Sample records for leak path factor

  1. Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

    1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

  2. Ultrasonic Phased Array Assessment of the Interference Fit and Leak Path of the North Anna Unit 2 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzle 63 with Destructive Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonic testing (UT) for primary water leak path assessments of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head penetrations. Operating reactors have experienced leakage when stress corrosion cracking of nickel-based alloy penetrations allowed primary water into the annulus of the interference fit between the penetration and the low-alloy steel RPV head. In this investigation, UT leak path data were acquired for an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism nozzle penetration, referred to as Nozzle 63, which was removed from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor when the RPV head was replaced in 2002. In-service inspection prior to the head replacement indicated that Nozzle 63 had a probable leakage path through the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was examined using a phased-array UT probe with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array. Immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter surface. The UT data were interpreted by comparing to responses measured on a mockup penetration with known features. Following acquisition of the UT data, Nozzle 63 was destructively examined to determine if the features identified in the UT examination, including leakage paths and crystalline boric acid deposits, could be visually confirmed. Additional measurements of boric acid deposit thickness and low-alloy steel wastage were made to assess how these factors affect the UT response. The implications of these findings for interpreting UT leak path data are described.

  3. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  4. Gaseous leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E. (Aurora, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  5. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  6. Comparison of an Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation with Destructive Analysis of a Documented Leak Path in a Nozzle Removed from Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-destructive and destructive testing methods were employed to evaluate a documented boric acid leakage path through an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor pressure vessel head that was removed from service in 2002. A previous ultrasonic in-service-inspection (ISI) conducted by industry prior to the head removal, identified a probable leakage path in Nozzle 63 located in the interference fit between the penetration tube and the vessel head. In this current examination, Nozzle 63 was examined using phased array (PA) ultrasonic testing with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array; immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter (ID) surface. A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the signal responses from the interference fit region. These responses were compared to responses obtained from a mockup specimen that was used to determine detection limits and characterization capabilities for wastage and boric acid presence in the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was destructively examined after the completion of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to visually assess the leak paths. These destructive and nondestructive results compared favorably

  7. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tens ion of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of this waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediments. Th e released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  8. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tension of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests of showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of the waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediment s. The released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  9. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As plant personnel know, repairing compressed air leaks can be an expensive, labor intensive and never-ending process. This article discusses ways plant personnel can reduce and maintain their leak rate at a lower level ...

  10. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It discusses how pressure/flow controllers, variable speed and variable displacement compressors, automation, and addressing critical plant pressures allow plant personnel to lower the header pressure, which eliminates artificial demand and controls the leak...

  11. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  12. Best Management Practice #3: Distribution System Audits, Leak...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leaks in distribution systems are caused by a number of factors, including pipe corrosion, high system pressure, construction disturbances, frost damage, damaged joints, and...

  13. Four dimensional quantum gravity: The covariant path integral and quantization of the conformal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, E.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After first reviewing the issue of vacuum energy (the cosmological constant problem) in the Einstein theory, the covariant path integral for gravity in four dimensions is constructed. The problem of vacuum energy requires determining the correct ground state of the quantum theory of gravity, and as such is an infrared problem, arising prior to and independently of the physics of the Planck scale. It is addressed in these lectures by studying the infrared fixed point of the low energy effective action of the conformal factor generated by the quantum trace anomaly in four dimensions. The infrared fixed point of this effective theory describes a conformally invariant phase of gravity with a vanishing effective cosmological term.

  14. Four dimensional quantum gravity: The covariant path integral and quantization of the conformal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After first reviewing the issue of vacuum energy (the cosmological constant problem) in the Einstein theory, the covariant path integral for gravity in four dimensions is constructed. The problem of vacuum energy requires determining the correct ground state of the quantum theory of gravity, and as such is an infrared problem, arising prior to and independently of the physics of the Planck scale. It is addressed in these lectures by studying the infrared fixed point of the low energy effective action of the conformal factor generated by the quantum trace anomaly in four dimensions. The infrared fixed point of this effective theory describes a conformally invariant phase of gravity with a vanishing effective cosmological term.

  15. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, Timothy J. (Graniteville, SC)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  16. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  17. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

  18. Analysis and design of an in-pipe system for water leak detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks are a major factor for unaccounted water losses in almost every water distribution network. Pipeline leak may result, for example, from bad workmanship or from any destructive cause, due to sudden changes of pressure, ...

  19. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  20. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E. (Las Vegas, NV); McLaurin, Felder M. (Las Vegas, NV); Ortiz, Monico (Las Vegas, NV); Huth, William A. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  1. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  2. Design of a Novel In-Pipe Reliable Leak Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris

    Leakage is the major factor for unaccounted losses in every pipe network around the world (oil, gas, or water). In most cases, the deleterious effects associated with the occurrence of leaks may present serious economical ...

  3. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  4. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo`s structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated. 5 figures.

  5. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

  6. Leak test fitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, Patrick T. (Kettering, OH)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  7. Leaking Pipelines: Doctoral Student Family Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serrano, Christyna M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sari M. “Why the Academic Pipeline Leaks: Fewer Men thanone reason the academic pipeline leaks. 31 Blair-Loy, Mary.to leak out of the “academic pipeline. ” The term “academic

  8. Analysis of SX farm leak histories -- Historical leak model (HLM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses readily available historical information to better define the volume, chemical composition, and Cs-137/Sr-90 amounts for leaks that have occurred in the past for tanks SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112. In particular a Historical Leak Model (HLM) is developed that is a month by month reconciliation of tank levels, fill records, and calculated boil-off rates for these tanks. The HLM analysis is an independent leak estimate that reconstructs the tank thermal histories thereby deriving each tank`s evaporative volume loss and by difference, its unaccounted losses as well. The HLM analysis was meant to demonstrate the viability of its approach, not necessarily to establish the HLM leak estimates as being definitive. Past leak estimates for these tanks have invariably resorted to soil wetting arguments but the extent of soil contaminated by each leak has always been highly uncertain. There is also a great deal of uncertainty with the HLM that was not quantified in this report, but will be addressed later. These four tanks (among others) were used from 1956 to 1975 for storage of high-level waste from the Redox process at Hanford. During their operation, tank waste temperatures were often as high as 150 C (300 F), but were more typically around 130 C. The primary tank cooling was by evaporation of tank waste and therefore periodic replacement of lost volume with water was necessary to maintain each tank`s inventory. This active reflux of waste resulted in very substantial turnovers in tank inventory as well as significant structural degradation of these tanks. As a result of the loss of structural integrity, each of these tanks leaked during their active periods of operation. Unfortunately, the large turnover in tank volume associated with their reflux cooling has made a determination of leak volumes very difficult. During much of these tanks operational histories, inventory losses because of evaporative cooling could have effectively masked any volume loss due to leak. However, careful comparison with reported tank levels during certain periods clearly show unaccounted volume losses for many tanks. As a result of the HLM analysis, SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112 all show clear evidence of unaccounted volume losses during the period 1958 to 1975. Likewise, the HLM does not show similar unaccounted volume losses for tank SX-105, a tank with no reported leak history, verifying that the HLM is consistent with SX-105 not leaking. These unaccounted volume losses establish the leak start date and rate, and when propagated over time show that SX-108 lost 203 kgal followed by SX-109 at 111. SX-111 at 55, and SX-112 at 44 kgal.0664 These leak volumes represent maximum or upper bounds estimates of each leak and are in total volume about six times the previous leak estimates.

  9. Path 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations > Transmission Planning > Path 15 Path 15 Pictures and Videos Jan 04 Feb 04 Mar 04 Apr 04 May 04 Jun 04 Jul 04 Aug 04 Mar 06 Path 15 is an 84-mile stretch of electrical...

  10. Detecting Air Leaks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    See if you can rattle them, since movement means possible air leaks. If you can see daylight around a door or window frame, then the door or window leaks. You can usually seal...

  11. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  12. Air Leaks in Unexpected Places | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1A Potential PathAddingAhorreLeaks in

  13. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  14. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  15. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David (7 Brown's La., Bellport, NY 11713)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  16. Leak detection on an ethylene pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamande, A.; Condacse, V.; Modisette, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A model-based leak detection system has been in operation on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline from Antwerp to Jemeppe on Sambre since 1989. The leak detection system, which is the commercial product PLDS of Modisette Associations, Inc., was originally installed by the supplier. Since 1991, all system maintenance and configuration changes have been done by Solvay et Cie personnel. Many leak tests have been performed, and adjustments have been made in the configuration and the automatic tuning parameters. The leak detection system is currently able to detect leaks of 2 tonnes/hour in 11 minutes with accurate location. Larger leaks are detected in about 2 minutes. Leaks between 0.5 and 1 tonne per hour are detected after several hours. (The nominal mass flow in the pipeline is 15 tonnes/hour, with large fluctuations.) Leaks smaller than 0.5 tonnes per hour are not detected, with the alarm thresholds set at levels to avoid false alarms. The major inaccuracies of the leak detection system appear to be associated with the ethylene temperatures.

  17. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  18. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapatic R. (Grafton, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  19. Sensitivity of Pion versus Parton-Jet Nuclear Modification Factors to the Path-Length Dependence of Jet-Energy Loss at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Barbara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the jet-path length and beam-energy dependence of the pion nuclear modification factor and a parton-jet nuclear modification factor at RHIC and LHC. We contrast predictions based on a linear pQCD and a highly non-linear hybrid-AdS holographic model of jet-energy loss. We find that both models require a reduction of the jet-medium coupling from RHIC to LHC to account for the measured pion nuclear modification factor. In case of the parton-jet nuclear modification factor, however, which serves as a lower bound for the LO jet nuclear modification factor of reconstructed jets, the extracted data can be characterized without a reduced jet-medium coupling at LHC energies. We conclude that while reconstructed jets are sensitive to both quarks and gluons and thus provide more information than the pion nuclear modification factor, their information regarding the jet-medium coupling is limited due to the superimposition with NLO and medium effects. Hence, a detailed description of the underlying physics requ...

  20. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  1. Saving Money with Air and Gas Leak Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodruff, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uncorrected air leaks and gas leaks cost your businesses time and money as well as being environmentally unfriendly. ? Air Leak Surveys ? Nitrogen Leak Surveys ? Gas Leak Survey (H2, O2, Natural Gas) ? Steam Leak Surveys ? Steam Trap Surveys ? Safe... sites per year ? Member of ISNetworld, and Browz. ? Security Checks o Petro Chemical Energy employee background checks performed by DISA ? Drugs & Alcohol Free Workplace o Petro Chemical Energy employees are tested for Drugs and Alcohol prior...

  2. Leak checker data logging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gannon, Jeffrey C. (Arlington, TX); Payne, John J. (Waterman, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  3. Leak checker data logging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

    1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

  4. Estimation of Leak Rate from the Emergency Pump Well in L-Area Complex Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, A

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an estimate of the leak rate from the emergency pump well in L-basin that is to be expected during an off-normal event. This estimate is based on expected shrinkage of the engineered grout (i.e., controlled low strength material) used to fill the emergency pump well and the header pipes that provide the dominant leak path from the basin to the lower levels of the L-Area Complex. The estimate will be used to provide input into the operating safety basis to ensure that the water level in the basin will remain above a certain minimum level. The minimum basin water level is specified to ensure adequate shielding for personnel and maintain the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' concept of radiological exposure. The need for the leak rate estimation is the existence of a gap between the fill material and the header pipes, which penetrate the basin wall and would be the primary leak path in the event of a breach in those pipes. The gap between the pipe and fill material was estimated based on a full scale demonstration pour that was performed and examined. Leak tests were performed on full scale pipes as a part of this examination. Leak rates were measured to be on the order of 0.01 gallons/minute for completely filled pipe (vertically positioned) and 0.25 gallons/minute for partially filled pipe (horizontally positioned). This measurement was for water at 16 feet head pressure and with minimal corrosion or biofilm present. The effect of the grout fill on the inside surface biofilm of the pipes is the subject of a previous memorandum.

  5. Adversaries and Information Leaks Geoffrey Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Geoffrey

    Adversaries and Information Leaks (Tutorial) Geoffrey Smith School of Computing and Information-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008 #12;384 G. Smith ­ The program c has direct access to the sensitive information

  6. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  7. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Miller III, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling di?usive transition paths Thomas F. Miller III ?the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for thedynamics I. INTRODUCTION Transition path sampling (TPS) is a

  8. acoustic leak detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLoS ONE 9(10): e Lawrence, Rick L. 8 Design and fabrication of a maneuverable robot for in-pipe leak detection MIT - DSpace Summary: Leaks in pipelines have been causing...

  9. New system pinpoints leaks in ethylene pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamande, A. [Solvay et Cie, Jemeppe sur Sambre (Belgium); Condacse, V.; Modisette, J. [Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model-based leak detection, PLDS, developed by Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston has been operating on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline since 1989. The 6-in. pipeline extends from Antwerp to Jemeppe sur Sambre, a distance of 73.5 miles and is buried at a depth of 3 ft. with no insulation. Except for outlets to flares, located every 6 miles for test purposes, there are no injections or deliveries along the pipeline. Also, there are block valves, which are normally open, at each flare location. This paper reviews the design and testing procedures used to determine the system performance. These tests showed that the leak system was fully operational and no false alarms were caused by abrupt changes in inlet/outlet flows of the pipeline. It was confirmed that leaks larger than 2 tonnes/hr. (40 bbl/hr) are quickly detected and accurately located. Also, maximum leak detection sensitivity is 1 tonne/hr. (20 bbl/hr) with a detection time of one hour. Significant operational, configuration, and programming issues also were found during the testing program. Data showed that temperature simulations needed re-examining for improvement since accurate temperature measurements are important. This is especially true for ethylene since its density depends largely on temperature. Another finding showed the averaging period of 4 hrs. was too long and a 1 to 2 hr. interval was better.

  10. Managing an Effective Leak Sealing Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinz, W. H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-line leak sealing program is an extremely effective method of cost savings to industrial plants. The dollars a plant saves can be direct and dramatic as in an avoided system shut-down or subtle and analytical as in a long term maintenance...

  11. Waste transfer leaks technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides technical support for the onsite radiological and toxicological, and offsite toxicological, portions of the waste transfer leak accident presented in the Documented Safety Analysis. It provides the technical basis for frequency and consequence bin selection, and selection of safety SSCs and TSRs.

  12. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  13. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

  14. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  15. LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clinton, J.H.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report.

  16. One-Piece Leak-Proof Battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The casing of a leak-proof one-piece battery is made of a material comprising a mixture of at least a matrix based on polypropylene and an alloy of a polyamide and a polypropylene. The ratio of the matrix to the alloy is in the range 0.5 to 6 by weight. The alloy forms elongate arborescent inclusions in the matrix such that, on average, the largest dimension of a segment of the arborescence is at least twenty times the smallest dimension of the segment.

  17. Strontium and cesium radionuclide leak detection alternatives in a capsule storage pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.; Crawford, T.W.; Joyce, S.M.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to assess radionuclide leak-detection systems for use in locating a capsule leaking strontium-90 or cesium-137 into a water-filled pool. Each storage pool contains about 35,000 L of water and up to 715 capsules, each of which contains up to 150 kCi strontium-90 or 80 kCi cesium-137. Potential systems assessed included instrumental chemical analyses, radionuclide detection, visual examination, and other nondestructive nuclear-fuel examination techniques. Factors considered in the assessment include: cost, simplicity of maintenance and operation, technology availability, reliability, remote operation, sensitivity, and ability to locate an individual leaking capsule in its storage location. The study concluded that an adaption of the spent nuclear-fuel examination technique of wet sipping be considered for adaption. In the suggested approoch, samples would be taken continuously from pool water adjacent to the capsule(s) being examined for remote radiation detection. In-place capsule isolation and subsequent water sampling would confirm that a capsule was leaking radionuclides. Additional studies are needed before implementing this option. Two other techniques that show promise are ultrasonic testing and eddy-current testing.

  18. ANNUAL MAINTENANCE AND LEAK TESTING FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trapp, D.

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide step-by-step instructions for the annual helium leak test certification and maintenance of the 9975 Shipping Package.

  19. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  20. A new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Horacio J.

    considers the blowdown effect in industrial boiler operation. This adds to the efficiency of recent advancesA new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection A. M. Pertew ,1 X. Sun ,1 R. Kent in identification-based leak detection techniques of boiler steam- water systems. Keywords: Industrial Boilers, Tube

  1. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  2. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieberbach, George (Tampa, FL); Bongaards, Donald J. (Seminole, FL); Lohmeier, Alfred (Tampa, FL); Duke, James M. (St. Petersburg, all of, FL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  3. Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Across Washington, DC Robert B. Jackson,,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Across Washington, DC Robert B. Jackson,,, * Adrian Down, Nathan G increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic

  4. Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidari, Arman S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

  5. allowable leak rates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Provot, N 2011-01-01 36 Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes, Vol. 31, No. 5, 1999 Mitochondrial Proton Leak and the Uncoupling Proteins Biology and Medicine Websites...

  6. The feasibility of electrophoretic repair of impoundment leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ji-Seok

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    finding, repairing and testing the leaks, are tedious, expensive, and dangerous to workers. Electrophoretic repair technique is an innovative, economic, and safe method to repair the leakage of impoundments. A suspension of clay particles is induced...

  7. Robot design for leak detection in water-pipe systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Changrak

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks are major problem that occur in the water pipelines all around the world. Several reports indicate loss of around 20 to 30 percent of water in the distribution of water through water pipe systems. Such loss of water ...

  8. 225-B Pool Cell 5 Liner Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the actions taken to confirm and respond to a very small (0.046 ml/min) leak in the stainless steel liner of Hanford`s Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) storage pool cell 5 in Building 225-B. Manual level measurements confirmed a consistent weekly accumulation of 0.46 liters of water in the leak detection grid sump below the pool cell 5 liner. Video inspections and samples point to the capsule storage pool as the source of the water. The present leak rate corresponds to a decrease of only 0.002 inches per week in the pool cell water level, and consequently does not threaten any catastrophic loss of pool cell shielding and cooling water. The configuration of the pool cell liner, sump system, and associated risers will limit the short-term consequences of even a total liner breach to a loss of 1 inch in pool cell level. The small amount of demineralized pool cell water which has been in contact with the concrete structure is not enough to cause significant structural damage. However, ongoing water-concrete interaction increases. The pool cell leak detection sump instrumentation will be modified to improve monitoring of the leak rate in the future. Weekly manual sump level measurements continue in the interim. Contingency plans are in place to relocate the pool cell 5 capsules if the leak worsens.

  9. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  10. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  11. Apparatus and method for detecting leaks in piping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trapp, Donald J. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for detecting the location of leaks along a wall or piping system, preferably in double-walled piping. The apparatus comprises a sniffer probe, a rigid cord such as a length of tube attached to the probe on one end and extending out of the piping with the other end, a source of pressurized air and a source of helium. The method comprises guiding the sniffer probe into the inner pipe to its distal end, purging the inner pipe with pressurized air, filling the annulus defined between the inner and outer pipe with helium, and then detecting the presence of helium within the inner pipe with the probe as is pulled back through the inner pipe. The length of the tube at the point where a leak is detected determines the location of the leak in the pipe.

  12. Apparatus and method for detecting leaks in piping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trapp, D.J.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device are disclosed for detecting the location of leaks along a wall or piping system, preferably in double-walled piping. The apparatus comprises a sniffer probe, a rigid cord such as a length of tube attached to the probe on one end and extending out of the piping with the other end, a source of pressurized air and a source of helium. The method comprises guiding the sniffer probe into the inner pipe to its distal end, purging the inner pipe with pressurized air, filling the annulus defined between the inner and outer pipe with helium, and then detecting the presence of helium within the inner pipe with the probe as is pulled back through the inner pipe. The length of the tube at the point where a leak is detected determines the location of the leak in the pipe. 2 figures.

