance with a minimum coverage of $200

Jawitz, James W.

308

For the mathematically accident prone student W Stephen Wilson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the mathematically accident prone student by W Stephen Wilson Many students make the claim answers, whatever the reason for the incorrect answer. Students who are accident prone in mathematics. This is generally good advice for anyone, not just the accident prone. As problems get more and more complicated

Wilson, W. Stephen

309

A New Accident Model for Engineering Safer Systems Nancy Leveson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Accident Model for Engineering Safer Systems Nancy Leveson Aeronautics and Astronautics Dept changes in the etiology of accidents and is creating a need for changes in the explanatory mechanisms used. We need better and less subjective understanding of why accidents occur and how to prevent future

Leveson, Nancy

310

Structure Evolution of Dynamic Bayesian Network for Traffic Accident Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure Evolution of Dynamic Bayesian Network for Traffic Accident Detection Ju-Won Hwang, Young and the accuracy in a domain of the traffic accident detection. Keywords-structure of dynamic Bayesian network; Bayesian network, evolution I. INTRODUCTION Every year, traffic congestion and traffic accidents have been

Cho, Sung-Bae

311

COMPARING THE IDENTIFICATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS BY DIFFERENT ACCIDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARING THE IDENTIFICATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS BY DIFFERENT ACCIDENT INVESTIGATORS USING Langley Research Center ,100 NASA Road / Mail Stop 130, Hampton VA 23681-2199 USA. Keywords: Accident Investigation, SOL, Root Cause Analysis. Abstract Accident reports play a key role in the safety of complex

Johnson, Chris

312

Annexes 195 13.11 Fecal Accident Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annexes 195 13.11 Fecal Accident Plan Residual and Contact Time Table Loose Stool Chlorine Residual and Contact Time Table Formed Stool Chlorine Residual mg/l or PPM Time Minutes 2 25 Sample Fecal Accident/spa at three locations to ensure proper mixing. Record fecal accidents in maintenance logs. Follow normal pool

313

A STAMP ANALYSIS OF THE LEX COMAIR 5191 ACCIDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STAMP ANALYSIS OF THE LEX COMAIR 5191 ACCIDENT Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment;A STAMP ANALYSIS OF THE LEX COMAIR 5191 ACCIDENT Paul S. Nelson 2 #12;Acknowledgements I want pressure" (Dekker, 2007, p. 131) A new, holistic systems perspective, accident model is used for analysis

Leveson, Nancy

314

Accident/Injury Reporting, Investigation, & Basic First Aid Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accident/Injury Reporting, Investigation, & Basic First Aid Plan Environmental Health, Safety of accidents/injuries at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFASU) and provides basic first aid practices. It is designed to help reduce injuries by reducing unsafe or hazardous conditions and discouraging accident

Long, Nicholas

315

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits EMPLOYEE___________ ACCIDENT DATA (to be completed by employee) Date of Injury_____/_____/____ Time of Injury the employee How did the injury or illness occur? (Describe fully the events that caused the accident) Describe

Jia, Songtao

316

DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A DIRECTORY OF ACCIDENT DATABASES INVOLVING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A DIRECTORY OF ACCIDENT DATABASES INVOLVING CHEMICALS J.P.Pineau Institut from end-users of accident data who need validated data for dealing with risk assessment in which Data collection Data analysis, Reliability, Uncertainty, Accident, Hazardous material, Risk analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

317

Scar sarcoidosis with a 50-year interval between an accident and onset of lesions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

year interval between an accident and onset of lesions Hiramreported in scars of accidents [ 2 ], herpes zoster [ 1 ],

Jr, Hiram Larangeira de Almeida; Fiss, Roberto Coswig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

320

Hanford Double-Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation Update - 15302  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank AY-102 was the first of 28 double-shell radioactive waste storage tanks constructed at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, near Richland, WA. The tank was completed in 1970, and entered service in 1971. In August, 2012, an accumulation of material was discovered at two sites on the floor of the annulus that separates the primary tank from the secondary liner. The material was sampled and determined to originate from the primary tank. This paper summarizes the changes in leak behavior that have occurred during the past two years, inspections to determine the capability of the secondary liner to continue safely containing the leakage, and the initial results of testing to determine the leak mechanism.

