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1

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2009  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the findings of the groundwater and leachate monitoring and sampling at the Environmental restoration Disposal Facility for calendar year 2009. The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence, D.W. Woolery

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP), Environmental Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Chapter 11 - Potable Water Chapter 12 - Groundwater Monitoring Chapter 13 - Landfill Gas and Leachate Monitoring Appendix A - Acronyms and Technical Terms Appendix B...

3

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

5

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is intended to document the quality assurance of the Environmental Monitoring Program. The Quality Assurance Project Plan has two parts and is written to become a chapter in the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Part A describes the management responsibilities and activities performed to assure the quality of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Part B covers the documentation requirements for changes in the Monitoring Program, and provides details on control of the design and implementation of quality assurance activities.

Holland, R.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 3720 facility  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the effluent monitoring plan for the 3720 facility. Airborne and liquid effluents are monitored.

Ballinger, M.Y.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim cleanup of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site (located on the Tonopah Test Range). This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the Double Tracks cleanup site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native plant species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of that study, and the results from numerous other studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the cleanup of the Clean Slate 1 site. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both short-term and long-term reclamation.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes a reclamation plan for the short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with the cleanup of radionuclide contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. The results of reclamation trials at Area 11, Area 19 and more recently the reclamation demonstration plots at the Double Tracks cleanup site, have been summarized and incorporated into this reclamation and monitoring plan. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both the effectiveness and success of short-term and long-term soil stabilization. The Clean Slate 1 site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. The surface soils were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement the requirements of this program plan, are also referenced. The DOE regulates its own activities for radiation protection of the public under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011). The effluent and environmental monitoring activities prescribed by DOE Order 5400.5 and the DOE/EH-0173T guidance manual are designed to ensure that DOE facilities implement standards and regulations to protect members of the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation. Effluent and environmental monitoring also provide 1999 Environmental Monitoring Plan DOE/WIPP 99-2194 the data necessary to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental protection regulations. Other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are empowered through specific legislation to regulate certain aspects of DOE activities potentially affecting public health and safety or the environment. Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards (43 FR 47707), requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all necessary actions for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. Beyond statutory requirements, the DOE has established a general environmental protection policy. The Environmental Policy Statement (issued by then Secretary Herrington on January 8, 1986, and extended on January 7, 1987) describes the DOE's commitment to national environmental protection goals in that it conducts operations ''in an environmentally safe and sound manner . . . in compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards'' (DOE, 1986). This Environmental Policy Statement also states the DOE's commitment to ''good environmental management in all of its programs and at all of its facilities in order to correct existing environmental problems, to minimize risks to the environment or public health, and to anticipate and address pote

Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders (''surveillance monitoring''); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jon W; Newcomer, Darrell R; Thornton, Edward C

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders ("surveillance monitoring"); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fiscal Year 2003 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the Groundwater Monitoring Project. It documents well and constituent lists for the monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders.

Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Lindberg, Jon W.; McDonald, John P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

McKinney, S.M.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Clean Slate 2 Revegetation and Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim clean-up of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at Clean Slate 2 located northwest of the Nevada Test Site on the Nellis Air Force Range. Surface soils at Clean Slate 2 were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Excavation of contaminated soils at Clean Slate 2 will follow procedures similar to those used during the cleanup of the Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1 sites. A maximum of approximately 33 cm (12 in) of the surface soils will be excavated and removed from the site. Near ground zero, where contamination levels are highest, approximately 2 m (7 ft) of soil may be removed. The maximum area to be excavated is estimated to be 18.4 hectares (45.4) acres. In addition to the disturbance associated with soil excavation, approximately 2.0 hectares (5.0) acres will be disturbed by the construction of staging areas and placement of support facilities. Short term stabilization consists of an application of a chemical soil stabilizer and long-term stabilizations involves the establishment of a permanent vegetative cover using selective native plant species, site preparation techniques, increasing organic matter and water holding capacity, irrigation to ensure seed germination and plant establishment. The cleanup site will be monitored to ensure success of revegetation and resuspension of soil particles is within established limits.

David Anderson

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Near Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near-facility environmental monitoring directed by Waste Management Technical Services and supersedes HNF-EP-0538-4. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Waste Management Technical Services in implementing near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1 (DOE 1990) as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE-RL 1997) and is used to define: Environmental measurement and sampling locations used to monitor environmental contaminants near active and inactive facilities and waste storage and disposal sites; Procedures and equipment needed to perform the measurement and sampling; Frequency and analyses required for each measurement and sampling location; Minimum detection level and accuracy; Quality assurance components; and Investigation levels. Near-facility environmental monitoring for the Hanford Site is conducted in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1990), 5400.5 (DOE 1993), 5484.1 (DOE 1990), and 435.1 (DOE 1999), and DOE/EH-O173T (DOE 1991). It is Waste Management Technical Services' objective to manage and conduct near-facility environmental monitoring activities at the Hanford Site in a cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner that is in compliance with the letter and spirit of these regulations and other environmental regulations, statutes, and standards.

MCKINNEY, S.M.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

Vance, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

Not Available

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures.

Loll, C.M.

1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

Steward, C.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

Jannik, G.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the interim status groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area A-AX.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Horton, Duane G.

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

None

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan provides updates the ongoing RCRA interim status groundwater monitoring program for the U-12 crib and provides a proposed RCRA final status post-closure groundwater monitoring program.

Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

NONE

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Final monitoring plan for site restoration at Murdock, Nebraska.  

SciTech Connect

In early 2005, Argonne National Laboratory conducted an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA; Argonne 2005b) to address carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in groundwater and surface water at Murdock, Nebraska, approximately 22 mi east-northeast of Lincoln (Figure 1.1). The EE/CA study was performed for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), as the technical basis for a proposed removal action for the Murdock site. The EE/CA was conducted in compliance with an Administrative Order on Consent issued for Murdock by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1991). Three removal action alternatives were examined through the use of site-specific data and predictive simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport performed with calibrated numerical models. The alternatives were evaluated individually and compared against performance criteria established under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). On the basis of these evaluations, an alternative employing phytoremediation in conjunction with seasonal groundwater extraction and treatment by spray irrigation was recommended by the CCC/USDA to permanently reduce the carbon tetrachloride contaminant levels in groundwater and surface water at the site. The proposed alternative is being implemented in cooperation with the EPA. Under the direction of the CCC/USDA and the EPA, implementation of the chosen removal action occurred in phases, beginning in April 2005. Installation of all the required remediation systems was completed by the end of August 2005. Specific technical objectives of the removal action are as follows: (1) To eliminate pathways for potential human exposure to carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the regulatory limit of 44.2 {micro}g/L in surface water at the site. (2) To minimize or eliminate any detrimental environmental impacts of carbon tetrachloride discharge to the surface waters of a tributary creek located immediately north of the town. (3) To permanently reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the groundwater and surface water at Murdock and hence restore these resources for potential beneficial use. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedy and its ability to achieve the objectives specified for this site, monitoring is required. This document outlines the proposed scope of a long-term program for monitoring of the removal action at Murdock. In this section the specific remedial objectives of the action are summarized, and a brief overview of the chosen remedy is provided. Section 2 summarizes the results of a baseline sampling event that documented the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in selected media at the Murdock site immediately before cleanup activities began. Section 3 recommends a strategy for subsequent monitoring of the removal action at Murdock, as well as criteria for evaluating the performance of the remedial systems and the progress of the restoration effort.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

Microsoft Word - List of Monitoring Plans.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seismometersaccelerometers, it is also well suited to environmental monitoring of offshore wind energy installations, as well as to a variety of marine geophysical...

59

Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of radiological airborne emissions. This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to written requirements.

Boom, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Groundwater Monitoring Guidance for the Industry Action Plan on Coal Combustion Product Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is scheduled to release federal guidelines for management of coal combustion products (CCPs) in 2007. The utility industry has developed a voluntary Action Plan as an alternative to the federal guidelines. In either case, groundwater monitoring will be required. The purpose of this report is to provide guidance for implementing a groundwater-monitoring program at CCP management sites consistent with the Action Plan proposed by the utility industry.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

Not Available

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains a revised and updated monitoring plan for RCRA interim status groundwater assessment, site hydrogeology, and a conceptual model of the RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal unit. Monitoring under interim status is expected to continue until the 216-U-12 crib is incorporated as a chapter into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit or administratively closed as proposed to EPA and Ecology.

Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental monitoring plan, July 1--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) under the terms of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) are providing annual reports: reporting of State`s monitoring and analysis, and findings of DOE`s quality and effectiveness of DOE`s monitoring and surveillance. This report blends some of both of the required annual reports as described in the TOA section A.7.2.2. The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) integrates the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report presents the results of environmental monitoring in Tennessee in the following areas: surface waters; ground water; air; and fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Engineering Task Plan for Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B&K). The GC and B&K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, helium, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples may be obtained from the SHMS as well and analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases. This document describes the requirements for the operation, maintenance, calibration, and data collection for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. Additionally, this document defines who is responsible for the various tasks.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the groundwater sampling and water level monitoring that will be conducted to evaluate contaminations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer entering and leaving the Idaho National Laboratory. The sampling and monitoring locations were selected to meet the data quality objectives detailed in this plan. Data for the Snake River Plain Aquifer obtained under this plan will be evaluated in the Operable Unit 10-08 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study report and will be used to support the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide groundwater model.

M. S. Roddy

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: environmental assessment and monitoring plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental monitoring and reporting plan is based on requirements set by the State of California, Water Quality Control Board, and the Division of Oil and Gas as well as special requirements by the County of Imperial, Air Pollution Control Board and other county offices. This plan addresses all of the applicable environmental impacts identified in the Final Environmental Report. Each item of the environmental monitoring and reporting requirements is addressed in terms of (a) impact; (b) mitigation measures and/or engineering practices; and (c) monitoring and reporting requirements. An overall summary of all of the reporting requirements is contained.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Engineering task plan for standard hydrogen monitoring system operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B and K). The GC and B and K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples are obtained from the SHMS as well and are analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant conducts a surface water monitoring program in response to DOE Orders and state of Tennessee requirements under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The anticipated codification of DOE Order 5400.5 for radiation protection of the public and the environment (10 CFR Part 834) will require an environmental radiation protection plan (ERPP). The NPDES permit issued by the state of Tennessee requires a radiological monitoring plan (RMP) for Y-12 Plant surface waters. In a May 4, 1995 memo, the state of Tennessee, Division of Water Pollution Control, stated their desired needs and goals regarding the content of RMPs, associated documentation, and data resulting from the RMPs required under the NPDES permitting system (L. Bunting, General Discussion, Radiological Monitoring Plans, Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control, May 4,1995). Appendix A provides an overview of how the Y-12 Plant will begin to address these needs and goals. It provides a more complete, documented basis for the current Y-12 Plant surface water monitoring program and is intended to supplement documentation provided in the Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), NPDES reports, Groundwater Quality Assessment Reports, and studies conducted under the Y-12 Plant Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The purpose of this update to the Y-12 Plant RMP is to satisfy the requirements of the current NPDES permit, DOE Order 5400.5, and 10 CFR Part 834, as current proposed, by defining the radiological monitoring plan for surface water for the Y-12 Plant. This plan includes initial storm water monitoring and data analysis. Related activities such as sanitary sewer and sediment monitoring are also summarized. The plan discusses monitoring goals necessary to determine background concentrations of radionuclides, to quantify releases, determine trends, satisfy regulatory requirements, support consequence assessments, and meet requirements that releases be ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA).

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the responsibilities and requirements for the design, technical documents, fabrication, testing, and installation of the SHMS-E and SHMS-E+ continuous gas monitors. The SHMS-E is identical in function to a SHMS-B but has the interface to accommodate an analytical module containing a gas chromatograph and a B and K photo acoustic gas monitor. Temporary addition of the analytical module adds the ``+`` to the SHMS-E designation. The analytical module is temporary in all installations.

Tate, D.D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the third revision of the 'Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan' for groundwater wells associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: (1) inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12; (2) identifying maintenance needs that extend the life of the well and assure well-head protection is in place, and (3) identifying wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring-well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. The inspection and maintenance of groundwater monitoring wells is one of the primary management strategies of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Management Plan, 'proactive stewardship of the extensive monitoring well network at Y-12' (BWXT 2004a). Effective stewardship, and a program of routine inspections of the physical condition of each monitoring well, ensures that representative water-quality monitoring and hydrologic data are able to be obtained from the well network. In accordance with the Y-12 GWPP Monitoring Optimization Plan (MOP) for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (BWXT 2006b), the status designation (active or inactive) for each well determines the scope and extent of well inspections and maintenance activities. This plan, in conjunction with the above document, formalizes the GWPP approach to focus available resources on monitoring wells which provide the most useful data. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes: (1) the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime); (2) the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime); and (3) the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV east of scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime in the 'Updated Subsurface Database for Bear Creek Valley, Chestnut Ridge, and parts of Bethel Valley on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (BWXT 2003a). A detailed description of the hydrogeologic framework at Y-12 can be found in the GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2004a).

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fiscal Year 2005 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various purposes, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users. DOE manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project integrates monitoring for various objectives into a single sampling schedule to avoid redundancy of effort and to improve efficiency of sample collection.This report documents the purposes and objectives of groundwater monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

Rieger, JoAnne T.; Hartman, Mary J.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Draft Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major objectives of the LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) are to: verify energy and dollar savings of energy conservation retrofits in state, school and local government buildings; reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements at facilities receiving retrofits; improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR Program; and provide a detailed data base of energy use in commercial/institutional buildings located in Texas.

Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.; Etheredge, R.; Glass, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Reactor Technology Complex Operable Unit 2-13  

SciTech Connect

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan describes the objectives, activities, and assessments that will be performed to support the on-going groundwater monitoring requirements at the Reactor Technology Complex, formerly the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The requirements for groundwater monitoring were stipulated in the Final Record of Decision for Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, signed in December 1997. The monitoring requirements were modified by the First Five-Year Review Report for the Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to focus on those contaminants of concern that warrant continued surveillance, including chromium, tritium, strontium-90, and cobalt-60. Based upon recommendations provided in the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Status Report for 2006, the groundwater monitoring frequency was reduced to annually from twice a year.

Richard P. Wells

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3  

SciTech Connect

RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP-03-3230 WIPP-03-3230 Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 2003 United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico DOE/WIPP 03-3230 ii DOE/WIPP 03-3230 iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................... viii 1. Introduction.................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview .................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Historical Perspective .............................................................................. 1 1.2.1 Evolution of the Groundwater-Monitoring Well Network

82

Preliminary Evaluation of a Newly Isolated Microalga Scenedesmus sp. CHX1 for Treating Landfill Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of landfill leach ate treatment using micro algae. The growth and nutrients removal efficiency of a newly isolated micro alga Scenedesmus sp. CHX1 were monitored when the strain grew in landfill leach ate at ... Keywords: Scenedesmus sp. CHX1, Growth, Landfill leachate, Nutrients removal

Hai-Xiang Cheng, Guang-Ming Tian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Plan for Demonstration of Online Monitoring for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Condition based online monitoring technologies and development of diagnostic and prognostic methodologies have drawn tremendous interest in the nuclear industry. It has become important to identify and resolve problems with structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents in the aging fleet of reactors. The Machine Condition Monitoring (MCM) test bed at INL will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness to advancement in online monitoring, sensors, diagnostic and prognostic technologies on a pilot-scale plant that mimics the hydraulics of a nuclear plant. As part of this research project, INL will research available prognostics architectures and their suitability for deployment in a nuclear power plant. In addition, INL will provide recommendation to improve the existing diagnostic and prognostic architectures based on the experimental analysis performed on the MCM test bed.