  13. RPP-ENV-39658 Revision 0 Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Johnson; J. G. Field; Revision Rpp-env

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy developed a process to reassess selected tank leak estimates (volumes and inventories), and to update single-shell tank leak and unplanned release volumes and inventory estimates as emergent field data is obtained (RPP-32681, Process to Assess Tank Farm Leaks in Support of Retrieval and Closure Planning). This process does not represent a formal tank leak assessment in accordance with procedure TFC-ENG-CHEM-D-42, “Tank Leak Assessment Process. ” This report documents reassessment of past leaks in the 241-SX Tank Farm. Tank waste loss events were reassessed for tanks 241-SX-104, 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108,

  14. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  15. Design and fabrication of a maneuverable robot for in-pipe leak detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, You, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks in pipelines have been causing a significant amount of financial losses and serious damages to the community and the environment. The recent development of in-pipe leak detection technologies at Massachusetts Institute ...

  16. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  17. Harms of Unintentional Leaks during Volume Targeted Pressure Support Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Harms of Unintentional Leaks during Volume Targeted Pressure Support Ventilation Sonia Khirani1 Background: Volume targeted pressure support ventilation (VT-PSV) is a hybrid mode increasingly used. The objective of the study was to determine the ability of home ventilators to maintain the preset minimal VT

  18. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. The main mineral precipitation and transformation pathways were studied in solutions

  19. AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh air that enters a house in a controlled manner to exhaust excess moisture and reduce odors and stuffiness. Air leakage, or infiltration, is outside air that enters a house uncontrollably through cracks

  20. T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.A.

    1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The W-259 project will provide upgrades to the 2706-T/TA Facility to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. The project provides decontamination activities supporting the environmental restoration mission and waste management operations on the Hanford Site.

  1. Methodology to quantify leaks in aerosol sampling system components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and that approach was used to measure the sealing integrity of a CAM and two kinds of filter holders. The methodology involves use of sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer gas with the device being tested operated under dynamic flow conditions. The leak rates...

  2. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-B Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-B Tank Farm (B Farm) leak cause and locations for the 100 series leaking tank (241-B-107) identified in RPP-RPT-49089, Hanford B-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the B Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  3. Mathematical Properties of Pump-Leak Models of Cell Volume Control and Electrolyte Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Hans

    Mathematical Properties of Pump-Leak Models of Cell Volume Control and Electrolyte Balance Yoichiro using pump-leak models, a system of differential algebraic equations that de- scribes the balance and stability of steady states for a general class of pump-leak models. We treat two cases. When the ion channel

  4. Mitochondrial proton leak and the uncoupling protein 1 homologues J.A. Stuart aYb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Jeffrey A.

    Review Mitochondrial proton leak and the uncoupling protein 1 homologues J.A. Stuart aYb , S 2000 Abstract Mitochondrial proton leak is the largest single contributor to the standard metabolic rate (SMR) of a rat, accounting for about 20% of SMR. Yet the mechanisms by which proton leak occurs

  5. Flight Path 5 - About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path(ER1)

  6. Flight Path 5 - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path(ER1)-

  7. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  8. Leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation technology trade study update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTZEL, J.S.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a revision and update to the initial report that describes various leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) technologies that can be used to support the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. This revision focuses on the improvements in the technical performance of previously identified and useful technologies, and it introduces new technologies that might prove to be useful.

  9. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J. A., E-mail: jschwart@pppl.gov; Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 k? trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  10. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe joints

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwartz, J. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451, USA; Jaworski, M. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451, USA; Mehl, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451, USA; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451, USA; Mozulay, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451, USA

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 k#2; trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  11. DNA Computing Hamiltonian path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagiya, Masami

    2014 DNA DNA #12;DNA Computing · Feynman · Adleman · DNASIMD · ... · · · · · DNADNA #12;DNA · DNA · · · · DNA · · #12;2000 2005 2010 1995 Hamiltonian path DNA tweezers DNA tile DNA origami DNA box Sierpinski DNA tile self assembly DNA logic gates Whiplash PCR DNA automaton DNA spider MAYA

  12. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-U Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-U Tank Farm (U Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-U-104, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112) identified in RPP-RPT-50097, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-U Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the U-Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  13. Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  14. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-C Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-C Tank Farm (C Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-C-101 and 241-C-105) identified in RPP-RPT-33418, Rev. 2, Hanford C-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the C Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  15. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-T Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-T Tank Farm (T Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-T-106 and 241-T-111) identified in RPP-RPT-55084, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-T Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the T Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  16. Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

  17. Beyond Leaks: Demand-side Strategies for Improving Compressed Air Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, B.; Scales, B.

    Beyond Leaks: Demand-side Strategies for Bill Howe, PE Director, Corporate Energy Services E Source, Inc. Boulder, Colorado SUMMARY Staggering amounts of compressed air are wasted or misapplied in otherwise well run manufacturing...-maintained plants lose about 10 percent of compressed air to leaks, while many more lose over 50 percent. In addition to leaks, wasteful application of compressed air can eat up another 5 to 40 percent of compressed air volume-even in otherwise well...

  18. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-A Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-A Tank Farm (A Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-A-104 and 241-A-105) identified in RPP-ENV-37956, Hanford A and AX Farm Leak Assessment Report. This document satisfies the A Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  19. A mathematical model for air brake systems in the presence of leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaratham, Srivatsan

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the pneumatic subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 16 Pressure transients at 722 kPa (90 psi) supply pressure with no leak. 22 17 Schematic of the setup for leak corroboration tests. . . . . . . . . . . 27 18 Comparison of measured and predicted mass... of detecting and locating leaks[6]. Most of the performance tests and visual based inspection tests of the air brake system indirectly correlate pressure in the brake chamber with the torque output, brake pad temperature, push rod strokes etc[7], [8]. More...

  20. Leake County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana: Energy Resources JumpPrataHill,LeadingLeake

  1. Hydrogen Leak Detection - Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContamination Detectorof Energy Leak Detection - Low-Cost

  2. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105, and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  3. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10.sup.-13 atm cc s.sup.-1. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces backstreaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium.

  4. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}13} atm cc/s. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces back streaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium. 2 figs.

  5. T-726:Linux-2.6 privilege escalation/denial of service/information leak

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a privilege escalation, denial of service or information leak.

  6. Flight Path 15R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is a

  7. Flight Path 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is05

  8. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L .2

  9. Flight Paths at WNR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path

  10. Flight Path 15R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications H.Y.R

  11. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL -

  12. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  13. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  14. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - - -

  15. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  16. Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

  17. Project uses microphones to detect underwater gas leaks Published: 14 Oct 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    into developing the technology,' said Leighton. Topics: Research and Development, carbon capture use and storage as naturally occurring methane gas leaks. `The current carbon- capture storage facilities have the ability Key Topics: Technology Scientists at Southampton University are employing hydrophones to monitor leaks

  18. Shortest Path Algorithms: A Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Bruce L., 1950-

    In this note we present some computational evidence to suggest that a version of Bellman's shortest path algorithm outperforms Treesort- Dijkstra's for a certain class of networks.

  19. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuanling, Dr. Li [Texas A& M University; Bogen, Paul Logasa [ORNL; Pogue, Daniel [Halliburton Energy Services; Furuta, Dr. Richard Keith [Texas A& M University; ShipmanIII, Dr. Frank Major [Texas A& M University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative Authoring of Walden's Paths. Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012.Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012

  20. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  1. Internal dissipation and heat leaks in quantum thermodynamic cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Correa; José P. Palao; Daniel Alonso

    2015-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The direction of the steady-state heat currents across a generic quantum system connected to multiple baths may be engineered so as to realize virtually any thermodynamic cycle. In spite of their versatility such continuous energy-conversion systems are generally unable to operate at maximum efficiency due to non-negligible sources of irreversible entropy production. In this paper we introduce a minimal model of irreversible absorption chiller. We identify and characterize the different mechanisms responsible for its irreversibility, namely heat leaks and internal dissipation, and gauge their relative impact in the overall cooling performance. We also propose reservoir engineering techniques to minimize these detrimental effects. Finally, by looking into a known three-qubit embodiment of the absorption cooling cycle, we illustrate how our simple model may help to pinpoint the different sources of irreversibility naturally arising in more complex practical heat devices.

  2. Theory of the leak-rate of seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson; C. Yang

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Seals are extremely useful devices to prevent fluid leakage. However, the exact mechanism of roughness induced leakage is not well understood. We present a theory of the leak-rate of seals, which is based on percolation theory and a recently developed contact mechanics theory. We study both static and dynamics seals. We present molecular dynamics results which show that when two elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces are squeezed together, as a function of increasing magnification or decreasing squeezing pressure, a non-contact channel will percolate when the (relative) projected contact area, A/A_0, is of order 0.4, in accor dance with percolation theory. We suggest a simple experiment which can be used to test the theory.

  3. Studies into the Initial Conditions, Flow Rate, and Containment System of Oil Field Leaks in Deep Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, Rachel

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    to contain an oil leak in the field. The dome was found to have satisfactory entrapment in the designed position....

  4. Detection and location of leaks in district heating steam systems: Survey and review of current technology and practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Lanham, R.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a survey undertaken to identify and characterize current practices for detecting and locating leaks in district heating systems, particular steam systems. Currently used technology and practices are reviewed. In addition, the survey was used to gather information that may be important for the application of acoustic leak detection. A few examples of attempts to locate leaks in steam and hot water pipes by correlation of acoustic signals generated by the leaks are also discussed.

  5. Initial Studies Toward Real-Time Transmission Path Rating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Diao, Ruisheng; Cai, Niannian; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuck, Brian; Guo, Xinxin

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand continues to increase while transmission line construction is being constrained by multiple factors— economic, environmental, and political. Effective and efficient utilization of transmission lines is thus of great importance in an open access environment. Large blocks of power are transferred from areas with inexpensive generation to heavy load demand areas or areas with high generation costs. This results in some transmission paths being loaded closer to their path ratings, which limits further power transfer between areas. Traditionally, rating of important paths was determined off line by assuming the worst-case study scenario; once determined, it could be used for years. With increasing uncertainty arising from rapid growth of renewable energy and smart technologies, path rating studies are needed in near-real time to account for the latest system status and support a reliable and economic power grid. This paper adopts a simplified procedure based on standards of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) to determine total transfer capability (TTC) or transfer limit for the purpose of demonstrating the benefits and necessity of real-time path rating. Initial studies are conducted to compute TTC of a two-area test system and a 39-bus test system. Results indicate that path rating can be significantly affected by loading conditions, generator schedules, system topology and other factors.

  6. Leak-Tight Welding Experience from the Industrial Assembly of the LHC Cryostats at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourcey, N; Chiggiato, P; Limon, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Musso, G; Poncet, A; Parma, V

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assembly of the approximately 1700 LHC main ring cryostats at CERN involved extensive welding of cryogenic lines and vacuum vessels. More than 6 km of welding requiring leak tightness to a rate better than 1.10-9 mbar.l.s-1 on stainless steel and aluminium piping and envelopes was made, essentially by manual welding but also making use of orbital welding machines. In order to fulfil the safety regulations related to pressure vessels and to comply with the leak-tightness requirements of the vacuum systems of the machine, welds were executed according to high qualification standards and following a severe quality assurance plan. Leak detection by He mass spectrometry was extensively used. Neon leak detection was used successfully to locate leaks in the presence of helium backgrounds. This paper presents the quality assurance strategy adopted for welds and leak detection. It presents the statistics of non-conformities on welds and leaks detected throughout the entire production and the advances in the use...

  7. Leak detection systems for uranium mill tailings impoundments with synthetic liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.A.; Tyler, S.W.; Gutknecht, P.J.; Mitchell, D.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the performance of existing and alternative leak detection systems for lined uranium mill tailings ponds. Existing systems for detecting leaks at uranium mill tailings ponds investigated in this study included groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drains, and lysimeters. Three alternative systems which demonstrated the ability to locate leaks in bench-scale tests included moisture blocks, soil moisture probes, and a soil resistivity system. Several other systems in a developmental stage are described. For proper performance of leak detection systems (other than groundwater wells and lysimeters), a subgrade is required which assures lateral dispersion of a leak. Methods to enhance dispersion are discussed. Cost estimates were prepared for groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drain systems, and the three experimental systems. Based on the results of this report, it is suggested that groundwater monitoring systems be used as the primary means of leak detection. However, if a more responsive system is required due to site characteristics and groundwater quality criteria, subliner drains are applicable for ponds with uncovered liners. Leak-locating systems for ponds with covered liners require further development. Other recommendations are discussed in the report.

  8. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) lead causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105 and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  9. Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-SX Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States)

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-SX Tank Farm (SX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114, and 241-SX-115) identified in RPP-ENV-39658, Rev. 0, Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the SX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  10. Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  11. Rough Paths Theory Fabrice Baudoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Let p > 2. If xn : [0,1] ? Rd is a sequence of bounded variation paths ... The fundamental theorem of Lyons is the following: ... Brownian motion (B(t))t?0.

  12. Survivable paths in multilayer networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parandehgheibi, Marzieh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of protection in multilayer networks. In single-layer net- works, a pair of disjoint paths can be used to provide protection for a source-destination pair. However, this approach cannot be directly ...

  13. COMPUTER SCIENCE: MISCONCEPTIONS, CAREER PATHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristidis, Vagelis

    COMPUTER SCIENCE: MISCONCEPTIONS, CAREER PATHS AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES School of Computing Undergraduate Student) #12;Computer Science Misconceptions Intro to Computer Science - Florida International University 2 Some preconceived ideas & stereotypes about Computer Science (CS) are quite common

  14. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfelder, R. [Particle Theory Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Particle Theory Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  15. Morse theory in path space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Seung Cho; Soon-Tae Hong

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the path space of a curved manifold on which a point particle is introduced in a conservative physical system with constant total energy to formulate its action functional and geodesic equation together with breaks on the path. The second variation of the action functional is exploited to yield the geodesic deviation equation and to discuss the Jacobi fields on the curved manifold. We investigate the topology of the path space using the action functional on it and its physical meaning by defining the gradient of the action functional, the space of bounded flow energy solutions and the moduli space associated with the critical points of the action functional. We also consider the particle motion on the $n$-sphere $S^{n}$ in the conservative physical system to discuss explicitly the moduli space of the path space and the corresponding homology groups.

  16. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  17. Further development of an in-pipe leak detection sensor's mobility platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Frederick M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water leakage is a major global problem and smaller sized leaks are difficult to find despite their prevalence in most water distribution systems. Previous attempts to develop a mobility platform for a sensor in use in ...

  18. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  19. BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    40' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:15...

  20. BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (3 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:19...

  1. BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (2 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:13...

  2. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  3. Calculation notes for surface leak resulting in pool, TWRS FSAR accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Surface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  4. Intelligent Coatings for Location And Detection of Leaks (IntelliCLAD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    danger of a gas leak. Ever since the tragic natural gas explosion of 1937 in a New London, Texas school building, various governments have mandated that odorants be added to...

  5. U.S. strategic petroleum reserve Big Hill 114 leak analysis 2012.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses recent well integrity issues related to cavern 114 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DM Petroleum Operations, M&O contractor for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, recognized an apparent leak in Big Hill cavern well 114A in late summer, 2012, and provided written notice to the State of Texas as required by law. DM has since isolated the leak in well A with a temporary plug, and is planning on remediating both 114 A- and B-wells with liners. In this report Sandia provides an analysis of the apparent leak that includes: (i) estimated leak volume, (ii) recommendation for operating pressure to maintain in the cavern between temporary and permanent fixes for the well integrity issues, and (iii) identification of other caverns or wells at Big Hill that should be monitored closely in light of the sequence of failures there in the last several years.

  6. Risks from Past, Current, and Potential Hanford Single Shell Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triplett, Mark B.; Watson, David J.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to significant delays in constructing and operating the Waste Treatment Plant, which is needed to support retrieval of waste from Hanford’s single shell tanks (SSTs), SSTs may now be required to store tank waste for two to three more decades into the future. Many SSTs were built almost 70 years ago, and all SSTs are well beyond their design lives. Recent examination of monitoring data suggests several of the tanks, which underwent interim stabilization a decade or more ago, may be leaking small amounts (perhaps 150–300 gallons per year) to the subsurface environment. A potential leak from tank T-111 is estimated to have released approximately 2,000 gallons into the subsurface. Observations of past leak events, recently published simulation results, and new simulations all suggest that recent leaks are unlikely to affect underlying groundwater above regulatory limits. However, these recent observations remind us that much larger source terms are still contained in the tanks and are also present in the vadose zone from historical intentional and unintentional releases. Recently there have been significant improvements in methods for detecting and characterizing soil moisture and contaminant releases, understanding and controlling mass-flux, and remediating deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes. To ensure extended safe storage of tank waste in SSTs, the following actions are recommended: 1) Improve capabilities for intrusion and leak detection. 2) Develop defensible conceptual models of intrusion and leak mechanisms. 3) Apply enhanced subsurface characterization methods to improve detection and quantification of moisture changes beneath tanks. 4) Maintain a flux-based assessment of past, present, and potential tank leaks to assess risks and to maintain priorities for applying mitigation actions. 5) Implement and maintain effective mitigation and remediation actions to protect groundwater resources. These actions will enable limited resources to be applied to the most beneficial actions. A systems-based approach will support extended safe storage of tank waste, reduce the risks from tank leaks, and protect human health and the environment.

  7. Research of documents pertaining to waste migration from leaking single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consort, S.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results from an investigation of the literature concerning single-shell tank (SST) leaks on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the investigation is to determine if available data confirm or refute the assertion that leaked waste from the SSTs has reached ground water. There are 67 leaking single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the Hanford Site. Although the maximum volume of leaked waste is approximately 4,013,000 L (1,060,000 gal), it is not the only waste in the ground beneath the 200 Area. Before 1966, supernatant solution was intentionally discharged from the cascading SSTs to the ground. Other leaks from piping and surface spills contributed to the waste in the ground. The maximum estimated volume of unintentionally leaked waste from the tanks is less than 1% of the intentionally released liquid waste that was sent to the cribs and trenches from the SSTs. The volume does not include the liquid waste sent intentionally from other facilities directly to the cribs, trenches, and injection wells. The components and concentrations of the intentionally released waste were in compliance with applicable standards at the time of release.

  8. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today outside of cost, derive from excessive false positives and false negatives arising from signal drift and unstable sensor baseline; both of these problems necessitate the need for unacceptable frequent calibration.

  9. A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Cist; Alan Schutz

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

  10. Crack Path Selection Fatigue crack path imaged via SEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Crack path selects secondary phases and interface Conclusions ·Nb-Si Alloys tested exhibited toughness phases fail in a brittle manner Fatigue Crack Growth ABSTRACT Advanced aerospace materials continue at high temperatures. An important property of any high temperature aerospace engineering material is its

  11. Acceptance test report for the AN valve pit leak detection and low point drain assembly mock up test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWER, K.L.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes The Performance Mock-up Test Procedure for the Valve Pit Leak Detection and Low Point Drain Assembly Performance Mock-Up Test Procedure.