Washenfelder, D. J.; Johnson, J. M.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced conceptual design report: T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades. Project W-259  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T Plant facilities in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were constructed in the early 1940s to produce nuclear materials in support of national defense activities. T Plant includes the 271-T facility, the 221-T facility, and several support facilities (eg, 2706-T), utilities, and tanks/piping systems. T Plant has been recommended as the primary interim decontamination facility for the Hanford site. Project W-259 will provide capital upgrades to the T Plant facilities to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. This document provides an advanced conceptual design concept that complies with functional requirements for the T Plant Secondary Containment and Leak Detection upgrades.

Hookfin, J.D.

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Using simulation of accidents to assess resilience capacities of organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and analysis of such simulations (toxic leak in a refinery, fire in a road tunnel, terrorist attack Symposium on Resilience Engineering, Juan-les-Pins : France (2006)" #12;situation. Another limitation lies

Boyer, Edmond

323

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operations. Main report. Volume 6. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1 which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis including internal fire and flood was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The results of the phase 2 level 2/3 study are the subject of this volume of NUREG/CR-6144, Volume 6.

Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A routine video inspection of the annulus space between the primary tank and secondary liner of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 was performed in August 2012. During the inspection, unexpected material was discovered. A subsequent video inspection revealed additional unexpected material on the opposite side of the tank, none of which had been observed during inspections performed in December 2006 and January 2007. A formal leak assessment team was established to review the tank's construction and operating histories, and preparations for sampling and analysis began to determine the material's origin. A new sampling device was required to collect material from locations that were inaccessible to the available sampler. Following its design and fabrication, a mock-up test was performed for the new sampling tool to ensure its functionality and capability of performing the required tasks. Within three months of the discovery of the unexpected material, sampling tools were deployed, material was collected, and analyses were performed. Results indicated that some of the unknown material was indicative of soil, whereas the remainder was consistent with tank waste. This, along with the analyses performed by the leak assessment team on the tank's construction history, lead to the conclusion that the primary tank was leaking into the annulus. Several issues were encountered during the deployment of the samplers into the annulus. As this was the first time samples had been required from the annulus of a double-shell tank, a formal lessons learned was created concerning designing equipment for unique purposes under time constraints.

Harrington, Stephanie J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Sams, Terry L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s).

SHERRELL, D.L.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Aerosol penetration of leak pathways : an examination of the available data and models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data and models of aerosol particle deposition in leak pathways are described. Pathways considered include capillaries, orifices, slots and cracks in concrete. The Morewitz-Vaughan criterion for aerosol plugging of leak pathways is shown to be applicable only to a limited range of particle settling velocities and Stokes numbers. More useful are sampling efficiency criteria defined by Davies and by Liu and Agarwal. Deposition of particles can be limited by bounce from surfaces defining leak pathways and by resuspension of particles deposited on these surfaces. A model of the probability of particle bounce is described. Resuspension of deposited particles can be triggered by changes in flow conditions, particle impact on deposits and by shock or vibration of the surfaces. This examination was performed as part of the review of the AP1000 Standard Combined License Technical Report, APP-GW-GLN-12, Revision 0, 'Offsite and Control Room Dose Changes' (TR-112) in support of the USNRC AP1000 Standard Combined License Pre-Application Review.

Powers, Dana Auburn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Leaking Interleavers for UEP Turbo Codes Abdul Wakeel, David Kronmueller, Werner Henkel, and Humberto Beltr~ao Neto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaking Interleavers for UEP Turbo Codes Abdul Wakeel, David Kronmueller, Werner Henkel to Turbo coding's exceptional performance. An interleaver provides bit-permutation designed to ensure deterministic randomness. When applying interleavers to unequal error protecting (UEP) Turbo codes, typically

Henkel, Werner

330

REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Analysis of a Friendly Fire Accident using a Systems Model of Accidents* N.G. Leveson, Ph.D.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Cambridge, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Analysis of a Friendly Fire Accident using a Systems Model of Accidents* N.G. Leveson, Ph.D.; University of Victoria; Victoria, Canada Keywords: accident analysis, accident models Abstract In another paper presented at this conference, Leveson describes a new accident model based on systems theory [2

Leveson, Nancy

332

HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or near miss. 2. Fill out the online accident report (OARS) form://www.ehs.washington.edu/ohsoars/index.shtm. The supervisor, lab manager, or person who had the accident can fill out the form. 3. For any serious accidents

Borenstein, Elhanan

333

INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIGHTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 61 - 85 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KArea Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leaktight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 41 - 45 months. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures.