Magdy S. Tawfik; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Advanced Metering Plan for Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This updated Advanced Metering Plan for monitoring whole building energy use in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) EMS4 buildings on the PNNL campus has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.2B, and Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program, October 2007 (Sullivan et al. 2007). The initial PNNL plan was developed in July 2007 (Olson 2007), updated in September 2008 (Olson et al. 2008), updated in September 2009 (Olson et al. 2009), and updated again in August 2010 (Olson et al. 2010).

Pope, Jason E.; Olson, Norman J.; Berman, Marc J.; Schielke, Dale R.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

Guettler, D.A.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWMON 1.12-1 GWMON 1.12-1 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan for the Land Farm Pilot Test Monument Valley, Arizona August 2000 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Ofice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-5 1 1-001 5-21-000 Document Number U0106701 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0106701 Contents Contents 1.0 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Pilot-Test Extraction Wellfield 2 4.0 Water Elevation Measurements and Monitoring ............... 4

87

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Leachate storage transport tanker loadout piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report shows the modifications to the W-025 Trench No. 31 leachate loadout discharge piping, and also the steps involved in installing the discharge piping, including dimensions and welding information. The installation of the discharge pipe should be done in accordance to current pipe installation standards. Trench No. 31 is a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility.

Whitlock, R.W.

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Plan for the performance monitoring of solar systems installed by the SUIEDE program: NCAT/SUEDE interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SUEDE Grantee solar system installation programs were reviewed to determine the type, number, and quality of Grantee-installed solar systems available for monitoring consideration. An NCAT Performance Monitoring Plan is presented which identifies the service and technical assistance that NCAT will need to provide based on the Grantee review. (MHR)

Hopkins, M

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effect of leachate recirculation on landfill gas production and leachate quality: A controlled laboratory study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a laboratory study conducted during 1992-1994 at Argonne National Laboratory. The study examined biogas production and leachate chemistry in parallel anaerobic assays run under either leachate recycle or leachate drainage regimes over a period of 400 days. A standardized synthetic refuse (paper, grass, food) was used in an experimental design which evaluated two elevated moisture contents and two added soils. All assays were conducted in vitro in 125 mL serum bottles. Four recycle/drainage events were completed during the 400 days of this experiment. Sufficient replicates (10 or 20) for each trial were included in the experimental design to permit destructive sampling of assay solids after each recycle/drainage event. Changes in the chemistry of solid, liquid, and gaseous phases were evaluated during the decomposition process. Analyses included major gases (CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}), selected chemical constituents of leachate (Cl-C5 carboxylic acids, total organic carbon, Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, iron, zinc, and chloride), leachate pH and conductivity, and selected solids analysis (gravimetric moisture content, volatile solids, total carbon, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin).

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated every three years, as specified in the ''Y-12 GWPP Management Plan'' (BWXT 2004). Between scheduled updates of this plan, addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee) will document any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan. The addenda, numbered in consecutive ascending order, will be forwarded to all personnel included on the distribution list for this plan. The addenda are inserted in Appendix C pending the next scheduled update of the plan, which will incorporate the information included in the addenda.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNLs R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 which provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater sampling (Section 3.0), whereas well granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also determines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 4.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 5.0). This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure 1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated in accordance with the schedule required in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2001). Between scheduled updates of this plan, any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan, will be described in addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee). Information included in the addenda will be incorporated into the plan during the next scheduled update.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Characterization of Field Leachates at Coal Combustion Product Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large amount of laboratory-generated leachate data has been produced over the last two decades to estimatecoal combustion product (CCP) leachate concentrations, and a variety of leaching methods have been used. No one method, however, has been shown to accurately represent field leaching conditions. In fact, little work has been performed to systematically evaluate field-generated leachates representative of a range of coal types, combustion systems, and management methods, and only limited work has be...

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier DemonstrationVadose Zone Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank of the 241-T Tank Farm in 1973. Five tanks are assumed to have leaked in the TY Farm. Many of the contaminants from those leaks still reside within the vadose zone within the T and TY Tank Farms. The Department of Energys Office of River Protection seeks to minimize the movement of these contaminant plumes by placing interim barriers on the ground surface. Such barriers are expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plumes and moving them further. The soil water regime is monitored to determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barriers. Soil-water content and water pressure are monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. Four instrument nests were installed in the T Farm in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2007; two nests were installed in the TY Farm in FY2010. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, and four heat-dissipation units. A meteorological station has been installed at the north side of the fence of the T Farm. This document summarizes the monitoring methods, the instrument calibration and installation, and the vadose zone monitoring plan for interim barriers in T farm and TY Farm.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Incorporating voltage security into the planning, operation and monitoring of restructured electric energy markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As open access market principles are applied to power systems, significant changes are happening in their planning, operation and control. In the emerging marketplace, systems are operating under higher loading conditions as markets focus greater attention to operating costs than stability and security margins. Since operating stability is a basic requirement for any power system, there is need for newer tools to ensure stability and security margins being strictly enforced in the competitive marketplace. This dissertation investigates issues associated with incorporating voltage security into the unbundled operating environment of electricity markets. It includes addressing voltage security in the monitoring, operational and planning horizons of restructured power system. This dissertation presents a new decomposition procedure to estimate voltage security usage by transactions. The procedure follows physical law and uses an index that can be monitored knowing the state of the system. The expression derived is based on composite market coordination models that have both PoolCo and OpCo transactions, in a shared stressed transmission grid. Our procedure is able to equitably distinguish the impacts of individual transactions on voltage stability, at load buses, in a simple and fast manner. This dissertation formulates a new voltage stability constrained optimal power flow (VSCOPF) using a simple voltage security index. In modern planning, composite power system reliability analysis that encompasses both adequacy and security issues is being developed. We have illustrated the applicability of our VSCOPF into composite reliability analysis. This dissertation also delves into the various applications of voltage security index. Increasingly, FACT devices are being used in restructured markets to mitigate a variety of operational problems. Their control effects on voltage security would be demonstrated using our VSCOPF procedure. Further, this dissertation investigates the application of steady state voltage stability index to detect potential dynamic voltage collapse. Finally, this dissertation examines developments in representation, standardization, communication and exchange of power system data. Power system data is the key input to all analytical engines for system operation, monitoring and control. Data exchange and dissemination could impact voltage security evaluation and therefore needs to be critically examined.

Nair, Nirmal-Kumar

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Biological treatment of leachate from a Superfund site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies were completed on treating a leachate from New Lyme, Ohio. The leachate was transported to Cincinnati, Ohio, where a pilot-sized rotating biological contactor (RBC) was used for a treatment evaluation. The biomass was developed on the RBC discs with primary effluent from the City of Cincinnati's Mill Creek Sewage Treatment Facility. Experiments were then conducted to determine the effectiveness of treating a hazardous waste leachate and to provide information on the following: the rate of organics removal; the final effluent quality; the fate of priority pollutants and specific organic compounds; and the loss of volatiles via stripping in the RBC. The paper reports on the results from these experiments and the applicability of an RBC to treat a hazardous-waste leachate from a Superfund site.

Opatken, E.J.; Howard, H.K.; Bond, J.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Department of Energy Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Multi-Year R&D Program Plan NATIONAL METHANE HYDRATE MULTI-YEAR R&D PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center...

107

Metering Plan: Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Plan presents progress toward the metering goals shared by all national laboratories and discusses PNNL's contemporary approach to the installation of new meters. In addition, the Plan discusses the data analysis techniques with which PNNL is working to mature using endless data streams made available as a result of increased meter deployment.

Pope, Jason E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Metering Plan: Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Plan presents progress toward the metering goals shared by all national laboratories and discusses PNNL's contemporary approach to the installation of new meters. In addition, the Plan discusses the data analysis techniques with which PNNL is working to mature using endless data streams made available as a result of increased meter deployment.

Pope, Jason E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

The U. S. Department of Energy's Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) planning process  

SciTech Connect

On September 2, 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada operations office (DOE/NV) was tasked by the under secretary to develop a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) capability for response to major radiological emergencies. Prior to this time, each DOE region responded to a major radiological accident in their region. The DOE/NV's basic role is to coordinate the use of DOE's assets countrywide and provide the management nucleus of a FRMAC. Six working groups plus a management panel were established to assist in the implementation of the FRMAC response capability, and an interim FRMAC operation plant was published 9 months later. The paper discusses working groups, galileo planning, exercises, FRMAC planning products and future FRMAC activities.

Brown, H.U.; Boardman, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

JONES, R.A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the element boron as it occurs in leachate at coal combustion product management sites. Included are discussions of boron's occurrence in soils and water, concentrations in coal combustion products (CCPs), CCP leaching characteristics, effects on human health and ecology, geochemistry, and treatment options for removal from water.

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Feedback following the Industry Engagement of the NNSA Unique Identifier and Global Monitoring 5 year plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration s project for developing a unique identifier and a concept for a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders made significant progress on developing functional requirements and a concept of operation for such a system. The multi-laboratory team is working to define the functional requirements for both the unique identifier and the global monitoring system and to develop a preliminary concept of operations to discuss with key industry stakeholders. Team members began meeting with industry representatives in January 2013 to discuss the preliminary concept and solicit feedback and suggestions. The team has met with representatives from United States Enrichment Corporation, Cameco, URENCO, Honeywell/ConverDyn, and others. This paper presents an overview of the preliminary concept of operations and shares the feedback obtained from the industry engagement meetings.

White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA] [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

TWRS hydrogen mitigation portable standard hydrogen monitoring system platform design and fabrication engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary function of portable gas monitoring is to quickly determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analysis. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analysis utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. This conservative approach to unknowns necessitates a significant increase in administrative and engineering costs. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore contribute to a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analysis, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. To determine release rate, both the gas concentrations and the dome space ventilation rates (exhauster flow rate or passive dome/atmosphere exchange rate) are needed. Therefore, to quickly verify waste tank categorization or to provide additional characterization for tanks with installed gas monitoring, a temporary, portable standard hydrogen monitoring system is needed that can be used to measure gas compositions at both high and low sensitivities.

Philipp, B.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Proposed Metering and Instrumentation Monitoring and Analysis Plan and Budget: Alamo Community College District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this overview is to outline the metering points that will be monitored by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL). At three of the campuses, Alamo Community College District (ACCD) has a central energy management system (EMS) installed that has the capability to record energy data. It is ESL's intent to utilize this system to collect data for energy monitoring and commissioning purposes. Since ACCD does not monitor gas consumption, ESL would like to incorporate gas metering into the current EMS. ESL may recommend upgrading some or all of the existing Energy Management System's software and client PC workstations (these hardware/software upgrades are not included in this budget), hi order for ESL to link into the existing EMS, it will be necessary to install additional software (PCAnywhere) or equipment (mainly another PC workstation) near the existing EMS computer terminals. ESL would also like Ethernet lines connected to the PC workstation so the system could be accessed via Internet. Software development will be needed to extract and format the existing EMS data sequence, push the data to ESL's network and load it into ESL's databases.

O'Neal, D. L.; Carlson, K. A.; Sweeney, J., Jr.; Milligan, K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) year 2000 compliance project plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11 of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

HOLM, M.J.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Subsidence monitoring and evaluation plan for strategic petroleum reserve storage sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence is occurring at all six Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) sites. It results from a combination of cavern closure, Frasch-process sulphur extraction, fluid withdrawal, and from natural causes. Of these, cavern closure resulting from slat creep is the predominant source. A subsidence monitoring program is recommended that includes: (a) continuation of annual releveling; (b) quadrennial determination of horizontal drift; (c) triennial measurement of gravity values to determine elevation change and to validate releveling data; (d) 1/2400 air photos quadrennially; (e) coordination of other subsidence monitoring efforts, especially involving regional subsidence; (f) continuation of cavern creep modeling; (g) engineering evaluation of observed and predicted subsidence effects; (h) information dissemination in the form of an annual review and report. A priority sequence is suggested that considers observed subsidence and operational factors such as oil inventories and risk appraisal. First (highest) priority is assigned to Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Second (intermediate) priority is given to Bayou Choctaw and Bryan Mound. Third, (lowest) priority is assigned to Sulphur Mines and Big Hill. The priority strategy can be used as a management tool in allocating resources and in determining relative attention that is required at the six sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

Neal, J.T.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Acceptance test plan for the 241-AN-105 multi-function corrosion monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly destined for installation into tank 241-AN-105. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly to be installed into tank 241-AN-105. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples along the probe body, and verification of operation of corrosion monitoring computer and instrumentation.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project Phase 1: Pre-stimulation coupled geomechanical modeling to guide stimulation and monitoring plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents activities and results associated with Phase 1 (pre-stimulation phase) of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project at the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal field, California. The paper presents development of a 3-D geological model, coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) modeling of proposed stimulation injection as well as current plans for stimulation and monitoring of the site. The project aims at creating an EGS by directly and systematically injecting cool water at relatively low pressure into a known High Temperature (about 280 to 350 C) Zone (HTZ) located under the conventional (240 C) steam reservoir at depths of {approx}3 km. Accurate micro-earthquake monitoring initiated before the start of the injection will be used as a tool for tracking the development of the EGS and monitoring changes in microseismicity. We first analyzed historic injection and micro-earthquake data from an injection well (Aidlin 11) located about 3 miles to the west of the new EGS demonstration area. Thereafter, we used the same modeling approach to predict the likely extent of the zone of enhanced permeability for a proposed initial injection in two wells (Prati State 31 and Prati 32) at the new EGS demonstration area. Our modeling indicates that the proposed injection scheme will provide additional steam production in the area by creating a zone of permeability enhancement extending about 0.5 km from each injection well which will connect to the overlying conventional steam reservoir, in agreement with the conclusions of Nielson and Moore (2000).

Rutqvist, J.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Garcia, J.; Walters, M.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

\\Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a common constituent in coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) and can be found in CCP leachate. The chemical profile provided here assembles and summarizes existing information on seleniums environmental characteristics, which are focused on conditions associated with CCP management. Extensive references provide a means for obtaining more detailed information on specific subject areas. The following topics are covered: 1) occurrence and sources of selenium; 2) environmental ...