  12. Influence of wetting effect at the outer surface of the pipe on increase in leak rate - experimental results and discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Shibata, Katsuyuki

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and computed results applicable to Leak Before Break analysis are presented. The specific area of investigation is the effect of the temperature distribution changes due to wetting of the test pipe near the crack on the increase in the crack opening area and leak rate. Two 12-inch straight pipes subjected to both internal pressure and thermal load, but not to bending load, are modelled. The leak rate was found to be very susceptible to the metal temperature of the piping. In leak rate tests, therefore, it is recommended that temperature distribution be measured precisely for a wide area.

  13. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  14. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  15. Path Integration on Darboux Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Grosche

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the Feynman path integral technique is applied to two-dimensional spaces of non-constant curvature: these spaces are called Darboux spaces $\\DI$--$\\DIV$. We start each consideration in terms of the metric and then analyze the quantum theory in the separable coordinate systems. The path integral in each case is formulated and then solved in the majority of cases, the exceptions being quartic oscillators where no closed solution is known. The required ingredients are the path integral solutions of the linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, the radial harmonic oscillator, the modified P\\"oschl--Teller potential, and for spheroidal wave-functions, respectively. The basic path integral solutions, which appear here in a complicated way, have been developed in recent work and are known. The final solutions are represented in terms of the corresponding Green's functions and the expansions into the wave-functions, respectively. We also sketch some limiting cases of the Darboux spaces, where spaces of constant negative and zero curvature emerge.

  16. NPRE at Illinois Three Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    and power systems · Thermal hydraulics and reactor safety · Alternate energy systems · Plasma modeling production; Nuclear power operations and control · Plasma sciences; Applied plasma physics; Nuclear fusionNPRE at Illinois Three Paths Students choose from three concentrations: · Plasma and Fusion · Power

  17. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  18. THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin Nobel Prize lecture

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Path ot Carbon in Photosynthesis. Science" l2J. , 476 (48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Nobel8-A Fig. 1. Elementary photosynthesis scheme. DES IOU OF THE

  19. THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, Melvin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis, Prentice-Hall, Ino. ,to StUdy the Products of Photosynthesis as Depending on the48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS J. A. Bassham and

  20. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  1. Development of a cold cathode ion source for a mass spectrometer type vacuum leak detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Harold Albert

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 7 cm., discharge voltage of about 2000 volts, discharge current of 10 ma., and a magnetic field strength of approximately 2200 Oersteds. As a leak detector it had a differential sensitivity of one part of helium in 10,000 parts of air ? about... for this ion souree as for the first type tested# Be? cause of the simpler construction and fewer components reauired, it appears that this type of source would have some valuable possibili? ties as a mass spectrometer ion source for the leak detector...

  2. SEVENTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 54-72 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 30 - 36 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51 – 96%. This is greater than seen to date for any packages inspected during KAC field surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress relaxation (CSR) data. These two predictive models show reasonable agreement at higher temperatures (350 – 400 ºF). However, at 300 ºF, the room temperature leak test failures to date experienced longer aging times than predicted by the CSRbased model. This suggests that extrapolations of the CSR model predictions to temperatures below 300 ºF will provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Leak test failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV O-ring fixtures.

  3. Heat Leak into Cryostat #1 through 304SS or G10 Supports Robert J. Weggel, Magnet Optimization Research Engineering, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Heat Leak into Cryostat #1 through 304SS or G10 Supports Robert J. Weggel, Magnet Optimization for refrigeration to cope with the heat leak through mechanical supports of Type 304 stainless steel (SS) with warm times the cross section of the SS support) requires only 18% as much power for refrigeration

  4. Efficient model-based leak detection in boiler steam-water systems Xi Sun, Tongwen Chen *, Horacio J. Marquez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Horacio J.

    Efficient model-based leak detection in boiler steam-water systems Xi Sun, Tongwen Chen *, Horacio detection in boiler steam-water systems. The algorithm has been tested using real industrial data from Syncrude Canada, and has proven to be effective in detection of boiler tube or steam leaks; proper

  5. Unaccounted-for gas project. Leak Task Force. Volume 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, R.M.; Robertson, J.L.; Grinstead, J.R.; Luttrell, D.J.; Walden, E.R.

    1990-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Leak Task Force quantified unintentional gas losses (leakage and dig-ins). Results show that 1987 gas leakage accounted for less than 5% of the operating UAF.

  6. Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc, Microfridges Doors and Hardware Door repair/replace Lock, latch or hinge repair, key stuck; Lost or stolen key, repair or replace Shades/Blinds Window treatment - repair or replace Washer/Dryer Washer/Dryer repair

  7. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas for electrical shock. NOTIFY University Police. What should I do if I smell natural or propane gas? LEAVE/Repair line, 7-6333, or CALL the Campus University Police or Security at (561) 297-3500 or 911

  8. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK NATURAL GAS - F 8a - 5p HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours, Weekends or Holidays What should I do Police 911. · NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  9. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas Physical Plant (772) 242-2246 M - F 8a - 5p (954) 762-5040 HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours University Police. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  10. Detecting leak regions through model falsification GAUDENZ MOSER AND IAN F.C. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    management support. Since a significant percentage of fresh water is lost globally due to leaks in these networks, the challenge to improve performance is compatible with goals of sustainable development is a precious resource that is necessary to preserve. Preservation involves reducing losses in the water

  11. Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Supporting Documentation: Miscellaneous Reports, Letters, Memoranda, And Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engeman, J. K.; Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D. G.; Rosenkrance, C. L.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reference materials cited in RPP-ASMT -53793, Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, that were obtained from the National Archives Federal Records Repository in Seattle, Washington, or from other sources including the Hanford Site's Integrated Data Management System database (IDMS).

  12. Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas By David Gardner Last updated at 11:32 AM on 3rd June 2010 BP's giant oil slick was bearing down on Florida holidaymakers a year visit Florida and state leaders fear the oil will devastate a tourist industry

  13. Rigorous Simulation of Accidental Leaks from High-Pressure Storage Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alisha, -

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of nature. The released chemical can form and disperse as vapor cloud leading to fire, explosion, or toxic exposure. The resulting leak could be single phase or multiphase release, choked or non-choked. These releases could result in liquid spills, vapor...

  14. Rigorous Simulation of Accidental Leaks from High-Pressure Storage Vessels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alisha, -

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of nature. The released chemical can form and disperse as vapor cloud leading to fire, explosion, or toxic exposure. The resulting leak could be single phase or multiphase release, choked or non-choked. These releases could result in liquid spills, vapor...

  15. FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{sup reg.} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200--350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 5 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30--48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200--300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51--95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350--400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests that CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Failure data at lower temperatures is needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining fixtures.

  16. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jenkins, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study.

  17. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R

  18. Flight Path 90L - TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L .

  19. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  20. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  1. Flight Path 14 - About DANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  2. Flight Path 15L - Collaborators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14

  3. Flight Path 15L - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications H.Y.

  4. Path integral evaluation of Dbrane amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend Polchinski's evaluation of the measure for the one-loop closed string path integral to open string tree amplitudes with boundaries and crosscaps embedded in Dbranes. We explain how the nonabelian limit of near-coincident Dbranes emerges in the path integral formalism. We give a careful path integral derivation of the cylinder amplitude including the modulus dependence of the volume of the conformal Killing group.

  5. Robust constrained shortest path problems under budgeted ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the robust constrained shortest path problem under resource uncertainty. .... they assess the effectiveness of the label-setting algorithm based on the ...

  6. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  7. Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

  8. Methodology for Augmenting Existing Paths with Additional Parallel Transects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is sample planning software that is used, among other purposes, to plan transect sampling paths to detect areas that were potentially used for munition training. This module was developed for application on a large site where existing roads and trails were to be used as primary sampling paths. Gap areas between these primary paths needed to found and covered with parallel transect paths. These gap areas represent areas on the site that are more than a specified distance from a primary path. These added parallel paths needed to optionally be connected together into a single path—the shortest path possible. The paths also needed to optionally be attached to existing primary paths, again with the shortest possible path. Finally, the process must be repeatable and predictable so that the same inputs (primary paths, specified distance, and path options) will result in the same set of new paths every time. This methodology was developed to meet those specifications.

  9. Hanford Double-Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation Update - 15302

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Johnson, J. M.

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank AY-102 was the first of 28 double-shell radioactive waste storage tanks constructed at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, near Richland, WA. The tank was completed in 1970, and entered service in 1971. In August, 2012, an accumulation of material was discovered at two sites on the floor of the annulus that separates the primary tank from the secondary liner. The material was sampled and determined to originate from the primary tank. This paper summarizes the changes in leak behavior that have occurred during the past two years, inspections to determine the capability of the secondary liner to continue safely containing the leakage, and the initial results of testing to determine the leak mechanism.

  10. The probability of intersystem LOCA: impact due to leak testing and operational changes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.P.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) identified the potential intersystem LOCA in a pressurized water reactor as a significant contributor to the risk resulting from core melt. Similar scenarios are also possible in boiling water reactors. This report evaluates various pressure isolation valve configurations used in reactors to determine the probability of intersystem LOCA. It is shown that periodic leak testing of these valves can substantially reduce intersystem LOCA probability. Specific analyses of the high pressure/low pressure interfaces in the Sequoyah (PWR) and Alan B. Barton (BWR) plants show that periodic leak testing of the pressure isolation check valves will reduce the intersystem LOCA probability to below 0.000001 per year.

  11. Advanced conceptual design report: T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades. Project W-259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hookfin, J.D.

    1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The T Plant facilities in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were constructed in the early 1940s to produce nuclear materials in support of national defense activities. T Plant includes the 271-T facility, the 221-T facility, and several support facilities (eg, 2706-T), utilities, and tanks/piping systems. T Plant has been recommended as the primary interim decontamination facility for the Hanford site. Project W-259 will provide capital upgrades to the T Plant facilities to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. This document provides an advanced conceptual design concept that complies with functional requirements for the T Plant Secondary Containment and Leak Detection upgrades.

  12. Targeted Path Profiling: Lower Overhead Path Profiling for Staged Dynamic Optimization Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    , their technique leaves a sizable fraction of paths unaccounted for. While a number of techniques have been

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  14. Use of the Niyama Criterion To Predict Shrinkage-Related Leaks in High-Nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Use of the Niyama Criterion To Predict Shrinkage-Related Leaks in High-Nickel Steel and Nickel by the present authors determined that Nymacro = 1.0 (°C-s)1/2 /mm for nickel-based alloys M30C, M35-1 and CW12MW-shrinkage in high-nickel alloys by determining Nymicro. This is accomplished by performing metallographic analyses

  15. Location of Leaks in Pressure Testable Direct Burial Steam Distribution Conduits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sittel, M. G.; Messock, R. K.

    are ~xcavated for repair. We have successfully used this system at several locations, and in a variety of soil conditions. Tracer gas leak testing provides an effective and inexpensive method to evaluate underground conduit systems. Performed on a regular... containing all equipment to accomplish the testing is also described. ~iAACERGAS Sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) has been chosen as a tracer gas because: a) it is chemically inert, non-toxic, and has negligible pollution potential; b) it is highly...

  16. Leaking Interleavers for UEP Turbo Codes Abdul Wakeel, David Kronmueller, Werner Henkel, and Humberto Beltr~ao Neto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Leaking Interleavers for UEP Turbo Codes Abdul Wakeel, David Kronmueller, Werner Henkel to Turbo coding's exceptional performance. An interleaver provides bit-permutation designed to ensure deterministic randomness. When applying interleavers to unequal error protecting (UEP) Turbo codes, typically

  17. Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Stephanie J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Sams, Terry L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A routine video inspection of the annulus space between the primary tank and secondary liner of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 was performed in August 2012. During the inspection, unexpected material was discovered. A subsequent video inspection revealed additional unexpected material on the opposite side of the tank, none of which had been observed during inspections performed in December 2006 and January 2007. A formal leak assessment team was established to review the tank's construction and operating histories, and preparations for sampling and analysis began to determine the material's origin. A new sampling device was required to collect material from locations that were inaccessible to the available sampler. Following its design and fabrication, a mock-up test was performed for the new sampling tool to ensure its functionality and capability of performing the required tasks. Within three months of the discovery of the unexpected material, sampling tools were deployed, material was collected, and analyses were performed. Results indicated that some of the unknown material was indicative of soil, whereas the remainder was consistent with tank waste. This, along with the analyses performed by the leak assessment team on the tank's construction history, lead to the conclusion that the primary tank was leaking into the annulus. Several issues were encountered during the deployment of the samplers into the annulus. As this was the first time samples had been required from the annulus of a double-shell tank, a formal lessons learned was created concerning designing equipment for unique purposes under time constraints.

  18. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s).

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH; MYERS DA

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  20. Aerosol penetration of leak pathways : an examination of the available data and models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data and models of aerosol particle deposition in leak pathways are described. Pathways considered include capillaries, orifices, slots and cracks in concrete. The Morewitz-Vaughan criterion for aerosol plugging of leak pathways is shown to be applicable only to a limited range of particle settling velocities and Stokes numbers. More useful are sampling efficiency criteria defined by Davies and by Liu and Agarwal. Deposition of particles can be limited by bounce from surfaces defining leak pathways and by resuspension of particles deposited on these surfaces. A model of the probability of particle bounce is described. Resuspension of deposited particles can be triggered by changes in flow conditions, particle impact on deposits and by shock or vibration of the surfaces. This examination was performed as part of the review of the AP1000 Standard Combined License Technical Report, APP-GW-GLN-12, Revision 0, 'Offsite and Control Room Dose Changes' (TR-112) in support of the USNRC AP1000 Standard Combined License Pre-Application Review.

  1. Transition Path Theory E. Vanden-Eijnden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Transition Path Theory E. Vanden-Eijnden Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University New York, NY 10012 eve2cims.nyu.edu Eric Vanden-Eijnden E. Vanden-Eijnden: Transition Path Theory of the Current and Transition Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 5 Comparison with Transition

  2. Variable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Thomas

    length path coupling theorem, we im- prove the upper bound on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics . By a "coupling" for this chain, we will mean a joint stochastic process (Xt, Yt) on × such that eachVariable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes Eric Vigoda July 17, 2006 Abstract We present a new

  3. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  4. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Birrer

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  5. EIGHTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 61 - 85 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KArea Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leaktight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 41 - 45 months. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures.

  6. NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The earliest 300 °F GLT O-ring fixture failure was observed at 34 months. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 72 - 96 months, which bounds O-ring temperatures anticipated during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the 200 ºF fixtures will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures, thus providing additional time to failure data. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 54 - 57 months. No additional O-ring failures have been observed since the last interim report was issued. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures. Additional irradiation of several fixtures is recommended to maintain a balance between thermal and radiation exposures similar to that experienced in storage, and to show the degree of consistency of radiation response between GLT and GLT-S O-rings.

  7. Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a flow path having solid components flowing therethrough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, William F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Elias, Gracy (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is provided for monitoring a flow path having plurality of different solid components flowing therethrough. For example, in the harvesting of a plant material, many factors surrounding the threshing, separating or cleaning of the plant material and may lead to the inadvertent inclusion of the component being selectively harvested with residual plant materials being discharged or otherwise processed. In accordance with the present invention the detection of the selectively harvested component within residual materials may include the monitoring of a flow path of such residual materials by, for example, directing an excitation signal toward of flow path of material and then detecting a signal initiated by the presence of the selectively harvested component responsive to the excitation signal. The detected signal may be used to determine the presence or absence of a selected plant component within the flow path of residual materials.

  8. Compiling Path Expressions into VLSI Circuits `I`. S. Annntharaman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    -timed. Ncvcrthdcss. UK circuits produced by our construction have area propordonal to N slog(N) whcrc N is the total expression: path R, + Wend, path R, + Wend. `fhc first path cxprcssion prohibits a read operation

  9. The Path of the Blind Watchmaker: A Model of Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Andrew Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    path of the blind watchmaker. This thesis presents a novelBlind WatchMaker Path (BWMPath) BWMPath contains the bulk of the software written for this thesis,

  10. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Abstract: The rates...

  11. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy...

  12. SPEEDING UP DYNAMIC SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS Finding ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 19, 2003 ... ... and Reps algorithm for updating a shortest path tree, which is a revision of ... tree, although it can be easily specialized for updating a tree [5].

  13. Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, D. R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set...

  14. Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIIE PAT3 OF C R O IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS A B K A. A. Benson andin the early products of photosynthesis, we Stepka, W. , inP THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. 111. BY A. A. Benson

  15. PATH-RELINKING INTENSIFICATION METHODS FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    user

    Apr 1, 2010 ... We consider in this paper a combinatorial optimization problem (COP), defined by a finite ... decreases, the system moves to a ground state of minimum energy. Finding ... Path-relinking, metaheuristics, hybrid metaheurisics. 1 ...

  16. Shortest Paths, Network Design and Associated Polyhedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnanti, Thomas L.

    We study a specialized version of network design problems that arise in telecommunication, transportation and other industries. The problem, a generalization of the shortest path problem, is defined on an undirected network ...

  17. Multi-objective stochastic path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. 2. Identify candidate constraints where clustering based multi-level programming can be applied to eliminate infeasible edges. 3. Provide an exact O (V.E) algorithm for building redundant shortest paths. 4...

  18. Non-classical paths in interference experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Sawant; Joseph Samuel; Aninda Sinha; Supurna Sinha; Urbasi Sinha

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in quantum interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  19. Multi-objective stochastic path planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research formulates the path planning as an optimization problem with multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. The first section introduces different variants of the PP problem and discusses existing ...

  20. TACIS 91: Application of leak-before-break concept in VVER 440-230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholome, G.; Faidy, C.; Franco, C. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of the leak-before-break (LBB) concept for primary piping in the first generation of WWER type plants in Russia is investigated. The procedures for LBB behavior used in France and Germany are applied, and the evaluation is discussed within the framework of the European Technical Assistance for the Community of Independent States (TACIS) project. Emphasis is placed on experimental validation of national and international engineering practice for evaluating and optimizing existing installations. Design criteria of WWER plants are compared to western standard design.

  1. A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L. [Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa (Canada)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

  2. The leak resistance of 2-inch N-80 API treaded tubular connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Peter Douglas

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -UPS OF 2-INCH N-80 EUE TUBING 15 17 13 FRONTAL VIEW OF TEST TANK 14 TEST TA1K 15 PRESSURE TEST DATA SHEET 16 LONG DURATION TANK 18 19 21 22 THE LEAK RESISTANCE OF 2-INCH N-80 API ~ED TUBULAR CONNECTION INTROI3UCTION In recent years, well depths... tension until an equivalent pull of 18, 000 feet of tubing was exerted. on the tubing. Each specimen was subJected to from 50 to 100 thermocycles to simulate the shut-in and. flow conditions in an oil well and to increase the severity of the pressure...

  3. The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

  4. Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, D. R.

    in sellable power output as a result of improved turbine efficiency. The Lyondell facility is a combined cycle power plant where a gas turbine: heat recovery system supplies steam to the steam turbine. Since this steam is a bypropuct of the gas turbine...steam Path Audits on Industrial steam Turbines DOUGLAS R. MITCHELL. ENGINEER. ENCOTECH, INC., SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits...

  5. Asymptotic properties of path integral ideals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, A.; Balaz, A.; Belic, A. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and analyze an interesting quantity, the path integral ideal, governing the flow of generic discrete theories to the continuum limit and greatly increasing their convergence. The said flow is classified according to the degree of divergence of the potential at spatial infinity. Studying the asymptotic behavior of path integral ideals we isolate the dominant terms in the effective potential that determine the behavior of a generic theory for large discrete time steps.