Daugherty, W. L.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

336

NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The earliest 300 °F GLT O-ring fixture failure was observed at 34 months. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 72 - 96 months, which bounds O-ring temperatures anticipated during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the 200 ºF fixtures will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures, thus providing additional time to failure data. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 54 - 57 months. No additional O-ring failures have been observed since the last interim report was issued. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures. Additional irradiation of several fixtures is recommended to maintain a balance between thermal and radiation exposures similar to that experienced in storage, and to show the degree of consistency of radiation response between GLT and GLT-S O-rings.

Daugherty, W.

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment of possible consequences of a hypothetical reactivity accident associated with a {open_quotes}Topaz-2{close_quotes} spacecraft reactor entering water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accident analysis for a Russian Topaz-2 nuclear reactor is summarized. The accident scenario involves emergency return from orbit, severe damage to reactor structural elements, and subsequent falling of the reactor core into the ocean. The thermionic converter reactor, used in spacecraft, has a large neutron leakage which decreases when water enters the inner core cavity. Preliminary results of numerical modeling, summarized in the article, show that the possible consequences of the hypothetical accidental submersion are limited. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Glushkov, E.S.; Ermoshin, M.Yu.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi; Skorlygin, V.V.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Carr, F. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Regulation with anticipated learning about environmental damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abatement costs and environmental damages, and a generalemissions. 2.2 Environmental damages and learning Let S t begas stocks and environmental damages. In some respects these

Karp, L; Zhang, J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

CIA Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epistemic modals are standardly taken to be context-dependent quantifiers over possibilities. Thus sentences containing them get truth-values with respect to both a context and an index. But some insist that this relativization ...

Gillies, Anthony S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L. [Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa (Canada)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

TACIS 91: Application of leak-before-break concept in VVER 440-230  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The applicability of the leak-before-break (LBB) concept for primary piping in the first generation of WWER type plants in Russia is investigated. The procedures for LBB behavior used in France and Germany are applied, and the evaluation is discussed within the framework of the European Technical Assistance for the Community of Independent States (TACIS) project. Emphasis is placed on experimental validation of national and international engineering practice for evaluating and optimizing existing installations. Design criteria of WWER plants are compared to western standard design.

Bartholome, G.; Faidy, C.; Franco, C. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Le risque d'accident nuclaire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Le risque d'accident nucléaire majeur : calcul et-27Feb2013 #12;Le risque d'accident nucléaire majeur : calcul et perception des probabilités1 François Lévêque L'accident de Fukushima Daiichi s'est produit le 11 mars 2011. Cette catastrophe nucléaire

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Antonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Anotonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Penn Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

accident loca testing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the degree ol' MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering SIMULATION OF A SMALL BREAK LOSS OF COOLANT ACCIDENT CONDUCTED AT THE BETHSY INTEGRAL TEST...

351

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Subcontractor Radioactive...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Subcontractor Radioactive Release During Transportation Activities on May 14, 2004, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Amended) Type B Accident Investigation Board...

352

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU), Building H2 Demolition, in Niskayuna, New, York Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29, 2010,...

353

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Brookhaven...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 4,...

354

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 8,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

fell from a Toro Workman 3200 Utility Vehicle and fracturedhis right leg above the ankle. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 8, 2004, Grounds Worker...

355

Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mod 14 - HTGR Accident Analyses - final...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling System (SCS) Core Conditioning System (CCS) - Helium Purification System Post Accident Train y (Pebble Bed HPS PAT) - Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) A ti d *...

357

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

15, 2001, Grout Injection Operator Injury at the Cold Test Pit South, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the...

358

accident source term: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

42 Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carps in north Croatia after the Chernobyl accident CERN Preprints Summary: Long-term investigations of...

359

accident source terms: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

42 Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carps in north Croatia after the Chernobyl accident CERN Preprints Summary: Long-term investigations of...

360

Type B Accident Investigation on the June 27, 2002, Exothermic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 27, 2002, Exothermic Metal Reaction Event During Converter Disassembly in Building K-33 at the East Tennessee Technology Park Type B Accident Investigation on the June 27,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microsoft Word - Case Study for Enhanced Accident Tolerance Design...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2355 Case Study for Enhanced Accident Tolerance Design Changes Steven Prescott Curtis Smith Tony Koonce June 2014 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work...

362

Accident Investigation of the February 5, 2014, Underground Salt...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

5, 2014, Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad NM Accident Investigation of the February 5, 2014, Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire...

363

Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation At Washington...

364

Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 February 10, 2006 An...

365

Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dworshak-Taft 1 Transmission Tower, at the Bonneville Power Marketing Administration Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from the Dworshak-Taft 1...