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Composition of Toxic Leachate and Unstable Compost to Produce Biodegradable Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper reports a study of mixing two materials that were toxic leachate and unstable compost, aiming to produce biodegradable material. Various low levels of BOD/COD of leachate were mixed with various high levels of C/N of unstable compost. CO2 evolution test was performed to measure the degree of biodegradable materials. The leachate contained BOD and COD that were more than 100 and 500 mg LG 1 respectively and represented by BOD/COD ratio of less than 0.1. The compost characterized by C/N ratio in the range of 15-20. Results showed that leachate and compost mixture produced biodegradable material. A mixture containing 20 % leachate and 80 % compost produced high level of biodegradable material. Key words: Toxic leachate % Unstable compost % Biodegradable material

Sarwoko Mangkoedihardjo; Yulia Maghriba; Rachmat Boedisantoso

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Measurements in Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to provide information to help interpret gross alpha and gross beta concentrations in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate. This objective was accomplished by chemically characterizing 15 field leachate samples that were collected at three CCP management facilities. The leachate samples were analyzed for gross alpha and gross beta concentrations and for the potential individual alpha and beta emitters in solution. Gross alpha concentrations at the three sites ranged fro...

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

West Valley low-level radioactive waste site revisited: Microbiological analysis of leachates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The abundance and types of microorganisms in leachate samples from the West Valley low-level radioactive waste disposal site were enumerated. This study was undertaken in support of the study conducted by Ecology and Environment, Inc., to assess the extent of radioactive gas emissions from the site. Total aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were enumerated as colony forming units (CFU) by dilution agar plate technique, and denitrifiers, sulfate-reducers and methanogens by the most probable number technique (MPN). Of the three trenches 3, 9, and 11 sampled, trench 11 contained the most number of organisms in the leachate. Concentrations of carbon-14 and tritium were highest in trench 11 leachate. Populations of aerobes and anaerobes in trench 9 leachate were one order of magnitude less than in trench 11 leachate while the methanogens were three orders of magnitude greater than in trench 11 leachate. The methane content from trench 9 was high due to the presence of a large number of methanogens; the gas in this trench also contained the most radioactivity. Trench 3 leachate contained the least number of microorganisms. Comparison of microbial populations in leachates sampled from trenches 3 and 9 during October 1978 and 1989 showed differences in the total number of microbial types. Variations in populations of the different types of organisms in the leachate reflect the changing nutrient conditions in the trenches. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microsoft Word - Appendix J-LCRS-Train 3 Treament Contingency Plan1.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LCRS/Train 3 Treatment Contingency Plan U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page J-3 J1.0 Contingency Plan Overview J1.1 Background The disposal cell at the Weldon Spring Site currently (August 2004) generates approximately 200 gallons of leachate per day, and manganese concentrations in the leachate exceeds the permitted effluent limit. The LCRS sump capacity is approximately 11,000 gallons, or 45 days of storage at the current flow rate. The uranium activity is below the discharge goal stated in the NPDES permit. This leachate is currently being hauled to the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) via commercial hauler for disposal and treatment under an approval granted to DOE on December 21, 2001, by the MSD. DOE had originally expected to treat the leachate on-site and

129

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Using tire chips as a leachate drainage layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Old tires represent a potentially cost-effective construction material that can be used in the installation of leachate drainage and collection systems. In fact, recent studies show that using shredded tires in conjunction with granular soil materials can even enhance the long-term performance of these systems. A typical design using shredded tire chips involves the placement of a minimum 1-foot-thick layer of chips on a granular soil layer overlaying the composite liner system. However, implementation of this design is not as simple as it looks. Protecting the liner from wire protruding from the tire chips derived from belted tires is essential. Because tire chips tend to clump together, placement and spreading also must be in relatively thick lifts and performed by low-ground-pressure equipment. In addition, a significant volume reduction in the tire chip layer can be anticipated as a result of normal loadings from the overlying waste. Equivalent internal friction angles and cohesiveness for the tire chips should be estimated for factors of safety against side-slope failure. Despite theses concerns, however,the advantages of constructing a tire-chip drainage layer often can outweigh the disadvantages, as long as the chips` long-term permeability characteristics and resistance to clogging -- a result of biological activity -- are at least equal to that of typical granular soil materials commonly used in leachate drainage and collection systems.

Duffy, D.P. [RMT, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Plan to Develop and Demonstrate Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring Systems in Hanford Site Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document describes changes that need to be made to the site's authorization basis and technical concerns that need to be resolved before proceduralized use of Electrochemical Noise based corrosion monitoring systems is fully possible at the Hanford Site.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Monitoring the Fixed FGD Sludge Landfill--Conesville, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years of extensive monitoring of the first full-scale application of the fixed flue gas desulfurization sludge process proved it technically sound. This new disposal method offers utilities leachate control in a landfill that allows diverse use of disposal sites in the future.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Aerobic attached growth biofilter using tire chips and mixed broken glass as media for landfill leachate treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ontario regulations can necessitate expensive leachate treatment plants in large landfills. Lower-cost technologies may suit rural landfills due to lower waste toxicity and less proximity (more)

Smith, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Aerobic Attached Growth Biofilter Using Tire Chips And Mixed Broken Glass As Media For Landfill Leachate Treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ontario regulations can necessitate expensive leachate treatment plants in large landfills. Lower-cost technologies may suit rural landfills due to lower waste toxicity and less proximity (more)

Smith, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nitrogen management in landfill leachate: Application of SHARON, ANAMMOX and combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant research on ammonia removal from leachate by SHARON and ANAMMOX process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHARON-ANAMMOX process for leachate a new research and this paper gives wide facts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cost-effective process, alternative to existing technologies for leachate treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Address the issues and operational conditions for application in leachate treatment. - Abstract: In today's context of waste management, landfilling of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is considered to be one of the standard practices worldwide. Leachate generated from municipal landfills has become a great threat to the surroundings as it contains high concentration of organics, ammonia and other toxic pollutants. Emphasis has to be placed on the removal of ammonia nitrogen in particular, derived from the nitrogen content of the MSW and it is a long term pollution problem in landfills which determines when the landfill can be considered stable. Several biological processes are available for the removal of ammonia but novel processes such as the Single Reactor System for High Activity Ammonia Removal over Nitrite (SHARON) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) process have great potential and several advantages over conventional processes. The combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process for municipal landfill leachate treatment is a new, innovative and significant approach that requires more research to identify and solve critical issues. This review addresses the operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of both the processes to remove ammonia from leachate.

Sri Shalini, S., E-mail: srishalini10@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India); Joseph, Kurian, E-mail: kuttiani@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fort Hood has selected an Energy Services Performance Contract (ESPC) contractor to help achieve its energy reduction goals as mandated by Executive Order. This ESPC is expected to be a $3.8 million, 20 year contract, which includes five primary types of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) in 56 buildings, and includes boiler insulation, control system upgrades, vending machine controls, cooling tower variable frequency drives (VFDs), and lighting retrofits. The plan of action for the ESPC includes cost effective M&V, using IPMVP Options B and C for the first two years after the retrofits are installed, and Option A combined with annual performance verification for the remainder of the contract. This paper discusses the development the Measurement and Verification (M&V) Plan for the Fort Hood Energy Services Performance Contract, and includes results of the baseline calculations (Haberl et al. 2002, 2003b).

Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microsoft Word - Appendix I-LCRS Operating Plan.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page I-3 I1.0 Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide information necessary for the proper operation and maintenance of the Leachate Collection and Removal System (LCRS). Specifically, the subsequent sections will provide the information relating to the management of leachate, maintenance and calibration of liquid level, general equipment maintenance, and reporting requirements. I2.0 Facility Description The LCRS facility is located at the north end of the disposal cell and consists of an 11,500-gallon horizontal below-grade pipe storage sump, four pipes from the disposal cell (east and west primary and east and west secondary) to convey the leachate to the sump, liquid level monitoring instruments, and other related equipment. An 8-foot chain link and barbed wire fence surrounds

139

Constructed wetlands for municipal solid waste landfill leachate treatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the US Geological Survey and Cornell University, in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Tompkins County Solid Waste Department, began a three-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, New York, to test the effectiveness of leachate treatment with constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. A parallel study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Fenton, New York was conducted by researchers at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hawk Engineering (Trautmann and others, 1989). Results are described.

Peverly, J.; Sanford, W.E.; Steenhuis, T.S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Interaction of Uranium Mill Tailings Leachate with Soils and Clay Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates leachate-soil interactions that will take place at the Morton Ranch for certain disposal alternatives. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the following: 1) physical and chemical characteristics of geologic materials from the Morton Ranch. 2) physical and chemical characteristics of acid leach tailings and tallings solution, 3) leaching tests with selected tailings materials and leach solutions to evaluate the leachability of contaminants with time under specific disposal alternatives, 4) adsorption studies measuring the sorption characteristics of heavy metals and radionuclides on the geologic materials at Morton Ranch, 5) clay liner stability tests to evaluate effects of acid leachate on clay mineralogy and clay permeability.

Gee, G. W.; Campbell, A. C.; Sherwood, D. R.; Strickert, R. G.; Phillips, S. J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Management Plan for Experimental Reintroduction of Sockeye into Skaha Lake; Proposed Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation, 2004 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Okanagan River sockeye salmon, which spawn near the town of Oliver, B.C., have their farther upstream migration limited by several water control and diversion dams. Stock numbers have been declining for many years and the Okanagan Native Alliance Fisheries Department (ONAFD) has been the principal advocate of a program to restore their numbers and range by reintroducing them into upstream waters where they may once have occurred in substantial numbers Some investigators have warned that without effective intervention Okanagan sockeye are at considerable risk of extinction. Among a host of threats, the quality of water in the single nursery areas in Osoyoos Lake. is deteriorating and a sanctuary such as that afforded in larger lakes higher in the system could be essential. Because the proposed reintroduction upstream has implications for other fish species, (particularly kokanee, the so-called ''landlocked sockeye'' which reside in many Okanagan lakes), the proponents undertook a three-year investigation, with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, to identify possible problem areas, and they committed to an interim experimental reintroduction to Skaha Lake where any problems could be worked out before a more ambitious reintroduction, (e.g. to Okanagan Lake) could be formally considered. The three-year investigation was completed in the spring of 2003. It included an assessment of risks from disease or the possible introduction of unwanted exotic species. It also considered the present quality and quantity of sockeye habitat, and opportunities for expanding or improving it. Finally ecological complexity encouraged the development of a life history model to examine interactions of sockeye with other fishes and their food organisms. While some problem areas were exposed in the course of these studies, they appeared to be manageable and the concept of an experimental reintroduction was largely supported but with the proviso that there should be a thorough evaluation and reporting of progress and results. A 2004 start on implementation and monitoring has now been proposed.

Wright, Howie; Smith, Howard (Okanagan Nation Alliance, Fisheries Department, Westbank, BC, Canada)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Metal Speciation in Landfill Leachates with a Focus on the Influence of Organic Matter  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

F Claret; C Tournassat; C Crouzet; E Gaucher; T Schfer; G Braibant; D Guyonnet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microbial nitrogen transformation potential in surface run-off leachate from a tropical landfill  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial nitrogen transformations can alleviate toxic ammonium discharge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic ammonium oxidation was rate-limiting in Indonesian landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic nitrogen ammonification was most dominant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anaerobic nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation potential were also high. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A two-stage aerobic-anaerobic nitrogen removal system needs to be implemented. - Abstract: Ammonium is one of the major toxic compounds and a critical long-term pollutant in landfill leachate. Leachate from the Jatibarang landfill in Semarang, Indonesia, contains ammonium in concentrations ranging from 376 to 929 mg N L{sup -1}. The objective of this study was to determine seasonal variation in the potential for organic nitrogen ammonification, aerobic nitrification, anaerobic nitrate reduction and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) at this landfilling site. Seasonal samples from leachate collection treatment ponds were used as an inoculum to feed synthetic media to determine potential rates of nitrogen transformations. Aerobic ammonium oxidation potential (<0.06 mg N L{sup -1} h{sup -1}) was more than a hundred times lower than the anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes and organic nitrogen ammonification, which were of the same order of magnitude. Anaerobic nitrate oxidation did not proceed beyond nitrite; isolates grown with nitrate as electron acceptor did not degrade nitrite further. Effects of season were only observed for aerobic nitrification and anammox, and were relatively minor: rates were up to three times higher in the dry season. To completely remove the excess ammonium from the leachate, we propose a two-stage treatment system to be implemented. Aeration in the first leachate pond would strongly contribute to aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrate by providing the currently missing oxygen in the anaerobic leachate and allowing for the growth of ammonium oxidisers. In the second pond the remaining ammonium and produced nitrate can be converted by a combination of nitrate reduction to nitrite and anammox. Such optimization of microbial nitrogen transformations can contribute to alleviating the ammonium discharge to surface water draining the landfill.

Mangimbulude, Jubhar C. [Faculty of Biology, Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana, Jl Diponegoro 52-60, Salatiga 50711 (Indonesia); Straalen, Nico M. van [Department of Ecological Science, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roeling, Wilfred F.M., E-mail: wilfred.roling@falw.vu.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. > Most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while Pb, Cu and Cd are associated with larger particles. > Metal complexation with OM is not sufficient to explain apparent supersaturation of metals with sulphide minerals. - Abstract: This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

Claret, Francis, E-mail: f.claret@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Tournassat, Christophe; Crouzet, Catherine; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Schaefer, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology Group, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Braibant, Gilles; Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

Mutch Jr, R. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mahony, J. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

147

Best management practices plan for installation of and monitoring at temporary Weirs at NT-4, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the installation of temporary weirs at NT-4 is to collect empirical surface water discharge data for the tributary during baseflow conditions and following rainfall events, during the spring and summer of 1997 in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Alternatives Evaluation project. The duration of surface-water monitoring activities is not planned to exceed 6 months. A minimum of four temporary weirs will be installed along the length of NT-4 in the locations indicated on Attachment A. The design specifications and locations for the weirs will be provided by the DOE prime contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Alternatives Evaluation project. The weirs will be fabricated by the Y-12 labor forces of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES). The Environmental Compliance Organization (ECO) of LMES will perform data collection in addition to weir installation, inspection, maintenance, and removal. Flow meters that collect data at five minute intervals will be installed on each weir and visual measurements using staff gauges mounted on each weir will also be performed.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydraulic Conductivity of Geosynthetic Clay Liners to Coal Combustion Product Leachates: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivity tests are being conducted on geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using solutions representing leachates observed in disposal facilities for coal combustion products (CCPs). Five different GCL products that are commercially available within the United States are being tested: two containing conventional sodium bentonite (NaB), two containing polymer-modified bentonite (PMB), and one with a bentonite polymer composite (BPC). Testing to date has been conducted by direct permeation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Groundwater Quality Signatures for Assessing Potential Impacts from Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron and sulfate are recognized as potential indicators of the influence of leachate from coal-combustion products (CCPs) on groundwater quality. However, there are cases in which these two constituents do not provide sufficient data to characterize groundwater for potential impacts from CCPs. In these cases, the concentrations of other indicator constituents in solution and/or advanced analytical techniques may be used to support other information. A three-tiered analysis approach can provide a ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Colloidal products and actinide species in leachate from spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were subjected to unsaturated leach tests with simulated groundwater at 90{degrees}C. The actinides present in the leachate were determined at the end of two successive periods of {approximately}60 days and after an acid strip done at the end of the second period. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. In addition, the actinide release behavior of the two fuels appeared to be different for both the total amount of material released and the relative amount of each isotope released. This paper will focus on the detection and identification of the colloidal species observed in the leachate that was collected after each of the first two successive testing periods of approximately 60 days each. In addition, preliminary values for the total actinide release for these two periods are reported.

Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Microsoft Word - Appendix J-LCRS-Train 3 Treament Contingency Plan1.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

February 2005 Second Draft Final Doc. No. S00790AG February 2005 Second Draft Final Doc. No. S00790AG Page I-3 I1.0 Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide information necessary for the proper operation and maintenance of the Leachate Collection and Removal System (LCRS). Specifically, the subsequent sections will provide the information relating to the management of leachate, maintenance and calibration of liquid level, general equipment maintenance, and reporting requirements. I2.0 Facility Description The LCRS facility is located at the north end of the disposal cell and consists of an 11,500-gallon horizontal below-grade pipe storage sump, four pipes from the disposal cell (east and west primary and east and west secondary) to convey the leachate to the sump, liquid level monitoring

154

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leachates from selected landfill sites in South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last few decades have seen dramatic growth in the scale of production and the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants. Consequently, PBDEs such as BDE -28, -47, -66, -71, -75, -77, -85, -99, -100, -119, -138, -153, -154, and -183 have been detected in various environmental matrices. Generally, in South Africa, once the products containing these chemicals have outlived their usefulness, they are discarded into landfill sites. Consequently, the levels of PBDEs in leachates from landfill sites may give an indication of the general exposure and use of these compounds. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and concentrations of most common PBDEs in leachates from selected landfill sites. The extraction capacities of the solvents were also tested. Spiked landfill leachate samples were used for the recovery tests. Separation and determination of the PBDE congeners were carried out with a gas chromatograph equipped with Ni{sup 63} electron capture detector. The mean percentage recoveries ranged from 63% to 108% (n = 3) for landfill leachate samples with petroleum ether giving the highest percentage extraction. The mean concentrations of PBDEs obtained ranged from ND to 2670 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 6638 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 7230 pg l{sup -1}, 41 to 4009 pg l{sup -1}, 90 to 9793 pg l{sup -1} for the Garankuwa, Hatherly, Kwaggarsrand, Soshanguve and Temba landfill sites, respectively. Also BDE -28, -47, -71 and BDE-77 were detected in the leachate samples from all the landfill sites; and all the congeners were detected in two of the oldest landfill sites. The peak concentrations were recorded for BDE-47 at three sites and BDE-71 and BDE-75 at two sites. The highest concentration, 9793 {+-} 1.5 pg l{sup -1}, was obtained for the Temba landfill site with the highest BOD value. This may suggest some influence of organics on the level of PBDEs. Considering the leaching characteristics of brominated flame retardants, there is a high possibility that with time these compounds may infiltrate into the groundwater around the sites since most of the sites are not adequately lined.

Odusanya, David O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Okonkwo, Jonathan O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: OkonkwoOJ@tut.ac.za; Botha, Ben [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart A. Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the WIPP DOEWIPP-03-3230 Describes the groundwater...

156

Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Strategic Plan Print ALS Strategic Plan Update: March 2013 The Advanced Light Source Strategic Plan, originally published in 2009, has been revised to reflect completed...

157

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

158

Life Cycle Management Planning at V.C. Summer Nuclear Plant: Main Condenser, Radiation Monitoring System, and Nuclear Safety-Related HVAC Chilled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes very important to keep the plant economically viable throughout its remaining licensed operating term (either a 40-year or 60-year term). This report provides the industry with lessons learned from applying the EPRI LCM planning process to three SSCs at V.C. Summer Generating Station.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Task Plan for the selection and evaluation of flow monitoring instrumentation to be used on the primary exhaust ventilation in Double Shell Hydrogen Watch List Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Task Plan outlines the activities required to select and evaluate flow measuring devices to be used in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts for Double Shell Tanks (DST) on the hydrogen watch list that don`t already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN. The continuous measurement and recording of this flow is necessary to quantify the amount of hydrogen being off-gased by these tanks for further mitigation studies.

Hertelendy, N.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microsoft Word - Vol II_Att C.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-7.0-Final Attachment C-GroundwaterLeak Detection and Leachate Monitoring Plan January 2014 Page i...

164

Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

Kwong, S.; Small, J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, The British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Anaerobic treatment of sludge from a nitrification-denitrification landfill leachate plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of anaerobic digestion of sludge from a MSW landfill leachate treatment plant, with COD values ranging between 15,000 and 19,400 mg O{sub 2} dm{sup -3}, in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. The reactor employed had a useful capacity of 9 l, operating at mesophilic temperature. Start-up of the reactor was carried out in different steps, beginning with diluted sludge and progressively increasing the amount of sludge fed into the reactor. The study was carried out over a period of 7 months. Different amounts of methanol were added to the feed, ranging between 6.75 and 1 cm{sup 3} dm{sup -3} of feed in order to favour the growth of methanogenic flora. The achieved biodegradation of the sludge using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket Reactor was very high for an HRT of 9 days, obtaining decreases in COD of 84-87% by the end of the process. Purging of the digested sludge represented {approx}16% of the volume of the treated sludge.

Maranon, E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain)]. E-mail: emara@uniovi.es; Castrillon, L. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, Y. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, E. [COGERSA, 33697 Serin, Gijon (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Stochastic modelling of landfill leachate and biogas production incorporating waste heterogeneity. Model formulation and uncertainty analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model simulating the hydrological and biochemical processes occurring in landfilled waste is presented and demonstrated. The model combines biochemical and hydrological models into an integrated representation of the landfill environment. Waste decomposition is modelled using traditional biochemical waste decomposition pathways combined with a simplified methodology for representing the rate of decomposition. Water flow through the waste is represented using a statistical velocity model capable of representing the effects of waste heterogeneity on leachate flow through the waste. Given the limitations in data capture from landfill sites, significant emphasis is placed on improving parameter identification and reducing parameter requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed, highlighting the model's response to changes in input variables. A model test run is also presented, demonstrating the model capabilities. A parameter perturbation model sensitivity analysis was also performed. This has been able to show that although the model is sensitive to certain key parameters, its overall intuitive response provides a good basis for making reasonable predictions of the future state of the landfill system. Finally, due to the high uncertainty associated with landfill data, a tool for handling input data uncertainty is incorporated in the model's structure. It is concluded that the model can be used as a reasonable tool for modelling landfill processes and that further work should be undertaken to assess the model's performance.

Zacharof, A.I.; Butler, A.P

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Lesson Plans!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you from other teachers, educators, and professionals. These lesson plans are provided free of charge, to help you planning a challenging curriculum that will instill a love of...

168

Medical Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Plans Retiree Medical Insurance Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of medical benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Medical plan options...

169

Transmission Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Transmission Planning We accept requests from electric utilities, firm-power customers, private power developers, and independent power generators to interconnect...

170

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Planning Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planning Workshop on Renewable Energy and Climate Science for the Americas: Metrology and Technology Challenges. ...

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, etc.) will be delivered to each well site in factory-sealed containers and remain in such until used) for the secondary upper pack · 3/8-inch bentonite pellets/chips seal · schedule 40 PVC blank casing · 30% solids, as determined by the Stoller geologist, the placement of a 5-feet bentonite seal (3/8-inch bentonite pellets

176

Environmental Monitoring Plan for Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEA Baseline Exposure Assessment CPC Condensation Particle Counter CNT Carbon Nanotubes DOE Department of Energy EETD Environmental Energy Technologies Division EHS Environment,...

177

Microsoft Word - Vol II_Att C.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6.0-Final Attachment C-Groundwater/Leak Detection and Leachate Monitoring Plan 6.0-Final Attachment C-Groundwater/Leak Detection and Leachate Monitoring Plan January 2013 Page i Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Overview of the OSDF .......................................................................................... 1-2 1.2 Program Overview ................................................................................................. 1-5 1.3 Plan Organization .................................................................................................. 1-6

178

Return on Investment of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Return on Investment of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s), Davion M Hill. On-Site Speaker (Planned)...

179

Security Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Appendix A Glossary - A glossary of security terms used within the security planning document. ... F, Glossary. None applicable.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN MITIGATION ACTION PLAN KEMPER COUNTY IGCC PROJECT KEMPER COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2010 2 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County IGCC Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR § 1021.331. PURPOSE Section 1021.331 of the DOE regulations implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021) provides

182

Compliance plan for PG and E geysers unit 16  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan is described to establish a monitoring system to assure that the geothermal power plant is constructed and operated in compliance with air and water quality, public health and safety, and other applicable regulations, guidelines, and conditions of the California Energy Commission. The plan is divided into: a Power Plant Compliance Plan and a Transmission Line Compliance Plan. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification.

Seamans, J.A.

1995-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities August 2013 2 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Standard Review Plan (SRP) Preparation...

185

NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Clausiusstrasse 25, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Kleine, Thorsten [Institut fuer Planetologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Dauphas, Nicolas, E-mail: burkhardt@erdw.ethz.ch [Origins Laboratory, Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Task Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task Plans Task Plans This page contains links to a tentative listing of active and closed TEC Task Plans. Final status of these task plans will be determined after the July 2000 TEC meeting. Task Plan Number/Title DOE Lead Staff Last Update Comment Status/ New No. After 7/27/00 GP-1, Section 180(c) Coordination (begun 1/96) C. Macaluso 7/98 DOE published a Revised Proposed Policy and Procedures in April 1998; no final policy will be issued until a definitive date for NWPA shipments is determined, based on site suitability or other legislative direction. To the extent that any issues related to Section 180(c) arise in TEC meetings, they are being discussed in the context of the consolidated grant topic group which is covered by another task plan. Closed

187

Decommissioning Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this EPRI Technical Report is to provide a series of pre-planning guidance documents for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. This guidance is based in part upon Nuclear Decommissioning Plans (NDPs) developed by Commonwealth Edison (now Exelon) following the premature closure of Zion Station in 1998 as well as from other industry references and experience. These NDPs focus on the planning activities over the period from prior to final shutdown through the transition period into de...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Open Government Plan 1.0 Web Improvement Strategy Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area What We Do For You Month by month the clean...

189

Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Plan (SSMP) to be submitted to Congress after the April 2010 release of the Nuclear Posture Review Report. It is aligned with the President's National Security Strategy...

190

Emergency Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Early Dismissal (Early Closing) Due to Inclement Weather - Snow/Ice or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Monitoring of the electrical distribution network operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution network operation is determined by the behaviour of the load. To plan and analyse the electrical network operation, precise modelling of load is substantial. The adequate approach to understand the electrical distribution network operation ... Keywords: SCADA, busloads, distribution network, load monitoring, mathematical model of load, network operation monitoring, state estimation

Jako Kilter; Mati Meldorf

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

193

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Work plan  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing is outlined. There are two tandem tasks in the program, a literature and information review and evaluation and an experimental effort. The experimental work will address environmental control technologies for retort and product water, contamination of ground water by abandoned in situ retorts, raw and spent shale leachates, fugitive emissions from background oil shale retorting, and aquifer bridging during or after shale oil extraction.

Wewerka, E.M.; Wagner, P.; Wanek, P.L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) Implementation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power producers are required to include a Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) Plan in their first Title V permit renewal application. In developing the CAM plan, sources must provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with the applicable emission limit(s) for each affected unit. Currently, only particulate mass emissions are of concern to power producers. Therefore, CAM plans must be based on measurable parameters that can be related to particulate emissions in a reliable manner. Since the regul...

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

196

2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by utilizing the energy conservation loan fund and Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund for exceeding typical occupants and facilities' staff to monitor and improve the energy usage of buildings. · Utilizingsub2010 Climate Action Plan Energy and Environmental Stewardship Initiative: Prepared by: The Office

Feschotte, Cedric

197

Disruption Management ( Operations Research between planning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creasing the cost of production gives rise to an increased demand for robustness in plans and calls ... T he monitoring and re-planning process is referred to as the control process. A s ..... have little help in estimating the quality of the recovery action they are about to. 8 .... and equipment , both of w hich are scarce resources.

198

PNL-MA-70 QA Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Instrument and External Dosimetry Section provides the calibration service for all portable radiation monitoring measuring and test equipment used on the Hanford Site. This document outlines the quality assurance (QA) plan for the Instrument Calibration and Evaluation Program. The scope of the QA plan in outlined, requirement specifications are provided, and QA program/organization and impact level are discussed.

Ethridge, L.J.

1993-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

200

Sample Project Execution Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan The project execution plan (PEP) is the governing document that establishes the means to execute, monitor, and control projects. The plan serves as the main communication vehicle to ensure that everyone is aware and knowledgeable of project objectives and how they will be accomplished. The plan is the primary agreement between Headquarters and the federal project director and a preliminary plan should be developed and approved at Critical Decision-1. Project objectives are derived from the mission needs statement, and an integrated project team assists in development of the PEP. The plan is a living document and should be updated to describe current and future processes and procedures, such as integrating safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GRIPS Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The GRIPS (Geothermal Resources Impact Projection Study) Commission was established by a Joint Powers Agreement between the California Counties of Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma. The objectives of GRIPS are primarily to develop and use a cooperative environmental data collection and use system including natural, social, and economic considerations to facilitate their independent decisions and those of State and Federal agencies related to the environmental effects of geothermal development. This GRIPS Plan was prepared from a wide range of studies, workshops, and staff analyses. The plan is presented in four parts: summary and introduction; environmental data status report; planned programs; and budget. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Multi-agent coordination by temporal plan fusion: Application to combat search and rescue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coordination of actions and plans that must be achieved by multiple agents is one of the most difficult tasks in the multi-agent domain. In order to work together and achieve a common goal, agents need to coordinate their plans in a way that guarantees, ... Keywords: Distributed plan monitoring, Multi-agent coordination, Plan fusion, Temporal fusion, Temporal merging, Temporal planning

Mohamad K. Allouche; Abdeslem Boukhtouta

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Test plan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3.0 TEST PLAN METHODOLOGY 8. 3.1 Assumptions 8. 3.2 Methodology 8. 4.0 COMMENTS ON INITIAL VIEW OF THE DATA 16 1.0 INTRODUCTION. EIA tasked Allied ...

204

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CFN Ops Plan | Work Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Plan Operations Plan Work Planning & Control for Experiments and Operations All experimental work will be conducted in accordance with Work Planning and Control for Experiments and Operations, which ensures proper design and operation of all experiments prior to their commencement. CFN will use the SBMS provided standard form for the formal documentation. The Lead Experimenter/Responsible person will notify the Experimental Safety Review Committee of any new experiments or modifications to existing experiments. CFN will appoint an Experimental Safety Review Committee. This committee will consist of the Experiment Review Coordinator, CFN personnel, Facility Support Representative (FSR), Environmental Compliance Representative (ECR). Additional subject matter experts may be appointed on an ad-hoc

208

Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure fails to extract oxoanion-forming elements that are extracted by municipal solid waste leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US EPA and state regulatory agencies rely on standard extraction tests to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate surface water or groundwater. To evaluate the predictive abilities of these extraction tests, the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), the Waste Extraction Test (WET), and the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) were compared with actual municipal solid waste leachates (MSWLs) for their ability to extract regulated elements from a variety of industrial solid wastes in short- and long-term extractions. Short-term extractions used MSWLs from a variety of California landfills. Long-term sequential extractions simulated longer term leaching, as might occur in MSW landfills. For most regulated elements, the TCLP roughly predicted the maximum concentrations extracted by the MSWLs. For regulated elements that form oxoanions (e.g., Sb, As, Mo, Se, V), however the TCLP underpredicted the levels extracted by the MSWL. None of the standard tests adequately predicted these levels. The results emphasize the need for better standardized techniques to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate groundwater with oxoanion-forming elements, particularly arsenic.