  6. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Anotonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Penn Valley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  7. Proceedings of the seminar on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faidy, C. [ed.] [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France); Gilles, P. [ed.] [Framatome, Paris (France)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the seminar was to present the current state of the art in Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology development, validation, and application in an international forum. With particular emphasis on industrial applications and regulatory policies, the seminar provided an opportunity to compare approaches, experiences, and codifications developed by different countries. The seminar was organized into four topic areas: status of LBB applications; technical issues in LBB methodology; complementary requirements (leak detection and inspection); LBB assessment and margins. As a result of this seminar, an improved understanding of LBB gained through sharing of different viewpoints from different countries, permits consideration of: simplified pipe support design and possible elimination of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) mechanical consequences for specific cases; defense-in-depth type of applications without support modifications; support of safety cases for plants designed without the LOCA hypothesis. In support of these activities, better estimates of the limits to the LBB approach should follow, as well as an improvement in codifying methodologies. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Maximizing Crosstalk-Induced Slowdown During Path Delay Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gope, Dibakar

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in path delay for c5315 .................................................................... 57 Figure 11 Increase in path delay for c2670 .................................................................... 60 Figure 12 Increase in path delay for c... for critical paths considering single aggressor crosstalk effect with due consideration to the timing alignment and direction. This method has similar CPU efficiency to that of [17] and [18]. However, they did not take into account the possible impact...

  9. Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis Tom Fricker University discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (logSPM, Kuczera et al., 2006). The purpose). 1 #12;3 The Saturated Path Hydrology Model We consider the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (log

  10. PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols Department of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California {narayans,fbai,bkrishna,helmy}@usc.edu ABSTRACT We develop a detailed approach to study how mobility im- pacts the performance of reactive MANET

  11. A Continuous-State Version of Discrete Randomized Shortest-Paths, with Application to Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    . It is shown that the continuous-state counterpart requires the solution of two partial differential equations, namely the backward variable. These partial differential equations are the so- called steady-state Bloch entropy [23]. The introduced path randomization allows balancing the load (number of packages) per path

  12. Flight Path 30R - About ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path of WNR.

  13. Flight Path 30R - About ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path of

  14. Flight Path 30R - ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path ofLinks

  15. Flight Path 30R - ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight path

  16. Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AHFD Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation University of Illinois at Urbana Systems Monitoring and Control Gavin R. Essenberg, Douglas A. Wiegmann, Aviation Human Factors Division experiments with more difficult path selection tasks might reveal if there are advantages for motion. Overall

  17. Specialist meeting on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholome, G.; Bazant, E.; Wellein, R. [Siemens KWU, Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Education, Science, Research and Technology, Bonn are summarized and compared to utility, manufacturer, and vendor tests. The purpose of the evaluation was to experimentally verify Leak-before-Break behavior, confirm the postulation of fracture preclusion for piping (straight pipe, bends and branches), and quantify the safety margin against massive failure. The results are applicable to safety assessment of ferritic and austenitic piping in primary and secondary nuclear power plant circuits. Moreover, because of the wide range of the test parameters, they are also important for the design and assessment of piping in other technical plant. The test results provide justification for ruling out catastrophic fractures, even on pipes of dimensions corresponding to those of a main coolant pipe of a pressurized water reactor plant on the basis of a mechanical deterministic safety analysis in correspondence with the Basis Safety Concept (Principle of Fracture Exclusion).

  18. Practical applications of the R6 leak-before-break procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A forthcoming revision to the R6 Leak-before-Break Assessment Procedure is briefly described. Practical application of the LbB concepts to safety-critical nuclear plant is illustrated by examples covering both low temperature and high temperature (>450{degrees}C) operating regimes. The examples highlight a number of issues which can make the development of a satisfactory LbB case problematic: for example, coping with highly loaded components, methodology assumptions and the definition of margins, the effect of crack closure owing to weld residual stresses, complex thermal stress fields or primary bending fields, the treatment of locally high stresses at crack intersections with free surfaces, the choice of local limit load solution when predicting ligament breakthrough, and the scope of calculations required to support even a simplified LbB case for high temperature steam pipe-work systems.

  19. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  20. On the dependence of the leak-rate of seals on the skewness of the surface height probability distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Lorenz; B. N. J. Persson

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seals are extremely useful devices to prevent fluid leakage. We present experimental result which show that the leak-rate of seals depend sensitively on the skewness in the height probability distribution. The experimental data are analyzed using the critical-junction theory. We show that using the top-power spectrum result in good agreement between theory and experiment.

  1. 18 IEEE Transactions onPower Delivery, Vol. 14, No.1, January 1999 Leak Location in Fluid Filled Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , dielectric fluid leaks, fluid-filled cable. Introduction High Pressure Fluid Filled (HPFF), pipe-type cable length ofthe underground transmission cable in the country. An HPFF cable system is comprised of a steel. HPFF cable systems have proven to be very reliable. However, in some cases due to various causes

  2. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  3. Activation Energies from Transition Path Sampling Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellago, Christoph

    unavailable for processes occurring in complex systems. Since in this method activation energies diatomic immersed in a bath of repulsive soft particles. Keywords: Activation energy; Computer simulation on the transition path sampling methodology, our approach to determine activation energies does not require full

  4. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  5. FESAC Fusion Development Path Rob Goldston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploration/Proof of Principle IFE IREs MFE PE Exp'ts Engineering Science/ Technology Development ComponentFESAC Fusion Development Path Rob Goldston Graduate Student Seminar March 21, 2005 #12;Panel Power Associates · Robert Goldston (Chair), Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory · Amanda Hubbard, MIT

  6. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Feasible Path Synthesis for Automated Guided Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Feasible Path Synthesis for Automated Guided Vehicles Reijer Idema 2005 TU Delft FROG Navigation for Automated Guided Vehicles Author: Reijer Idema Supervisors: prof.dr.ir. P. Wesseling (TU Delft) dr.ir. Kees is a manufacturer of Automated Guided Vehicles. They have developed a multitude of vehicles that transport products

  8. Clearance Based Path Optimization for Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Abstract Many motion planning techniques, like the probabilistic roadmap method (PRM), gen- erate low] and humanoid robot planning [13]. A commonly used technique for planning paths is the Probabilistic Roadmap. 1.1 Probabilistic Roadmap Method The probabilistic roadmap method consists of two phases

  9. Clearance Based Path Optimization for Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Abstract Many motion planning techniques, like the probabilistic roadmap method (PRM), gen­ erate low] and humanoid robot planning [13]. A commonly used technique for planning paths is the Probabilistic Roadmap.1 Probabilistic Roadmap Method The probabilistic roadmap method consists of two phases: a construction and a query

  10. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  11. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  12. New Paths to Retirement Joseph F. Quinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    -war early retirement trend -- the fact that older men were leaving the labor force earlier and earlierNew Paths to Retirement April 1998 Joseph F. Quinn Department of Economics Boston College Chestnut will be presented at the Pension Research Council conference on "Forecasting Retirement Needs and Retirement Wealth

  13. Asymmetrical Path Interference Test of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei Xiaochun

    2006-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The asymmetrical path interference test of light is put forward in the paper. In the test, two different results would arise under the same experimental conditions if light is regarded as wave or particle. Therefore, the test can help us to comprehend which concept, wave or particle, is more essential for micro-particles.

  14. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage in the Management of Postsurgical Biliary Leaks in Patients with Nondilated Intrahepatic Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, Guido, E-mail: guido.cozzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Severini, Aldo; Civelli, Enrico; Milella, Marco [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Pulvirenti, Andrea [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Salvetti, Monica [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Romito, Raffaele [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Suman, Laura; Chiaraviglio, Francesca [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bile ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.

  15. The Use of Path Integral Ideals: Deriving the Euler Summation Formula for Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, Aleksandar; Balaz, Antun; Belic, Aleksandar [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and comment on a new quantity that we have recently introduced: the path integral ideal. The new quantity governs the flow of a discrete quantum theory to its continuum limit. Path integral ideals satisfy a unique integral equation - the distinction between different quantum theories being in the boundary conditions. An asymptotic expansion of this equation has led to the derivation of a generalization of Euler's summation formula for path integrals. The new analytical method has brought about a systematic improvement of the convergence of path integrals. Applied to numerical procedures, the new analytical input has resulted in the speedup of numerical simulations by many orders of magnitude. On the analytical side, the integral equation for ideals may turn out to be a useful setting for extending the obtained results to a wider setting - e.g. to p-adic valued theories and theories on non-commuting space-times.

  16. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin,...

  17. EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel December 7, 2011 - 3:33pm Addthis Downtown...

  18. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  19. An Optimal Path Model for the Risk-Averse Traveler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leilei Zhang

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2014 ... The model is suitable for a risk-averse traveler, who prefers a path with ... Citation

  20. Software-based tool path evaluation for environmental sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KONG, DAEYOUNG; Seungchoun Choi; Yusuke Yasui; Sushrut Pavanaskar; Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, while the sustainability and energy ef?ciencyof sustainability of a tool path (i.e. energy consumption

  1. Path-transformations in probability and representation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Jonathan

    Path-transformations in probability and representation theory Neil O'Connell University of Warwick Biane and Philippe Bougerol Neil O'Connell Path-transforms in probability and rep. theory #12;Pitman is a three-dimensional Bessel process. Neil O'Connell Path-transforms in probability and rep. theory #12;The

  2. Dynamic Path Consistency for Spatial Reasoning Lamia Belouaer, Maroua Bouzid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Ontology of a given environment. In order to evaluate the performance of our dynamic path consistency method, we reactive planning and path finding. Let us consider the example of an accident at a nuclear plant. Generally if something goes wrong there are always planned paths from any position in the nuclear plant

  3. Your path to a career in Health Care Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Your path to a career in Health Care Professions #12;H ealth care professionals have successful careers in a variety of areas. They may work in health care administration, provide patient care, or sell is not the only path to a career in health care. In the following pages, you will find that there are many paths

  4. Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure- Theoretic Approach Devesh K. Jha the problem of goal-directed robot path planning in the presence of uncertainties that are induced by bounded, probabilistic finite state automata 1 Motivation and Introduction In general, path planning of robots (e

  5. Efficient Path Delay Test Generation with Boolean Satisfiability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Kun

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    delay test generator CodGen. A mixed structural-functional approach was implemented in CodGen where longest paths were detected using the K Longest Path Per Gate (KLPG) algorithm and path justification and dynamic compaction were handled with the SAT...

  6. Walden's Paths quiz: system design and implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arora, Avital Jayant

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have them submitted to the instructor for evaluation. ~ Any enors tn transmitting results to the instructor may cause incorrect analysis by the instructor or incorrect grades. ~ The testing and result reporting mechanism can be a security concern... to Walden's Paths . . Different types of questions. Submitting long answers to instructor for evaluation. . . . . Different types of quizzes. Result page for quiz Preview question. . Printer friendly version. Identifying the user . . Emailing...

  7. Systematically Accelerated Convergence of Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogojevic, A.; Balaz, A.; Belic, A. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new analytical method that systematically improves the convergence of path integrals of a generic N-fold discretized theory. Using it we calculate the effective actions S{sup (p)} for p{<=}9, which lead to the same continuum amplitudes as the starting action, but that converge to that continuum limit as 1/N{sup p}. We checked this derived speedup in convergence by performing Monte Carlo simulations on several different models.

  8. Free Energy Changes, Fluctuations, and Path Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate some of the static and dynamic relations discovered by Cohen, Crooks, Evans, Jarzynski, Kirkwood, Morriss, Searles, and Zwanzig. These relations link nonequilibrium processes to equilibrium isothermal free energy changes and to dynamical path probabilities. We include ideas suggested by Dellago, Geissler, Oberhofer, and Schoell-Paschinger. Our treatment is intended to be pedagogical, for use in an updated version of our book: Time Reversibility, Computer Simulation, and Chaos. Comments are very welcome.

  9. The criteria of fracture in the case of the leak of pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habil; Ziliukas, A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to forecast the break of the high pressure vessels and the network of pipes in a nuclear reactor, according to the concept of leak before break of pressure vessels, it is necessary to analyze the conditions of project, production, and mounting quality as well as of exploitation. It is also necessary to evaluate the process of break by the help of the fracture criteria. In the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant of, in Lithuania, the most important objects of investigation are: the highest pressure pipes, made of Japanese steel 19MN5 and having an anticorrosive austenitic: coal inside, the pipes of distribution, which arc made of 08X1810T steel. The steel of the network of pipes has a quality of plasticity: therefore the only criteria of fragile is impossible to apply to. The process of break would be best described by the universal criteria of elastic - plastic fracture. For this purpose the author offers the criterion of the double parameter.

  10. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  11. Leak before break behaviour of austenitic and ferritic pipes containing circumferential defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadtmueller, W.; Sturm, D.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several research projects carried out at MPA Stuttgart to investigate the Leak-before-Break (LBB) behavior of safety relevant pressure bearing components are summarized. Results presented relate to pipes containing circumferential defects subjected to internal pressure and external bending loading. An overview of the experimentally determined results for ferritic components is presented. For components containing postulated or actual defects, the dependence of the critical loading limit on the defect size is shown in the form of LBB curves. These are determined experimentally and/or by calculation for through-wall slits, and represent the boundary curve between leakage and massive fracture. For surface defects and a given bending moment and internal pressure, no fracture will occur if the length at leakage remains smaller than the critical defect length given by the LBB curve for through-wall defects. The predictive capability of engineering calculational methods are presented by way of example. The investigation programs currently underway, testing techniques, and initial results are outlined.

  12. Diffusion Coefficient of Tritium Through Molten Salt Flibe and Rate of Tritium Leak from Fusion Reactor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukada, Satoshi [Kyushu University (Japan); Anderl, Robert A. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Sagara, Akio [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Kyushu University (Japan)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion coefficients of hydrogen isotopes in Flibe were correlated with making reference to previous relating data of F{sup -} ion self-diffusivity and Flibe viscosity and so on. Rates of tritium permeation through structural materials in a fusion reactor system with Flibe blanket were estimated comparatively under conditions with or without a Flibe permeation barrier. A way to lower the tritium leak rate below a level regulated by law was proposed, and its effectiveness was discussed.

  13. The {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} applicability in decision support system {open_quotes}strength{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torop, V.M.; Orynyak, I.V. [Institute for Problems of Strength, Kiev (Ukraine); Kutovoy, O.L. [Institute of Structure Integrity, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A software decision support system, STRENGTH, for application of leak before break analysis, is described. The background methodology and sample application are outlined. The program allows multioptional computation of loading parameters for different types of defects, and variable properties for metals and welded joints. Structural strength is assessed, and service life predictions are made. The program is used to analyze specific defects identified by nondestructive testing.

  14. Radial Inflow Gas Turbine Flow Path Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samip Shah; Gaurang Chaudhri; Digvijay Kulshreshtha; S. A. Channiwalla

    Abstract:- A new method for radial inflow gas turbine flow paths design based on a unique integrated conceptual design environment AxSTREAM is presented in this paper. This integrated environment is a seamless and swift processing scheme that incorporates stages aerodynamic analysis and preliminary design/sizing based on the one dimensional method. The environment makes possible to find number of different designs with inverse task solver, basing on initially specified boundary conditions, closing conditions and design variables. Design space explorer provides easy and visual comparison for range of obtained design in customizable coordinate axes. Solution filtering on different parameters, such as meridional and axial dimensions, maximal blades weight, saving the time to choose from thousands obtained solutions the only one right design. Flexibility of presented approach allows to built-up complete gas turbine flow path from consequence of individual elements: stationary and rotating elements, ducts, heat exchangers, and analyze it in common environment. Complete control of all aspects of aerodynamic flow path quality, structural reliability, and integral performances on design and offdesign conditions is performing throughout all design process. This gives full interaction between user and system for immediate correction and enhancement of current design data using various optimization capabilities to feel the impact of changes on each design step. Integrated system AxSTREAM significantly shortening the design cycle time from initial machine concept to finalized design with all offdesign performances details. The design process is demonstrated for a 25kW radial inflow gas turbine. Keywords:- Radial Inflow Turbine, Performance Maps, AxSTREAM I.

  15. Priming on the path of least resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wruck, Eric Michael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the different measures of representativeness, the model predicts Output Dominance will account for the most variance in how frequently an exemplar is used in an imagination task ( i. e. Imagination Frequency). Another significant feature of the path of least... Frequency-Convergent = IF-C; Imagination Frequency-Divergent = IF-D. 25 Table 2 (continued) output typic I'amil IF- T IF- C IF- D saying the pledge of allegiance 2 4. 6 4. 6 0 0 0 senior ring dunking tribal worship/ceremonies tucking children in 4 7...

  16. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart (PPPL) [PPPL

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  17. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is aL

  18. Flight Path 30R | ICE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R is

  19. Flight Path Target 4 East Port

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs andR Flight Path 15R90L

  20. Career Paths | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,ComputersTrinity /Paths | National Nuclear

  1. PathScale Compliers at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysicsParticipantsPartners ofPatents Kumar, PathScale

  2. Flight Path 30L - About ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14Publications

  3. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14PublicationsLinks

  4. Flight Path 30L - ICE House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path

  5. Flight Path 60R - About GEANIE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flight

  6. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE Collaborators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4

  7. Flight Path 60R - GEANIE publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4R -

  8. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget 4R

  9. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTarget

  10. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL -

  11. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussel, G. [AIB Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  12. Construction of vertex-disjoint paths in alternating group networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuming; Xiao, Wenjun; Parhami, Behrooz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    misplaced symbols are Construction of vertex-disjoint paths32845671 ? 23145678 ? e Construction of vertex-disjoint2164537 ? e ? 2314567 ? e Construction of vertex-disjoint

  13. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Andrew Held, Senior Director of Feedstock Development, Virent, Inc.

  14. Rethinking the Cyber Threat A Framework and Path Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Rethinking the Cyber Threat A Framework and Path Forward SCOTT CHARNEY Corporate Vice President ..................................................................................................................................................5 Understanding the Cyber Threat .................................................................................................................5 Rethinking the Cyber Threat

  15. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  16. Distributional properties of stochastic shortest paths for smuggled nuclear material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roach, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The shortest path problem on a network with fixed weights is a well studied problem with applications to many diverse areas such as transportation and telecommunications. We are particularly interested in the scenario where a nuclear material smuggler tries to succesfully reach herlhis target by identifying the most likely path to the target. The identification of the path relies on reliabilities (weights) associated with each link and node in a multi-modal transportation network. In order to account for the adversary's uncertainty and to perform sensitivity analysis we introduce random reliabilities. We perform some controlled experiments on the grid and present the distributional properties of the resulting stochastic shortest paths.

  17. DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that account for uncertainty in meteorological conditions, contaminant source, and degradation mechanisms. Path Forward: Systems 15 A: Liner Transport - Define existing...

  18. GRASP WITH PATH-RELINKING FOR THE MULTI-PLANT ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 21, 2008 ... sectors, for example, in the mattress, stainless steel, and beverage industries, where plants are spread out .... The pure GRASP heuristic does not have the path

  19. Solution Methods for the Multi-trip Elementary Shortest Path ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    builds partial paths, it assigns a label to each, indicating the resource .... node are used to update the elapsed time and the vehicle load (resources consumed),.

  20. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  1. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  2. Minimal paths between communities induced by geographical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Arruda, Henrique Ferraz; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate the betweenness centrality in geographical networks and its relationship with network communities. We show that nodes with large betweenness define what we call characteristic betweenness paths in both modeled and real-world geographical networks. We define a geographical network model that possess a simple topology while still being able to present such betweenness paths. Using this model, we show that such paths represent pathways between entry and exit points of highly connected regions, or communities, of geographical networks. By defining a new network, containing information about community adjacencies in the original network, we describe a means to characterize the mesoscale connectivity provided by such characteristic betweenness paths.