366

Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accidental Discharge at the Sandia National Laboratory Site 9920, Albuquerque, NM Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device Fireset and Detonator...

367

Accident Investigation of the October 1, 2013, Tice Electric...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employee Fatality near Patrick's Knob Radio Station, Bonneville Power Administration Accident Investigation of the October 1, 2013, Tice Electric Company Employee Fatality near...

368

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Bechtel Jacobs...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at the K-25 Building, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Fall Injury on...

369

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transfer Activities, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic Metal Reactor Event During Sodium...

370

Type A Accident Investigation of the March 16, 2000, Plutonium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multiple Intake Event at the Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Type A Accident Investigation of the March 16, 2000, Plutonium-238 Multiple Intake...

371

Type B Accident Investigation Report on the Exertional Heat Illnesses...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heat Illnesses during SPOTC 2006 at the National Training Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 13, 2006 Type B Accident Investigation Report on the Exertional Heat Illnesses...

372

Accident Response Group | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects ofAboutTest Facility VitalyGateAccessingAccident

373

Ramkrishna Mukherjee. Uganda: An Historical Accident?: Class, Natona, State Formation. Trenton, New Jersey: Africa World Press, 1985 281pp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trenton, Historical Accident? : Class, Natona, New Jersey:in Mukherjee Historical Accident. analyzes the "poUticalare not an "historical accident." War, Violence and Children

Isabirye, Stephen B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl.Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Type B Accident Investigation of the March 20, 2003, Stair Installation Accident at Building 752, Sandia National Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Karen L. Boardman, Manager, Sandia Site Office (SSO), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

376

Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Alternative cladding materials are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as >100X improvement (compared to current Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance in steam environments at ?1200°C for short (?4 h) times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti2AlC that is not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore may be challenging to use as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation assisted Cr-rich ?’ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at >1400°C are still being evaluated. Keywords: Accident tolerant LWR Fuel cladding, FeCrAl, Mo, Ti2AlC, Al2O3, high temperature steam oxidation resistance

none,

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non- isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

Chan, K.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)][Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident locations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

locations Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: accidents Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident site grissom Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

site grissom Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident reports Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accident reports Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident prone locations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 9 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

384

accident victims bio-indicateurs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Every year, traffic congestion and traffic accidents have been Cho, Sung-Bae 119 The Analysis of a Friendly Fire Accident using a Systems Model of Accidents* N.G. Leveson,...

385

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of accident investigation. The course is intended to meet the every five year refresher training requirement for DOE Federal Accident Investigators under DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations.

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions lessons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: the lessons that are really taught by an accident or group of accidents....

387

Using a town’s GIS project to create a deer-vehicle accident management plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO CREATE A DEER-VEHICLE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT PLAN Elizabethhigh numbers of deer-vehicle accidents (DVAs) on a landscapeto provide an assessment of accident risk in time and space.

Rogers, Elizabeth I.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu¿an hour of education yields a glimmer of hope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. : Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu— an hour ofOpen Access Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu—an hour ofnumber of road traffic accidents in the year 2012 decreased

Basnet, Bibhusan; Vohra, Rais; Bhandari, Amit; Pandey, Subash

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Approaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pedestrian Exposure to Risk of Road Accident in New Zealand.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 27, No. 3, 1995, pp.Automated Traffic Accident Surveillance and Analysis System,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

391

STUDENT / VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORT FORM nco/revised 10/06/03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT / VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORT FORM nco/revised 10/06/03 (To Be Completed By Individual Involved In Accident) 1. Name: ________________________________________ Student ID or DL No.: _______________________ 2 No - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6. Date of Accident: ___________________ Day of Week: _______________________ Time: ____________ 7

Azevedo, Ricardo

392

The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 2 #12;The multiple risk situations Earthquake Tsunami Nuclear accident Energy shortage Energy priceThe 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath of nuclear energy has blocked risk discussions and reasonable preparations. Electric companies Opponents

Ferrari, Silvia

393

Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly.

Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

accident analysis codes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accident analysis codes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Analysis of accidents during...