Hooper, K.; Iskander, M.; Sivia, G. [California Dept. of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Lab.] [and others

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook The Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook, published by the...

210

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

214

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2011) January 2011) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

215

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCTOBER 2010) OCTOBER 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

216

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) -Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

217

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PLANNING PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 6 Competition Requirements 4. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 5. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 6. FAR Part 9 Contractor Qualifications 7. FAR Part 10 Market Research 8. FAR Part 11 Describing Agency Needs 9. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 10. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 11. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 12. FAR 17 Special Contracting Methods 13. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 14. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 15. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy

218

Systems Engineering Management Plan. Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to define and establish the MRS Project Systems Engineering process that implements the approved policy and requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This plan is Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan (PMP). This plan provides the framework for implementation of systems engineering on the MRS Project consistent with DOE Order 4700.1, the OCRWM Program Management System Manual (PMSM), and the OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP).

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Committee on Monitoring Research Terms of Reference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Council is, therefore, developing an overall proposal for monitoring the progress of research within NOAA. The four key elements of the new monitoring strategy are: To link research milestones with activities in the Program Operating Plans of the goal and program teams, the Annual Operating Plans of the Line Offices and the performance objectives of the NOAA strategic plan; To regularly evaluate the quality, relevance, and value of NOAAs research, both internally in NOAA, and by external review teams; To use a NOAA-wide database to track research accomplishments, and the outcomes in society that result from them; To track the financial reporting of research activities across the Agency. Because monitoring of research in NOAA is proposed to be systematic and ongoing, it is appropriate to establish a permanent Committee of the Research Council for that purpose. The NOAA Executive Panel endorsed such a Committee. Definitions Research and development are defined as:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer ? five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannual groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, U-234, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occurring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannal groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occuring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Identification of tire leachate toxicants and a risk assessment of water quality effects using tire reefs in canals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cover is important to aquatic habitat and fisheries often try to improve habitats by addition of natural and artificial material to improve cover diversity and complexity. Habitat-improvement programs range from submerging used Christmas trees to more complex programs. Used automobile tires have been employed in the large scale construction of reefs and fish attractors in marine environments and to a lesser extent in freshwater and have been recognized as a durable, inexpensive and long-lasting material benefiting fishery communities. Recent studies by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation have quantified the importance of tire reefs to enhancing freshwater canal fisheries in the southwestern United States. These studies have demonstrated that fishes and aquatic macroinvertebrates are attracted to these structures, increasing species diversity, densities and biomass where reefs are placed in canals. However, the use of tire reefs in aquatic environments which have relatively small volumes compared to marine or reservoir environments has raised water quality concerns. Effects of tires on water quality have not typically been studied in the past because of the obvious presence of fishes and other aquatic organisms that make use of tire reefs; the implication being that tires are inert and non-toxic. Little information on effects of tires on water quality is in the literature. Stone demonstrated that tire exposure had no detrimental effects on two species of marine fish while results of Kellough's freshwater tests were inconclusive, but suggested that some factor in tire leachate was toxic to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Nozaka et al. found no harmful substances leached from tire material soaked in fresh water. Because there are few data on toxicity associated with tires, this became the focus of our study. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures developed by the EPA were used to evaluate water quality impacted by tires. 17 refs., 4 figs.

Nelson, S.M.; Mueller, G. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (United States)); Hemphill, D.C. (Lower Colorado Regional Office, Boulder City, NV (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy planning and management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.1 (May 2010) 7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 13. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy Guiding Principles

231

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) --Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles

232

Berkeley Lab Strategic Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Development (LDRD) BER Review Annual Lab Plan Notable Outcomes Division-Level Strategic Planning Related Links Strategic Planning Laboratory Directed Research and...

233

Plan Descriptions & Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Descriptions & Summaries Retiree Insurance Plans Retiree health and welfare benefits are managed by AonHewitt and Associates. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Plan...

234

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook A. Dane and L. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Indian Energy 1000 Independence...

235

Transmission Planning | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Planning Transmission Planning Modernizing America's electricity infrastructure is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's top priorities. The National Transmission Grid Study (PDF 2.0 MB) made clear that without dramatic improvements and upgrades over the next decade our nation's transmission system will fall short of the reliability standards our economy requires, and will result in higher electricity costs to consumers. The Department's research into a variety of tools that will improve advanced system monitoring, visualization, control, operations, and market structure will ultimately modernize the electricity transmission infrastructure to ease congestion, allow for increases in demand, and provide a greater degree of security. The next generation supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and

236

New Production Reactors Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Part I of this New Production Reactors (NPR) Program Plan: describes the policy basis of the NPR Program; describes the mission and objectives of the NPR Program; identifies the requirements that must be met in order to achieve the mission and objectives; and describes and assesses the technology and siting options that were considered, the Program's preferred strategy, and its rationale. The implementation strategy for the New Production Reactors Program has three functions: Linking the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities to policies requirements, and the process for selecting options. The development of an implementation strategy ensures that activities and procedures are consistent with the rationale and analysis underlying the Program. Organization of the Program. The strategy establishes plans, organizational structure, procedures, a budget, and a schedule for carrying out the Program. By doing so, the strategy ensures the clear assignment of responsibility and accountability. Management and monitoring of the Program. Finally, the strategy provides a basis for monitoring the Program so that technological, cost, and scheduling issues can be addressed when they arise as the Program proceeds. Like the rest of the Program Plan, the Implementation Strategy is a living document and will be periodically revised to reflect both progress made in the Program and adjustments in plans and policies as they are made. 21 figs., 5 tabs.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Microsoft Word - N01401_NE and 4-5 Closure Mon Plan.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Closure Monitoring Plan for the Closure Monitoring Plan for the Northeast Site and 4.5 Acre Site August 2009 LMS/PIN/N01401 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01401 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Closure Monitoring Plan for the Northeast Site and 4.5 Acre Site August 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Closure Monitoring Plan for the Northeast Site and 4.5 Acre Site July 2009 Doc. No. N01401 Page i Contents 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Summary of Source Removal Activities............................................................................. 1 3.0 Delineation of Contaminant Plumes ...................................................................................

238

How should indicators be found for scenario monitoring ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario planning is a widely used approach for developing long-term strategies. The typical scenario process involves developing scenarios, identifying strategies whose success is contingent on the scenario, and monitoring ...

He, Zheng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ambient monitoring of pollutants around synfuel plants : final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to aid in the evaluation of Environmental Monitoring Plans (EMP) submitted to the U.S. Synfuel Corporation by prospective operators of large-scale synfuel plants who are applying for financial ...

Golomb, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flight Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing broader linguistic capability and cultural understanding iscritical to prevail in the long war and meet 21 st Century challenges. The Department must dramatically increase the number of personnel proficient in key languagesand make these languages available at all levels of action and decision from the strategic to the tactical. 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review, p. 78 Due to the nature of immediate and likely future challenges, our Joint forces require Airmen capable of influencing the outcomes of US, allied, and coalition operations anywhere in the world. While we, the Air Force, have made considerable initial progress toward building the necessary cross-cultural skills, we recognize the existing processes for obtaining this forceenhancing capability (appropriate culture, region, language and negotiation skills) are not currently mature or robust enough to optimally meet immediate expectations or near-future requirements. Therefore, it is imperative that we tailor our cultural, regional, and language competency development to maximize our efforts and meet Air Force and Joint requirements informed by National guidance. To this end, the Air Force Culture, Region, and Language (CRL) Flight Plan represents our framework for implementing relevant National Security and National Defense strategies via Air Force programs. The dynamic global environment has made Cross-Cultural Competence a critical and necessary capability for the Total Force. The Air Force CRL Flight Plan supports the

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rad Monioring Subgroup Draft 1 Work Plan 020408  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 of 3 (Draft) Work Plan for the DOE TEC Rail Topic Group Radiation Monitoring Sub-Group Status: Active TEC Stakeholder Leads: Marty Vyenielo (PANE Task Force), Cort Richardson...

242

Cogeneration Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration, the sequential use of a fuel to generate electricity and thermal energy, has become a widely discussed concept in energy engineering. American-Standard, a world-wide diversified manufacturing corporation, has actively been pursuing cogeneration projects for its plants. Of concern to us are rapidly escalating electrical costs plus concern about the future of some utilities to maintain reserve capacity. Our review to date revolves around (1) obtaining low-cost reliable fuel supplies for the cogeneration system, (2) identifying high cost/low reserve utilities, and (3) developing systems which are base loaded, and thus cost-effective. This paper will be an up-to-date review of our cogeneration planning process.

Mozzo, M. A. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT PLANS MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  Overview  Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects  Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing of Project Planning Elements  Elements of Deactivation Project Planning  Examples From Project Management Plans Overview The purpose here is to assist project managers and project planners in creating a project plan by providing examples and pointing to information that have been successfully used by others in the past. Section 4.2 of DOE Guide 430.1-3, DEACTIVATION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE discusses the content and purpose of deactivation project management plans. It is presented as a suggested outline followed by other potential subjects. For the convenience of readers, that information is repeated below.

244

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests  

SciTech Connect

This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Molecke, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Our Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan is designed to create a culture which values trust and human dignity and provides the opportunity for personal development and self- fulfillment in the attainment of DOE's mission and goals. The 2012- 2015 strategic plan has three essential pillars - mission focus, accountability, and continual learning. It also: Creates a universal definition of diversity and inclusion. Designs strategic outreach and recruitment initiatives to reach all segments of society. Creates an internal DOE-wide Diversity and Inclusion Council to monitor progress and support employee engagement. Promotes effective communication with employees and stakeholders to

248

STRATEGIC PLANNING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Academy of Public Administration is an independent, nonprofit organization chartered by Congress to improve governance at all levelslocal, regional, state, national, and international. The Academys membership of more than 550 Fellows includes current and former members of Congress, cabinet-level appointees, senior federal executives, state and local practitioners, businesspeople, nonprofit leaders, and scholars with distinguished records in public management. Since its establishment in 1967, the Academy has assisted hundreds of federal agencies, congressional committees, state and local governments, civic organizations, and institutions overseas through problemsolving, research, analysis, information sharing, developing strategies for change, and connecting people and ideas. Most reports and papers issued by Academy panels respond to specific requests and needs of public agencies. Projects also address governmentwide and broader societal topics identified by the Academy. In addition to government institutions, the Academy is also supported by businesses, foundations, and nonprofit organizations. A Final Report by a Panel of the NATIONAL ACADEMY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION for the Office of Strategic Planning

Hale Champion; Mary Jane England; Harry Hatry

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Transmission Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unscheduled electricity flows over transmission lines leading to increased risks to electric system-construction alternatives to transmission; · Inability to effectively monitor the wholesale electricity market, identifyBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Transmission Issues INTRODUCTION The Fifth Power Plan

250

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

LANS DB PENSION PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2010 December 2010 u:\my documents\pension plan\revised tcp1 db plan spd dec 2010.doc LANS Defined Benefit Pension Plan Summary Plan Description This Summary Plan Description (SPD) is intended to provide a summary of the principal features of the LANS Defined Benefit Pension Plan ("Plan") and is not meant to interpret, extend or change the Plan in any way. This SPD will continue to be updated. Please check back on a regular basis for the most recent version. Nothing in the Plan and/or this SPD shall be construed as giving any member the right to be retained in service with LANS or any affiliated company, or as a guarantee of any rights or benefits under the Plan. LANS, in its sole discretion, reserves the right to amend the SPD or Plan, or to terminate the Plan, at any time.

253

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600 Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared, safety, and welfare. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Energy Emergency Response Plan was prepared from

254

Final Addendum Appendix AD3: RM&E Plan Walla Walla Subbasin Plan AD3-i November 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change. For example, a master plan for spring Chinook hatchery production at the South Fork Walla Walla.8.20 Monitor and Assess Flow Requirements for Adult Spring Chinook Salmon Homing to the Walla Walla River ........................................................................... 36 2.8.21 Monitor and Assess the Impact of Flow on Steelhead and Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage

255

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Officer Biological (Accident Reports) 2204 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) (4/2007) 1

Oliver, Douglas L.

256

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

Kim, Duck O.

257

Solar Decathlon 2005, Instrumentation and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review Web Site Resources: Instrumentation and Monitoring 1 Solar Decathlon 2005, Instrumentation and Monitoring The Solar Decathlon organizers installed sensors and monitoring equipment in each house during assembly and removed the equipment during disassembly. (Some of the equipment was installed on prior visits to the teams' sites on their campuses during construction.) The locations of sensors and monitoring equipment were planned in advance through negotiations between the organizers and each team. Installation had to be completed on the Mall at least two days before the start of the objectively measured contests (October 10, 2005). Most of the teams, despite their very best intentions, were finishing construction of their houses during assembly on the Mall, which made

258

Solar Decathlon 2007 Instrumentation and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Decathlon 2007 Solar Decathlon 2007 Instrumentation and Monitoring The Solar Decathlon Instrumentation and Monitoring Group (IMG), led by Mountain Energy Partnership (MEP) personnel, installed sensors and monitoring equipment in each house during assembly and removed the equipment during disassembly. The locations of sensors and monitoring equipment were planned in advance through negotiations between the organizers and each team. Installation had to be completed on the Mall at least two days before the start of the objectively measured contests (October 15, 2007). Most of the teams, despite their best intentions, were finishing construction of their houses during assembly on the Mall, which made installation of instrumentation a bit tricky. MEP is accustomed to working with the normal last-minute nature of

259

Structural health monitoring of wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To properly determine what is needed in a structural health monitoring system, actual operational structures need to be studied. We have found that to effectively monitor the structural condition of an operational structure four areas must be addressed: determination of damage-sensitive parameters, test planning, information condensation, and damage identification techniques. In this work, each of the four areas has been exercised on an operational structure. The structures studied were all be wind turbines of various designs. The experiments are described and lessons learned will be presented. The results of these studies include a broadening of experience in the problems of monitoring actual structures as well as developing a process for implementing such monitoring systems.

Simmermacher, T.; James, G.H. III.; Hurtado, J.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » China-GHG Monitoring (Redirected from GIZ-China GHG Monitoring) Jump to: navigation, search Name China - GHG Monitoring Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Center for Clean Air Policy Partner on behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References GTZ in the People's Republic of China[1] Overview The project aims to develop capacities for a GHG-Monitoring system and an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Integrated Planning and Performance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOESC Scientific Facilities Strategic Plan (20 years, major capital projects) * DOE Strategic Plan (7-10 years) * DOE (HEP)Fermilab Strategic Plan (10 years) * FRAFNAL Plan for...