  3. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric and gas water heaters, both of which areMEPS revisions. For gas water heaters, the energy factor islevel. For electric water heaters, continued efficiency

  4. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  5. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  6. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

  7. Application of the leak-before-break concept to the primary circuit piping of the Leningrad NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eperin, A.P.; Zakharzhevsky, Yu.O.; Arzhaev, A.I. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year Finnish-Russian cooperation program has been initiated in 1995 to demonstrate the applicability of the leak-before-break concept (LBB) to the primary circuit piping of the Leningrad NPP. The program includes J-R curve testing of authentic pipe materials at full operating temperature, screening and computational LBB analyses complying with the USNRC Standard Review Plan 3.6.3, and exchange of LBB-related information with emphasis on NDE. Domestic computer codes are mainly used, and all tests and analyses are independently carried out by each party. The results are believed to apply generally to RBMK type plants of the first generation.

  8. Schedule path optimization for quantum annealing and adiabatic quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lishan Zeng; Jun Zhang; Mohan Sarovar

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum annealing and adiabatic quantum computing have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent quantum annealing implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount.

  9. Methanol Along the Path from Envelope to Protoplanetary Disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of > 1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical ch...

  10. Journal of Differential Equations Ramification of rough paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 1, 2009 ... B-series. The stack of iterated integrals of a path is embedded in a larger al- gebraic structure ... iterated integrals [18,19] which is at the base of Lyons theory of rough paths [20]. Lyons theory ...... ?|b| ? g(|b|)(rs), see e.g. [5, p.

  11. On the Optimal Path Length for Tor Kevin Bauer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borisov, Nikita

    -hop paths trivially reveal entry guards to exit routers, but even with three-hop paths the exit can learn disadvantage of a two-hop design is that exit routers can triv- ially discover clients' entry guards, since they communicate directly. We empir- ically demonstrate that malicious exit routers can identify clients' entry

  12. Improved Hardness of Approximation for Stackelberg Shortest-Path Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verbrugge, Clark

    the Stackelberg shortest-path pricing problem, which is defined as follows. Given a graph G with fixed-cost on the predefined fixed costs and our prices, a customer purchases a cheapest s-t-path in G and we receive payment costs, we may assign prices to a subset of the items. Given both fixed costs and prices, a single

  13. Large deviations for rough paths of fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Annie

    limit theorem. Stochastic modeling deals basically with rough path controls. Indeed, the ground-breaking It^o's theory on stochastic differential equations is based on Brownian motion, which has almost surely nowhere differentiable sam- ple paths but only -H¨older continuous ones, with ]0, 1 2 [. Note

  14. Power Transmission Network Design by Greedy Randomized Adaptive Path Relinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    different solutions could be reached exploring these different trajectories. The electric power system1 Power Transmission Network Design by Greedy Randomized Adaptive Path Relinking Haroldo Faria Jr Adaptive Path Relinking, applied to solve static power transmission network design problems. This new

  15. SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Efficient camera path planning algorithm for human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    , and a near-optimal path can be obtained. In addition, some COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS Comp. AnimSPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Efficient camera path planning algorithm for human motion overview I-Cheng Yeh1 research topic, benefiting many animation applications. Existing optimal-based approaches are generally

  16. Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    -lived radioactive components. · Safe: no catastrophic accidents; Low-risk for nuclear materials proliferation WhyMike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization Aspen, 9 July 2003 Fusion Energy: "Pipe Dream or Panacea" #12;Mike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths

  17. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES ZHENJIE REN Abstract, inspired by [3], we define the viscosity solution, by using the nonlinear expectation. The paper contains , that for any bounded viscosity subsolution u1 and Key words and phrases. Path dependent PDEs, Dirichlet problem

  18. A middle path for electricity options and sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, J.I.; Herring, J.S.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a landmark article in Foreign Affairs in October 1976, Amory Lovins presented his vision of two vastly different and seemingly irreconcilable paths that energy provision might take into the future. One path was a ``hard`` path, characterized by extensive development of large, capital-intensive centralized electrical generating facilities and their peripherals, designed with little consideration given to the matching of these facilities to the requirements of the end-use needs. The second, ``soft`` path was characterized by energy technologies that are diverse, operate on renewable energy flows, are relatively simple, less capital-intensive, and matched in scale and energy quality to end-use needs. One of the most controversial arguments in the Lovins` paper was that the ``hard`` and ``soft`` paths are culturally and institutionally antagonistic. In retrospect, it seems this argument was self-fulfilling, for the history of the energy debate throughout the developed world since the appearance of the Lovins` article has been marked by an either-or antagonism that has left little room for serious discussion of a ``middle-path.`` In this paper, we argue that ``middle-path,`` paved with elements of both the soft and hard, is especially suited for developing countries, since they do not now carry the burden of an existing and extensive ``hard path`` energy infrastructure.

  19. MIXED INTEGER PROGRAMMING FOR MULTI-VEHICLE PATH PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How, Jonathan P.

    .up.pt http://www.fe.up.pt/ecc2001/ Keywords: autonomous vehicles, path planning, collision avoidance Abstract This paper presents a new approach to fuel-optimal path plan- ning of multiple vehicles using a combination will be optimized with respect to both fuel and/or time, and must ensure that the vehicles do not collide with each

  20. Analog VLSI for Robot Path Planning Mircea Stan Wayne Burleson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan, Mircea R.

    . In cartesian space there are two or three dimensions and the robot arm's nonzero dimensions must be takenAnalog VLSI for Robot Path Planning Mircea Stan Wayne Burleson Department of Electrical & Computer­545­4611 fax Abstract Analog VLSI provides a convenient and high­ performance engine for robot path planning

  1. Path Integrals and Lorentz Violation in Polymer Quantized Scalar Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nirmalya Kajuri

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a path integral formulation of polymer quantized scalar field theory, starting from the Hilbert Space framework. This brings the polymer quantized scalar field theory under the ambit of Feynman diagrammatic techniques. The path integral formulation also shows that Lorentz invariance is lost for the Klein-Gordon field.

  2. Performance-Aware Speculation Control using Wrong Path Usefulness Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Austin {cjlee, patt}@ece.utexas.edu §School of Computer Science Georgia Institute of Technology hyesoon are useless for processor performance and try to eliminate the execution of all wrong-path instructions incurred by fetch gating mech- anisms that assume wrong-path execution is useless, thereby both im- proving

  3. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beckenbach, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R. [California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  4. A New Weighted Shortest Path Tree for Convergecast Traffic Routing in WSN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , existing SPT approaches aim to construct a tree rooted at the sink such that the cost of the path from any to the basic one. Index Terms--Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN), Shortest Path Tree (SPT), weighted path cost such that the path cost from any node to the sink is minimal. In existing construction algorithms, the cost of a path

  5. Theory of extreme correlations using canonical Fermions and path integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shastry, B. Sriram, E-mail: sriram@physics.ucsc.edu

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The  t–J  model is studied using a novel and rigorous mapping of the Gutzwiller projected electrons, in terms of canonical electrons. The mapping has considerable similarity to the Dyson–Maleev transformation relating spin operators to canonical Bosons. This representation gives rise to a non Hermitian quantum theory, characterized by minimal redundancies. A path integral representation of the canonical theory is given. Using it, the salient results of the extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory, including the previously found Schwinger equations of motion, are easily rederived. Further, a transparent physical interpretation of the previously introduced auxiliary Greens function and the ‘caparison factor’, is obtained. The low energy electron spectral function in this theory, with a strong intrinsic asymmetry, is summarized in terms of a few expansion coefficients. These include an important emergent energy scale ?{sub 0} that shrinks to zero on approaching the insulating state, thereby making it difficult to access the underlying very low energy Fermi liquid behavior. The scaled low frequency ECFL spectral function, related simply to the Fano line shape, has a peculiar energy dependence unlike that of a Lorentzian. The resulting energy dispersion obtained by maximization is a hybrid of a massive and a massless Dirac spectrum E{sub Q}{sup ?}??Q??(?{sub 0}{sup 2}+Q{sup 2}), where the vanishing of Q, a momentum type variable, locates the kink minimum. Therefore the quasiparticle velocity interpolates between (??1) over a width ?{sub 0} on the two sides of Q=0, implying a kink there that strongly resembles a prominent low energy feature seen in angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) of cuprate materials. We also propose novel ways of analyzing the ARPES data to isolate the predicted asymmetry between particle and hole excitations. -- Highlights: •Spectral function of the Extremely Correlated Fermi Liquid theory at low energy. •Electronic origin of low energy kinks in energy dispersion. •Non Hermitian representation of Gutzwiller projected electrons. •Analogy with Dyson–Maleev representation of spins. •Path integral formulation of extremely correlated electrons.

  6. Results of Tank-Leak Detection Demonstration Using Geophysical Techniques at the Hanford Mock Tank Site-Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During July and August of 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), hosted researchers from Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National laboratories, and a private contractor, HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., for deployment of the following five geophysical leak-detection technologies at the Hanford Site Mock Tank in a Tank Leak Detection Demonstration (TLDD): (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); (2) Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction (CEMI); (3) High-Resolution Resistivity (HRR); (4) Cross-Borehole Radar (XBR); and (5) Cross-Borehole Seismic Tomography (XBS). Under a ''Tri-party Agreement'' with Federal and state regulators, the U.S. Department of Energy will remove wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) and other miscellaneous underground tanks for storage in the double-shell tank system. Waste retrieval methods are being considered that use very little, if any, liquid to dislodge, mobilize, and remove the wastes. As additional assurance of protection of the vadose zone beneath the SSTs, tank wastes and tank conditions may be aggressively monitored during retrieval operations by methods that are deployed outside the SSTs in the vadose zone.

  7. Real time imaging of live cell ATP leaking or release events by chemiluminescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yun

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to expand the chemiluminescence microscopy applications in live bacterial/mammalian cell imaging and to improve the detection sensitivity for ATP leaking or release events. We first demonstrated that chemiluminescence (CL) imaging can be used to interrogate single bacterial cells. While using a luminometer allows detecting ATP from cell lysate extracted from at least 10 bacterial cells, all previous cell CL detection never reached this sensitivity of single bacteria level. We approached this goal with a different strategy from before: instead of breaking bacterial cell membrane and trying to capture the transiently diluted ATP with the firefly luciferase CL assay, we introduced the firefly luciferase enzyme into bacteria using the modern genetic techniques and placed the CL reaction substrate D-luciferin outside the cells. By damaging the cell membrane with various antibacterial drugs including antibiotics such as Penicillins and bacteriophages, the D-luciferin molecules diffused inside the cell and initiated the reaction that produces CL light. As firefly luciferases are large protein molecules which are retained within the cells before the total rupture and intracellular ATP concentration is high at the millmolar level, the CL reaction of firefly luciferase, ATP and D-luciferin can be kept for a relatively long time within the cells acting as a reaction container to generate enough photons for detection by the extremely sensitive intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. The result was inspiring as various single bacterium lysis and leakage events were monitored with 10-s temporal resolution movies. We also found a new way of enhancing diffusion D-luciferin into cells by dehydrating the bacteria. Then we started with this novel single bacterial CL imaging technique, and applied it for quantifying gene expression levels from individual bacterial cells. Previous published result in single cell gene expression quantification mainly used a fluorescence method; CL detection is limited because of the difficulty to introduce enough D-luciferin molecules. Since dehydration could easily cause proper size holes in bacterial cell membranes and facilitate D-luciferin diffusion, we used this method and recorded CL from individual cells each hour after induction. The CL light intensity from each individual cell was integrated and gene expression levels of two strain types were compared. Based on our calculation, the overall sensitivity of our system is already approaching the single enzyme level. The median enzyme number inside a single bacterium from the higher expression strain after 2 hours induction was quantified to be about 550 molecules. Finally we imaged ATP release from astrocyte cells. Upon mechanical stimulation, astrocyte cells respond by increasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level and releasing ATP to extracellular spaces as signaling molecules. The ATP release imaged by direct CL imaging using free firefly luciferase and D-luciferin outside cells reflects the transient release as well as rapid ATP diffusion. Therefore ATP release detection at the cell surface is critical to study the ATP release mechanism and signaling propagation pathway. We realized this cell surface localized ATP release imaging detection by immobilizing firefly luciferase to streptavidin beads that attached to the cell surface via streptavidin-biotin interactions. Both intracellular Ca{sup 2+} propagation wave and extracellular ATP propagation wave at the cell surface were recorded with fluorescence and CL respectively. The results imply that at close distances from the stimulation center (<120 {micro}m) extracellular ATP pathway is faster, while at long distances (>120 {micro}m) intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling through gap junctions seems more effective.

  8. NGNP Program 2013 Status and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology can play an important role in the energy future of the United States by extending the use of nuclear energy for non-electricity energy production missions, as well as continuing to provide a considerable base load electric power generation capability. Extending nuclear energy into the industrial and transportation sectors through the coproduction of process heat and electricity provides safe, reliable energy for these sectors in an environmentally responsible manner. The modular HTGR provides a substantial improvement in nuclear plant safety for the protection of the public and the environment, and supports collocation of the HTGRhigh temperature gas-cooled reactor with major industrial facilities. Under U.S. Department of Energy direction since 2006, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project at Idaho National Laboratory has been working toward commercializing the HTGR technology. However, a recent decision by the Secretary of Energy to reduce the scope of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to a research and development program, considerable realignment has taken place. This report: (1) summarizes the accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program from FY2011 through FY2013; (2) lays out the path forward necessary to achieve the ultimate objective of commercializing HTGR technology; and (3) discusses ongoing technical, licensing, and evaluation activities under the realigned Next Generation Nuclear Plant program considered important to preserve the significant investment made by the government to-date and to maintain some progress in meeting the objectives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct2005).

  9. Using shortest path to discover criminal community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalingam, Pritheega; Rao, Asha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracting communities using existing community detection algorithms yields dense sub-networks that are difficult to analyse. Extracting a smaller sample that embodies the relationships of a list of suspects is an important part of the beginning of an investigation. In this paper, we present the efficacy of our shortest paths network search algorithm (SPNSA) that begins with an "algorithm feed", a small subset of nodes of particular interest, and builds an investigative sub-network. The algorithm feed may consist of known criminals or suspects, or persons of influence. This sets our approach apart from existing community detection algorithms. We apply the SPNSA on the Enron Dataset of e-mail communications starting with those convicted of money laundering in relation to the collapse of Enron as the algorithm feed. The algorithm produces sparse and small sub-networks that could feasibly identify a list of persons and relationships to be further investigated. In contrast, we show that identifying sub-networks o...

  10. A Path to Collaborative Strategic Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy M. Carlson

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative learning is critical for the future of any organization and must align with the strategic organizational processes that result in products valued by others. To discover these processes, proposal preparation is explored using topic-oriented ethnography, grounded theory, and an innovative addition to qualitative interviewing, called metainquiry. Using interview data from editors, graphic artists, text processors, scientists, engineers, and technical managers, substantive theory emerges. The research discovers the five essential processes of owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing needed for organizational strategic learning to occur. The dimensions of these processes are made explicit and can be used to gauge the health of any organization. The substantive theory also provides insight into the ability of collaborative learning to evolve, flourish, and adapt to the strategic advantage of the organization. Lastly, actionable goals with ten essential elements emerge that link owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing as a path for all organizations to follow to promote collaborative learning communities and enhance their competitive advantage.

  11. Lexicalisation Patterns of Rendering Path Descriptions in Polish Translation from English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch?opek, Dorota

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with constructions lexicalising precise path through satellites, Polish translation renders the path, neutralises it, changes it, or omits the path conveyed by the original version, which is illustrated by this paper....

  12. MS17AM LEAK CHECKER The MS17AM is a manual valve version of the MS17AB. Since it is a manual unit, some care must be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    MS17AM LEAK CHECKER The MS17AM is a manual valve version of the MS17AB. Since it is a manual unit, some care must be exercised in the sequencing of the valves. The most important things to remember are that during normal leak testing: 1. The THROTTLE VALVE is NEVER opened unless the ROUGH VALVE has been

  13. As you know, water costs continue to rise, but you can do something to help yourself. Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will help you a certification program focused on water efficiency to ensure that your in-ground irrigation system is not leaking tape and a wrench. 8. Consult with an irrigation installer (WaterSense partner) who has passed

  14. Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 was enacted by Congress to move the nation toward increased energy independence by increasing the production of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law establishes a new renewable fuel standard (RFS) that requires the nation to use 36 billion gallons annually (2.3 million barrels per day) of renewable fuel in its vehicles by 2022. Ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the US, and its production has grown dramatically over the past decade. According to EISA and RFS, ethanol (produced from corn as well as cellulosic feedstocks) will make up the vast majority of the new renewable fuel requirements. However, ethanol use limited to E10 and E85 (in the case of flex fuel vehicles or FFVs) will not meet this target. Even if all of the E0 gasoline dispensers in the country were converted to E10, such sales would represent only about 15 billion gallons per year. If 15% ethanol, rather than 10% were used, the potential would be up to 22 billion gallons. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10, that is, gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85, a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in FFVs. Although DOE remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Given this reality, DOE and others have begun assessing the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as one way to transition to higher volumes of ethanol. In October of 2010, the EPA granted a partial waiver to the Clean Air Act allowing the use of fuel that contains up to 15% ethanol for the model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor vehicles. This waiver represents the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward the commercialization of E15 gasoline blends. On January 2011, this waiver was expanded to include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a relatively short timeframe. Initially, these material studies included test fuels of Fuel C,

  15. Optimally controlling hybrid electric vehicles using path forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsargyri, Georgia-Evangelina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) with path-forecasting belong to the class of fuel efficient vehicles, which use external sensory information and powertrains with multiple operating modes in order to increase fuel economy. ...

  16. Human-Automation Path Planning Optimization and Decision Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Path planning is a problem encountered in multiple domains, including unmanned vehicle control, air traffic control, and future exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. Due to the voluminous and complex nature of the ...

  17. Finding Smallest Paths in Rectilinear Polygons on a Hypercube Multiprocessor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    vertices on a hypercube multiprocessor with max(n; p) processors in time O(t + log n) where p = n log n). Smallest paths have applications in VLSI design (minimizing vias), robot motion planning, and the design

  18. Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene January 23, 2015 The crystal structure of CrI3 includes hexagonal nets formed by Cr atoms (blue) with magnetic moments...

  19. Combining Path Integration and Remembered Landmarks When Navigating without Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrater, Paul R.

    This study investigated the interaction between remembered landmark and path integration strategies for estimating current location when walking in an environment without vision. We asked whether observers navigating without ...

  20. Optimally Controlling Hybrid Electric Vehicles using Path Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.

    The paper examines path-dependent control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). In this approach we seek to improve HEV fuel economy by optimizing charging and discharging of the vehicle battery depending on the forecasted ...

  1. Path dependent receding horizon control policies for hybrid electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.

    Future hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) may use path-dependent operating policies to improve fuel economy. In our previous work, we developed a dynamic programming (DP) algorithm for prescribing the battery state of charge ...

  2. Multiphase flow and control of fluid path in microsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhunjhunwala, Manish

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniaturized chemical-systems are expected to have advantages of handling, portability, cost, speed, reproducibility and safety. Control of fluid path in small channels between processes in a chemical/biological network ...

  3. Asymptotically optimal path planning and surface reconstruction for inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by inspection applications for marine structures, this thesis develops algorithms to enable their autonomous inspection. Two essential parts of the inspection problem are (1) path planning and (2) surface ...