396

Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Aurélie Moskal a , Jean on the vehicle. Moped and motorcycle riders are analyzed separately, adjusting for the main characteristics of the accident. Results: for both moped and motorcycle riders, being male, not wearing a helmet, exceeding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through December 31, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through December 31, 2008 These slides are updated on a monthly Goal DART Goal 1.17 #12;8 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3

Eisen, Michael

398

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Goal DART Goal 1.17 #12;8 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3

Eisen, Michael

399

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through November 30, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through November 30, 2008 These slides are updated on a monthly Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1

Eisen, Michael

400

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through November 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through November 30, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1

Eisen, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through February 28, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through February 28, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Goal DART Goal 1.17 #12;9 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3

Eisen, Michael

402

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through August 31, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through August 31, 2008 These slides are updated on a monthly 1.17 #12;7 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3

Eisen, Michael

403

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through April 30, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through April 30, 2010 These slides are updated on a monthly Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1

Eisen, Michael

404

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through May 31, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through May 31, 2010 These slides are updated on a monthly basis DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2

Eisen, Michael

405

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through June 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through June 30, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1

Eisen, Michael

406

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2010 These slides are updated on a monthly Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28

Eisen, Michael

407

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through October 31, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through October 31, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly;8 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2

Eisen, Michael

408

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through September 30, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through September 30, 2008 These slides are updated on a monthly.17 #12;7 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3

Eisen, Michael

409

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through April 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through April 30, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2. 93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1

Eisen, Michael

410

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through December 31, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through December 31, 2010 These slides are updated on a monthly.17 #12;9 LBNL vs DOE Contractor Rates Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3

Eisen, Michael

411

accident dosimetry systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accident dosimetry systems First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A New Accident Model for...

412

SAS4A LMFBR whole core accident analysis code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure that public health and safety are protected even under accident conditions in an LMFBR, many accidents are analyzed for their potential consequences. Extremely unlikely accidents that might lead to melting of reactor fuel and release of radioactive fission products are referred to as hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs). The evaluation of such accidents involves the simultaneous evaluation of thermal, mechanical, hydraulic and neutronic processes and their interactions. The complexity of this analysis requires the use of large, integrated computer codes which address the response of the reactor core and several important systems. The SAS family of codes, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, provides such an analysis capability. The SAS4A code, the latest generation of this series of codes, has recently been completed and released for use to the LMFBR safety community. This paper will summarize the important new capabilitites of this analysis tool and illustrate an application of the integrated capability, while highlighting the importance of specific phenomenological models.

Weber, D.P.; Birgersson, G.; Bordner, G.L.; Briggs, L.L.; Cahalan, J.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Kalimullah; Miles, K.J.; Prohammer, F.G.; Tentner, A.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow: causes, accidents, logic, argument, visualization, road traffic accidents Abstract In the prototypical accident report, specific findings, particularly those related to causes and contributing factors

Johnson, Chris

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident fuel dispersion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of the transportation system. We construct measures of each externality: noise, air pollution, accidents and congestion... pollution and accidents. For highway travel,...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident safety issues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, accident investigation, indoor air quality, bloodborne pathogens, chemical safety, lockout-tagout, hot work... Accidents 15 12;III. EH&S DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS 16...

416

Type A Accident Investigation Report of the June 25, 1997 Contract...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Officer, Bonneville Power Administration, upon approval of the US Department of Energy (DOE), appointed a Type A Accident Investigation Board to investigate the accident in...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions vercors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 5 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: Incident:...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents home Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Alaska Fairbanks AccidentIncident Report (personal injury) To report an automobile... accident, do not use this form, please go to: http:www.alaska.eduswrisk...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident diagrams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences, University of Arkansas Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT REPORT Department of Financial Services Summary: AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT REPORT...

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident issues differences Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glasgow Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 4 September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS Summary: September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS UCLA STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident declaration form Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Strathclyde Collection: Mathematics 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of Lethbridge Campus...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident containment conditions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 9 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: Incident:...

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident additional information Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 13 September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS Summary: information with the other people involved in the accident. You...

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents occupational Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 6 Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Summary: SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date...

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident causes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Warwick Collection: Engineering 3 Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Summary: SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident medical aspect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 5 Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Summary: SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date...

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents aviation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequences simulated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 3 A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK Summary: for an accident report...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident analysis handbook Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 3 A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK Summary: relevant to the accident and...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions key Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M....

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequences analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident zone osobennosti Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 2 A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK Summary: and the work zone accident...

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation accidents findings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft accident investigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

436

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident research thermal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: , accident prevention, system safety Abstract System safety professionals,...

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident lessons learned Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: seek to learn from the results of accident investigations. We believe that...

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management center Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M....

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequences elimination Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft accident victims Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The occasion... of accidents and disasters. The areas included were nuclear power plants, petrochemical plants, aircraft... accident as a case in point. Other systems that belonged...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident research priorities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

traffic accidents in Toxoplasma-infected military drivers... , for example, in a higher risk of traffic accidents in subjects with this life-long infection. Two recent......