262

NEHRP - Final Plan Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... However, NEHRP funds do not support targeted ... FEMA does provide linkage of ongoing work in ... Plan discussion about Strategic Planning Principles ...

263

NSLS Work Planning & Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Planning & Controls NSLS Work Planning and Control Procedure Lead Working Guidelines Information on Working in Areas Subject to Radiation from VUV Injection Procedure for...

264

WSDOT Test Method T 127 Preparation of Leachate Sample for Testing Toxicity of HECP Effluents 1. Scope This test method outlines the procedure for collecting leachate from a HECP sample. 2. References 2.1 EPA-821-R-02-012 Methods for Measuring Acute Toxic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.1 Lay cheesecloth over clean topsoil 3.2 Apply the HECP to the cheesecloth at the following coverage: 3.2.1 HECP Long-Term or Moderate-Term Mulch 3,500 lbs per acre in two lifts with no more than 2000 # per acre in any one lift. 3.2.2 HECP Short-Term Mulch 2000 # per acre minimum, or manufacturers recommended rate may be used. 3.3 Allow material to cure for 48 hours 3.4 Pull cheesecloth up with mat of HECP, brush off any soil 3.5 Cut HECP into squares and provide 1.02 pounds of HECP to the laboratory. 4. Preparation of the Leachate (done by the laboratory) 4.1 Allow hydromulch product to soak in water for one hour 4.2 Remove hydromulch sheet from water 4.3 Filter water through a 60 micron filter water may be pre-filtered through a 35 mesh and then a 120 mesh before using the 230 mesh/63 micron filter. Note: Leachate not immediately used for testing should be stored at 4 C in the dark until

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference[1] Resources Design of a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Audit of Solar Home Systems Project Mid-term Review Panel for Solar Home Systems Project Socio-Economic Survey of the Photovoltaic Pilot Project References ↑ "Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Energy_Monitoring_Evaluation_Terms_of_Reference&oldid=329154"

266

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Volume 3: Sample Implementation Actions, Research Monitoring and Evaluation, and Policy and Planning Volume 3/ 1 VOLUME 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING One of the major challenges within the Region has been understanding the interrelationships among the numerous proposed fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery actions. One reason for this difficulty is that these actions are derived from many different regional proposals, each of which has been designed to meet a specific goal. In addition, the lack of an effective tool to illustrate these interrelationships has hampered understanding.

267

TASK PLAN: Tribal Issues Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task Plan 1 Tribal Issues Topic Group 7/12/00 Task Plan 1 Tribal Issues Topic Group 7/12/00 Task Plan 1 Page 1 Status: Active DOE Lead: National Transportation Program (NTP-AL; Judith Holm @ 505-845-4767) Start Date: January 1998 End Date: TBD Subject: TEC Topic Group - Tribal Issues rpose: To address issues such as: (1) HM-164 as it relates to Tribes; (2) to complete the Tribal column of the Rail Topic Group Regulatory Matrix; (3) to determine Tribal authority to stop and inspect shipments of radioactive materials; (4) to provide tribal pre-notification of DOE spent fuel shipments consistent with DOE policy and to provide continuous satellite-based tracking and monitoring capability to Tribes; (5) and to address Tribal involvement in transportation planning, training, and funding. The Topic Group

268

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Draft Mission Plan Amendment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has prepared this document to report plans for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, whose mission is to manage and dispose of the nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment. The Congress established this program through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Specifically, the Congress directed us to isolate these wastes in geologic repositories constructed in suitable rock formations deep beneath the surface of the earth. In the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the Congress mandated that only one repository was to be developed at present and that only the Yucca Mountain candidate site in Nevada was to be characterized at this time. The Amendments Act also authorized the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. After a reassessment in 1989, the Secretary of Energy restructured the program, focusing the repository effort scientific evaluations of the Yucca Mountain candidate site, deciding to proceed with the development of an MRS facility, and strengthening the management of the program. 48 refs., 32 figs.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening Line Management Oversight and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Review Plan Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities August 2013 2 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Standard Review Plan (SRP) Preparation for Facility Operations Applicability CD-0 CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operation Post Operation August 2013 3 Table of Contents Objective ......................................................................................................................................... 4 Requirements .................................................................................................................................. 4 Primary References ......................................................................................................................... 6

271

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ground water protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected alternative wouldhave significant environmental impact. This MAP contains mitigation and monitoring commitments for the project, including commitments set in permits for the new facility. Mitigation Action Plan for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications EA-1592: Finding of No Significant Impact

276

Plan - Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Plan Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Plans NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program now requires that each proposal include a Data Management Plan (DMP) of up to two pages. A DMP for a proposal is a brief document that outlines what you will do with your data during and after your research, to ensure your data will be safe, documented, and accessible now and in the future. A DMP - developed early and used throughout the research project - will increase research efficiency by making the data understandable and usable in the future and

277

Guidance for Planning Exercises  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating Transportation Emergency Preparedness Tabletops, Drills and Exercises Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-10.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance for Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Evaluating aluating aluating aluating aluating T T T T Tr r r r ransportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emergenc genc genc genc gency Pr y Pr y Pr y Pr y Prepar epar epar epar eparedness T

278

Process Test Plan Shutdown P16 Exhauster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Process Test Plan was written to gather temperature data to determine the amount of heat load remaining in tank 241-C-106. This process test plan is being conducted to gather the temperature data necessary to determine how much of the initial heat load is still left in 241-C-106. The heat load will be determined by shutting off the C-106 exhaust system, monitoring the change in tank temperature, and plugging the resulting data into the thermal model for this tank.

PARKMAN, D.B.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - prjct planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Checklist Planning Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and preparing project planning activities. The checklist reflects recognized project planning activities to be performed throughout the information systems project life cycle. Project planning is generally characterized as a process for selecting the strategies, policies, programs, and procedures for achieving the objectives and goals of the project. The objectives of project planning for information systems projects are summarized as the following: C User's environment is analyzed. C Project objectives and scope are defined. C High-level functional requirements are estimated.

282

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

Oliver, Douglas L.

283

IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

286

Strategic Planning History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategy for Global Change Research Related Federal Climate Efforts Strategic Planning History Print E-mail Below is a timeline of past strategic plans that have guided The U.S....

287

Business Continuity Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article considers various strategies for protecting an organisation from both natural and man-made disasters. The differences between business continuity planning, and disaster recovery planning are recognised. 1997 John Wiley & Sons, ...

Martin Nemzow

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen Posture Plan  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Hydrogen Posture Plan, published in December 2006, outlines a coordinated plan for activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, both at the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportat

289

RM Capital Investment Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plans FY 2004 (568kb pdf) FY 2005 (625kb pdf) FY 2006 (625kb pdf) FY 2007 (1.45mb pdf) Meter policy Capital Investment Plans...

290

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

291

Draft 2013 Annual Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft 2013 Annual Plan Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999 - Draft 2013 Annual Plan...

292

Exposure Reduction Through Optimized Planning and Scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry is challenged with increasing material inspections and complex maintenance work in areas with high radiation fields. Compounding this problem is the drive to reduce worker exposure. Efficient job planning and monitoring of worker exposure becomes more important in light of these challenges. An essential component of the ALARA program is centered on accurate and detailed work control. Drawing on industry experience, best practices, and the experience of the EPRI ALARA assessment team, EPRI de...

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Microsoft Word - Vol I.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume I Volume I Legacy Management Plan April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 4 Final Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan U.S. Department of Energy Volume I-Legacy Management Plan Doc. No. S03496-4.1-Draft Page 1-2 September 2010 * Attachment C-Groundwater/Leak Detection and Leachate Monitoring Plan * Attachment D-Integrated Environmental Monitoring Plan * Attachment E-Community Involvement Plan These support plans outline the operational requirements associated with the ongoing groundwater remedy (Attachment A); the surveillance and maintenance requirements for the OSDF (Attachment B); surveillance and maintenance for the leachate and groundwater associated with the OSDF (Attachment C); the environmental monitoring requirements necessary

294

Sandia Strategic Plan 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia embarked on its first exercise in corporate strategic planning during the winter of 1989. The results of that effort were disseminated with the publication of Strategic Plan 1990. Four years later Sandia conducted their second major planning effort and published Strategic Plan 1994. Sandia`s 1994 planning effort linked very clearly to the Department of Energy`s first strategic plan, Fueling a Competitive Economy. It benefited as well from the leadership of Lockheed Martin Corporation, the management and operating contractor. Lockheed Martin`s corporate success is founded on visionary strategic planning and annual operational planning driven by customer requirements and technology opportunities. In 1996 Sandia conducted another major planning effort that resulted in the development of eight long-term Strategic Objectives. Strategic Plan 1997 differs from its predecessors in that the robust elements of previous efforts have been integrated into one comprehensive body. The changes implemented so far have helped establish a living strategic plan with a stronger business focus and with clear deployment throughout Sandia. The concept of a personal line of sight for all employees to this strategic plan and its objectives, goals, and annual milestones is becoming a reality.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

HR Fundamentals Retirement Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FY 12-13 #12;Professional & Faculty Retirement · TIAA/CREF · Defined Contribution Retirement Plan 401 & State Taxes are deferred · Immediate Vesting · www.tiaa-cref.org (800) 842-2776 FY 12-13 #12;TIAA - Public Employee's Retirement System "Defined Contribution Plan" 3) TIAA/CREF ­ Defined Contribution Plan

Dyer, Bill

296

Conversion Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Plan Conversion Plan This template is used to document the conversion plan that clearly defines the system or project's conversion procedures; outlines the installation...

297

Strategic Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home About Us Strategic Plan Strategic Plan Leadership Budget Our Organization Strategic Plan Careers Our...

298

Training Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Plan Training Plan This template is used to define the plan, scope, environment, roles and responsibilities for training needs for systemsoftware development and...

299

Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III. LABORATORY STRATEGIC PLAN DOE Program Focus on ResultsInstitutional Plan addresses the strategic goals of DOE andbelow does not support those elements of the strategic plan

Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 14 Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) August 2013 2 of 14 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Standard Review Plan (SRP) Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) Applicability CD-0 CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operation Post Operation August 2013 3 of 14 Table of Contents Objective ....................................................................................................................................................... 4 Overview of Commercial Grade Dedication for Nuclear Facilities .............................................................. 4 Requirements ................................................................................................................................................ 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Management Examples Work Management Examples Example 36 8.2.5 Work Processes Work associated with nuclear safety functions will be planned, authorized, and performed following approved technical standards, instructions, procedures, and other control documentation commensurate with the complexity and risk posed by the task. The calibration program governs the process that ensures quality of the calibration and maintenance of process monitoring equipment. Equipment found to be out of calibration is tagged and not used until re-calibrated. HNF-PRO that implement DOE-Order 5480.19, and HNF-PRO-233, -298, and others determined applicable, will be evaluated and necessary facility specific procedures developed to complement them for implementation. 10.2 Personnel Safety

303

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

304

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Strategic Energy Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook A. Dane and L. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Indian Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington DC 20585 | 202-586-1272 energy.gov/indianenergy | indianenergy@hq.doe.gov Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

305

Operating plan FY 1998  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Report: EM Strategic Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STRATEGIC PLANNING STRATEGIC PLANNING September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Strategic Planning Subcommittee Background In Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) was tasked to assess EM's strategic planning capabilities/processes and, in particular, to review the status of the initiatives pursued by the Office of Strategic Planning and Analysis (EM-32). This charge was derived from the Board's work pertaining to the topics of Discretionary Budgeting and Technical Uncertainty and Risk Reduction, which were addressed in previous reports and recommendations to the Assistant Secretary. The EMAB Strategic Planning Committee was formed to expand on this earlier work and pursue dialogues with the EM Office of Program Planning and Budget (EM-30) in

307

Reliabilit PlanningReliability Planning David Duebner, Expansion Planningp g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EE552 Reliabilit PlanningReliability Planning David Duebner, Expansion Planningp g September 27, 2010 #12;Reliability Planning OverviewReliability Planning Overview · Midwest ISO Transmission Expansion Plan (MTEP)p ( ) · MTEP Reliability Study Process ­ Planning Criteriag ­ Reliability Analysis

McCalley, James D.

308

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan: Magma Gulf/Technadril-Dept. of Energy MGT-DOE AMOCO Fee No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Lousiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: generalized site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, production testing, environmental assessment and monitoring plan, permits, program management, reporting, and schedule. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

Not Available

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Certifications and Professional Development Real Estate History DOE Strategic Plans Strategic Plan for the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration...

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - WGA presentation on mkt monitor 110403.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Review of Market Monitoring A Review of Market Monitoring A Review of Market Monitoring A Review of Market Monitoring Activities at U.S. Independent System Activities at U.S. Independent System Operators Operators Bernard Lesieutre & Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Las Vegas NV November 4, 2003 Energy Analysis Department Approach Approach * Focused on four operating ISOs - CAISO, ISO-NE, NYISO, and PJM * Conducted Interviews - ISO market monitoring staff - External Market monitors (e.g., CAISO MSC) - State PUC and FERC OMOI staff * Review documents on Market Monitoring - ISO Market Monitoring plans; Annual Reports - Regulatory proceedings Energy Analysis Department Approach (cont) Approach (cont) * Synthesize information on market monitoring

312

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

314

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

318

Project Execution Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF P C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Project E Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Execution view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) n Plan e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

319

New Planning Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation into how various regulatory, economic, and technical changes are likely to affect the framework for transmission planning. It begins with an overview of the Existing Planning Framework, structured along the lines of five key aspects that encompass the purview, role, and responsibilities of transmission planning. The report then explores seven scenarios (future states) of transformative change in the electricity industryranging from the greater penetration of wind ge...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship for Los Angeles Unified School District  

SciTech Connect

This Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship states goals, measures progress toward goals and how actions are monitored to achieve continuous improvement for the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Walker, A.; Beattie, D.; Thomas, K.; Davis, K.; Sim, M.; Jhaveri, A.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Path planning for UAVs under communication constraints using SPLAT! and MILP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2 physical survey, environmental and meteorological monitoring, aerial photography, and search- and will in this paper address the problem of offline path planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Our goal

Johansen, Tor Arne

322

Review Functional hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a costeffective manner.

Michael R Pinsky; Didier Payen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Business concepts ontology for an enterprise performance and competences monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the financial indicators and reporting tools are the core instruments used for enterprise survival, the instruments for intellectual capital monitoring assist in defining the enterprise competitive advantages and strategic planning. Given the current ... Keywords: Competence, Corporate memory, Intellectual capital, Ontology

Yelena Jussupova-Mariethoz; Andre-Rene Probst

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

JGI - Sequencing Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequencing Plans Sequencing Plans JGI engages users from the National Laboratory system, academic institutions, and private industry to perform sequencing projects that directly relate to the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research's missions in alternative energy, global carbon cycling, and bioremediation. JGI's sequencing portfolio is drawn from its user programs, including the Community Science Program and the new Bioenergy Research Centers, as well as targets chosen by DOE to meet programmatic objectives. Plans by Program and Year All projects GEBA Sequencing Plans Community Science Program FY2014 Community Sequencing Program FY2013 Community Sequencing Program FY2012 Community Sequencing Program FY2011 Community Sequencing Program FY2010 Community Sequencing Program FY2009

325

Business Plan Competition Opportunities  

The Draper Fisher Jurvetson Venture Challenge is a West Coast business plan competition available to the colleges and universities across the West Coast that

326

SEAB Climate Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy.

327

Planning, Budget, and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EERE Planning, Budget, and Analysis (Revised) Philip Patterson (Economist) and Jeff Dowd (Economist) DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems...

328

Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

329

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Operations Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Strategic Plan Updated July 2009 Operations Organization Chief Operating Officer (COO) Deputy COO Environment, Health & Safety EH&S Facilities FAC Project Management...

331

Workforce Diversity Action Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workforce Diversity Action Plans Workforce Diversity Office Best Practices Diversity Council Compendium of Diversity Activities Principles for a Diverse Community Lawrence Berkeley...

332

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorized Personnel (attach more sheets if necessary) Printed name Signature Date SSRL Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005...

333

Planning and Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Ten-Year Capital Program Projects Lovell-Yellowtail Transmission Line Rebuild project Studies WACM Wind production summary overview (Oct. 2006)...

334

ORISE: Exercise Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps federal, state and local emergency management personnel plan and prepare for the threat of a national security or...

335

FY 1987 current fiscal year work plan  

SciTech Connect

This Current Year Work Plan presents a detailed description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office during FY87. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance, task monitoring, information gathering and task reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of program status reports for DOE. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. This work plan includes: system analyses, requirements analyses, interim and procedure development, legislative and regulatory analyses, dispatch and traffic analyses, and data bases.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

337

Community Relations Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I allow my comments to be publically posted to this website. Anti-spam Code (enter "MYCODE" in this field): Submit Environmental Protection What We Monitor & Why...

338

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Guidelines for strategic planning  

SciTech Connect

Strategic planning needs to be done as one of the integral steps in fulfilling our overall Departmental mission. The role of strategic planning is to assure that the longer term destinations, goals, and objectives which the programs and activities of the Department are striving towards are the best we can envision today so that our courses can then be set to move in those directions. Strategic planning will assist the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, and Under Secretary in setting the long-term directions and policies for the Department and in making final decisions on near-term priorities and resource allocations. It will assist program developers and implementors by providing the necessary guidance for multi-year program plans and budgets. It is one of the essential steps in the secretary's Strategic Planning Initiative. The operational planning most of us are so familiar with deals with how to get things done and with the resources needed (people, money, facilities, time) to carry out tasks. Operating plans like budgets, capital line item projects, R D budgets, project proposals, etc., are vital to the mission of the Department. They deal, however, with how to carry out programs to achieve some objective or budget assumption. Strategic planning deals with the prior question of what it is that should be attempted. It deals with what objectives the many programs and activities of the Department of Department should be striving toward. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to those organizations and personnel starting the process for the first time as well as those who have prepared strategic plans in the past and now wish to review and update them. This guideline should not be constructed as a rigid, restrictive or confining rulebook. Each organization is encouraged to develop such enhancements as they think may be useful in their planning. The steps outlined in this document represent a very simplified approach to strategic planning. 9 refs.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Iintegrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi, DOE/EIS-0409 (September 2010)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Hopper Batch Jobs See the man pages for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, ALPS logs and job summary statistics. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. To delete a job from the hopper xfer queue users must add an additional parameter @hopper06 Example:6004861.hopper06@hopper06 qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low)

343

What We Monitor & Why  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by monitoring wildlife, plants, water quality, and air quality. June 27, 2012 Raft Trip: rafts on the Rio Grande Workers prepare for the annual Fall sampling campaign on the...

344

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

A probabilistic plan recognition algorithm based on plan tree grammars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the PHATT algorithm for plan recognition. Unlike previous approaches to plan recognition, PHATT is based on a model of plan execution. We show that this clarifies several difficult issues in plan recognition including the execution of multiple ... Keywords: Action grammars, Bayesian methods, Goal recognition, Intent inference, Plan recognition, Probabilistic grammars, Task tracking

Christopher W. Geib; Robert P. Goldman

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Graphite technology development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

NONE

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

350

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

DISASTER PLAN Library Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York: Neal-Schuman; 1992. Kahn, Miriam. Disaster Response and Prevention for Computer And DataDISASTER PLAN Library Materials For the University of Toronto Library System September 2013 disaster planning for archives, libraries and record centres. Second edition. Boston: Scarecrow Press, 2002

Sokolowski, Marla

352

Manufacturing research strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides an overall strategic roadmap for the DOE-defense programs advanced manufacturing research program which supports the national science based stockpile stewardship program. This plan represents a vision required to develop the knowledge base needed to ensure an enduring national capability to rapidly and effectively manufacture nuclear weapons.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Program Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) was initiated in 1991 to coordinate DOE's university and federal-laboratory atmospheric-chemistry research, and to focus these efforts on national and international information requirements in the atmospheric-chemistry field. This Program Operations Plan describes the structure and vision of the effort designed to fulfill these needs, and is divided into two major components. The first of these is a Strategic Plan, which outlines the ACP's rationale, objectives, and vision, and describes its products that are anticipated over a future ten-year period. Although based on realistic appraisals of goals that are attainable given the financial, material, and intellectual resources of the ACP community, this Strategic Plan does not describe these resources themselves. The second component of the Program Operations Plan, the Implementation Plan, deals directly with these resource considerations. As such it focuses on practical implementation of Strategic-Plan elements at the individual research institutions, the anticipated scientific contributions of these groups, and their coordination within the ACP. In contrast to the Strategic Plan, this Implementation Plan extends only five years into the future.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

PROJECT PLANNING TEMPLATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan i Issue Date: 4/24/2009 Plan i Issue Date: 4/24/2009 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Engineering and Construction Management Project Plan for the Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Version 2.0a (Public) April 20, 2009 Submitted by: Energy Enterprises Solutions 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, MD 20874 Phone 301-916-0050 Fax 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net PARS II Project Plan ii Issue Date: 4/24/2009 Title Page Document Name: Project Plan for the Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II), V2.0a Publication Date: April 24, 2009 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07, CLIN 2 Prepared by: Judith Bernsen, PMC, LLC Kai Mong, Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC

355

Commissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Checkout, Testing, and Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ch 0 OFFICE OF heckout, T C CD-1 F ENVIRON Standard R Testing, a Revi Critical Decis CD-2 Ma NMENTAL Review Plan and Com iew Module sion (CD) Ap CD arch 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) mmissioni e pplicability D-3 EMENT ing Plan CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

356

Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Objectives and strategies of the International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD and D) Act of 1978 calls for the Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a plan to demonstrate photovoltaic systems in other nations and to facilitate the widespread use of these systems. The objective of the International Photovoltaic Program Plan, the strategies that will be used in the plan, and the approach that is being taken to prepare the plan are described. Background on photovoltaic technology and markets and the DOE domestic photovoltaic effort is also provided. The International Photovoltaic Program Plan will complement the DOE domestic activities to stimulate international markets. A number of national and international benefits could result if the objective of accelerating the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets is realized. A primary benefit is that foreign markets may help stabilize the US photovoltaic industry and foster its expansion. Other benefits include contributions to the advancement of developing countries, reductions in world oil imports, and improvements in the US balance of trade. Strategies to be addressed in the plan are photovoltaic system demonstrations, systems development, information gathering and dissemination, financial incentives, and administrative actions. A critical aspect of the plan will be the coordination of selected programs and the monitoring and assessment of the plan's results. Analyses of international markets, international financial institutions, foreign competition, international marketing experiences of other US industries, and system development needs have been initiated to support the plan.

Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Koontz, R.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Perelman, L.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixer pump systems have been chosen as the method for retrieval of tank wastes contained in double shell tanks at Hanford. This document describes the plan for testing and demonstrating the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps to mobilize waste in tank AZ-101. The mixer pumps, equipment and instrumentation to monitor the test were installed by Project W-151.

STAEHR, T.W.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Strong planning under partial observability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rarely planning domains are fully observable. For this reason, the ability to deal with partial observability is one of the most important challenges in planning. In this paper, we tackle the problem of strong planning under partial observability in ... Keywords: Binary decision diagrams, Heuristic search in belief space, Planning in nondeterministic domains, Planning under partial observability, Symbolic model checking

Piergiorgio Bertoli; Alessandro Cimatti; Marco Roveri; Paolo Traverso

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reading Through a Plan: A Visual Theory of Plan Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problem: Planners may read plans often, but the profession continues to view the interpretation of plan content as something that is either too obvious or too unimportant to require explicit discussion. Plans are seldom ...

Ryan, Brent D.

362

Test plan : reducing soft costs of rooftop solar installations attributed to structural considerations.  

SciTech Connect

This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

Dwyer, Stephen F.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

VME system monitor board  

SciTech Connect

Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EMSL Strategic Plan 2008  

SciTech Connect

This Strategic Plan is EMSLs template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges of the Department of Energy and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Strategic Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE and its Office of Science. We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Strategic Plan should be viewed as a living document for which we will continually evaluate changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly.

Campbell, Allison A.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Public affairs plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Public Affairs Plan is to establish goals for the Fiscal Year 1995 UMTRA public affairs program and identify specific activities to be conducted during the year. It also describes the roles of various agencies involved in the conduct of the public affairs program and defines the functions of the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Public Affairs Department. It integrates and replaces the Public Participation Plan (DOE/AL/62350-47D) and Public Information Plan (DOE/AL/623590-71). The plan describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans to keep stakeholders and other members of the public informed about project policies, plans, and activities, and provide opportunities for stakeholders and interested segments of the public to participate in project decision-making processes. The plan applies to the UMTRA Project Office; the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs (OIEA); the UMTRA TAC; the UMTRA Remedial Action Contractor (RAC); and other cooperating agencies.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

EMSL Contribution Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Contribution Plan is EMSLs template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSLs workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSLs long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2 describes EMSLs detailed business plan, including an analysis of opportunity, organizational investments, and actionable milestones.

Campbell, Allison A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

High Performance Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

10-Yr. Transmission Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Marketing Rates Power Marketing Rates 10-Yr Transmission Plan 2012 Customer Meeting Announcement Agenda 120611 CRSP South Projects CRSP South PowerPoint Presentation CRSP South 2009-2011 Capitalized Execution CRSP North Projects CRSP North PowerPoint Presentation CRSP North 2009-2011 Capitalized Execution About Power Marketing Transmission Newsroom Business Policies Products Plan contents OASIS News features Careers No FEAR act Organization chart Plan processes Functions News releases Doing business Privacy policy History General power contract provisions OATT Revisions Fact sheets Energy Services Accessibility Financial information Rates and Repayment Interconnection Publications EPTC Adobe PDF Power projects EPAMP Infrastructure projects Federal Register Notices

369

Plan recognition in exploratory domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a challenging plan recognition problem that arises in environments in which agents engage widely in exploratory behavior, and presents new algorithms for effective plan recognition in such settings. In exploratory domains, agents@? ... Keywords: Plan recognition, User modeling

Yaakov Gal; Swapna Reddy; Stuart M. Shieber; Andee Rubin; Barbara J. Grosz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Interconnection Transmission Planning: Awards | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection Transmission Planning: Awards Interconnection Transmission Planning: Awards List of Interconnection Transmission Planning awards under the American Recovery and...

371

Usability in multiple monitor displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to examine the impact of multiple monitors on user performance and multitasking. Forty-three participants were assigned to two groups - a multi-monitor group and a singlemonitor group - to carry out a series of tasks. ... Keywords: large display monitor, multiple monitors, multitasking, usability, user performance

Jacob M. Truemper; Hong Sheng; Michael G. Hilgers; Richard H. Hall; Morris Kalliny; Basanta Tandon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Annual Training Plan Template | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Template Annual Training Plan Template The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan. The...

373

WIPP - Passive Institutional Controls (PICs) Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plans Files below are in PDF format and can be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. PICs Implementation Plan Permanent Markers Implementation Plan Permanent Markers Testing Plan...

374

Monitoring Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Overview Please see the man pages of the commands below for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, and job summary statistics. Command Description qsub batch_script Submit batch script to queue; returns job_id. qdel job_id Delete job from queue. qhold job_id Place job on hold in queue. qrls job_id Release held job. qalter Change attributes of submitted job. qmove new_queue job_id Move job to a different queue. qstat -a List jobs in submission order. qstat -f job_id Produce detailed report about job. qs List jobs in priority order. showq List jobs in priority order, categorized by job state. showstart job_id Produce estimate of start time for job. checkjob job_id Produce scheduling diagnostics for job.

375

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

376

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

377

Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Plans to Strategic Plans to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Strategic Plans on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home

378

Integrated Planning and Performance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Management (IPPM) Head Program Administrator Planning Coordination Performance Analysis Chief Operating Officer Risk Analysis Lab PlanningGoal Setting Process ...

379

Geothermal Technologies Program Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

This DOE/EERE program strategic plan builds upon previous program plans and R&D direction reviews with industry representatives and other stakeholders.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2011-2020 Strategic Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LM has completed its 2011-2020 Strategic Plan. The new plan provides our organization with clear directions for the future.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

382

Emergency Action Plan (EAP) Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00q09e011.doc i (042013) Local Emergency Plan BUILDING: COMPLEX: ZONE: PLAN APPROVAL DATE: Approved by Name Signature Date Local Emergency Coordinator John Cintorino Facility...

383

Policy & Strategic Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Directed R&D Laboratory Directed R&D Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Policy & Strategic Planning Directorate Policy and Strategic Planning (P&SP) Directorate coordinates development of the Laboratory Strategic Plan and annual business plans at the institutional and organizational Level. This function includes administration of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. The Directorate is also responsible for the Laboratory's technology transfer functions, including collaborations with industry and work for others; and for increasing funding from sources other than DOE. Organization Chart (pdf) Top of Page Last Modified: June 4, 2013 Please forward all questions about this site to: Teresa Baker

384

DOE Retro Analysis Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retro Analysis Plan Retro Analysis Plan August 2, 2011 Page 1 August 2, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Esq. Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis Dear Mr. Cohen: These comments are submitted by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) notice appearing in the July 11, 2011 Federal Register requesting comments on the Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules. We are encouraged by DOE's efforts to implement Executive Order 13563. We appreciate the actions already taken by DOE to address our concerns regarding the Final Rule on Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Regulations for Consumer Products and Commercial and

385

Plan Your School Visit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Your School Visit Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit Chaperones To ensure that your students have the best possible experience at the Museum, we ask that you provide one chaperone for every 6 children. The chaperones should stay with their assigned group of students throughout the entire visit and model positive behavior. General Before arriving at the Museum, please remind your students about the following guidelines: If possible, leave food and drinks on the bus. Respect other visitors in the Museum by using inside voices, walking, etc. Please be gentle with the exhibits. Cameras are welcome at the Bradbury Science Museum. Have fun! Upon your arrival

386

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

387

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues...

388

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TURBINES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREfACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States...

389

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEPTEMBER 2013 CARBON STORAGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREfACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the...

390

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

391

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Climate Action Plan (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In June 2003, the Maine State Legislature passed a bill charging the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) with developing an action plan with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG)...

393

LFRG Program Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the EM Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Program Management Plan (LFRG PMP) is to establish the LFRG roles and responsibilities, the LFRG management processes,...

394

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site`s environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy`s Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Climate Action Plan (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Climate Change Action Plan (DCCAP) was prepared with funding from the Delaware State Energy Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys State and Local Climate Change Program...

397

Climate Action Plan (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On April 20, 2007, Governor Martin OMalley signed Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 establishing the Maryland Climate Change Commission (MCCC) charged with collectively developing an action plan to...

398

EMSL 2006 Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

The 2006 EMSL Strategic Plan describes the elements of EMSLs 5-year strategy to provide outstanding value to its user community and to meet evolving goals of the DOE Office of Biological Research.

Campbell, Allison A.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) environmental management programs, (4) training, (5)Management Programs3-5 Structure and Responsibility.3-6 Training,Management System Plan Program Elements Additional information regarding EMS training

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Monitoring systems initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Site Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management December 2013 LMS/S07225 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Site Sustainability Plan December 2013 Doc. No. S07225 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii I. Executive Summary ...............................................................................................................1 II. Performance Review and Plan Narrative ...............................................................................9 1 GHG Reduction and Comprehensive GHG Inventory ...........................................................9

407

Energy Efficiency Planning Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand planning is an essential undertaking for utilities looking to understand and quantify the dispatchable resources associated with energy efficiency and demand response programs. Further, demand planning enables a utility to select the most appropriate, cost-effective suite of energy efficiency technologies, demand response technologies, and program delivery mechanisms for its unique market and operating conditions as well as the optimal level of investment. This guidebook reviews and explains a com...

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

WESTERN UNIVERSITY Disaster Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Assumptions 1.7.1 Emergency 1.7.2 Disaster 1.8 Concept of Operations 1.8.1 Background 1.8.2 Emergency Response/Administrative Unit Responsibilities 1.8.8 Situation Reports 2. UTILIZING THE DISASTER PLAN 2.1 Emergency Process Members ­ Individual Responsibilities #12;WESTERN UNIVERSITY Disaster Plan January, 2013 2.7.1 VP

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

409

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EMP Attachment 2 DOE-SC PNNL Site Data Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Data Management Plan (DMP) describes the data management processes and activities under the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. The activities currently in the Plan are limited to offsite environmental surveillance of PNNL Site radiological releases to the air. The DMP provides guidance on data capture, processing and transmittal, and database configuration management. The requirements for the PNNL Site Environmental Monitoring (SEM) Database and associated records are documented in order to assure that vital data are recorded accurately, stored in a manner that retains data integrity, and are suitable for analyst to use. Protocols and procedures must ensure the data will be adequate and robust.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

First Nations Community Planning Model [EDRA / Places Awards, 2003 -- Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EDRA/Places planning awards should principally recognizeoutcomes. But others felt the awards should also recognize

Moffat, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Rack Protection Monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

A system for monitoring and displaying the consumption of energy by measuring the actual energy consumed and comparing the measured energy consumption with an ideal or desired energy consumption. The desired energy consumption data may be based upon actual operations or may be generated by ideal consumption characteristics. In some instances, the ideal figures may be modified to compensate for variations in external conditions.

Bertolasi, R.B.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Drought Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Drought Monitor was started in spring 1999 in response to a need for improved information about the status of drought across the United States. It serves as an example of interagency cooperation in a time of limited resources. The Drought ...

Mark Svoboda; Doug LeComte; Mike Hayes; Richard Heim; Karin Gleason; Jim Angel; Brad Rippey; Rich Tinker; Mike Palecki; David Stooksbury; David Miskus; Scott Stephens

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

of seashore Why monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Manage ment at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Umeå. The survey of habitats and the field survey, the total area of shore habitats along the coast can be calculated and their overall of seashore monitoring Over an aerial photo of each sample unit, a hexagonal grid is laid. At every crossing

420

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "leachate monitoring plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Generalizing GraphPlan by Formulating Planning as a CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the approach of encoding planning problems as CSPs more closely. First we present a simple CSP encoding for planning problems and then a set of transformations that can be used to eliminate variables and add new constraints to the encoding. We show that our transformations uncover additional structure in the planning problem, structure that subsumes the structure uncovered by GRAPHPLAN planning graphs. We solve the CSP encoded planning problem by using standard CSP algorithms. Empirical evidence is presented to validate the effectiveness of this approach to solving planning problems, and to show that even a prototype implementation is more effective than standard GRAPHPLAN. Our prototype is even competitive with far more optimized planning graph based implementations. We also demonstrate that this approach can be more easily lifted to more complex types of planning than can planning graphs. In particular, we show that the approach can be easily extended to planning with resources.

Adriana Lopez; Fahiem Bacchus

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE funding.

Martin E. Cobern

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities, October 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Number: HIAR LLNL-2012-10-23 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Lead Planning Activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dates of Activity 10/23/2012 - 10/24/2012 Report Preparer: Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to maintain site operational awareness of key nuclear safety performance areas, monitor ongoing site oversight and planning activities for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) nuclear facilities, and identify and initiate coordination of future HSS oversight activities at the site, including planned HSS targeted reviews planned for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013.

425

EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is constructed and operated, and as direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts from these actions occur over time. EIS-0350-S1-MAP-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0350-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0350-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

426

Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis For meeting Federal sustainability requirements, agencies can use evaluation methods-such as benchmarking and energy audits-and planning to make their existing buildings energy efficient. To comply with energy reduction requirements agencies should follow a few basic steps: Benchmark buildings Conduct energy audits Create an action plan Monitor progress. This is a cyclical process that will need to be continually updated. For meeting water use reduction requirements in buildings, see Water Efficiency. Benchmark Buildings The first step in managing a building stock's sustainability is to benchmark buildings. Benchmarking allows buildings to be compared for

427

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Number: HIAR LLNL-2012-10-23 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Lead Planning Activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dates of Activity 10/23/2012 - 10/24/2012 Report Preparer: Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to maintain site operational awareness of key nuclear safety performance areas, monitor ongoing site oversight and planning activities for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) nuclear facilities, and identify and initiate coordination of future HSS oversight activities at the site, including planned HSS targeted reviews planned for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013.

428

Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Energy Program Areas » Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Planning for Existing Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis For meeting Federal sustainability requirements, agencies can use evaluation methods-such as benchmarking and energy audits-and planning to make their existing buildings energy efficient. To comply with energy reduction requirements agencies should follow a few basic steps: Benchmark buildings Conduct energy audits Create an action plan Monitor progress. This is a cyclical process that will need to be continually updated. For meeting water use reduction requirements in buildings, see Water Efficiency. Benchmark Buildings The first step in managing a building stock's sustainability is to

429

CMS System Security Plan Template  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System Security Plan (SSP) Template Instructions. This template contains boiler plate language. Each template must be ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

Johnson, R.G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

432

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is a dynamic long-range environmental-protection plan for SRS. The EIP communicates the current and future (five year) environmental plans from individual organizations and divisions as well as site environmental initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed compliance with changing environmental/ regulatory requirements. Communication with all site organizations is essential for making the site environmental planning process work. Demonstrating environmental excellence is a high priority embodied in DOE and WSRC policy. Because of your support and participation in the three EIP initiatives; Reflections, Sectional Revision, and Integrated Planning, improvements are being made to the EIP and SRS environmental protection programs. I appreciate the ``Partnership in Environmental Excellence`` formed by the environmental coordinators and professionals who work daily toward our goal of compliance and environmental excellence. I look forward to seeing continued success and improvement in our environmental protection programs through combined efforts of all site organizations to protect our employees, the public health, and the environment. Together, we will achieve our site vision for SRS to be the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Draft Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. The Plan's appendices provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

DRAFT Bear Safety Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bear Safety Plan June 2010 Bear Safety Plan June 2010 NSA_bsp_Rev9.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Bear Safety Plan Background As a major part of DOE's participation in the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (AAO) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) exists on the North Slope of Alaska with its Central Facility near the town of Barrow. A secondary facility exists at Atqasuk, a town 100km inland from Barrow. Other instrumentation locations in more remote areas on the North Slope may be established in later stages of the project. Polar bears, and to a lesser extent, brown bears (barren ground grizzly) are significant hazards within the ACRF/NSA/AAO

436

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baselines - Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) for WBS 1.4 (FDH 1998). These cost and schedule details will provide the basis for a baseline change request that will be processed to revise the MYWP, consistent with the accelerated project plan presented below. 6.1 Project Baseline Overview This section of the IPMP presents the PFP baseline cost and schedule summary. The currently approved PFP Stabilization and

437

Report: Strategic Planning Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Planning Impacts Strategic Planning Impacts September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ARRA Implementation and Oversight Subcommittee Background: EM plans to use the influx of stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to fulfill compliance agreements, complete construction projects, and address the program's lower-tier activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and soil and groundwater remediation. Using the ARRA funds to reduce the physical size of the EM complex will also help to lower overall lifecycle costs, create jobs, and allow the program to capitalize on its past successes. Implementation of ARRA is a high-visibility endeavor that has the potential to impact the EM base program's day-to-day operations and processes.

438

Customer Service Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Service Plan Department of Energy Customer Service Plan - 2011 1 A Message from the Secretary Over the past two and a half years, the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy have worked to make the federal government more open for the American public and its own employees. Through these efforts, we have significantly expanded the amount and breadth of information available online about our programs and services. We have also transformed the way we communicate with the public by relaunching Energy.gov, making it an interactive, streamlined information platform. In April, President Obama directed federal agencies to take this ongoing effort one step further and establish Customer Service Plans, improving the public's interactions with the

439

INL Executable Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID-11383 ID-11383 Revision 2 INL FY 2011 Site Sustainability Plan with the FY 2010 Annual Report December 2010 (This Page Intentionally Left Blank) DOE/ID-11383 Revision 2 INL FY 2011 Site Sustainability Plan with the FY 2010 Annual Report December 2010 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE Idaho Operations Office (This Page Intentionally Left Blank) (This Page Intentionally Left Blank) (This Page Intentionally Left Blank) (This Page Intentionally Left Blank) INL FY 2011 Site Sustainability Plan with the FY 2010 Annual Report DOE/ID-11383 Revision 2 December 2010 Approved By: ~~~/ Jeffrey~USseau Fa~ 7 Dlte President and General Manager , - Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (This Page Intentionally Left Blank)

440

DOE CONTRACTOR PENSION PLANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-13 1-13 For use in M&O and non-M&O cost reimbursement solicitations and contracts where work had been previously performed under a DOE M&O contract and the successor Contractor is (a) required to employ all or part of the former Contractor's workforce and sponsors the employee pension and benefit plans; or (b) retains sponsorship of benefit plans that survive performance of the contract work scope. Contracts in this latter category include, but are not limited to, environmental remediation, infrastructure services and other site-specific project completion contracts. DOE-H-1002 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS (a) Contractor Employee Compensation Plan The Contractor shall submit, for Contracting Officer approval, by (fill-in

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441

High Risk Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Plan Risk Plan John Bashista Melissa Rider Jeff Davis Timeline to date * OMB memo on Improving Government Acquisition issued July 29, 2009 - Review existing contracts and acquisition practices to save 7% of baseline contract spending (3.5% in FY 2010 and 3.5% in FY 2011) - Reduce high risk contracts by 10% the share of dollars obligated in FY2010 - Final plan was due and submitted on November 2, 2009 - OMB reviewed and requested revision Dec 23, 2009 - Revision submitted April 21, 2010 M&Os are an Issue * With respect to reductions in high risk contracting strategies, the M&O contracts was also a challenge since the opportunity to further influence competition and contract type was highly constrained. The Department had already competed approximately 85 percent of its M&O

442

Standard Review Plan Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision (CD) Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision (CD) Milestones Review & Approval Standard Review Plan (SRP) E n v i r o n m e n t a l M a n a g e m e n t DOE - EM - SRP - 2010 2nd Edition Overview March 2010 This page intentionally left blank. Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 1 Standard Review Plan Overview Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision Milestones Review and Approval The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing the design, construction, operation, and eventual disposition of mission-critical projects/facilities. Coupled with this ongoing mission is the added responsibility for EM to diligently leverage and apply American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to accelerate the completion of its

443

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Carol Blackston, Director (Acting) IM Organization Structure (as of 1/13/2014) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) Russell Pereira (Acting) Associate CIO for Technology Evaluation and Chief Technology Officer (IM-50) Peter Tseronis Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services Steve Cox (Acting)

444

Human Capital Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Plan Bea Dukes Melissa Rider AHCP Issues  Decentralization of Contracting Process within DOE  In spite of MA and CFO guidance, the actual (FTE) growth of Acquisition Workforce depends on Program Office and/or site level management Recap of this year's planning process  Thanks for your efforts on the development and consolidation of this year's AHCP  Collaborative effort with most HCA level activities  A few glitches ◦ OMB Template very confusing and required much clarification ◦ Many changes throughout the process  Thanks for your patience ◦ Lesson Learned: SPE, CFO, HC and Program Offices must be in synchronization Fallout  Additional funding called out in FY11 -

445

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Energy Organizational Planning  

SciTech Connect

As the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) continues to refine and finalize its Strategic Energy Plan, it became necessary to insure that a sustainable organization structure was developed through which the energy program and its initiatives could be nurtured and managed. To that end, SNI undertook a study to thoroughly evaluate the existing organizational structures and assess the requisite changes and/or additions to that framework that would complement the mission of the Strategic Plan. The goal of this study was to analyze, work with staff and leadership and recommend the most effective plan for the development of an organizational framework within which the Seneca could more effectively exercise energy sovereignty control and manage their natural resource assets i.e. develop its own energy resources, meet the current and projected energy needs of their community, and sit at the table with other regional energy providers to deal with issues on a peer-to-peer basis.

Gina C. Paradis; James Yockey; Tracey LeBeau

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Peter Lenentine, Director IM Organization Structure (as of 12/19/2013) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) TheAnne Gordon Technology Evaluation Office (IM-50) Peter Tseronis, Director (Acting) Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services John Berthiaume (Acting) Human Capital and Administrative

448

Biological monitoring of oil shale products and effluents using short-term genetic analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term health hazards such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and teratogenesis due to the exposure to crude shale oil, particulate pollutants, and the leachates from raw or spent shale constitute a major concern in the development of shale oil technology. In order to monitor such biological effects, we have applied short-term genetic analyses with the exemplary test materials. The Salmonella/microsomal activation system (Ames assay) was generally applicable but only upon chemical fractionation. The Stedman liquid-liquid extraction procedure or the Sephadex gel filtration (LH-20) technique were effectively utilized. Mutagenicity analyses with various crude oils and product water have revealed biological activity in the basic (aromatic amine fractions) or in the neutral (polyaromatic hydrocarbon fraction) fractions. Extracts and chromatographically isolated materials from raw and spent shale were subjected to mutagenicity studies. Mutagenic activity was noted and correlates with the biological activity of compounds that are either identified or predicted to occur in these materials. Comparison to other energy technologies and overall health hazard of the test materials are discussed.

Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.; Schmidt-Collerus, J.J.; Leffler, L.; Guerin, M.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449