  4. Maximal Sensitive Dependence and the Optimal Path to Epidemic Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forgoston, Eric; Shaw, Leah B; Schwartz, Ira B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extinction of an epidemic or a species is a rare event that occurs due to a large, rare stochastic fluctuation. Although the extinction process is dynamically unstable, it follows an optimal path that maximizes the probability of extinction. We show that the optimal path is also directly related to the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the underlying dynamical system in that the optimal path displays maximum sensitivity to initial conditions. We consider several stochastic epidemic models, and examine the extinction process in a dynamical systems framework. Using the dynamics of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents as a constructive tool, we demonstrate that the dynamical systems viewpoint of extinction evolves naturally toward the optimal path.

  5. Panel Discussion: Career Paths in Energy & Sustainability: Perspective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a.m.-7 p.m. The events include: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Panel Discussion "Career Paths in Energy & Sustainability: Perspectives from Successful Women Professionals," including Dr....

  6. Threat-aware Path Planning in Uncertain Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoude, Georges

    This paper considers the path planning problem for an autonomous vehicle in an urban environment populated with static obstacles and moving vehicles with uncertain intents. We propose a novel threat assessment module, ...

  7. Thermal Conductivity Spectroscopy Technique to Measure Phonon Mean Free Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, A. J.

    Size effects in heat conduction, which occur when phonon mean free paths (MFPs) are comparable to characteristic lengths, are being extensively explored in many nanoscale systems for energy applications. Knowledge of MFPs ...

  8. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Arunas Chesonis, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, Sweetwater Energy

  9. The paths and characteristics of real estate entrepreneurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazmierski, Michael (Michael Anthony)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What paths have real estate entrepreneurs taken to establish their own firm? Also, what characteristics did they develop and utilize in the process? This thesis gives the unique opportunity to better understand the life ...

  10. Stochastic mobility-based path planning in uncertain environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    The ability of mobile robots to generate feasible trajectories online is an important requirement for their autonomous operation in unstructured environments. Many path generation techniques focus on generation of time- ...

  11. Alarm guided critical function and success path monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of alarm indication on the overview (IPSO) display to initiate diagnosis of challenges to critical functions or unavailability of success paths, and further alarm-based guidance toward ultimate diagnosis.

  12. Optimal multi-robot path planning with temporal logic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulusoy, Alphan

    In this paper we present a method for automatically planning optimal paths for a group of robots that satisfy a common high level mission specification. Each robot's motion in the environment is modeled as a weighted ...

  13. Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies Daniel Hernandez1 , Ryan Smith2 these, mesoscale eddies are of particular interest due to the relevance they have in many oceano

  14. Vickrey Prices and Shortest Paths: What is an edge worth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    network and electrical routing, trans- portation, robot motion planning, critical path computation interest in pric- ing networks and computing resources, which in turn is prompted by the prominent role

  15. Vickrey Prices and Shortest Paths: What is an edge worth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    . Their applications include network and electrical routing, trans­ portation, robot motion planning, critical path by recent interest in pric­ ing networks and computing resources, which in turn is prompted by the prominent

  16. Greedy Path Planning for Maximizing Value of Information in Underwater Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    heritage sites, environmental monitoring (for oil spills or carbon dioxide leaks) and studies of marine to the transmission properties in the underwater environment. Radio waves propagate only for short distances under

  17. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A geologic/geochemical investigation in the vicinity of UPR-200-E-82 was performed using pairs of cone-penetrometer probe holes. A total of 41 direct-push cone-penetrometer borings (19 pairs to investigate different high moisture zones in the same sampling location and 3 individual) were advanced to characterize vadose zone moisture and the distribution of contaminants. A total of twenty sample sets, containing up to two split-spoon liners and one grab sample, were delivered to the laboratory for characterization and analysis. The samples were collected around the documented location of the C-152 pipeline leak, and created an approximately 120-ft diameter circle around the waste site. UPR-200-E-82 was a loss of approximately 2,600 gallons of Cs-137 Recovery Process feed solution containing an estimated 11,300 Ci of cesium-137 and 5 Ci of technetium-99. Several key parameters that are used to identify subsurface contamination were measured, including: water extract pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, technetium-99, sodium, and uranium concentrations and technetium-99 and uranium concentrations in acid extracts. All of the parameters, with the exception of electrical conductivity, were elevated in at least some of the samples analyzed as part of this study. Specifically, soil pH was elevated (from 8.69 to 9.99) in five samples collected northeast and southwest of the C-152 pipeline leak. Similarly, samples collected from these same cone-pentrometer holes contained significantly more water-extractable sodium (more than 50 ?g/g of dry sediment), uranium (as much as 7.66E-01 ?g/g of dry sediment), nitrate (up to 30 ?g/g of dry sediment), and technetium-99 (up to 3.34 pCi/g of dry sediment). Most of the samples containing elevated concentrations of water-extractable sodium also had decreased levels of water extractable calcium and or magnesium, indicating that tank-related fluids that were high in sodium did seep into the vadose zone near these probe holes. Several of the samples containing high concentrations of water-leachable uranium also contained high pore water corrected alkalinity (3.26E+03 mg/L as CaCO3), indicating that the elevated water-leachable uranium could be an artifact of uranyl-carbonate complexation of naturally occurring labile uranium. However, a mass scan of the water extract containing the highest concentration of uranium was performed via inductively coupled mass spectrometry over the range of 230 to 240 atomic mass units, and a discernable peak was observed at mass 236. Although the data is considered qualitative, the presence of uranium-236 in the 1:1 sediment:water extract is a clear indication that the sample contains contaminant uranium [Hanford reprocessed fuel waste]. After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone surrounding the C-152 pipeline leak site has been contaminated by waste generally sent to tanks. The two zones or regions that contained the largest amount of contaminants, either in concentration or by occurrence of several key constituents/contaminants of concern, were located: 1) between the 241-C-151 and 241-C-152 Diversion Boxes (near the location of UPR-200-E-82) and 2) directly across the C-152 waste site near the C-153 Diversion Box (near where a pipeline, which connects the two diversion boxes, is shown on old blue prints . Without the use of more sophisticated analytical techniques, such as isotope signature analysis of ruthenium fission product isotopes, it is impossible to determine if the contamination observed at these two locations are from the same waste source or are a result of different leak events.

  18. FIBREEZE: LEAK-PROOF HOLLOW FIBERS for ARTIFICIAL LUNGS Alexis Zambino, Corina Ramirez, Maddie Cramer, Sissy Henriquez, Spencer Lehr, Trisha Ambe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    FIBREEZE: LEAK-PROOF HOLLOW FIBERS for ARTIFICIAL LUNGS Alexis Zambino, Corina Ramirez, Maddie Technology Center ARTIFICIAL LUNG BASICS CLINICAL NEED & PROBLEM NOVELTY & INNOVATION DESCRIPTION OF MARKET and characterization · Mr. Dave Skoog for his immense support, time, help, and patience ·Lung disease is one

  19. To appear in A. Ram & D.B. Leake, editors, Goal-Driven Learning, MIT Press/Bradford Books. Learning as Goal-Driven Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalski, Ryszard S.

    "toolbox"), the inferential theory of learning proposes a taxonomy of the types of inferencesTo appear in A. Ram & D.B. Leake, editors, Goal-Driven Learning, MIT Press/Bradford Books. Chapter 21 Learning as Goal-Driven Inference Ryszard S. Michalski and Ashwin Ram 1 Inferential Theory

  20. Back-reactions, short-circuits, leaks and other energy wasteful reactions in biological electron transfer: Redox tuning to survive life in O2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Back-reactions, short-circuits, leaks and other energy wasteful reactions in biological Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland c s t r a c t The energy-converting redox enzymes perform productive reactions efficiently despite

  1. Inquiry-based learning templates for creating online educational paths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Sarah Alice

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in the collection of information for a path by providing prompts to include certain types of information. These prompts will direct the author?s search for Web pages to include in the path in terms of the type of information, specific content, and type... Strategy Next, students have to develop a strategy for searching for information that can answer the foundation questions. In this step, students identify search terms (keywords) and search engines. This step might also...

  2. Path integrals for stiff polymers applied to membrane physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Dean; R. R. Horgan

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Path integrals similar to those describing stiff polymers arise in the Helfrich model for membranes. We show how these types of path integrals can be evaluated and apply our results to study the thermodynamics of a minority stripe phase in a bulk membrane. The fluctuation induced contribution to the line tension between the stripe and the bulk phase is computed, as well as the effective interaction between the two phases in the tensionless case where the two phases have differing bending rigidities.

  3. Turbine Steam Path Audits for Improved Performance and Profitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babson, P. E.

    TURBINE STEAM PATH AUDITS FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE AND PROFITABILITY PAUL E. BABSON, DIRECTOR, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, ENCOTECH, INC., SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT This paper describes the use and value of conducting steam path audits... in turbines. Critical measurements and observations made during overhaul identify and quantify the effects of component degradations upon turbine performance as compared to design conditions. The information generated permits performance oriented repair...

  4. Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O. [Tractebel Energy Engineering, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

  5. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

  6. Euclidean Path Modeling from Ground and Aerial Views* Irnran N. Junejo and Hassan Foroosh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foroosh, Hassan

    the trajecto- ries, we can efficientlyassign detectedtrajectoryits associ- ated path model, thereby only

  7. Concurrent constraint programming-based path planning for uninhabited air vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaventure, Olivier

    Concurrent constraint programming-based path planning for uninhabited air vehicles Stefano Gualandi path length, fuel consumption, and path risk are given as well. 1. INTRODUCTION Path planning is a well, it becomes relevant when defining an air vehicle mission. Due to all the domain constraints to be considered

  8. Coherent perfect absorption of path entangled single photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumei Huang; G. S. Agarwal

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the question of coherent perfect absorption (CPA) of single photons, and more generally, of the quantum fields by a {\\it macroscopic} medium. We show the CPA of path entangled single photons in a Fabry-Perot interferometer containing an absorptive medium. The frequency of perfect absorption can be controlled by changing the interferometer parameters like the reflectivity and the complex dielectric constant of the material. We exhibit similar results for path entangled photons in micro-ring resonators. For entangled fields like the ones produced by a down converter the CPA aspect is evident in phase sensitive detection schemes such as in measurements of the squeezing spectrum.

  9. Magnetic Relativistic Schrödinger Operators and \\\\Imaginary-time Path Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Ichinose

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three magnetic relativistic Schr\\"odinger operators corresponding to the classical relativistic Hamiltonian symbol with magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials are considered, dependent on how to quantize the kinetic energy term $\\sqrt{(\\xi-A(x))^2 +m^2}$. We discuss their difference in general and their coincidence in the case of constant magnetic fields, and also study whether they are covariant under gauge transformation. Then results are reviewed on path integral representations for their respective imaginary-time relativistic Schr\\"odinger equations, i.e. heat equations, by means of the probability path space measure related to the L\\'evy process concerned.

  10. NRC Job Code V6060: Extended in-situ and real time monitoring. Task 4: Detection and monitoring of leaks at nuclear power plants external to structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Task 4 of the NRC study on compliance with 10 CFR part 20.1406, minimization of contamination, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a one-year scoping study, in concert with a parallel study performed by NRC/NRR staff, on monitoring for leaks at nuclear power plants (NPPs) external to structures. The objective of this task-4 study is to identify and assess those sensors and monitoring techniques for early detection of abnormal radioactive releases from the engineered facility structures, systems and components (SSCs) to the surrounding underground environment in existing NPPs and planned new reactors. As such, methods of interest include: (1) detection of anomalous water content of soils surrounding SSCs, (2) radionuclides contained in the leaking water, and (3) secondary signals such as temperature. ANL work scope includes mainly to (1) identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, the sensors and techniques that have most promise to detect radionuclides and/or associated chemical releases from SSCs of existing NPPs and (2) review and provide comments on the results of the NRC/NRR staff scoping study to identify candidate technologies. This report constitutes the ANL deliverable of the task-4 study. It covers a survey of sensor technologies and leak detection methods currently applied to leak monitoring at NPPs. The survey also provides a technology evaluation that identifies their strength and deficiency based on their detection speed, sensitivity, range and reliability. Emerging advanced technologies that are potentially capable of locating releases, identifying the radionuclides, and estimating their concentrations and distributions are also included in the report along with suggestions of required further research and development.

  11. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  12. A CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROUGH PATH ABOVE FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    fractional Brownian motion B with any Hurst parameter H ? (0,1), by means ... Rough paths analysis is a theory introduced by Terry Lyons in the pioneering ... functions with finite p-variation with p > 1, or by Hölder continuous functions of order ...

  13. Creating an ICT Portfolio at PATH Richard Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    · Diagnostic tests for diseases · Reproductive health technologies · Maternal & child health technologies in health technologies · Founded 1977 N ki i 70 t i­ Now working in 70 countries · Program for Appropriate Technology in Health 1/21/2010 2Change Seminar PATH focus · Solutions for emerging and epidemic diseases

  14. Finding the Most Likely Infection Path in Networks with Limited ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    directed tree that spans to a set of known infected nodes, subject to path .... and simplified analytical models to increasingly in-depth stochastic agent based ... minimum cost Steiner tree such that the total amount of ressources used in the tree ...

  15. Three Paths to a Revised Information and Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Three Paths to a Revised Information and Computer Literacy Requirement May 1, 2006 Summary implementation of the Computer Literacy requirement. We have attempted to reconcile UGC's desire not to implement previous vote to abolish the Computer Literacy requirement. We have also taken into consideration

  16. PATH PLANNING & MEASUREMENT REGISTRATION FOR ROBOTIC STRUCTURAL ASSET MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France Copyright Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (2014)" #12;INTRODUCTION When considering the applicationPATH PLANNING & MEASUREMENT REGISTRATION FOR ROBOTIC STRUCTURAL ASSET MONITORING S.G. Pierce, C

  17. A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning Chao Zhou, Zhiqiang Cao, Shuo a novel miniature biomimetic robotic fish based on single link with compact structure, high maneuverability and multiple sensors. The robotic fish mimics the motion of Thunniform mode, and the methods

  18. The Museum Theorem: Thick Face-Paths and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Douglas B.

    The Museum Theorem: Thick Face-Paths and Hamiltonian-Connectedness in Plane Graphs Xiaoyun Lu #12;Visiting a Museum The Problem: The entrance and exit of a museum are fixed. You insist on visiting room F. The pieces of what you skip should be somehow "small". #12;Visiting a Museum The Problem

  19. Communication and Path Planning Strategies of a Robotic Coverage Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    and communication energy costs. However, simplified path loss models are utilized to model the communication can be utilized to escape bad communication spots and save the overall energy consump- tion to a remote station. The goal of the robot is to minimize its total energy consumption, which includes both

  20. PATH FOLLOWING CONTROL FOR A MOBILE ROBOT PUSHING A BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    PATH FOLLOWING CONTROL FOR A MOBILE ROBOT PUSHING A BALL Xiang Li, Andreas Zell Wilhelm-Schickard-Institute, Department of Computer Architecture, University of Tübingen, Sand 1, 72076 Tübingen, Germany {lix, zell}@informatik.uni-tuebingen.de Abstract: This paper focuses on the control problem of a mobile robot pushing a ball. In order to drive

  1. Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

  2. Bounded Uncertainty Roadmaps for Path Planning Leonidas J. Guibas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guibas, Leonidas J.

    Bounded Uncertainty Roadmaps for Path Planning Leonidas J. Guibas1 , David Hsu2 , Hanna Kurniawati2 uncertainty during planning. We in- troduce the notion of a bounded uncertainty roadmap (BURM) and use, and it is not much slower than classic probabilistic roadmap planning algorithms, which ignore uncertainty

  3. MANAGING HANFORD'S LEGACY NO-PATH-FORWARD WASTES TO DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEST LD

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. This vision will protect the Columbia River, reduce the Site footprint, and reduce Site mortgage costs. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste.' The majority of these wastes are suspect transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes which are currently stored in the low-level Burial Grounds (LLBG), or stored above ground in the Central Waste Complex (CWC). A portion of the waste will be generated during ongoing and future site cleanup activities. The DOE-RL and CHPRC have collaborated to identify and deliver safe, cost-effective disposition paths for 90% ({approx}8,000 m{sup 3}) of these problematic wastes. These paths include accelerated disposition through expanded use of offsite treatment capabilities. Disposal paths were selected that minimize the need to develop new technologies, minimize the need for new, on-site capabilities, and accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  4. "Multi-machine" Strategy: The Other Path of the FESAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extrapolating to steady-state. · Demonstrate steady-state heat removal and particle control at power plant & performance under power plant conditions [5 to 10 MW-yr/m2]. #12;1987 TPA Burning Plasma Logic · Employed & Simulation FESAC/Snowmass Report: ITER-Based Development Path #12;Roadmap to Fusion Power EU Variation

  5. Algorithms for an Unmanned Vehicle Path Planning Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Jianglei

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    as possible. The main purpose of this thesis is to address two path planning problems involving a single UV. The two problems we consider are the quota problem and the budget problem. In the quota problem, the vehicle has to visit a sufficient number...

  6. Path Placement Optimization of Manipulators Based on Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    utilisant la consommation ´energ´etique comme crit`ere. Ce travail propose une mthodologie pour d´es: Placement de trajectoires, Consommation ´energ´etique, Optimisation, Manipu- lateur parall`eles. hal to perform a given operation more efficiently with respect to the energy consumed. The path placement problem

  7. Planning Singularity-free Paths on Closed-Chain Manipulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ros, Lluís

    . Henderson is with the Numerical Analysis Group in the Mathematical Sciences Department at IBM's Thomas J for computing singularity-free paths on closed-chain manipulators. Given two non-singular configurations configuration is found. If desired, the method can also be used to compute an exhaustive atlas of the whole

  8. Allinea DDT: Your Partner in Finding Debugged Paths on Mira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Allinea DDT: Your Partner in Finding Debugged Paths on Mira Ian Lumb Senior! #12;BG /P Case Study: Debugging Process Reproduced the crash Ran Allinea DDT in offline mode ­ MPI implementation bug? ­ Memory bug? Ran Allinea DDT in offline mode again Memory debugging enabled

  9. Adleman[1] 1994 DNA Hamiltonian Path Problem , DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. Adleman[1] 1994 DNA Hamiltonian Path Problem , DNA DNA [2]. DNA DNA , . , , 2 , DNA 4 . DNA 4 A(Adenine), C(Cytosine), G(Guanine), T(Thymine) 2 4 . , . 1 mole 6x10 23 DNA DNA . , . DNA NP-complete [1, 2], [2

  10. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  11. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  12. Generalized Doppler effect in spaces with a transport along paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozhidar Z. Iliev

    2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An analog of the classical Doppler effect is investigated in spaces (manifolds) whose tangent bundle is endowed with a transport along paths, which, in particular, can be parallel one. The obtained results are valid irrespectively to the particles mass, i.e. they hold for massless particles (e.g. photons) as well as for massive ones.