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident records Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

traffic accidents in Toxoplasma-infected military drivers... , for example, in a higher risk of traffic accidents in subjects with this life-long ... Source: Flegr, Jaroslav -...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents industrial Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 4 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: . Accidents on yard and industry tracks...

445

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident risks methodology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Engineering 6 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: ABSTRACT Train accident rates are a...

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence code Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Technology Group Collection: Engineering ; Chemistry 2 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: train length and accident rate and...

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents analysis code Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: accidents analysis code Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: a sensitivity analysis was conducted to...

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequence analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, Preliminary risk analysis (PRA), risk, potential accident, feared events, Automatic Train Control. I... , dangers and potential accidents respectively. At the beginning of the...

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents graves susceptibles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: accidents than shorter trains. This is because longer trains are more susceptible to car... THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN...

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequence evaluation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MIT) Collection: Engineering 48 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: are frequently available, contain information on the accident...

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident severity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 22 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: to their vulnerability, is the high risk of accident involvement,...

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence uncertainty Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Databases and Resources 56 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders...

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident loca based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Fossil Fuels 34 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: -control study with accident responsibility as the event. 2....

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequence analyses Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 40 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: or Bulletins d'Analyse des Accidents corporels de la Circulation...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 12 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: they were responsible or not for the accident. In this way, we...

456

MELCOR accident analysis for ARIES-ACT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model a loss of flow accident (LOFA) in the ARIES-ACT1 tokamak design. ARIES-ACT1 features an advanced SiC blanket with LiPb as coolant and breeder, a helium cooled steel structural ring and tungsten divertors, a thin-walled, helium cooled vacuum vessel, and a room temperature water-cooled shield outside the vacuum vessel. The water heat transfer system is designed to remove heat by natural circulation during a LOFA. The MELCOR model uses time-dependent decay heats for each component determined by 1-D modeling. The MELCOR model shows that, despite periodic boiling of the water coolant, that structures are kept adequately cool by the passive safety system.

Paul W. Humrickhouse; Brad J. Merrill

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Practical applications of the R6 leak-before-break procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A forthcoming revision to the R6 Leak-before-Break Assessment Procedure is briefly described. Practical application of the LbB concepts to safety-critical nuclear plant is illustrated by examples covering both low temperature and high temperature (>450{degrees}C) operating regimes. The examples highlight a number of issues which can make the development of a satisfactory LbB case problematic: for example, coping with highly loaded components, methodology assumptions and the definition of margins, the effect of crack closure owing to weld residual stresses, complex thermal stress fields or primary bending fields, the treatment of locally high stresses at crack intersections with free surfaces, the choice of local limit load solution when predicting ligament breakthrough, and the scope of calculations required to support even a simplified LbB case for high temperature steam pipe-work systems.

Bouchard, P.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Specialist meeting on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Education, Science, Research and Technology, Bonn are summarized and compared to utility, manufacturer, and vendor tests. The purpose of the evaluation was to experimentally verify Leak-before-Break behavior, confirm the postulation of fracture preclusion for piping (straight pipe, bends and branches), and quantify the safety margin against massive failure. The results are applicable to safety assessment of ferritic and austenitic piping in primary and secondary nuclear power plant circuits. Moreover, because of the wide range of the test parameters, they are also important for the design and assessment of piping in other technical plant. The test results provide justification for ruling out catastrophic fractures, even on pipes of dimensions corresponding to those of a main coolant pipe of a pressurized water reactor plant on the basis of a mechanical deterministic safety analysis in correspondence with the Basis Safety Concept (Principle of Fracture Exclusion).

Bartholome, G.; Bazant, E.; Wellein, R. [Siemens KWU, Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Revised paper Leak NED 1997.doc 8:53 25.10.2002 1 Submitted to Nuclear Engineering and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised paper Leak NED 1997.doc 8:53 25.10.2002 1 Submitted to Nuclear Engineering and Design in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors comprise most of the reactor coolant pressure wall thickness were allowed (The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1986). Therefore, all tubes

Cizelj, Leon

462

Nuclear waste shipping container response to severe accident conditions, A brief critique of the modal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modal Study (NUREG/CR-4829) attempts to upgrade the analysis of spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents, and to verify the validity of the present regulatory scheme of cask performance standards as a means to minimize risk. While an improvement over many prior efforts in this area (such as NUREG-0170), it unfortunately fails to create a realistic simulation either of a shipping cask, the severe conditions to which it could be subjected, or the potential damage to the spent fuel cargo during an accident. There are too many deficiencies in its analysis to allow acceptance of its results for the presumed cask design, and many pending changes in new containers, cargoes and shipping patterns will limit applicability of the Modal Study to future shipments. In essence, the Modal Study is a good start, but is too simplistic, incomplete, outdated and open to serious question to be used as the basis for any present-day environmental or risk assessment of spent fuel transportation. It needs to be redone, with peer review during its production and experimental verification of its assumptions, before it has any relevance to the shipments planned to Yucca Mountain. Finally, it must be expanded into a full risk assessment by inputing its radiological release fractions and probabilities into a valid dispersal simulation to properly determine the impact of its results. 51 refs.

Audin, L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage in the Management of Postsurgical Biliary Leaks in Patients with Nondilated Intrahepatic Bile Ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bile ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.

Cozzi, Guido, E-mail: guido.cozzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Severini, Aldo; Civelli, Enrico; Milella, Marco [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Pulvirenti, Andrea [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Salvetti, Monica [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Romito, Raffaele [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Suman, Laura; Chiaraviglio, Francesca [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

Shinn, J

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

BDS thin film damage competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

466

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Roughly one out of every four accidents (25%) involves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Roughly one out of every four accidents (25%) involves at an unsafe speed · Failure to check mirrors often Fleet Safety: Backing Accidents Safety Tip #2 Accidents hurt-- safety doesn't. All backing accidents are preventable. The key is to plan ahead to avoid backing

Minnesota, University of

467

RESEARCH FOUNDATION -STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK REPORT OF ACCIDENT OR INJURY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH FOUNDATION - STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK REPORT OF ACCIDENT OR INJURY (OTHER THAN A MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT) Revised: July 2008 1. Date and T ime of accident: Date: T ime: 2. Date of Report: 3. T o be completed by Safety Supervisor: YEAR: NO.: SEQUENCE: FILE ID: 4. Did accident involve personal injury? Yes

Suzuki, Masatsugu

468

INTRODUCTION OF FREQUENCY IN FRANCE FOLLOWING THE AZF ACCIDENT Clment LENOBLE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION OF FREQUENCY IN FRANCE FOLLOWING THE AZF ACCIDENT Clément LENOBLE* , Clarisse DURAND** * INERIS, Accident risks division, Parc Technologique Alata BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte ** French been consecutive to industrial accidents. Two years after the industrial accident of AZF (French

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

Monthly Theme OARS January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monthly Theme ­ OARS ­ January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss Online Accident Reporting System (OARS) debuts January 2009 EH&S has a NEW online system to report any accident or incident that happens at the University. The web- based reporting system is called OARS -- Online Accident Reporting

Calgary, University of

470

Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is evaluated. The waste consists of a homogenous mixture of plutonium 49, beryllium, and air contained in a 35 gallon carbon steel drum. Possible consequences are investigated.

Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Response of Soviet VVER-440 accident localization systems to overpressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Soviet designed VVER-440 model V230 and VVER-440 model V213 reactors do not use full containments to mitigate the effects of accidents. Instead, these VVER-440 units employ a sealed set of interconnected compartments, collectively called the accident localization system (ALS), to reduce the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere during accidents. Descriptions of the VVER accident localization structures may be found in the report DOE NE-0084. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the structural integrity of the VVER-440 ALS at the Soviet design pressure, and to determine their response to pressure loadings beyond the design value. Complex, three-dimensional, nonlinear, finite element models were developed to represent the major structural components of the localization systems of the VVER-440 models V230 and V213. The interior boundary of the localization system was incrementally pressurized in the calculations until the prediction of gross failure. 6 refs., 9 figs.

Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.; Sienicki, J.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling control room crews for accident sequence analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report describes a systems-based operating crew model designed to simulate the behavior of an nuclear power plant control room crew during an accident scenario. This model can lead to an improved treatment of potential ...

Huang, Y. (Yuhao)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Failsafe : living with man-made disaster and accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"There is no progress with out progress of the catastrophe." Virilio. This thesis project proposes that technological solutions in the design of our systems are not enough to prevent 'man-made' accident. Social, organisational ...

Higgins, Saoirse, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report BNFL, Inc. Employee...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Park Building K-31 February 1, 2004 On December 17, 2003, at approximately 7:15 a.m., an accident occurred at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park,...

475

Accident Investigation of the July 30, 2013, Electrical Fatality...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 30, 2013, Electrical Fatality on the Bandon-Rogue No. 1 115kV Line at the Bonneville Power Administration Accident Investigation of the July 30, 2013, Electrical Fatality on...

476

Type B Accident Investigation Report of the October 28, 2004...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004...

477

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on...

478

Accidents, engineering and history at NASA: 1967-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manned spaceflight program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has suffered three fatal accidents: one in the Apollo program and two in the Space Transportation System (the Shuttle). These were ...

Brown, Alexander F. G. (Alexander Frederic Garder), 1970-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Type B Accident Investigation of the August 22, 2000, Injury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site October 20, 2000 On August 22, 2000, an accident occurred at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) located in Piketon, Ohio. An...

480

A STAMP model of the Überlingen aircraft collision accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAMP is a method for evaluating accidents that is based on systems theory. It departs from traditional event chain models that tend to focus on human errors instead of the goals and motives that triggered the errors. The ...

Wong, Brian, 1982 Nov 11-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leaks damage accidents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1 Room 402 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on June 7, 2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1...

482

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River Site FB-Line Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River...

483

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste...

484

Some methods of estimating uncertainty in accident reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the paper four methods for estimating uncertainty in accident reconstruction are discussed: total differential method, extreme values method, Gauss statistical method, and Monte Carlo simulation method. The methods are described and the program solutions are given.

Milan Batista

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

485

accident dosimetry system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A New Accident Model for Engineering Safer Systems Nancy Leveson Engineering Websites Summary: A New...

486

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Employee Puncture...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-TRU Waste Remediation Facility at the Savannah River Site on June 14, 2010 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Employee Puncture Wound at the F-TRU Waste Remediation...

487

Type B Accident Investigation of the January 10, 2006, Flash...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10, 2006, Flash Fire and Injury at the Savannah River National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the January 10, 2006, Flash Fire and Injury at the Savannah River...

488

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

489

Type B Accident Investigation Of The February 25, 2009 Injury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

To A Passenger In An Electric Cart At The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico Type B Accident Investigation Of The February 25, 2009 Injury To A Passenger In An...

490

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C.F. [Martin Marietta Utility Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

492

Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

Brownridge, James D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through January 31, 2012 These slides are updated on a monthly Systems Engineer suffered the injuries from a single vehicle motorcycle accident. The employee had braked 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Nuclear Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Physics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Energy

Eisen, Michael

494

The role of NUREG-1150 in accident management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG-1150 is being prepared by the NRC and its contractors to estimate the risk from five commercial light water reactors: Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, Grand Gulf, and Zion. Level 3 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being prepared for each of these plants. These PRAs provide a framework for evaluating accident management alternatives from a risk standpoint. This paper describes the accident management benefits that NUREG-1150 is providing.

Camp, A.L.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The role of NUREG-1150 in accident management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NUREG-1150 report is being prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its contractors to estimate the risk from five commercial light water reactors: Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, Grand Gulf, and Zion. Level-3 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being prepared for each of these plants. These PRAs provided a framework for evaluating accident management alternatives from a risk standpoint. This paper describes the accident management benefits that NUREG-1150 is providing.

Camp, A.L.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Routine and post-accident sampling in nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the Three Mile Island accident by NRC has resulted in new post-accident-sampling-capability requirements for utilities that operate pressurized water reactors and/or boiling water reactors. Several vendors are offering equipment that they hope will suffice to met both the new NRC regulations and an operational deadline of January 1, 1981. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems and projected future-new-system needs for TVA reactors are being evaluated in light of TMI experience.

Armento, W.J.; Kitts, F.G.; German, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Evaluation of accident frequencies at the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using the fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The evaluation demonstrates that due to low frequency of occurrences, the following design basis accidents are considered not credible (annual frequency of less than 10{sup -6}): Rearrangement of multi-canister overpack (MCO) internals; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen explosion; MCO external hydrogen explosion; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

LIU, Y.J.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

498

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through July 31, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through July 31, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1.92 3.90 3.41 2.65 2

Eisen, Michael

499

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through September 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through September 30, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1.92 3.90 3.41 2.65 2

Eisen, Michael

500

Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through May 31, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Berkeley Lab Accident Statistics Through May 31, 2009 These slides are updated on a monthly basis Berkeley Lab Site Accident Rates 5.70 4.95 3.79 2.92 2.93 3.27 3.63 2.44 2.17 2.51 1.17 1.81 1.28 1.65 1

Eisen, Michael