  13. A Probabilistic Approach to Optimal Robust Path Planning with Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    and Brian Williams Abstract-- Autonomous vehicles need to plan trajectories to a specified goal that avoid of aircraft obstacle avoidance scenarios. I. INTRODUCTION Path planning for autonomous vehicles the future probabilistic distribution of the vehicle state so that the probability of collision

  14. Chance-Constrained Optimal Path Planning with Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    . Williams Abstract--Autonomous vehicles need to plan trajectories to a specified goal that avoid obstacles validation with an aircraft obstacle avoidance example. I. INTRODUCTION Path planning for autonomous vehicles approach plans the future probabilistic distribution of the vehicle state so that the probability

  15. Robust Path Planning and Feedback Design under Stochastic Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    . Introduction Autonomous vehicles such as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) need to be able to plan trajectories; prior work showed that a UAV operating at a constant altitude as well as other autonomous vehicles canRobust Path Planning and Feedback Design under Stochastic Uncertainty Lars Blackmore Autonomous

  16. Path Cost Optimization Using Genetic Algorithm with Supervised Crossover Operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    are widely applied in maneu- vering robots, such as autonomous underwater vehicles [1] and unmanned aerial effective way. The term cost can be inter- preted as fuel consumption, path visibility, probability of being and solution quality of genetic algorithms. 1. Introduction Thanks to highly advanced autonomous technologies

  17. Path integral for space-time noncommutative field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The path integral for space-time noncommutative theory is formulated by means of Schwinger's action principle, which is based on the equations of motion and a suitable ansatz of asymptotic conditions. The resulting path integral has essentially the same physical basis as the Yang-Feldman formulation. It is first shown that higher derivative theories are neatly dealt with by the path integral formulation, and the underlying canonical structure is recovered by the Bjorken-Johnson-Low (BJL) prescription from correlation functions defined by the path integral. A simple theory which is nonlocal in time is then analyzed for an illustration of the complications related to quantization, unitarity, and positive energy conditions. From the viewpoint of the BJL prescription, the naive quantization in the interaction picture is justified for space-time noncommutative theory but not for the simple theory nonlocal in time. We finally show that the perturbative unitarity and the positive energy condition, in the sense that only the positive energy flows in the positive time direction for any fixed time slice in space-time, are not simultaneously satisfied for space-time noncommutative theory by the known methods of quantization.

  18. A Path Planning Method Using Cubic Spiral with Curvature Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    . The generated path is constituted by both cubic spirals and straight lines, and has continuous and bounded it for the reason of practical use. Mobile robots with forward and backward driving abilities and only uni-direction driving ability are both considered. This method is flexible and is eligible to incorporate with other

  19. Tracking butterfly flight paths across the landscape with harmonic radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northampton, University of

    Tracking butterfly flight paths across the landscape with harmonic radar E. T. Cant1,*, A. D. Smith of five butterfly species were successfully tracked using harmonic radar within an agricultural landscape. Keywords: butterfly flight; harmonic radar; linear landscape features; Aglais urticae; Inachis io 1

  20. Noncommutative Harmonic Oscillator at Finite Temperature: A Path Integral Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jahan

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the path integral approach to a two-dimensional noncommutative harmonic oscillator to derive the partition function of the system at finite temperature. It is shown that the result based on the Lagrangian formulation of the problem, coincides with the Hamiltonian derivation of the partition function.

  1. Indexing and Querying XML Data for Regular Path Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Bongki

    by generating interactive site maps [19]. To retrieve XML and semi-structured data, several query languages have of XML data sources from docu- ments to databases and object repositories. The common featuresIndexing and Querying XML Data for Regular Path Expressions £ Quanzhong Li Bongki Moon Dept

  2. The Number of Hamiltonian Paths in a Rectangular Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Karen L.

    The Number of Hamiltonian Paths in a Rectangular Grid@wesleyan.edu Abstract It is easy to find out which rectangular m vertex by n vertex grids have answers for grids with fixed m for m = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 1 Introduction Given a grid with m vertices

  3. Many Paths to Alopecia via Compromised Regeneration of Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Many Paths to Alopecia via Compromised Regeneration of Hair Follicle Stem Cells Ji Li1,2,3,4 , Ting regeneration, or increased destruction of hair follicles. Much work has elucidated the roles of diffusible morphogens in modulating hair follicle stem cell activities. Recent studies have revealed novel molecular

  4. Multi-path transportation futures study : vehicle characterization and scenario analyses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering; ORNL

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance - and uncertainty - of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). This Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of 'what if' questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  5. Assessing the impact of automated path planning aids in the maritime community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchin, Mariela E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the area of merchant maritime navigation, electronic charts are a relatively new tool. As a result, navigational path planning environments that allow users to manually enter a path onto an electronic chart are becoming ...

  6. Scientists at ALS Find New Path to More Efficient Organic Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists at ALS Find New Path to More Efficient Organic Solar Cells Scientists at ALS Find New Path to More Efficient Organic Solar Cells Print Monday, 07 January 2013 00:00...

  7. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  8. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

  9. Transition Path, Quasi-potential Energy Landscape and Stability of Genetic Switches Xiaoguang Li,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiejun

    Transition Path, Quasi-potential Energy Landscape and Stability of Genetic Switches Cheng Lv,1, reconstructing the global quasi-potential energy landscape, analyzing the uphill and downhill transition paths the properties of transition paths, discuss their relation to the quasi-potential energy landscape

  10. Evaluation of a total energy sensor for glide path control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oseguera, Rosa Maria

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of optimization problems and boundary conditions. The performance index was defined in terms of altitude h (relative and absolute), or path inclination 7 (relative and absolute) to determine the optimal trajectory on take-off through a wind shear. Resulting... flow. The subsequent mass flow was measured by a constant-temperature hot film probe in the duct. Airspeed, altitude, and climb speed were recorded using an analog and a digital recording system. The wind field was modeled approximately...

  11. GROUNDWATER/LEAK DETECTION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POST 2,000LISTAttachment C

  12. Tool path generation and 3D tolerance analysis for free-form surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Young Keun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    path calculation is the method by which the trajectories of the tool is constrained to lie on the designed part. Commonly used tool path generations are as follows: 1. planar section curve 2. iso-parametric curve 3. offset curve 4. projection curve 5... sections as tool path 11 Fig. 4. Surfaces in APT are (a) the overall length of tool path is very large, (b) the tool paths do not take into account the geometry of the designed part. 2. Iso-parametric curve: With the introduction of parametric patches...

  13. Solving the broken link problem in Walden's Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Zubin Jamshed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the path author with a wide range of choices. The algorithm would support search engines by Google4, Yahoo5, MSN6 and Altavista7. 4http://www.google.com 5http://new.search.yahoo.com 6http://search.msn.com 7http://www.altavista.com 26 A verbose... keeping track of all the documents that link to the page and notifying them with the page?s new location at migration time. The main drawback of the abovementioned methods 1http://www.ietf.com/html.charters/urn-charter.html 12 is that even...

  14. Path-sensitive analysis for reducing rollback overheads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, John K.P.; Wang, Kai-Ting Amy; Yamashita, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaotong

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanism is provided for path-sensitive analysis for reducing rollback overheads. The mechanism receives, in a compiler, program code to be compiled to form compiled code. The mechanism divides the code into basic blocks. The mechanism then determines a restore register set for each of the one or more basic blocks to form one or more restore register sets. The mechanism then stores the one or more register sets such that responsive to a rollback during execution of the compiled code. A rollback routine identifies a restore register set from the one or more restore register sets and restores registers identified in the identified restore register set.

  15. Graphene-based battery electrodes having continuous flow paths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jiguang; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Xu, Wu; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Deyu

    2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some batteries can exhibit greatly improved performance by utilizing electrodes having randomly arranged graphene nanosheets forming a network of channels defining continuous flow paths through the electrode. The network of channels can provide a diffusion pathway for the liquid electrolyte and/or for reactant gases. Metal-air batteries can benefit from such electrodes. In particular Li-air batteries show extremely high capacities, wherein the network of channels allow oxygen to diffuse through the electrode and mesopores in the electrode can store discharge products.

  16. Amplification of maximally-path-entangled number states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Rai, Amit [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Chaturvedi, S. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the behavior of a non-Gaussian state like the maximally path-entangled number state commonly known as a N00N state under phase-insensitive amplification. We derive an analytical result for the density matrix of the N00N state for arbitrary gain of the amplifier. We consider cases of both symmetric and antisymmetric amplification of the two modes of the N00N state. We quantitatively evaluate the loss of entanglement by the amplifier in terms of the logarithmic negativity parameter. We find that N00N states are more robust than their Gaussian counterparts.

  17. FACT SHEET: The Path Forward on Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:Energy FACT SHEET: Department ofThe Path

  18. Path to High Efficiency Gasoline Engine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESSHeavy-dutyDepartmentPath to High

  19. TowPath Renewable Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEI Community Cost Per MwHTowPath

  20. Flight Path 15L - About Chi-Nu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14) utilizes

  1. Flight Path 15L - About Chi-Nu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path 14 (1FP14)

  2. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  3. Nuclear Power - Control, Reliability and Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Actinides: Where Do We Stand with the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Technique? 167 Mario De Cesare Part 2 Reliability and Failure Mechanisms 187 Chapter 10 Evaluation of Dynamic J-R Curve for Leak Before Break Design of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Piping... Network 6. Autonomous Control for Space 7. Radiation-Hard and Intelligent Optical Fiber Sensors 8. Monitoring Radioactivity 9. Origin and Detection of Actinides ? Reliability and Failure Mechanisms 10. Dynamic J-R Curve for Leak Analysis 11...

  4. Trees over Infinite Structures and Path Logics with Synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spelten, Alex; Winter, Sarah; 10.4204/EPTCS.73.5

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide decidability and undecidability results on the model-checking problem for infinite tree structures. These tree structures are built from sequences of elements of infinite relational structures. More precisely, we deal with the tree iteration of a relational structure M in the sense of Shelah-Stupp. In contrast to classical results where model-checking is shown decidable for MSO-logic, we show decidability of the tree model-checking problem for logics that allow only path quantifiers and chain quantifiers (where chains are subsets of paths), as they appear in branching time logics; however, at the same time the tree is enriched by the equal-level relation (which holds between vertices u, v if they are on the same tree level). We separate cleanly the tree logic from the logic used for expressing properties of the underlying structure M. We illustrate the scope of the decidability results by showing that two slight extensions of the framework lead to undecidability. In particular, this applies to the ...

  5. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Christopher E. (Schenectady, NY); Dinc, Osman S. (Troy, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat S. (Schenectady, NY); Correia, Victor H. (New Lebanon, NY); Aksit, Mahmut F. (Troy, NY)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

  6. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  7. Spectrally resolved spatiotemporal features of quantum paths in high-order harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lixin; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhai, Chunyang; Wang, Feng; Shi, Wenjing; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally disentangle the contributions of different quantum paths in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the spectrally and spatially resolved harmonic spectra. By adjusting the laser intensity and focusing position, we simultaneously observe the spectrum splitting, frequency shift and intensity-dependent modulation of harmonic yields both for the short and long paths. Based on the simulations, we discriminate the physical mechanisms of the intensity-dependent modulation of HHG due to the quantum path interference and macroscopic interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that the atomic dipole phases of different quantum paths are encoded in the frequency shift. In turn, it enables us to retrieve the atomic dipole phases and the temporal chirps of different quantum paths from the measured harmonic spectra. This result gives an informative mapping of spatiotemporal and spectral features of quantum paths in HHG.

  8. AHSS Stamping Project ? A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Nonlinear Strain Paths Advanced High-Strength Steel Stamping Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS)...

  9. Policy Strategies and Paths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamic Invert Simulation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Kranzl, Lukas; Huber, Claus; Haas, Reinhard; Tsioliaridou, Elena

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schemes for sustainable energy systems”. InternationalPaths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamicmoney - for promoting sustainable energy systems - be spent

  10. A method for finding the statically sensitized critical path in VLSI circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Anindita

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is not to eliminate the false paths but to identify the critical path. Here, instead of starting with a path list and examining one path at a time from this list, they start at a PI with a logic value of 0 or 1 and try to get to the PO of the longest sensitizable... propagate an event from a PI to a PO in the presence of sn input vector. In order to activate a fault the test generation algorithms have to find an input vector that sets a specified line in a circuit to the desired value. This is an instance...

  11. action-based path sampling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matter (arXiv) Summary: We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPCE model of liquid water. Based on thousands of evaporation trajectories, we...

  12. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  13. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  14. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdeldjalil Merdaci; Ahmed Jellal; Lyazid Chetouani

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the normalized wave functions and the eigenvalues in terms of different physical parameters and quantum numbers. By interchanging quantum numbers, we show that our solutions possed interesting properties. The density of current and the non-relativistic limit are analyzed where different conclusions are obtained.

  15. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  16. Path Integral Quantization of Quantum Gauge General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Path integral quantization of quantum gauge general relativity is discussed in this paper. First, we deduce the generating functional of green function with external fields. Based on this generating functional, the propagators of gravitational gauge field and related ghost field are deduced. Then, we calculate Feynman rules of various interaction vertices of three or four gravitational gauge fields and vertex between ghost field and gravitational gauge field. Results in this paper are the bases of calculating vacuum polarization of gravitational gauge field and vertex correction of gravitational couplings in one loop diagram level. As we have pointed out in previous paper, quantum gauge general relativity is perturbative renormalizable, and a formal proof on its renormalizability is also given in the previous paper. Next step, we will calculate one-loop and two-loop renormalization constant, and to prove that the theory is renormalizable in one-loop and two-loop level by direct calculations.

  17. Metabolic paths in world economy and crude oil price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picciolo, Francesco; Ruzzenenti, Franco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1983 Hamilton demonstrated the correlation between the price of oil and gross national product for the U.S. economy. A prolific literature followed exploring the potential correlation of oil prices with other important indices like inflation, industrial production, and food prices, using increasingly refined tools. Our work sheds new light on the role of oil prices in shaping the world economy by investigating the metabolic paths of value across trade between 1960 and 2010, by means of Markov Chain analysis. We show that the interdependence of countries' economies are strictly (anti)correlated to the price of oil. We observed a remarkably high correlation of 0.85, unmatched by any former study addressing the correlation between oil price and major economic indicators.

  18. Fluctuation Statistics in Networks: a Stochastic Path Integral Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew N. Jordan; Eugene V. Sukhorukov; Sebastian Pilgram

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the statistics of fluctuations in a classical stochastic network of nodes joined by connectors. The nodes carry generalized charge that may be randomly transferred from one node to another. Our goal is to find the time evolution of the probability distribution of charges in the network. The building blocks of our theoretical approach are (1) known probability distributions for the connector currents, (2) physical constraints such as local charge conservation, and (3) a time-scale separation between the slow charge dynamics of the nodes and the fast current fluctuations of the connectors. We derive a stochastic path integral representation of the evolution operator for the slow charges. Once the probability distributions on the discrete network have been studied, the continuum limit is taken to obtain a statistical field theory. We find a correspondence between the diffusive field theory and a Langevin equation with Gaussian noise sources, leading nevertheless to non-trivial fluctuation statistics. To complete our theory, we demonstrate that the cascade diagrammatics, recently introduced by Nagaev, naturally follows from the stochastic path integral. We extend the diagrammatics to calculate current correlation functions for an arbitrary network. One primary application of this formalism is that of full counting statistics (FCS). We stress however, that the formalism is suitable for general classical stochastic problems as an alternative to the traditional master equation or Doi-Peliti technique. The formalism is illustrated with several examples: both instantaneous and time averaged charge fluctuation statistics in a mesoscopic chaotic cavity, as well as the FCS and new results for a generalized diffusive wire.

  19. Gelatin based on Power-gel.TM. as solders for Cr.sup.4+laser tissue welding and sealing of lung air leak and fistulas in organs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Tang, Jing; Evans, Jonathan M.; Ho, Peng Pei

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser tissue welding can be achieved using tunable Cr.sup.4+ lasers, semiconductor lasers and fiber lasers, where the weld strength follows the absorption spectrum of water. The use of gelatin and esterified gelatin as solders in conjunction with laser inducted tissue welding impart much stronger tensile and torque strengths than albumin solders. Selected NIR wavelength from the above lasers can improve welding and avoid thermal injury to tissue when used alone or with gelatin and esterified gelatin solders. These discoveries can be used to enhance laser tissue welding of tissues such as skin, mucous, bone, blood vessel, nerve, brain, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, lung, bronchus, respiratory track, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or gynecologic tract and as a sealant for pulmonary air leaks and fistulas such as intestinal, rectal and urinary fistulas.

  20. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  1. Boosting QED and QCD bound states in the path integral formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Simonov

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave functions and energy eigenvalues of the path integral Hamiltonian are studied in Lorentz frame moving with velocity $v$. The instantaneous interaction produced by the Wilson loop is shown to be reduced by an overall factor $\\sqrt{1-(\\frac{v}{c})^2}$. As a result one obtains the boosted energy eigenvalues in the Lorentz covariant form $E= \\sqrt{\\veP^2+M^2_0}$, where $M_0$ is the c.m. energy, and this form is tested for two free particles and for the Coulomb and linear interaction.Using Lorentz contracted wave functions of the bound states one obtains the scaled parton wave functions and valence quark distributions for large $P$. Matrix elements containing wave functions moving with different velocities strongly decrease with growing relative momentum, e.g. for the time-like formfactors one obtains $F_h(Q_0)\\sim (\\frac{M_h}{Q_0})^{2 n_h} $ with $n_h = 1$ and 2 for mesons and baryons, as in the "quark counting rule".

  2. Path Planning for Deformable Linear Objects Mark Moll, Member, IEEE and Lydia E. Kavraki, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    -like robots. Index Terms-- path planning, deformation, minimal-energy curves, modeling, differential geometry of a wire subject to manipulation constraints. These configurations correspond to minimal-energy curves. By restricting the planner to minimal-energy curves, the execution of a path becomes easier. Our curve

  3. Integrated Control-Path Design and Error Recovery in the Synthesis of Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    11 Integrated Control-Path Design and Error Recovery in the Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip YANG ZHAO, TAO XU, and KRISHNENDU CHAKRABARTY Duke University Recent advances in digital microfluidics that incorporates control paths and an error- recovery mechanism in the design of a digital microfluidic lab

  4. Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    275 Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving neural model of the animal behavior known as path integra- tion, a navigation process requiring a compass mention of the simi- larity of their compass sensors to the known properties of the polarization

  5. EIS-0516: Clean Path Energy Center Project; San Juan County, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EIS for the proposed interconnection of the Clean Path Energy Center Project to Western’s transmission system at the Shiprock Substation. The planned Clean Path Energy Center will consist of a 680 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant co-located with a 70 MW solar photovoltaic project.

  6. Remarks on low-energy approximations for Feynman path integration on the sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshihisa Miyanishi

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We shall define the oscillatory integrals by action integrals, Van Vleck determinant and Dewitt curvature. Our method employs action integrals along the shortest paths. We have the strong but not uniform convergence of time slicing Feynman path integrals for low energy functions.

  7. Feedback Control for Steering Needles Through 3D Deformable Tissue Using Helical Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Feedback Control for Steering Needles Through 3D Deformable Tissue Using Helical Paths Kris Hauser controller that steers a needle along 3D helical paths, and varies the helix radius to correct a model predictive control framework that chooses a needle twist rate such that the predicted helical

  8. Path tracking control of agricultural tractors with compensation for steering dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Path tracking control of agricultural tractors with compensation for steering dynamics R. Eaton, H for path tracking control due to their generic and more simplistic nature when compared to dynamic models. However, control based solely on the kinematic model rarely takes into consideration any of the dynamics

  9. Transition paths in molecules at finite temperature F. J. Pinski1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Andrew

    Transition paths in molecules at finite temperature F. J. Pinski1,a and A. M. Stuart2,b 1 evolving via Brownian dynamics, the most likely transition path between reactant and product may be found as a minimizer of the Freidlin­Wentzell action functional. An analog for finite temperature transitions is given

  10. The definition of reaction coordinates for reaction-path dynamics Gregory A. Natanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    The definition of reaction coordinates for reaction-path dynamics Gregory A. Natanson Computer only small-amplitude deviations from a minimum-energy path (MEP) through nuclear coordinate space. Thus. In choosing the coordinate system, the critical issue is the definition of the reaction coordinate. Along

  11. Zero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ...le of the optimal paths. We show that, in the Cobb-Douglas case, the ratio of the values of the resource and capitalZero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an amenity value Dasgupta­Heal­Solow model when the stock of natural capital is a direct argument of well-being, besides

  12. On the complexity of hamiltonian path and cycle problems in certain classes of digraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutin, Gregory

    -Jensen Gregory Gutin Abstract We survey results on the sequential and parallel complexity of hamiltonian path results on hamiltonian paths starting in a specified vertex for a quite general class of digraphs. 1 in Rostock, September 8-10 1997. The purpose of the paper is to survey results on the complexity

  13. Availability-Based Path Selection Song Yang, Stojan Trajanovski and Fernando A. Kuipers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuipers, Fernando A.

    Availability-Based Path Selection Song Yang, Stojan Trajanovski and Fernando A. Kuipers Delft communication networks, connection avail- ability, which is defined as the probability that the corresponding). The path over which a connection is to be established should obey the agreed-upon availability, otherwise

  14. Quantum free-energy differences from nonequilibrium path integrals. II. Convergence properties for the harmonic oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Quantum free-energy differences from nonequilibrium path integrals. II. Convergence properties July 2008; published 2 October 2008 Nonequilibrium path-integral methods for computing quantum free-energy with the purpose of establishing the convergence properties of the work distribution and free energy as the number

  15. 1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Quingyuan

    1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path Using Observations from FIRE 1, Introduction Q. HAN, * W. Rossow, t R. WELCH, * A. WHITE, * * AND J Cloud effective radii (r) and cloud liquid water path (LWP) are derived from ISCCP spatially sampled

  16. The Impact of Manufacturing Offshore on Technology Development Paths in the Automotive and Optoelectronics Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Development Paths in the Automotive and Optoelectronics Industries by Erica R.H. Fuchs Submitted in particular at the automotive and optoelectronics industries. The dissertation uses an innovative combinationThe Impact of Manufacturing Offshore on Technology Development Paths in the Automotive

  17. On Setting up Energy-Efficient Paths with Transmitter Power Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    On Setting up Energy-Efficient Paths with Transmitter Power Control in Wireless Sensor Networks Science Simon Fraser University Vancouver, Canada Email: jcliu@cs.sfu.ca Abstract-- Energy-efficiency could find a more energy-efficient path to the sink. We provide an efficient approximation algorithm

  18. Deciding a Class of Path Formulas for ConflictFree Petri Nets \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bow-Yaw

    Deciding a Class of Path Formulas for Conflict­Free Petri Nets \\Lambda Hsu­Chun Yen y Bow­Yaw Wang results for problems concerning conflict­free Petri nets. To do so, we first define a class of formulas for paths in Petri nets. We then show that answering the satisfiability problem for conflict­ free Petri

  19. Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

  20. Path planning for UAVs under communication constraints using SPLAT! and MILP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    -rescue tasks [3]. In general, autonomous vehicles are chosen for tasks that are either dirty, dull or dangerous will in this paper address the problem of offline path planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Our goal is to find paths that meet mission objectives, are safe with respect to collision and grounding, fuel

  1. Design Technical Brief A Geometric Path Planner for Car-like

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jiansong

    Journal of Mechanical Design Technical Brief A Geometric Path Planner for Car-like Robots Shiang a refined slabbing method, originally used for free-flying robots, for finding efficient paths for nonholo- nomic robots. Our method takes kinematic constraints and rever- sal maneuvers into account. We create

  2. Energy-Aware Path Selection for Scheduled Lightpaths in IP-over-WDM Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuipers, Fernando A.

    Energy-Aware Path Selection for Scheduled Lightpaths in IP-over-WDM Networks Song Yang and Fernando in the context of energy-aware routing. In this paper we study energy-efficient path selection under propose an energy-aware routing algorithm that is based on traffic grooming, but which has the flexibility

  3. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey negative radiative forcing on the global scale, mainly due to the cloud cover effect. © 2013 Elsevier B

  4. inequality path inequality path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    F #12; ¡ ¡ ¨ £ ¢ ¥¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ £ £ ¤ ¢ © ¤ ¥ ¦¨§ ¢ ¤ © £ ¢ ¡ ¤ ¡ ¤ ¢ © ¢ ¤ ¤ £ ¤ ¢ ¡ ¦ S-PVC; ¡¢ ¦ £¤ ¦ ¤ ¤ ¡ ¢ ¤ ¢ © ¡ ¢ ¦ ¡ ¢ ¥ © § ¢ £¤ © ¡ ¡¢ ¡ £ §¨ ¨ $ S-PVC suspension F TC Theat 90C 50C o o (ii) (i) Fsteam cw §¨ ¨ $ $ S-PVC suspension TC T 50C o susp F Fcw steam §¨ ¨ $ $ $ S-PVC suspension TC T 50C o susp z=0 Fsteam Fcw #12

  5. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

  6. Input-output multiplier distributions from probabilistic production paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konecny, R.T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard Leontief input-output model, a single dominant technology is assumed in the production of a particular commodity. However, in the real world, quite similar commodities are produced by firms with vastly different technologies. In addressing this limitation, the Probabilistic Production Path model (PPP) is used to investigate both the method of production and identity of the producer. An important feature of the PPP model is the consideration of the effects that heterogeneous technologies and dissimilar trade patterns have on the properties of the distribution of input-output multipliers. The derivation of the distribution of output multipliers is generalized for discrete probabilities based on market shares. Due to the complexity of the generalized solution, a simulation model is used to approximate the multiplier distribution. Results of the model show that the distributional properties of the multipliers are unpredictable, with the majority of the distributions being multimodal. Typically, the mean of the multipliers lies in a trough between two modes. Multimodal multiplier distributions were found to have a tighter symmetric interval than the corresponding standard normal confidence interval. Therefore, the use of the normal confidence interval appears to be sufficient, though overstated, for the construction of confidence intervals in the PPP model.

  7. A quantative evaluation of the reformulated 1996 path-goal theory of work unit leadership via structural equation modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howieson, William B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Professor Robert J House published a reformulated Path-Goal Theory of Work Unit Leadership, based on his earlier 1971 and 1974 theories. Path-goal leadership attempts to explain the impact that leader behaviour ...

  8. Volume I51, number I,2 CHEMICAL PJIYSICS LETTERS 7 October 1988 CORRECT SHORT TIME PROPAGATOR FOR FEYNMAN PATH INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    FOR FEYNMAN PATH INTEGRATION BY POWER SERIES EXPANSION IN At Nancy MAKRI and William H. MILLER Department propagator in a discretized Feynman path integral (and also several more sophisticated "improved" ones. Introduction Feynman path integration [ 11 has proved to be a powerful technique for evaluating equilibrium

  9. Verifying UAV Path Planning: A Formal Approach of Choice. Antonios Tsourdos, Brian A White and Rafal bikowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    Flight Control Systems Design at Cranfield University. He has published over fifty papers on flight and Rafal bikowski Guidance & Control Group Dept. of Aerospace, Power and Sensors Cranfield University method is used to find the optimal turning radii of paths. The path planning guarantees design of paths

  10. On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden-Eijnden 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden and simplified version of the string method in collective variables for computing minimum free energy paths) the minimum free energy path (MFEP) plays an important role. Given a set of collective variables to describe

  11. Local representation of N-body Coulomb energy with path integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takanori Sugihara; Junichi Higo; Haruki Nakamura

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We represent N-body Coulomb energy in a localized form to achieve massive parallelism. It is a well-known fact that Green's functions can be written as path integrals of field theory. Since two-body Coulomb potential is a Green's function of Poisson equations, it reduces to a path integral of free scalar field theory with three spatial dimensions. This means that N-body one also reduces to a path integral. We discretize real space with a cubic lattice and evaluate the obtained multiple integrals approximately with the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method.

  12. Maximum Entropy Models of Shortest Path and Outbreak Distributions in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hadiji, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of networks are often characterized in terms of features such as node degree distributions, average path lengths, diameters, or clustering coefficients. Here, we study shortest path length distributions. On the one hand, average as well as maximum distances can be determined therefrom; on the other hand, they are closely related to the dynamics of network spreading processes. Because of the combinatorial nature of networks, we apply maximum entropy arguments to derive a general, physically plausible model. In particular, we establish the generalized Gamma distribution as a continuous characterization of shortest path length histograms of networks or arbitrary topology. Experimental evaluations corroborate our theoretical results.

  13. Methodology Using MELCOR Code to Model Proposed Hazard Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavin Hawkley

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates a methodology for using the MELCOR code to model a proposed hazard scenario within a building containing radioactive powder, and the subsequent evaluation of a leak path factor (LPF) (or the amount of respirable material which that escapes a facility into the outside environment), implicit in the scenario. This LPF evaluation will analyzes the basis and applicability of an assumed standard multiplication of 0.5 × 0.5 (in which 0.5 represents the amount of material assumed to leave one area and enter another), for calculating an LPF value. The outside release is dependsent upon the ventilation/filtration system, both filtered and un-filtered, and from other pathways from the building, such as doorways (, both open and closed). This study is presents ed to show how the multiple leak path factorsLPFs from the interior building can be evaluated in a combinatory process in which a total leak path factorLPF is calculated, thus addressing the assumed multiplication, and allowing for the designation and assessment of a respirable source term (ST) for later consequence analysis, in which: the propagation of material released into the environmental atmosphere can be modeled and the dose received by a receptor placed downwind can be estimated and the distance adjusted to maintains such exposures as low as reasonably achievableALARA.. Also, this study will briefly addresses particle characteristics thatwhich affect atmospheric particle dispersion, and compares this dispersion with leak path factorLPF methodology.

  14. Sampling-based coverage path planning for complex 3D structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englot, Brendan J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Path planning is an essential capability for autonomous robots, and many applications impose challenging constraints alongside the standard requirement of obstacle avoidance. Coverage planning is one such task, in which a ...

  15. Stay on marked paths to avoid poison ivy. Watch young children carefully around river and creeks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Caution · Stay on marked paths to avoid poison ivy. · Watch young children carefully around river or outdoor cooking are not permitted. Poison Ivy Hours · Trails and gardens open 8 am to dusk. · Conservatory

  16. Programmed path : the conceptual re-enactment of a Charlestown warehouse and dock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Sarah Rundquist

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptually re-defining the role of a 100-year-old waterfront brick and timber warehouse structure, it is turned inside-out : interior becomes path. Programmatic functions imitate the physical characteristics of a conceptual ...

  17. PATH SAMPLING FOR PARTICLE FILTERS WITH APPLICATION TO MULTI-TARGET TRACKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the particle filter is a problem of conditional path sam- pling for stochastic differential equations (SDEs-target tracking. The suggested approach was based on Girsanov's change of measure theorem for stochastic dif

  18. Path integral formulation of retardation effects in nonlinear optics Vladimir Chernyaka) and Shaul Mukamel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Path integral formulation of retardation effects in nonlinear optics Vladimir Chernyaka) and Shaul;accepted4 October 1993) The signaturesof retardation in nonlinear optical susceptibilitiesare studiedby optical signalsare usually'calculatedby first calculating a nonlinear susceptibility definedby expanding

  19. Slip-Compensated Path Following for Planetary Exploration Daniel M. Helmick, Stergios I. Roumeliotis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    estimator, and a slip-compensated path following algorithm. Figure 2 provides a high-level functional block kinematics, described in Section 3, uses position sensor inputs from the joints and wheels of the rocker

  20. Paths to Magne,c Fusion Energy (nature ignores budget austerity)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paths to Magne,c Fusion Energy (nature ignores budget austerity) S. Prager fusion problems should be solved in parallel with ITER Energy confinement to fusion energy present DIII-D NSTX CMOD Plasma confinement research program #12

  1. CFD based rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals and impeller leakage paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Avijit

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accurately using simple flow model like bulk flow. CFD approach is employed since it can accurately predict and capture recirculating zones using proper mesh distribution. The Impeller Leakage paths and Labyrinth Seals, typically, have a recirculation zone...

  2. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldmann, Maximilian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. Firstly, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Secondly, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  3. Analysis of Path Planning Algorithms : a Formal Verification-based Approach Arash Khabbaz Saberi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groote, Jan Friso

    Analysis of Path Planning Algorithms : a Formal Verification-based Approach Arash Khabbaz Saberi1, The Netherlands a.khabbaz.saberi@student.tue.nl, j.f.groote@tue.nl, s.keshishzadeh@tue.nl Abstract

  4. Conceptual Soundness, Metric Development, Benchmarking, and Targeting for PATH Subprogram Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey. G.; Doris, E.; Coggeshall, C.; Antes, M.; Ruch, J.; Mortensen, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the conceptual soundness of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) program's revised goals and establish and apply a framework to identify and recommend metrics that are the most useful for measuring PATH's progress. This report provides an evaluative review of PATH's revised goals, outlines a structured method for identifying and selecting metrics, proposes metrics and benchmarks for a sampling of individual PATH programs, and discusses other metrics that potentially could be developed that may add value to the evaluation process. The framework and individual program metrics can be used for ongoing management improvement efforts and to inform broader program-level metrics for government reporting requirements.

  5. Common-path interference and oscillatory Zener tunneling in bilayer graphene p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandkishore, Rahul Mahajan

    Interference and tunneling are two signature quantum effects that are often perceived as the yin and yang of quantum mechanics: a particle simultaneously propagating along several distinct classical paths versus a particle ...

  6. You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and engineering. Our'Texas Aggie football team is nationally acclaimed, and every game brings a festive atmosphere

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ePATHS- electrical PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ePATHS - electrical PCM...

  8. A construction of the rough path above fractional Brownian motion using Volterra’s representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nualart, David; Tindel, Samy

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is devoted to construct a rough path above a multidimensional fractional Brownian motion B with any Hurst parameter H?(0,?1), by means of its representation as a Volterra Gaussian process. This approach yields ...

  9. Stochastic approaches to mobility prediction, path planning and motion control for ground vehicles in uncertain environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of autonomous or semi-autonomous unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) to rapidly and accurately predict terrain negotiability, generate efficient paths online and have effective motion control is a critical requirement ...

  10. C-O Bond Activation and C-C Bond Formation Paths in Catalytic CO Hydrogenation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loveless, Brett

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anderson, The Fischer-Tropsch and Related Synthesis, Wiley,Anderson, The Fischer-Tropsch and Related Synthesis, Wiley,C-C bond formation paths in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are

  11. Constructing Path Efficient and Energy Aware Virtual Multicast Backbones in Static Ad Hoc Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Tamaghna; Roy, Rajarshi; 10.5121/ijwmn.2010.2210

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For stationary wireless ad hoc networks, one of the key challenging issues in routing and multicasting is to conserve as much energy as possible without compromising path efficiency measured as end-to-end delay. In this paper, we address the problem of path efficient and energy aware multicasting in static wireless ad hoc networks. We propose a novel distributed scalable algorithm for finding a virtual multicast backbone (VMB). Based on this VMB, we have further developed a multicasting scheme that jointly improves path efficiency and energy conservation. By exploiting inherent broadcast advantage of wireless communication and employing a more realistic energy consumption model for wireless communication which not only depends on radio propagation losses but also on energy losses in transceiver circuitry, our simulation results show that the proposed VMB-based multicasting scheme outperforms existing prominent tree based energy conserving, path efficient multicasting schemes.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  13. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  14. World-line instantons and the Schwinger effect as a WKB exact path integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Gordon; Gordon W. Semenoff

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the semiclassical expansion of the world line path integral for a charged relativistic particle in a constant external electric field is presented. We show that the Schwinger formula for charged particle pair production is reproduced exactly by the semiclassical expansion around classical instanton solutions when the leading order of fluctuations is taken into account. We prove that all corrections to this leading approximation vanish and that the WKB approximation to the world line path integral is exact.

  15. Denial of Service attacks: path reconstruction for IP traceback using Adjusted Probabilistic Packet Marking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Raghav

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    DENIAL OF SERVICE ATTACKS: PATH RECONSTRUCTION FOR IP TRACEBACK USING ADJUSTED PROBABILISTIC PACKET MARKING A Thesis by RAGHAV DUBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DENIAL OF SERVICE ATTACKS: PATH RECONSTRUCTION FOR IP TRACEBACK USING ADJUSTED PROBABILISTIC PACKET MARKING A Thesis by RAGHAV DUBE Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  16. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Miller, Phil [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Venkataraman, Ramprasad [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Arya, Anshu [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Terry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block to processor. Other mappings can be tested with only small, local changes to the code.

  17. Electronic quantum effects mapped onto non-Born-Oppenheimer nuclear paths: Nonclassical surmounting over potential barriers and trapping above the transition states due to nonadiabatic path-branching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the path-branching representation for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244102 (2010)] so as to treat dynamics in an energy range comparable to the barrier height of adiabatic potential energy curves. With this representation two characteristic chemical reaction dynamics are studied, in which an incident nuclear wavepacket encounters a potential barrier, on top of which lies another nonadiabatically coupled adiabatic potential curve: (1) Dynamics of initial paths coming into the nonadiabatic interaction region with energy lower than the barrier height. They branch into two pieces (and repeat branching subsequently), the upper counterparts of which can penetrate into a classically inaccessible high energy region and eventually branch back to the product region on the ground state curve. This is so to say surmounting the potential barrier via nonadiabatically coupled excited state, and phenomenologically looks like the so-called deep tunneling. (2) Dynamics of classical paths whose initial energies are a little higher than the barrier but may be lower than the bottom of the excited state. They can undergo branching and some of those components are trapped on top of the potential barrier, being followed by the population decay down to the lower state flowing both to product and reactant sites. Such expectations arising from the path-branching representation are numerically confirmed with full quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics. This phenomenon may be experimentally observed as time-delayed pulses of wavepacket trains.

  18. A collaborative network middleware project by Lambda Station, TeraPaths, and Phoebus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyshev, A.; /Fermilab; Bradley, S.; /Brookhaven; Crawford, M.; /Fermilab; DeMar, P.; /Fermilab; Katramatos, D.; /Brookhaven; Shroff, K.; /Brookhaven; Swany, M.; /Delaware U.; Yu, D.; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TeraPaths, Lambda Station, and Phoebus projects, funded by the US Department of Energy, have successfully developed network middleware services that establish on-demand and manage true end-to-end, Quality-of-Service (QoS) aware, virtual network paths across multiple administrative network domains, select network paths and gracefully reroute traffic over these dynamic paths, and streamline traffic between packet and circuit networks using transparent gateways. These services improve network QoS and performance for applications, playing a critical role in the effective use of emerging dynamic circuit network services. They provide interfaces to applications, such as dCache SRM, translate network service requests into network device configurations, and coordinate with each other to setup up end-to-end network paths. The End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS) builds upon the success of the three projects by combining their individual capabilities into the next generation of network middleware. ESCPS addresses challenges such as cross-domain control plane signalling and interoperability, authentication and authorization in a Grid environment, topology discovery, and dynamic status tracking. The new network middleware will take full advantage of the perfSONAR monitoring infrastructure and the Inter-Domain Control plane efforts and will be deployed and fully vetted in the Large Hadron Collider data movement environment.

  19. Rapid communication Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    transmission and distribution pipelines for natural gas in the U. S. cause an average of 17 fatalities, 68 signatures w20& lighter (m ¼ À57.8&, Æ1.6& s.e., n ¼ 8). Repairing leaky natural gas distribution systems injuries, and $133 M in property damage each year (PHMSA, 2012). A natural gas pipeline explosion in San

  20. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems