National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ldi ngs tha

  1. F i W ldi PFusion Welding -Processes ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldi PFusion Welding - Processes ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

  2. F i W ldiFusion Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldiFusion Welding ver. 1 ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

  3. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  4. Requirement of a Tha4-conserved Transmembrane Glutamate in Thylakoid Tat Translocase Assembly Revealed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is dispensable and the amphipathic helix essential for transport. We then investigated a conserved Tha4 that serves as a protein- conducting channel and SecA, an ATP-driven motor that ``pushes'' proteins

  5. ViennaNGS: A toolbox for building efficient next-generation sequencing analysis pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfinger, Michael Thomas

    ViennaNGS: A toolbox for building efficient next-generation sequencing analysis pipelines Michael T on building efficient pipelines for NGS data processing. It comes with functionality for extracting pipelines are available for general [4, 3], and specialized assays such as de-novo motif discovery [6

  6. NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

    2013-03-22

    Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Williams, M.

    2013-09-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

  8. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) for assessment of microbial water quality: current progress, challenges, and future opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, BoonFei

    Water quality is an emergent property of a complex system comprised of interacting microbial populations and introduced microbial and chemical contaminants. Studies leveraging next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies ...

  9. Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to Fuel Your NGS Research ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carter, Jennifer [Agilent

    2013-03-22

    Jennifer Carter on "Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to fuel your NGS Research" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  11. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  12. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomicsmore »system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.« less

  13. Kevin Kiesler 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Vallone-NGS-SWGDAM-Jan2014.pdf 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Kiesler 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Vallone-NGS-SWGDAM-Jan2014://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Vallone-NGS-SWGDAM-Jan2014.pdf 2 Applied Genetics Platform 316 6 M 1 Gb 318 11 M 2 Gb #12;Kevin Kiesler 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech

  14. Nature Application Notes Page 1 Fast and Robust Food Authenticity Testing using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    with the development of SAFESeqr Kit for NGS library preparation and SAFESeqr Suite analysis software. SAFESeqr using the SAFESeqr Suite analysis software-interest (approximately 100 bp) in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was determined through our in-house bioinformatics pipeline

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  16. Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory

    2013-03-22

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  19. Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-Fast Clustering Algorithms (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Li, Weizhong [San Diego Supercomputer Center

    2013-01-22

    San Diego Supercomputer Center's Weizhong Li on "Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-fast Clustering Algorithms" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Using GC-FID to Quantify the Removal of 4-sec-Butylphenol from NGS Solvent by NaOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Jr., Frederick V.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-01

    A caustic wash of the solvent used in the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process was found to remove the modifier breakdown product 4-sec-butylphenol (SBP) with varying efficiency depending on the aqueous NaOH concentration. Recent efforts at ORNL have aimed at characterizing the flowsheet chemistry and reducing the technical uncertainties of the NG-CSSX process. One technical uncertainty has been the efficacy of caustic washing of the solvent for the removal of lipophilic anions, in particular, the efficient removal of SBP, an important degradation product of the solvent modifier, Cs-7SB. In order to make this determination, it was necessary to develop a sensitive and reliable analytical technique for the detection and quantitation of SBP. This report recounts the development of a GC-FID-based (Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection) technique for analyzing SBP and the utilization of the technique to subsequently confirm the ability of the caustic wash to efficiently remove SBP from the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) used in NG-CSSX. In particular, the developed technique was used to monitor the amount of SBP removed from a simple solvent and the full NGS by contact with sodium hydroxide wash solutions over a range of concentrations. The results show that caustic washing removes SBP with effectively the same efficiency as it did in the original Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process.

  1. Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-04-29

    Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar® L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar® L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar® L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar® L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent work underway with simulants in SRNL as well as any DWPF CPC testing done with the new SE stream to ascertain whether any need develops that could result in modification of any currently planned F/H Laboratory testing protocols.

  2. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD and satisfying dose limits to critical structures. This project is funded by MCubed and grant R01-CA132834.

  3. > THA11P002 < 1 Abstract--The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This persistent mode, floating coil (F-coil) consists of a Nb3Sn magnet installed inside a high-pressure vessel- lead composite radiation shield and by a toroidal vacuum shell. The built-in tube heat exchanger serves is interrupted, the heat exchanger is pumped out, retractable lines are disengaged from F-coil ports, the ports

  4. ThA5-3 10:40 Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Coast-Islandof Hawai'i, Hawai'i, USA August 22-27, 1999 Improving Turbocharged Diesel Engine Operation with Turbo Power a turbocharger power assist system, con- sisting, for example, of an electric motor and a bat- tery, is coupled to the turbocharger shaft. The method of investigation relies on formulating and solving nu- merically an appropriate

  5. Report on the NGS3 Working Group on Safeguards by Design For Aqueous Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael; Schanfein, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the Working Group on SBD for Aqueous Reprocessing Facilities was to provide recommendations, for facility operators and designers, which would aid in the coordination and integration of nuclear material accountancy and the safeguards requirements of all concerned parties - operators, state/regional authorities, and the IAEA. The recommendations, which are to be provided to the IAEA, are intended to assist in optimizing facility design and operating parameters to ensure the safeguardability of the facility while minimizing impact on the operations. The one day Working Group session addressed a wide range of design and operating topics.

  6. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low-dose CBCT.

  7. Coupled modes analysis of SRS backscattering, with Langmuir decay and possible cascadings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salcedo, Ante, 1969-

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments aimed at understanding stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF laser-plasma interactions, suggest that SRS is coupled to the Langmuir decay interaction (LDI). The effects of LDI on the saturation of the ...

  8. Dr. Peter M. Vallone 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Vallone-NGS-SWGDAM-Jan2014.pdf 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr. Peter M. Vallone 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech Please bring it up!!! #12;Dr. Peter M. Vallone 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech Sanger sequencer' #12;Dr. Peter M. Vallone 1/7/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech

  9. The Institute for Pathology, University of Cologne, is one of the first institutions globally to provide "Next Generation Sequencing" (NGS) approaches in routine diagnostic processing. In close cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    . in Nature Genetics). Recently the bioinformatic tools of CLC (http://qiagenbioinformatics.com/products the workflow of automated extraction, library construction, next generation sequencing, data interpretation/biomedical-genomics- workbench/) and Ingenuity (http://www.ingenuity.com/products/variant-analysis) has in close partner- ship

  10. Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 6th A Pragmatic Long Distance and International Operational Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tappert, Charles

    components of contemporary designs for the Long Distance & International (LDI) License in Pakistan and identifies critical aspects needed to implement a commercial LDI network in Pakistan. An extensive study in Pakistan and which require redress by the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) are highlighted

  11. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  12. Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  13. Step Plus Proposal for Personnel Actions Robert Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    (CAES), Plant Pathology Rachael Goodhue, CAES, Agricultural & Resource Economics Kyaw Tha Paw U, CAES

  14. Development of and Application of Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Mass Spectrometry Based Biosensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamez, Roberto

    2014-05-05

    exhibited by gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanomaterials have made for versatile platforms in a wide range of applications including surface plasmon biosensing techniques and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). A primary driver for this work...

  15. CALS Office of Student Services--Career Development Cornell University 140 Roberts Hall Ithaca, NY 14853 www.cals.cornell.edu P: 607/255CALS (2257) F: 607/2544613 calsstudentservices@cornell.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    2257-01-01

    or view them online at: www.cals.cornell.edu/cals/current/career/. Job Pos ngs: An extensive number than five years ago, you can search for Cornell alumni job pos ngs by establishing an experience

  16. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  17. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  18. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    improvement in Cs decontamination and overall performance With NGS, interim salt processing facility at SRS has demonstrated a Cs decontamination factors equal to the...

  19. Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Personnel Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel DOE Technical Standards Ownership APPENDIX B: Non-Government Standards (NGS) Committee...

  20. Microgrid Policy Review of Selected Major Countries, Regions, and Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Min

    2014-01-01

    cogeneration of a natural gas station (NGS). The micro-cogeneration systemgas reciprocating engine cogeneration, a thermal storage tank, storage batteries integrated into the building energy management system.

  1. Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

  2. Neutrinos from Stored Muons STORM Target Station Conceptualg p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    beamline chase with adequate shielding · Active beamline elements include: - Production target Focusing Supply Lines OOuter Conductor Water Scavenge Tank #12;STORM Target Station Conceptual Design Approach techniques T h hi ldi l ld b l i· Target chase shielding steel would be mostly comprise of relatively

  3. Chem 502 Seminar Topics Loothuraja Rasu (Inorganic) An Introduction to Organocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    12 Feb CCIS 1-160 Xuxin Fan (Analytical), Quantum Dot Loaded Liposomes As Fluorescent Labels Scully (Organic) Break It To Make It: Utility of New Metal-Free, Oxidative, C-C Bond Cleaving Reactions for Immunoassay 26 Feb CCIS 1-160 Andrews Ahiabu (Analytical), LDI-MS Assisted by Chemical-Free Gold Nanoparticles

  4. NANO AT HOME: An Experiment That You Can Try PLEASE NOTE: The Center for Nano and Molecular Science and Technology (CNM) at The University of Texas at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    contac Make sure tha make the CD u ayer from the also be weak heat gun and ure it has goo ed, the metal

  5. ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN 136Xe BOMBARDMENTS OF 249Cf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregorich, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    onto the column in HHO. or HCl in a volume of lessin about 50ul of a 0.1M HHO_ solution. The walls of tha

  6. The comparative digestibility and nutritive value of sorghum silages harvested at different stages of maturity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helm, Raymond E

    1960-01-01

    of ~ tnrity had a higher digos4ihLXity of protein, othcsr occtrnot, ni~ Ane edesA snd cascrgy, Credo fiber digosMan cess no greater than tha4 in tha ration oontaining meghm silage haroestod in the soft deagh s4ags of natority, Raticncs oontcdccing gy Begari...

  7. BEAM TRANSMISSION EFFICIENCY BETWEEN INJECTOR AND TARJET IN THE GANIL COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on the characteristics of tha extracted beast and the required beta propertiet on.the target, ia deecribed. ..' The GANIL injected in tha SSCt, betatron and chroaatic «etching of tht beaa on :the target, enlttSnct and energy » ditperiion measurement!1 , emittance and energy diaparaion liaitation". Since CANIL ia running (end 82

  8. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, L.W.

    2009-01-01

    predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present thetools for estimating energy usage. These data bases provideft -yr in resource energy usage. These same office bUild~ngs

  9. AN INTERACTIONIST APPRAISAL OF IMPRESSION FORMATION: The "Central Trait" Hypothesis Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Bill D.; Stanfield, Gary G.

    1973-10-01

    This article examines the nature of first impressions from the interactionist perspective. A modified H. H. Kelley design (1950) of student-teacher interaction was employed with a sample of 195 college students. The fi ndi ngs demonstrate...

  10. TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkingburg, David R. Van

    2011-01-01

    grass cutti ngs 1. 55 kg, Eucalyptus duff 2.47 kg. 0,04 kg~grass cuttings. and Eucalyptus duff in a Mobil Korditeand grass along with Eucalyptus leaves burn first leaving

  11. Engineered Polymerases Enable Novel Sequencing Applications ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Appel, Maryke [Kappa Biosystems

    2013-03-22

    Maryke Appel on "Engineered polymerases provide improved NGS library amplification and enable novel sequencing applications" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. Microgrid Policy Review of Selected Major Countries, Regions, and Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Min

    2014-01-01

    cogeneration of a natural gas station (NGS). The micro-cogeneration systemnatural gas reciprocating engine cogeneration, a thermal storage tank, storage batteries integrated into the building energy management system.

  13. A review of "Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England" by Su Fang Ng 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanagh, Sheila T.

    2008-01-01

    . Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Viii+236 pp. Review by SHEILA T. CAVANAGH, EMORY UNIVERSITY. Su Fang Ng?s comprehensive new book explores conceptualizations of families... in literature and political thought of seventeenth-century England. Casting a wide net, ranging from Milton and Hobbes to Margaret Cavendish and early Quakerism, Ng?s monograph will be of interest to scholars work- ing in disparate areas of seventeenth...

  14. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  15. Disclosure practice for selected items of corporate balance sheets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Shafaat Ahmad

    1958-01-01

    . fire losses, sale of significant portions of tha productive facilities of the business, acquisition of substantial plants ~ collection of a material amount of life insurance on the death of an officer, changes in capital structures...

  16. Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    rate o termine if addit execution of in What th he current Syst hat are limited t hese tools curr omposition, res ot meeting was itial batches. T anning tool tha ncomplete sync or...

  17. Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2011-01-01

    ROM JPN TUR QAT ZAF KOR KAZ HRV TUN LTU MAR CHL COL MEX MYSKAZ ZAF KOR MAR TUR QAT VNM HRV CHL TUN LTU MEX THA COL CHN

  18. Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2012-01-01

    ZAF TUR QAT KOR KAZ TUN MAR HRV LTU CHL COL MEX MYS CHN VNMTUR MAR QAT VNM CHL TUN LTU HRV MEX COL CHN THA LBN VEN PERFRA*), GREECE(GRC*), CROATIA(HRV), HUNGARY(HUN*), INDONESIA(

  19. Building America Puts Residential Research Results To Work; Building America Research That Works (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Residential buildings use more than 20% of the energy consumed annually in the United States. To help reduce that energy use, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its Building America partners conduct research to develop advanced building energy systems tha

  20. Dilma Vana Rousseff Presidenta da Repblica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    ­ Administradora Thaís Caroline da Silva Dias ­ Administradora Zilmar Silva Rocha ­ Técnica em Contabilidade da Costa Ferreira ­ Economista Tiago Mota dos Santos ­ Diretor de Contabilidade e Finanças

  1. Anti-inflammatory and Cytotoxic Activities of Mango (Mangifera indica L. var Keitt) Polyphenols in Cancer and Non-cancer Breast Fibroblasts in Vitro 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbizu Berrocal, Shirley

    2013-08-12

    , Gedong, Golek, Madu, Manalagi Israel Haden, Tommy Atkins, Keitt, Maya, Nimrod, Kent, Palmer Malaysia Apple Rumani, Arumanis, Golek, Kuala Selangor 2, Malgoa Myanmar Aug Din, Ma Chit Su, Sein Ta Lone, Shwe Hin Tha Pakistan Anwar Ratol...

  2. Tribological behavior of carbo thermoplastic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    processes were selected to produce semi-finished parts. Annealing and machining was always required after steel. However, the f induced by the AF is so high tha material is not interesting for be applications

  3. Variation in joint fluid composition and its effect on the tribology of replacement joint articulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucco, Daniel Clarke, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene wear is a significant clinical problem limiting the long-term survival of joint replacement prostheses, particularly in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although the tribology ...

  4. Comparison of benzene hexachloride formulated from high and low gamma concentrates for cotton aphid control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raven, Klaus Gustav

    1957-01-01

    by KLAUS GUSTAV RAVEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head f Department) May 1957 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer would like to express his sincere appreciation to Dr. D. F. Martin for his constant encouragement and aid... technical material. Several processes have bees developed to soncentrate the gamsa isomer, Host processes are based on tha differential solubility of the ismsars in organic solvents. The solubility may be increased by vary- ing tha temperature...

  5. Vector magnetometry and lightwave defect imaging sensor technologies for internal pipe inspection systems. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study, conceptual design, and prototype development. Final report, March 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S.; Fowler, T.; Peters, E.; Power, W.; Reed, M.

    1994-01-05

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring the development of a vehicle and sensors for an integrated nondestructive internal inspection system for natural gas distribution pipes. Arthur D. Little has developed two sensor technologies, Vector Magnetometry (VM) and Lightwave Defect Imaging (LDI) for the system. The Vector Magnetometry sensor utilizes multiple arrays of miniature detection coils (fluxgate magnetometer elements); a three-axis array measures both the amplitude and phase of the magnetic leakage field that occurs in the vicinity of pipe wall defects. This technology is applicable to both cast iron and steel pipe.

  6. Use of plate efficiencies in the treatment of conventional columns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Dan Lee

    1962-01-01

    of the right hand side of Equation (24) is multiplied by (V l/di), the following form is obtainedt (54) When Equations (50), (53), and (54) are solved for v /d $+1, 1 1 1n terms of v~1/di, A 1, and E 1 alone, one obtains , ?, (6(, ", ~ ?(Wf 1 ~ ~ 4 I...+l, i the general form of the material-balance equation for the recti- fying section is obtaineds v d ~+1 i di Eo (dig )i (77) 4p At the feed plate, ~f ~f-1 i ~f-1 i v A rv The values for Ji/di are calculated fros the fallowing naterial...

  7. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case will not impact decontamination or immobilization operations at Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications have zero tolerance for dimensional changes such as the operation of valves while other applications a finite dimensional change improves the function of the application such as seals and gaskets. Additional considerations are required before using the conclusions from this work to judge outcomes in field applications. Decane, a component of Isopar?L that is most likely to interact with the polymers, mildly interacted with the elastomers and the propylene based polymers but their degree of swelling is at most 10% and the confined geometry that they are typically placed in indicate this is not significant. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid may leach protein into the NGS solvent. Since Vellumoid is used at the mixer in Saltstone where it sees minimum quantities of solvent, this leaching has no effect on the extraction process at MCU or the immobilization process at saltstone. No significant interaction is expected between MaxCalix and the polymers and elastomers used at MCU, DWPF, and Saltstone. Overall, minimal and insignificant interactions are expected on extraction and immobilization operations when MCU switches from CSSX to NGS solvent. It is expected that contacting NGS will not accelerate the aging rate of polymers and elastomers under radiation and heat. This is due to the minimal interaction between NGS and the polymers and the confined geometries for these polymers. SRNL recommends the use of the HSP method (for screening) and some testing to evaluate the impact of other organic such as alcohols, glycolate, and their byproducts on the polymers used throughout the site.

  8. Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Joakim Ågren;Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Abstract-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way DNA is sequenced and the whole genome (i.e., all the DNA

  9. Integrated Multilayer Nanogenerator Fabricated Using Paired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 Received September 12, 2008; Revised Manuscript the application of the NGs from low frequency (approximately the hertz range) to a relatively high frequency brush architecture, direct current is generated by exciting the architecture using ultrasonic waves

  10. Seven Bridges Genomics 625 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge, MA 02138 www.sbgenomics.com www.twitter.com/sbgenomics team@sbgenomics.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    pipeline have been replaced my new versions since the original publication. This webinar will first provide min Abstract Several pipelines have emerged as solutions for SNP and Indel detection in raw next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. In addition to this "standard" variant detection performed by many pipelines, the Huge

  11. journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/nanoenergy Available online at www.sciencedirect.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    nanowires (NWs) for NGs, opening a new materials system for harvesting mechanical energy. Free of research for new energy technology. The powering of liquid crystal displays (LCD), light emitting diodes,d,nn a School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA

  12. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    of zinc blend structured nanowires (NWs) for NGs, opening a new materials system for harvesting mechanical [5], has been an active area of research for new energy technology. The powering of liquid crystal,d,nn a School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA

  13. Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), that is among the dirtiest coal power plants in the country1 Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station Sonya largest user of energy in the state of Arizona. It is powered by a coal plant in Northern Arizona

  14. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  15. arXiv:1112.5524v2[math.CO]24Feb2012 Nonrepetitive Colouring via Entropy Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David R.

    of a vertex v V (G) is NG(v) := {w V (G) : vw E(G)}. The neighbourhood of a set S V (G) is NG(S) := {NG(x) : x S} \\ S. The degree of a vertex v V (G) is degG(v) := |NG(v)|. We use N(v) and N(S) and deg

  16. Ford`s 1996 Crown Victoria dedicated natural gas vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapetz, J.; Fulton, B.; LeRoux, M.; Locke, J.; Peters, E.; Roman, L.; Walsh, R. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Beitler, J.; Wolff, W.

    1995-12-31

    Ford Motor Company has introduced a Crown Victoria dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) to meet rising demand for vehicles powered by cleaner burning fuels and to reduce dependency on foreign energy imports. The Crown Victoria NGS is a production vehicle maintaining Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) quality and warranty while complying with all applicable corporate, federal and state requirements.

  17. Broadcast Domination on block graphs in linear time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heggernes, Pinar

    the vertices adjacent to v, denoted by NG(v). The degree of a vertex v is defined by degG(v) = |NG(v)|. We also define NG[v] = NG(v){v}. The neighbourhood of a set of vertices S, denoted NG(S), is the set of all

  18. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Dan Rutherford Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Dan Rutherford Building King's Buildings A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES Dan Rutherford Building King's Buildings Edinburgh EH9 3JF United Kingdom http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/buildi ngs/daniel-rutherford-building #12;If you require this document in an alternative format (e.g. large

  19. Capabilities of Next Generation Sequencing Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    region of heteroplasmy · SRM 2392­I · From cell line HL-60 #12;New Technology for Sequencing · SRMs were Platforms · Ion Torrent (Life Tech.) ­ Semiconductor sequencing · SOLiD (Life Tech.) ­ Sequencing (March 2013) http://www.decibio.com/NGS_PR Roche 454 10% Illumina 45% Life Tech. 44% Other 1% Market

  20. Capabilities of Next-Generation Sequencing Instrumentation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · From cell line HL-60 #12;New Technology for Sequencing · SRMs were initially characterized with Sanger Platforms · Ion Torrent (Life Tech.) ­ Semiconductor sequencing · SOLiD (Life Tech.) ­ Sequencing (March 2013) http://www.decibio.com/NGS_PR Roche 454 10% Illumina 45% Life Tech. 44% Other 1% Market

  1. COMMUNICATION www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    are consumed at an extremely fast rate, various types of renewable energy technologies have been developed National Cheng Kung University Tainan 70101, Taiwan Prof. C.-P. Liu Research Center for Energy Technology that the output performance of n-type ZnO-based NGs can be enhanced by p-type doping,[20] but decreased

  2. www.afm-journal.de 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    , such as wind, solar and geothermal, has attracted considerable interest due to the energy crisis and global nanogenerator (NG) is related to a piezoelectric potential generated in nanowires (NWs) when they are dynami an external circuit to bal- ance the potential. Over the years, many kinds of NGs have been demonstrated

  3. Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-02-13

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  4. Laws restricting price-fixing and their enforcements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Lon Don

    1962-01-01

    'aI;eescsesfh'k. . credo, yrXaa, ~ss, aoasrox cear @abide ebiHeias, ess. , alee greasily tha p'sxf'oxaaaca of vaxioui fanetioaa chat a frao aiiLsxpxisa mast':, acccep&sh. assaxiisg 'pxofit aagimisatioa as tha goal af ths ia8ivi&uik ox' firm~ it ia readily apparel...'elojsd. co. the "sncenb ' ' ' thbt ' in". Che eighteenth"-:CS4t'orf' egreemgint'p SCIOag, 'Sillerg 'tc 16@t. entpnt, ' divide Rect@Ca'. or' et~Be . fix prices were'conspiracies kn-rsptrsint'of credo for vbicb ia)ured''parties could claim dcnsgesi 1]ader...

  5. Responses of bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) to 2, 4-D in relation to soil moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultemeier, George Wayne

    1961-01-01

    aawesas of sasssssso {smwoas oaeam) VO 2y~ ZS lSLATIQl XO SOKL COOTIES Sabaltted to tha Oraduate Sohool of the 4@Caaltaral ead Xacdeeloal Collage of Teaaa ia Partial falflllaeat of tha ragyalreaeata for the degree of kgeaty 1961 acawaeea... eed aeweecriya pwyeratkoae 0~4 ls gltm 0o Qe teaeheea 1a Star11aa llaeAt tot yereiLeekoa to eetehLieh research @Late m their reaohee ead to Sr. Soaa14 L? Saee aad Ori Leo Si MerrA11 for eooyeratioa eith reeoaroh oa the %eeoc AgrLeaLtaral Seyeriaeet...

  6. Ris6-M-165A CO Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -73 Avallabl« on raquaat trom: Library o\\ tha Danish Atomic Enaroy Commtaaton (Atomanarglkommlaalonana of failure analysis a r e considered. v_opies to lO Abstract to Available on request from the Library of systems 2 An example 4 Classification of systems 7 Cause and effect 8 Loops in cause effect graphs 9

  7. -A Science Service Feature 0 bHY THE VdZATHEH 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    w i t h the prevailing distribution of temperature. In tha last analysis, the pre- The trade winds differences i n prossure come ultimately from differences i n temperature, vB,iling winds blow i n accordance engine driven by the sun. Tho general features of this engine would bc simple enough i f the earth did

  8. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Ingenta Content Distribution Psy Press Titles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    applications. The reduction in volume and footprint of the systems is foremost in the minds of urban architects the operating cost remains a critical factor with high energy prices. The impetus toward improving the energy efficiency of refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment be- comes clear when we recognize tha

  9. The Detection of Artificial Coatings on Rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyder, Ernest E.

    1913-05-15

    by me d i d run o v e r t h i s . . I n some cases the po l i shed r i c e may be ove r 10%, but the amount o f s o l i d s i s 3o smal l tha t the we i gh t o f ash i s be low the exper imenta l e r r o r . In tha t case the r i c e i s uncoated... by me d i d run o v e r t h i s . . I n some cases the po l i shed r i c e may be ove r 10%, but the amount o f s o l i d s i s 3o smal l tha t the we i gh t o f ash i s be low the exper imenta l e r r o r . In tha t case the r i c e i s uncoated...

  10. Distribution of the zooplankton in the salt marshes of southeastern Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuzon du Rest, Rene Pierre

    1962-01-01

    ptANl aeooaeaflLLEJ to thia eer oorireeaeae. Xf @+a hag tace tha eeoc, theta gietxQaeiaw jaetarw ends here baca- liffereet ael their varLatiewa kw 4iatrQwtiee aeeww the three aeh- araaa eel% hara beee osgg IeLwer. Owly aerghaliae er geeioee like...

  11. Determinants of Financial Stress and Recovery during the Great Recession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Pasricha, Gurnain Kaur

    2010-01-01

    COL EGY RUS THA HUN ARE BGD HRV FRA JPN ESP TWN FIN TUR BELCOL ARG BRA PHL LKA UKR RUS HRV PER GRC PRT ESP HUN JPN SWEBEL HUN CAN SVK PRT JOR MEX HRV GRC CZE DEU ITA SVN AUS GBR

  12. Current account patterns and national real estate markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2008-01-01

    CHE NOR IRL AUT ESP CAN GRC HRV SGP MYS ISR BGR SWE GBR KORSample USA DNK TWN LUX SGP HRV THA BGR DEU NZL CAN ESP AUTGBR SWE ESP ISR LUX NOR MLT HRV HUN CAN PRT USA Excluding G7

  13. Corrupting Learning: Evidence From Missing Federal Education Funds in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraz, Claudio; Finan, Frederico; Moreira, Diana B

    2012-01-01

    PRT CHL FIN POL LVA GRC HUN HRV ITA TUR ROM THA ISR MEX JOREST BEL FRA JPN POL LTU SVK HRV LVA GRC SVN CHL PRT ESP HUNGRC GBR NOR LUX LVA ESP USA HRV CHE JPN AUT POL DNK ISL SVN

  14. The Spatial Structure of Transnational Human Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the spatial structures of animal displacements and local-scale human motion follow L\\'{e}vy flights. Whether transnational human activity (THA) also exhibits such a pattern has however not been thoroughly examined as yet. To fill this gap, this article examines the planet-scale spatial structure of THA (a) across eight types of mobility and communication and (b) in its development over time. Combining data from various sources, it is shown that the spatial structure of THA can indeed be approximated by L\\'{e}vy flights with heavy tails that obey power laws. Scaling exponent and power-law fit differ by type of THA, being highest in refuge-seeking and tourism and lowest in student exchange. Variance in the availability of resources and opportunities for satisfying associated needs appears to explain these differences. Over time, the L\\'{e}vy-flight pattern remains intact and remarkably stable, contradicting the popular idea that socio-technological trends lead to a "death of dista...

  15. Digitally controlled low frequency square wave electronic ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the Boost converter is commonly used. However the boost output DC voltage has to be set to be greater tha and the second is a full-bridge converter (FB) used for both ignition and square wave drive. Ignition is achieved as a resonant inverter. After ignition the converter operates as a LFSW inverter by controlling the FB to act

  16. BAT RESEARCH NEWS Volume 37: Number 4 Winter 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , BAT RESEARCH NEWS Volume 37: Number 4 Winter 1996 Bat Collisions with Wind Turbines colliding with a lighthouse at LODg POlDL. OnWlo. Bat collisions with wind turbines used to produce e \\IIRA IS a 25·megawau faciluy and conSISts cf 73 KVS-33 wind turbines thaI were grouped InlO 10 Stnngs

  17. Effect of Surface Mass on Roof Thermal Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.; Shipp, P. H.; Sanders, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    -rmrur.~ and nut nuua for tha Pmr Irt Mlly war. Twc hr1.d: bm&q T-r.rur.s CInm ter .r.d1sr1- BARE ROOF, MAY 1 -- MAY 7, 1986 *CAM 0- CmalwNs I70 BARE ROOF, MAY 1 -. MAY 7, 1986 wc1mu WUNY~ cwnms , ,---- ---"- .- - - nuc, MR. . -. El EXPWl...

  18. INTRODUCING ASK, A SIMPLE KNOWLEDGEABLE SYSTEM Bozenn H. Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inatitnce of Technology Pasadena, California 91125 ABSTRACT ASK, ~ ~imple Knowledgeable System, is a total in the sense thaC its development concentrated on clean engineering solutions to what could be done now is Boston. London has been replaced by Boston as the home port of Maru. >The cargo of Maru is coal. coal has

  19. Terminological Logics and Conceptual Graphs: An Historical Perspective?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Renate A.

    expressive ones, like KL of [6]. The history of these algebras can be traced back to the work of Boole, De be traced, as far back, as the nineteenth century, to the beginnings of algebraic logic and quantification on the existential graphs of Peirce. It is less well-known tha* *t, in essence, Peirce also developed the algebraic

  20. Carbon Dioxide Exchange Between an Old-growth Forest and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Carbon Dioxide Exchange Between an Old-growth Forest and the Atmosphere Kyaw Tha Paw U,1 * Matthias ABSTRACT Eddy-covariance and biometeorological methods show significant net annual carbon uptake in an old that old-growth forest eco- systems are in carbon equilibrium. The basis for differences between

  1. Ris Report No. 295 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical Operator Equivalents and Magnetic Anisotropy of the Heavy Rare Earth Metals by Oluf Danielsen. On this background temperature laws of the magnetic anisotropy of tha heavy rare earth metals are calculated. Further wave energy gap of the heavy rare earth metals cal- culated. This report Is submitted to the Technical

  2. Unagreement is an Illusion. Apparent person mismatches and nominal structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Höhn, Georg F.K.

    2015-01-01

    /*pane go.3sg/3pl ekdromi. trip ‘No pupil will go on a trip.’ (21) (O) det.nom.sg kathe each mathitis pupil tha fut paei/*pane go.3sg/3pl ekdromi. trip ‘Each pupil is going to go on a trip.’ 8 I have also found a speaker of Spanish raised in Venezuela who...

  3. Classroom and Academic Office Building Project No.: 900290 RFQ: Selected Firm Posting Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Schleuning 621 SW Morrison Ste. 200 Portland, OR 97205 503-222-1917 23 Stantec Lou Viani 1201 J. St. Studio San Francisco, CA 94105 415-398-7575 25 THA Architecture Jonah Cohen 733 SW Oak St. Portland, OR 97205 Architecture John Blumthal 1211 SW 5th Ave Ste. 2700 Portland, OR 97204 503-221-0150 30 Zimmer Gunsul Frasca

  4. Faculdade ou Institutos Total Faculdade de Direito -FDD 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    Med. Vet - FAV AGR 18 VET 17 Gestão de Agronegócios 5 Fac de Arquitetura e Urbanismo - FAU PRO - Dep. de Projeto Expressão e Representação em Arquitetura e Urbanismo 15 TEC - Dep. de Tecnologia em Arquitetura e Urbanismo 8 THA - Dep. de Teoria e História em Arquitetura e Urbanismo 7 Faculdade de Ciências

  5. Selected income tax problems of closely-held corporations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Thomas Martin

    1952-01-01

    shish derive the ~orlop of their inoocN frees ~waled "fQn rentable, " Tha oor~4es involved are dealing in tangibLe prep?rttr? (filcc? delivered in sans) bcg, probablp ?he aosb vale ahlo sharaetoristis of 4hs file is its ocqyridhb as an artieM. e p...

  6. GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    of NGS is the re-sequencing of genomes, such as the 1000 human genomes project (http://www .1000genomes.org/) or the 1001 Arabidopsis genome project (http://www.1001genomes.org/). Genome (re)sequencing is importantGenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3, *, Thomas Van Parys1,2 , Yvan Saeys

  7. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-11-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-06

    At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

  9. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  10. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTERIM SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 8 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L.

    2015-01-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 8 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and several Extraction-Scrub- Strip (ESS) tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). No issues with the projected Salt Batch 8 strategy are identified. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (MST) (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable average decontamination factors for plutonium of 2.62 (4 hour) and 2.90 (8 hour); and average strontium decontamination factors of 21.7 (4 hour) and 21.3 (8 hour). These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ARP tests. The two ESS tests also showed acceptable performance with extraction distribution ratios (D{sub (Cs)}) values of 52.5 and 50.4 for the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend (from MCU) and NGS (lab prepared), respectively. These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests. Even though the performance is acceptable, SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed in order to improve our predictive capabilities for the ESS tests.

  11. Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

    2012-11-14

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

  12. Mr & Mrs Vernon Wright Scholarship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    %e nriter niehee te onseeee l4e ayyeaeiatiea ta Sr~ C E, '%Cakier, l3eaa ef the Selac@ of VooationaX %ealCkg, nnser ehaee Liroetken thin thaeie hae baca yseyaxeL? far nie cdk anL haiggaX euggaehienem ta tha fialioehag naeihann of tha..., and eheulk bo xegaixed Co 4e aQ. ihe oyoxatione in +hie@ he hae not aXxoadg aoyd. sod ekLX3 ke a mQe, ee Sar ae yoeaLM?, the elsa5eNAa ~ he xeyaized to 4e aXX oX' the neck themlaLvee~ boeenee veoatdosaL egeiceLtavaX o4noatioa ~ tsisee to 4ew4oy beth mn...

  13. African Rue Biology and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2002-10-17

    s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e and will kill gr ass es in the immedia te applica t ion ar ea... t r ea t smaller ar eas or spars ely sca t ter ed plant s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e...

  14. Regmi Research Series ,Year 1, November 1, 1969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1969-01-01

    . The Kimal:J.yan .'rya5 (tha Kh ,1.~), "ha war.., ')ir.i.rr 'lti l~,-: .. from Kashllu.r n.hKl. swear to hll.Vo stopped at. the Sllkhika Ltlkh. So NCi'.1.1 t,~d Mt boon arU"lexed to "lY.lvarta. The slMll Kirat or HKirat Kingdom • . - . "When Bidudab, a Ko~hal King, invaood Kapilavasw, the birthpbcc ,,1· . tho Buddh:1, durin,; ~-ittor...

  15. Effect of viscosity of asphalt on stress strain and volume change characteristics of asphaltic mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand

    1966-01-01

    help given by the Texas Transportation Instituce for the auchor s graduate study i. s sincerely appreciated, The author is very grateful to Nsp students Messrs. Dou Russell and John cohagan uho helped cha author in tha experimental murk. Thanks ara... dua Mrs. Rddie Raye andrews for her excellent aud patient typing of this thesis. Finally, the author is deeply indebted to his uife for her conCinuous help and encouragamant. iv I INTRODUCTION II REVIEW OP LITERATBRE Rheological Properties...

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in bovine and porcine muscle as influenced by electrical stimulation, aging, freezing, thawing and heating 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Sharen Sue

    1987-01-01

    LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN BOVINF. AND PORCINE MUSCLE AS INFLUENCED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION, AGING, FREEZING, THA&v'ING AiVD HEATING A Thesis by SHAREN SUE COLLINS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Animal Science LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN BOVINE AND PORCINE MUSCLE AS INFLUENCED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION, AGING, FREEZING, THAWING AND HEATING A Thesis...

  17. Investigation of tornado models and structure by use of radar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, William Andrew

    1957-01-01

    has been nost helpful in giving advice as to interpretation of radar echoes. Dr. gaiter J. Saucier has rendered invaluable assistance by the explanation and analysis of certain physical concepts. The wenbers of tha drafting section and photography... 6. Radar Echo Associated with Worchester, Massachusetts Tornado 21 7, Typical Thunderstorn Reproduced frow The Thunderstorn S. Modified Thundatstorn in Dry Enwiroment 9. Vertical Cross Section of Precipitation Pattern in Sinplified Horisontal...

  18. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  19. Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adibi, Sara [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Branicio, Paulo S., E-mail: branicio@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Joshi, Shailendra P., E-mail: Shailendra@nus.edu.sg [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-07-28

    Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15?nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5?nm for Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} and 3?nm for Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36}. The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} yield/flow stress: 2.54?GPa/1.29?GPa and Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} yield/flow stress: 3.57?GPa /1.58?GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

  20. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieffer, Gregg

    2010-12-15

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

  1. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

  2. The Post-occupancy Performance of Green Office Buildings: Evidence for the Fiekd 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsham, G.

    2013-01-01

    ? Fine-tuning of certification systems to ensure better performance ? A research consortium http://archive.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/projects/irc/post-occupancy.html Partners PERD Field study stud G ti l ffi b ildi (N 24)? reen vs. conven ona o ce u ngs... = ? Matched pairs ? Across Canada and northern US public and private sector , ? Size: 1300 to 38500 m2 ? Age: 1956 to 2009 ? Green: mostly LEED at some level http://nparc.cisti-icist.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/npsi/ctrl?action=rtdoc&an=20857897&article=0&fd...

  3. Nutrient and dissolved-oxygen distributions in the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, John Miller

    1974-01-01

    . "; AND RUTRIE:l S TO ?iATER '?ASSES AiJD CLRRERT PATTER??S General ?4ethodo loEy of Data Collection Analysis of the Thermo-Raline Structure at Section C Analysis of thc Thermal Structure of the Easie n Gulf of ?mexico, 4'ay 19(2 Relationships of 0.... Crossing 2, Stations 12- 17. Crossing 3, Stations 26-30. Crossing 4, Stations 45- 49. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 a ~ c d. nity with super- ive geostrophic ngs of Section indicated. tions of sali ache of relet e four crossi e point A...

  4. A preliminary study of the significance of flourides in Texas ground waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Robert Melton

    1939-01-01

    ent, Those findings are in line with the work of MoKay, Black, Std. th, Do Ms, and. othoxo who have done laboratory work cm fluoride fee41ngs; but they bear an importance of their aon, fca' they point aut the sexiousness of the problem fram a... in the soil, sxe taken 1nto solution by wata', an4 do thereby fin4 their way into plants that sre used as faod. The fciLlawing table shows the fluoride content of foods {10) {Goutier and Claucntann) c Food Item Corn meal Corn bran !511igrams of Fluorine...

  5. The Air or Brayton Cycle Solvent Recovery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    it suitable for solvent recovery. Thi s unit util i zes ai r foil beari ngs. to recover the heat for useful purposes. It is easy Over the past several years they have sold. these for the air cycle system to return the solvent lean uni ts to condense... CYCLE SOLVENT RECOVERY SYSTEM Bryce J. Fox 3M Company St. Paul, ABSTRACT The required temperature and technique for condensing common industrial solvents from the exhaust air of drying ovens is explained. ?:The benefits of the Air Cycle...

  6. Interspecific association and dispersion patterns of the red imported fire ant, aphids and some predaceous insects in a cotton agroecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Joseph John

    1982-01-01

    tive to th othe insects stud1ed. This ant is a social insect which aggregates about the colony or a food source. Honeydew is a food source which often br1ngs ants and aph1ds together (Way 1963). A lesser degree of aggregation was observed for 0...INTERSPECIFIC ASSOCIATION AND DISPERSION PATTERNS OF THE RED IMPORTED FIRE ANT, APHIDS AND SOME PREDACEOUS INSECTS IN A COTTON AGROECOSYSTEM A Thesis by JOSEPH JOHN REILLY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial...

  7. Passiflora spp. (Cultivated) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monique D. Reed

    2011-08-10

    ??2) D(5)=25. ?(X??Z)+(OMEGA??2) F(LpL)=AM(2)+AM(3) Fi, ), 2)=(H(Z)??Z)+(Hi', 31??2)?AR(2)?AMf3) F(L, 31'=AM(ZI?(H(3)??2)?AM(31?(H(2)??2) Fi L, 4!= i H(21??2)?( H( 3)??2) Ff)p'5!'=F(). sLJ+AM(4) F(). , 61=F(J. pZJ+AM(4)?F('L, ()+(H(4)??2) Fffp7)=F..."=Filp71+AM(5)?FIL?6)+(H(5)??21?F(J?5) FiLp L4)=-i=(fp81', +AM(51?F(L, 71+(H(5)??2)?F(Lp6) F(LpL5)=F(Lp9!'+AM(51'?F(Lp8)+(H(51??2)?F(fp7) F:L, L6)=F(LpLDI+AM('5J'?F((, 9)?(H(5)??2)?F(. fp81 F(LpL7)=AM(51?F(L, LD)+(H(5)??21?F((p9) F(Lp)81'=(H(51??2)?F...

  8. Safety analysis of optically ignited explosive and pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Holswade, S.

    1994-05-01

    The future of optical ordnance depends on the acceptance, validation and verification of the stated safety enhancement claims of optical ordnance over existing electrical explosive devices (EED`s). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance, with the primary motivation of this effort being the enhancement of explosive safety by specifically reducing the potential of premature detonation that can occur with low energy electrically ignited explosive devices. By using semiconductor laser diodes for igniting these devices, safety improvements can be made without being detrimental to current system concerns since the inputs required for these devices are similar to electrical systems. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) of the energetic material provides the opportunity to remove the bridgewire and electrically conductive pins from the charge cavity, creating a Faraday cage and thus isolating the explosive or pyrotechnic materials from stray electrical ignition sources. Recent results from our continued study of safety enhancements are presented. The areas of investigation which are presented include: (1) unintended optical source analysis, specifically lightning insensitivity, (2) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and electrostatic discharge (ESD) insensitivity analysis, and (3) powder safety.

  9. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  10. Neutron generator production mission in a national laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Larry E.

    2007-08-01

    In the late 1980's the Department of Energy (DOE) faced a future budget shortfall. By the spring of 1991, the DOE had decided to manage this problem by closing three production plants and moving production capabilities to other existing DOE sites. As part of these closings, the mission assignment for fabrication of War Reserve (WR) neutron generators (NGs) was transferred from the Pinellas Plant (PP) in Florida to Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The DOE directive called for the last WR NG to be fabricated at the PP before the end of September 1994 and the first WR NG to be in bonded stores at SNL/NM by October 1999. Sandia National Laboratories successfully managed three significant changes to project scope and schedule and completed their portion of the Reconfiguration Project on time and within budget. The PP was closed in October 1995. War Reserve NGs produced at SNL/NM were in bonded stores by October 1999. The costs of the move were recovered in just less than five years of NG production at SNL/NM, and the annual savings today (in 1995 dollars) is $47 million.

  11. The comparative value of five types of molasses as feeds for fattening beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blankenship, Albert Young

    1954-01-01

    )or Subjects Animal Production Tha nritsr ?Lehoe to thacdc J, R, Siggac deeoeiato professor ot Aniaal iLsahandrrc foa seeietsnea in PLscadng ?n4 essaying ost tbe yro ~ in Lntooprettng the data ehiaincsLc snd far hia hApfnx ecggeetiacce in PCayarLCC +? n...65 to $75 per ton for sorghun grains molasses is known to be an economical carbohydrate feed The purpose of this project was to study the utility oi' five types of molasses %de waA me rwyseelek bg Qe Teaeea N, tea ~~ VeNasay f~g Ceca te&seia )bak...

  12. Strength properties of coarse sand subjected to repetitive loading in large triaxial shear testing equipment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard Brooks

    1961-01-01

    to the atmosphere through the button head which served as aa escape chaanel to pravuat build up of internal hydrostatic pressure within the specimen. b. Detailed procedurec The detailed yrocedure, de~eloped duriug the co?rse of this study, is sat forth.... Strerch membrana over top of forming plates snd secure temporarily with a rubber bend. S. Neigh quantity of sample required for relative density de ~ irad; (sieve approximately 120 grams of the No. 40 sieve sine from tha weighed sample). RLx remaining...

  13. Structural problems in connection with panel heating 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langdale, Frederick Darrow

    1940-01-01

    apaofffeatfohi og tha AILerfeaa Sooiitg for Testia8 lfatorialo. Tho '. reagfroaeLLts are oo follosi& ;k. 8. T. , tf. 8tanderde, 193d, Part I, pads 9tL. h ' -I & c' 18 1 Teaeilo?trsngth, lbe, psr ?g. ia. ' . ; - 55, 060 to 'f0, 000 --. Yield yoiat - Na.... goo& disk?, ' ' 3/4 1noh 1n, thickness an4 sight inohoa ia disaster with a central hole I - Crjlled to silos the 'pipe to ysse throngh, 'Wore ccad? for tho bottoa of the J ferns, ss chess in figure 8. , &sos ylotos wore rosiovod When tho ?pootwone...

  14. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 28 Number 1 Number 1 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    ). FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS OF SRIT 1 GONG-SA-LNGA-PA-CHEN-PO'I-GSUNG-'BUM. The Collected works of Vth Dalai Lama Vol., TA (IX) AND THA (X). 2 DAMS NGAG MDZOD CATALOGUE (KAGYUDPA CATALOG UE SERIES VOL. I) It is the first comprehensive catalogue of Gdams­ ngag... represent the world of the senses. Presumably, the imagery is related to the Vajrayana symbolism ofthe peacock's colourful tail being depend­ ent on the defiled foods it consumes. Again, the snakes could also carry the implication ofthe Vajrayana...

  15. Does Developmental Education Meet Student Needs? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobo, Andrew; Duncan, Cherrelle; Goodman, Cameron; Harris, Jennifer; Jarvis, Staci; Kombos, Thanasis; McDaniel, Torey; Prescott, Jena Overall; Rapini, Sarina; Shafer, Jye; King, Silvia; Zhang, Helen

    2013-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 DE An A VEL nalysis B OPM MEE ased on St D ENT T STUD udent Exp OES AL E ENT N erience in DUC EEDS? Texas Com 2 ATI munity C A R S Th Texa 6100 Fou Bry (9 Su Lori P A Ch Cam Je Tha To Jena S H 012-2... 1 Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (2011) 2 Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (2012, 2013) 3 Complete College America (2011) 2 validity and robustness of the study. Three focus groups were held and a total of 40 students...

  16. Frosted Windows : 300 Years of St. Petersburg Through Western Eyes : An Exhibition / Curated by Sally Haines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haines, Sally

    2013-01-01

    in Russia and Poland. Covers 22 June to July, 1828, Warsaw-Smolensk-Moscow-Novgorod-St. Petersburg, by way of Austria, and looking for perma­ nent lodgings in Peterborough. MS B144 Notes From Underground... If you ' re i n ter-ested in matters Polish... experi­ ences d u r i n g his Russian years a n d never came back to see his masterpiece in place a n d ready to leap into t he no longer frozen future. Falconet knew that Ca tha r ine a b h o r r e d allegory and h e h imsel f d id n o t want a...

  17. The Intellectual Legacy of Nebraska Sociology: A Bibliographical Chronology of Separately Published Works, 1887-1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    series of scholarly papers. Hunt attempted a relevant recasting of known Western ...~'?CiQ.~og!c.~ .~9w~~dge.jl,l~9 .. th~A.~9nJ~xt. of ..~ntb~r. _.:c¢~..Agn~.. Ried- e­ !Dann s. (1977) ~lologlCal novella, The Story of Adamsville, is an especially.... Hutton Webster [FAC]. Genealogical and Autobiographical Notes. Palo Alto, private printing. 1953. James M. Reinhardt [PAC]; with contributions by Paul Meadows [PAC]. Society and the Nursing Profession: An Introductory Sociol­ ogy. Philadelphia: Saunders...

  18. A comparative study of the toxicity of Gonyaulax monilata and Gymnodinium breve to various marine organisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sievers, Anita Marie

    1967-01-01

    indicate mean death times. LD5p )IKg 2LD5p 8+ Since oysters ars cacable of avoiding adverse corditions by closuxe of tha shell, observations vere m, ds of opening nd closing activity. oysters in ii-Il and in the con ~la opened soon after introduction... suffocati:~n, either by oxygen deficiency in the w:&ter or bA mechanical clogging of i:he gills, as a cause of death. 'Ibis weri showed ~Wi' G. ~v could be a direct cause of mass mortalities of marine animals. It wa- ala~ gourd that, toxicity wcc...

  19. Geology of the Hilda-Southwest area, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammer, Bobby Rex

    1959-01-01

    antts. 'ka the yalloelsh byoen, aiasadvely bedded:: sccndetona bf tha walwe "mailbox & vhds '-'aoeieeybnde&. dn. '~al, to. an'sbgayt ~ Xn -taiwatat4on, and toyowtnyhy cehlob shoes'-:dlstgootly; on', ace'lal yhotogw@yhs. Thy'wanga ia~g'' Iy a' ws..., ~' +. "'. i" a" e'', e', ?, 'w 'i'', ". i"''y, 'ii:"'i'; +':w', "y, i', 4'"'i' '', '65. l; ZCN(KC . 6KKCST' g"'i" g -. 'a. , '?' 'y, "'j 'l a', , ~ . o, , +, I' 'e" ~ e 'i- c' ?, . 'w e BERARNCZQ. ' e s . w 'a ~, q a e +, w a ~ r, ~ ~ e ~ e r + y y, g...

  20. Regmi Research Series ,Year 21, January, 1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1989-01-01

    ;L Durbar do no~ eppaar to~ke any r;,e.p,~Jrs. - , . " , , (2) " There are but two usu al modes of conveyil;1g goods. ' naDialy, by garis and p"ck-anim:::.ls, tha latter chiefly ponies. TraderS from .British terri toriBS CEr..n ot expect to find means... granted t o the common people (lata­ &l8.~) of Gorkha town . The matte r has been represented t o us . "we hereby order that the Chumewan tax be collected fro~ homesteads and rice-fields in that area at the same rates as t hose s.t which it had been...

  1. Tides Of Time Issue 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1992-01-01

    , typesetting, design: ...... Julian Mander Proof-reading: . Julian Mander & David Vaughan Special Thanks 10: .... Birmingham Railway Publica/jons Trin ity 1992 , TidesofTune: #8 } lJo{ution to flLL (jour pro6{~mlJ ... Dear Aunty Ainley. When alone... at vaOOlri I mug "'"'" "'" ha~j.., 6nfibxI rune; Oucibk I _ of u..;,. "'" thaI keep; popping up for no appam1l reason, buikIings thai goo...

  2. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on tobacco tissue and tobacco mosaic virus multiplication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Lester Lynn

    1969-01-01

    of polio-P. '. !A infectivity bv Di'ISO; however, DNSO did not erh=nce Infection by intact viruses. D!%0 failed to protect RNA from R. "IAse; his enzyme destroyed tha bio". ogical activity of polio-RNA. Cochran et al. (S) i'epo"ted that the ini...0 was applied to the plant by infusion. Orchid rials fil'. ed " ith 3 percent D"ISO were placed on freshly broken leai' Detioles at thc base of the plants. The inoculum was a purj fied pron raticn previously described and diluted to 10 3 with dis+"'l...

  3. The hematological response and survival of acutley irradiated rats previously exposed to continuous and fractionated, low intensity gamma irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooper, John Anderson

    1964-01-01

    72 ro sixteen dnyS sfcoE' tliQ lane Gmnkk dosog chc animals were exposed to BOO I. The average Gnrrivnl tRee was 8. 8 days es cemiierod to 4. 2 days fer controls. There was no nnrtnkkty esseckeced viCh, Che coitilitkoaing dose Encronsecll...- inclusions (nuclear satellites) W-tha. peripheral Head ?8 Cpl Silas female mice after- total bad~ axpesnra- :- to X=Mys ~ . The incidaaca ef these inclusioas rangsd gemM~ par cant, ', :-. w' -". a "v:d to, l. l6 per cont for acute doses of l00 to 000 r...

  4. Flax in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, Irvin Milburn

    1980-01-01

    and th was thus informatio R(pt)[( number o ~opposite the projectil spirit to tha bevalac/si gate whethe transverse state of th heavy-ion transversel x n transverse s ~ f!# /T , ~2! azimuthal e mo- the reac- 1 /ptdpt) e flow.... It is shown that the pt e flow that is complementary to that obtained from g features of using the pt dependence to study formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are demon- z relativistic transport model ~ART! @15# we show that the ra- tio R(pt...

  5. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01

    , the field results of this study can be divided intc, three parts: (I) plant characteristics prior to harvest, (2) machine performance and (3) effect of machine on the corn ears. Review of Literature According to Shedd (7), a few corn picking machines... and yields are shown as shelled corn. Preharvest Plant Data Manufacturers of corn harvesting machinery have found tha: corn growers of the Southwest prefer a machine that snaps the ears from the stalks without removing the husks. They have nlw Figure 7...

  6. A study of disability veiling glare for selected roadway lighting systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Hans Carl

    1966-01-01

    , 'him', to, nse. a phase;of. thig, research for a thesis. ', S~ hppreciation, 'is. expressed to' Profeikoi, Neil'oa J:. , 'Rwan:;who ', 5' pro~oct, 80pertfisor 'of-'. Research Qoje'ct . (2-;8%4-78)'j'. '. , As 'e':~: of, . thaL-~~w=~te-~ttee =he...;:'. ", " Layout M-Te"t SLte. . for. StaggereIL'S7stem . '. . . . , . "; ml, - '. '- , . : -:s;, :. ;:-. . :-. 1I';VslW-Cont@ms, 'fest p-1: . . '. . . , 6. '- ': K-value: Contours:, :. Tait 6-2:. ;. '. . . . . . . ;, . :. . -'26. ? 7, . K-value Contours, Test...

  7. The influence of ammonium nitrogen and phosphorus on the soil microflora as related to the seedling disease complex of cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales-Bermudez, Marciano

    1956-01-01

    interesting results vhen Granosan vas used as a soil- sterilising agent for controlling damping-off of pine seedlings caused by R. solani and ~thrum ultissns Trow. In seven experiments, when Gran- osan was applied to the seed bed in a 0. 3 per cent aqueous... in the center of a Petri plate containing the medium. The dilution was spread completely over the surface of tba medium with a sterilised glass rod. Tha plates were numbered according to treatments. Five plates were made for every treatment, The platea were...

  8. High-moisture grain and high-moisture hay (haylage) for growing and fattening beef cattle and the value of pelleting coastal bermuda hay for growing beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Harold William

    1961-01-01

    WC space, reduces feedlot losses, eiaplifieo feed baadliag, reduces traaaportatioa seato, reduces duet, asd elisiaetse selective feedlot. ws aloe hase that che swuipsoat aseeoaary fer pallet isg io bulhy asd quite eapeaoivs aed that it ie the esaeumdsg... tests with cattle several years sgs. These tests vere conducted due to early frosts ia Cbs cora belt which kille4 the plants thus eausiag s delay of tha senal 4rying process of Che oars. Seisture coateat of this corn vas too high for ncrketing...

  9. 2013 TCEQ Annual Report Volume II. Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Yazdani, B.; Baltazar, J. C.; Do, S. L.; Ellis, S.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Parker, P.; Degelman, L.; Zilbertshtein, G.; Claridge, D.

    2014-01-01

    am also grateful to Dr. D. J, Hartfiel and Dr. L. J. Ringer, for serving as committee members TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I. BASIC NOTIONS OF MACHINES. Basic Definitions. Equivalence and Realizations Partitions and S. P. Partitions 1 8... properties: yh hh hh 1 tha hh 1 1 11 hh hyl 1 hh ~P11* of the American Mathematical ~gociet l. a finite set, X, of inputs such that any finite sequence of elements of X can be applied to the given digital system; 2. a finite set, S, of states which can...

  10. P(t) Dependence of Transverse Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming; Li, GQ.

    1996-01-01

    and th was thus informatio R(pt)[( number o ~opposite the projectil spirit to tha bevalac/si gate whethe transverse state of th heavy-ion transversel x n transverse s ~ f!# /T , ~2! azimuthal e mo- the reac- 1 /ptdpt) e flow.... It is shown that the pt e flow that is complementary to that obtained from g features of using the pt dependence to study formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are demon- z relativistic transport model ~ART! @15# we show that the ra- tio R(pt...

  11. Geology of the Shiloh School-Liberty Church area, West Burleson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Raymond Leon

    1956-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ so ~ ~ see I"e7' Cn44en City foraaticua a~ines lignitic ssn4h4y silva snt elk/S eoeeeeeeeee ' %s Tba fernatiens beeess progressively yeeager te44ard ths sonthaast fros tha Ch4een city fernatien en ths north44sst te the crockett fernatien on Q... iparta contact~ and at the Sparta 'ecljsa const, , ;esistant beds in the Sparta and jIjecj;ss formations form isolated~ rounded hills as outliors on the !aches and, . ueen City formations (Pigur? 16)~ Sose rolling hills aro found on the Sparta...

  12. Foreign Competition- The Great Debate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foveaux, M. T.

    1985-01-01

    . . , The strain of import competition is show ng up in refined petroleum products. Imports of gaso line totalled 107 million barrels in 1984. Inde pendent refiners joined by two oil companie have requested the government to impose quota A related problem may... to the gasoline arket as gasoline blendstock where it is causing rouble for domestic refiners. They want the usua~ Naph tha duty rate, when the Naptha is used in gasn line, of one and a quarter cents per gall n ap plied. Countries exporting Naphtha to th U...

  13. A Common Definition for Zero Energy Buildings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen's Guide to the

  14. A Cornerstone of Our Energy Future: Women | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen's Guide to

  15. A Cure for the Summertime Blues? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen's Guide toDrew

  16. A Few Words on How to Make the Best of Your Early Career | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen's GuideEnergy

  17. A First Peek at Our Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen's

  18. A Global Sustainable Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen'sThe EnergyWorld

  19. A Good Year for Solar in Phoenix Area | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen'sThe EnergyWorldA

  20. A Government-Wide Approach to a Diverse Workforce | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA Citizen'sThe

  1. A Legacy of Benefit | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of5thA

  2. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  3. The Tragic Fate in Chiller’s Later Dramas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, Francis Joseph

    1894-01-01

    Waster T h e s i s S e r a a n L a n g e , F r a n c i s J« 18S4 T r a g i c f a t e i n S c h i l l e r ' s l a t e r dramas. K, i -W r r ^ J I A J O O I , 0 - - . T ' '7 ( yf / (X 0 The anc i en t Oreek^ saw tha t there was no s t a b i l... i t y i n the heavens above o r i n the e a r t h below, tha t r u i n f o l l o w e d sueeesa an iwa t- r .col u<•< n the h e e l s of p r o s p e r i t y . Th i s he observed and h i s s i m p l e , c h i l d - l i k e mind f a n c i e d a t f i...

  4. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

  5. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

    2008-01-24

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  6. Historische Fragen zur Ethnogenese der Salaren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Arienne M.

    2006-01-01

    Xúnhuà-tíng ??? in der Mitte. 6 den Salaren der äußeren fünf G?ngs ist besonders groß. (Zu? wén xi?ng zòu g?o xù bi?n ??????? Band 51 (1874), in Saguchi 1986: 97) Das Machtzentrum liegt seit dem Zeiten der frühen Míng-Zeit und dem Anführer Hán B?o in den... in the middle. 11 Those which were consolidated into other gongs are starred on the map. 5 wen xiang zou g?o xu bian, j51, ‘Shoufu Xúnhuà ting cheng ci (1874), in Saguchi 1986:97) The durative power center lay since early Míng times in the hands of the t?s?s...

  7. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  8. Football - Individuals - 1930s - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-09-05

    the design of efficient input circuits for c u s s c amplifiers t heddsigngeof cpi utramh lX jr?cla? t??io?s? nd go dg??s nf? ?ofgsfg ??e usn? o? ??s?gie?n? ?f?efssief? hs?nig ?sfg theds igno lu? h?c??? fc ?jj?????l ????l ??r???lc jar ??cc... ? t??m?j??rc utramh lX jr?cla? ?e t heddsigngeof c???eggs? go g?s ?in??ngs c??oo? o? g?s t?ie???g?in? nf? ?s??nfe?n? ?o??s?s o? ls?nd ef ?nigen? ????e???sfg o? g?s is??eis?sfgd ?oi g?s ?s?iss pu ha?lar aj ?u?maca?u? theds igno rampl Xhjmd...

  9. An investigation of the effect of lenses on the pressure draw-down performance of a well 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Leonard Joe, Jr

    1963-01-01

    = Pressure at any time (t) P Static Reservoir Pressure 8 P Pressure at time of shut-in (t = o) 0 c = Productivity factor (pressure build-up in pounds per hour per pounds per square inch differential). If we take three pressure readi, ngs (P , P , P... LENS PERMEAEILITT RESERVOIR PERMEASILITT 70 0 60 14 O G 61 50 E 0, 1 20 10 1. 0 2. 0 5. 0 -2 -I 0 I I I I 5 I I 8 9 10 11 12 LOG DIMENSIONLESS TIME 10 PIGURE \\ o Id IC 0) IL' tL 0, 0 W l3 z 0 Ol W Z IC A ts l 'nisi sosa...

  10. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

  11. Proceedings of the DOE standards managers workshop, Gaithersburg, Maryland, October 26--28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    On May 19, 1992, the Secretary of Energy signed the revised DOE Order 1300.2A, Department of Energy Technical Standards Program, which set the policy and assigned responsibility for activities within the program. The purpose of the revision to the order was to place greater emphasis on the use of technical standards for design, construction, testing, modification, operation, decommissioning, decontamination, and remediation of DOE`s facilities and activities. Within the context of this order, Standards Managers have been assigned for each DOE Secretarial office, each DOE Field Office, and each management and operating (M&O) contractor or site manager to be responsible for and provide the appropriate amount of emphasis on consistent use of standards at DOE facilities. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119 also stresses the importance of the use of standards within Government facilities and directs that activities first attempt to locate and adopt non-Government standards (NGSs) for DOE use. If an NGS is not complete enough for the intended application, it should be adopted for the activity and tailored for the need by development of a Government (DOE) standard. When these NGS documents are unavailable, DOE components will develop an appropriate Government standard to satisfy the need. This expanded DOE program will provide all the information necessary to adopt, tailor, or develop these standards and track the activities. A key to the proper implementation of technical standards and governing requirements is establishing a culture of knowledge and commitment. The workshop provided an in-depth orientation on the Technical Standards Program to participating DOE and M&O Standards Managers.

  12. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2011-11-30

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

  13. Regmi Research Series ,Year 2, January 1, 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1970-01-01

    , Vol. lIT, Part I, P. 214. lD.rhere exists considerable ~1f.terc~c9 ,in the ma~s of t he Sanskrit term Kirat and the term as it is used in' our 1anguage~ In ' the 15th century, the Sen Kings of Hakwanpur described areas occupied by Magars as "Magarat... ." In the 16th century, the San Kings conquered the hill ragUrns aast of t.h l3 Dudhkoshi river as well as tha Tarai rtlglons of Saptari and Morang. The h:ill .r"6r;t0ns east of the Dudhkosh1. .'Woro inhabited by Kirats, who were contcrnp- , tuousl.Y called...

  14. Filamentary Switching: Synaptic Plasticity through Device Volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Barbera, Selina; Alibart, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the computational functionalities and performances of the brain remains one of the biggest challenges for the future of information and communication technologies. Such an ambitious goal requires research efforts from the architecture level to the basic device level (i.e., investigating the opportunities offered by emerging nanotechnologies to build such systems). Nanodevices, or, more precisely, memory or memristive devices, have been proposed for the implementation of synaptic functions, offering the required features and integration in a single component. In this paper, we demonstrate that the basic physics involved in the filamentary switching of electrochemical metallization cells can reproduce important biological synaptic functions that are key mechanisms for information processing and storage. The transition from short- to long-term plasticity has been reported as a direct consequence of filament growth (i.e., increased conductance) in filamentary memory devices. In this paper, we show tha...

  15. Statistical Analysis of Bus Networks in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Ramadurai, Gitakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Through the past decade the field of network science has established itself as a common ground for the cross-fertilization of exciting inter-disciplinary studies which has motivated researchers to model almost every physical system as an interacting network consisting of nodes and links. Although public transport networks such as airline and railway networks have been extensively studied, the status of bus networks still remains in obscurity. In developing countries like India, where bus networks play an important role in day-to-day commutation, it is of significant interest to analyze its topological structure and answer some of the basic questions on its evolution, growth, robustness and resiliency. In this paper, we model the bus networks of major Indian cities as graphs in \\textit{L}-space, and evaluate their various statistical properties using concepts from network science. Our analysis reveals a wide spectrum of network topology with the common underlying feature of small-world property. We observe tha...

  16. An accounting system for a Class I motor common carrier of property 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packenham, Edward S

    1950-01-01

    QL 'be thoee a?4? to ecsssoetiag lgaoa fee therma Iwstim ef ~ swww ~ J4llkl sw%swl? 1$ %Ash QR OOMMtlaI lllWI leap%&~ S4? 4?ysHag+ f?ea ?see@tel eaah haaliieg ynreo4ese ia ws4? eoeoeasrg 'hy tho ical oat?WLieh?4 ~o of aet oetMomsctct wheseia a aanrsoe...?ahar wiD ba grayer?4g yr?yegg eyg?ci??4 e?4 yeiC. thC? CrrL?a yreei?C?e tha yassihglitf ef fLNlacc? t??a?t ee ahliC?CC??at ~?g. Cll ?f ths ?cyley?es will be yes ee e waahig basis* Vega?CX y?re? ??4 y?y?aaA 4?tes vill bs acCaaCcQ?4 se ee ts yaaac...

  17. A floristic study of Karnes County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Joe Chilton

    1955-01-01

    eeatribstLon this wash nsr sdd to ths flame sf 2&as is ~ thaLra, Icy eLI~eah Qlggeiattans swo e?tonlled t0 Qx ~ 4oba Jy gynarchy Osai~ of ~ oon ~ Lttasb for h1s Qleosraga~t %cd sonstrttire gcidasso fran ths bsgisccing to the ocsplotiaa of tais washy Qr... duns 6. 04 9, 63 1, 52 . o7 5. 19 1, 19 4ugmA Septsnbsr October Morenbsr Dsoeubsr Totals . 00 5, "/6 1. 96 9. 93 3. 34 1, 21 4. 20 1, 85 4, 81 ~ 27 2, 69 1. 63 28, "g 28, 92 18. 98 Oeoasionaily in the paste md sore frequently during tbs...

  18. Order Reduction of the Radiative Heat Transfer Model for the Simulation of Plasma Arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An approach to derive low-complexity models describing thermal radiation for the sake of simulating the behavior of electric arcs in switchgear systems is presented. The idea is to approximate the (high dimensional) full-order equations, modeling the propagation of the radiated intensity in space, with a model of much lower dimension, whose parameters are identified by means of nonlinear system identification techniques. The low-order model preserves the main structural aspects of the full-order one, and its parameters can be straightforwardly used in arc simulation tools based on computational fluid dynamics. In particular, the model parameters can be used together with the common approaches to resolve radiation in magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including the discrete-ordinate method, the P-N methods and photohydrodynamics. The proposed order reduction approach is able to systematically compute the partitioning of the electromagnetic spectrum in frequency bands, and the related absorption coefficients, tha...

  19. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 34 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01

    ,TIONSHIP TPJ,T DEVELOPED BETWEEN KIRK AND SPOCK HI THE TV SERIES STILL EVIDENT TI'l THE FILM, OR Hi,S TIlTj i%mI;,SIS BEl'l'! PIlICW ON OTm~R BEIJ/i'IONSHIPS, 10 o. DECKER? No, thore is a definite bond botween Kirk and Spock that was ovident in tha TV series...rosted in the following extracts from 0rticles but we are m(:l,king no gunr3ntoos thnt they have their faots correct. TDIE Jan 15th 1979 1 Sinoe the series endeel, Captain (now Admiral) Kirk hGS been kicked upstairs to dull desk duty~ I\\.lr. Spock hu...

  20. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research by groups of investigators in the Division during the period of October 1, 1984, through September 30, 1985. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period. For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, tha crosscurrents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other. In addition, this report includes information on the Division's educational activities, Advisory Committee, seminar program, and international interactions, as well as extramural activities of staff members, abstracts for technical meetings, and funding and personnel levels.

  1. Influence of the radiation absorbed by micro particles on the flame propagation and combustion regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, M F; Liberman, M A

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiation of the hot combustion products usually does not influence noticeably the flame propagating through gaseous mixture. the situation is changed drastically in the presence even small concentration of particles, which absorb radiation, transfer the heat to the surrounding unburned gaseous mixture by means of heat conduction, so that the gas phase temperature in front of the advancing flame lags that of the particles. It is shown that radiative preheating of unreacted mixture ahead of the flame results in a modest increase of the advancing flame velocity for a highly reactive gaseous fuel, or to considerable increase of the flame velocity in the case of a slow reactive mixture. The effects of radiation preheating as stronger as smaller the normal flame velocity. The radiation heat transfer can become a dominant mechanism compared with molecular heat conduction, determining the structure and the speed of combustion wave in the case of a small enough velocity of the advancing flame. It is shown tha...

  2. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  3. The effects of heat transfer on the aerodynamic characteristics of a hot wing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, John Michael

    1972-01-01

    Pm. !13th the approximate temperatur. e profile, the i nteorai:ion of ti e n omentura ec!Qa r'. !0"3 '! s Pedi!cec to a fol", Peq'. ll Yi t!g Qnlp the llifo qu, dratures x T 1 0 0 (x) = exp (2 f (-. ?. ? e 2 - -, - LI, + IiJ ? d, , l 'I " ' ii 'Il...OO'(l. ". i'li: v Hsl&. "C l EO I ST I CS OF O IIOT The !&fleet?oF Peat Tf an" fef on tha ', cr odyl&an!le Charac. Ori . tie? c?f e Hot I?fi 1;. !II v 1?3 j2) John i". icha 'I uaciarf, B. . '&. . Texa ?s!1 Univers! t!; Di rerted by: inr. L), vi d J. !'Ioi...

  4. T-Negative Issue 23 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1974-01-01

    Kirk ,' , b,vMary 'LoUlse Dodge ~There ' l$a questton .tha t mus,t , occurtj:> m9$t U'~tarTrek!1fans b.ut~ is ,:rarel.y Voice'apubllcal1y. , Let's ' get,' it 'out 'inthe ~open: ' IiWha t IS going " on" between Caota in Kirk and Uhura '{ II , T... obviously more than one transporter would be bLlil t into 8 David Gerrold, The World of Star Trek, p. 219; anon., "U.S.S. Enterprise/science and technology"l"rlthe 23rd century," in S't

  5. The role of lateral drag in the dynamics of Ice Stream B, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whillans, I. M.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    1997-11-05

    'ersit.y, Collllnblls, Oh io 132/0, U S.A. ABSTRACT. The p a rtiti oning of res istiye force b e t wee n the bed a nd sides of Ice Stream B, Anta rcti ca , is obta ined fo r three large a reas tha t have been measured using repeat aeri a l photogrammetry. Problems... associated with data errors a nd local vari ations in ice strength and velocity a re reduced by considering th e a reall y ave raged budge t o f fo rces for each photo block. Results indicate that the bed under Ice Stream B must be very wea k a nd unable...

  6. Accumulated dose to the rectum, measured using dose-volume histograms and dose-surface maps, is different from planned dose in all patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaife, Jessica E.; Thomas, Simon J.; Harrison, Karl; Romanchikova, Marina; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.; Forman, Julia; Bates, Amy M.; Jena, Raj; Parker, M. Andrew; Burnet, Neil G.

    2015-07-24

    ve tha t f ro m the DVHs. To facilita te visua l comp a riso n of the DSMs, we deve lop e d a syste m to sta n da rdize the ir sup e rior - inf e rio r len gth s. The med ian MV rad iu s durin g trea tm e nt was calcula te d for each participa... PR OO FS BJ R UN CO RR EC TE D 15 p rost a te can c e r. Inte rna tio na l jou rna l of rad iation onco logy, biolo gy, physics. 2008 ;7 0 (4 ):1 12 4 - 9 . 13. Jan i AB, Su A, Corre a D, Gratzle J. Compa riso n of late gastro inte stin a l...

  7. Comparison of reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Céline; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods: the SEEK filter and the R-4D-Var. A hybridization of the two, combining the variational framework and the sequential evolution of covariance matrices, is also preliminarily investigated and assessed in the same experimental conditions. The comparison is performed using the twin-experiment approach on a model of the Tropical Pacific domain. The assimilated data are simulated temperature profiles at the locations of the TAO/TRITON array moorings. It is shown that, in a quasi-linear regime, both methods produce similarly good results. However the hybrid approach provides slightly better results and thus appears as potentially fruitful. In a more non-linear regime, when Tropical Instability Waves develop, the global nature of the variational approach helps control model dynamics better than the sequential approach of the SEEK filter. This aspect is probably enhanced by the context of the experiments in tha...

  8. Dependence of Magnetic Field Quality on Collar Supplier and Dimensions in the Main LHC Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellesia, B; Santoni, C; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    In order to keep the electro-magnetic forces and to minimize conductor movements, the superconducting coils of the main Large Hadron Collider dipoles are held in place by means of austenitic steel collars. Two suppliers provide the collars necessary for the whole LHC production, which has now reached more than 800 collared coils. In this paper we first assess if the different collar suppliers origin a noticeable difference in the magnetic field quality measured at room temperature. We then analyze the measurements of the collar dimensions carried out at the manufacturers, comparing them to the geometrical tolerances. Finally we use a magneto-static model to evaluate the expected spread in the field components induced by the actual collar dimensions. These spreads are compared to the magnetic measurements at room temperature over the magnet production in order to identify if the collars, rather than other components or assembly process, can account for the measured magnetic field effects. It has been found tha...

  9. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E. [Department of Agronomy, Plant breeding and genetic, Faculty of Agricutlure, Zabol University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-01-30

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  10. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the “first stage” D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) predicted equivalent DF for MCU from this testing is greater than 3,500 assuming 95% efficiency during extraction and 80% efficiency during scrub and strip. Hydraulically, the system performed very well in all tests. Target flows were easily obtained and stable throughout testing. Though some issues were encountered with plugging in the coalescer, they were not related to the solvent. No hydraulic upsets due to the solvent were experienced during any of the tests conducted. The first extraction coalescer element used in testing developed high pressure drop that made it difficult to maintain the target flow rates. Analysis showed an accumulation of sodium aluminosilicate solids. The coalescer was replaced with one from the same manufacturer’s lot and pressure drop was no longer an issue. Concentrations of Isopar™ L and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the amount of solvent carryover. For low-flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) conditions in stripping, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L post-contactor concentration to be 25 mg/L, HPLC measured 39 mg/L of Modifier. For moderate-flow (0.54 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L postcontactor to be ~69 mg/L, while the HPLC measured 56 mg/L for Modifier. For high-flow (0.8 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L post-contactor to be 39 mg/L. The post-coalescer (pre-decanter) measurements by SVOA for Isopar™ L were all less than the analysis detection limit of 10 mg/L. The HPLC measured 18, 22 and 20 mg/L Modifier for the low, medium, and high-low rates respectively. In extraction, the quantity of pre-coalescer Isopar™ L carryover measured by SVOA was ~280-410 mg/L at low flow (4 gpm aqueous), ~400-450 mg/L at moderate flow (8 gpm aqueous), and ~480 mg/L at high flow (12 gpm aqueous). The amount of post coalescer (pre-decanter) Isopar™ L carryover measured by SVOA was less than 45 mg/L for all flow rates. HPLC results for Modifier were 182, 217 and 22

  11. Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2014-04-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating this. SRNL results support the transition to routine operations.

  12. Large Scale Comparative Visualisation of Regulatory Networks with TRNDiff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chua, Xin-Yi [QFAB Bioinformatics, Inst. for Molecular Biosciences, Brisbane (Austrialia); Buckingham, Lawrence [School of EECS, QUT, Brisbane (Australia); Hogan, James M. [School of EECS, QUT, Brisbane (Australia); Novichkov, Pavel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has seen explosive growth in genomic datasets, and dense coverage of related organisms, supporting study of subtle, strain-specific variations as a determinant of function. Such data collections present fresh and complex challenges for bioinformatics, those of comparing models of complex relationships across hundreds and even thousands of sequences. Transcriptional Regulatory Network (TRN) structures document the influence of regulatory proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs) on associated Target Genes (TGs). TRNs are routinely inferred from model systems or iterative search, and analysis at these scales requires simultaneous displays of multiple networks well beyond those of existing network visualisation tools [1]. In this paper we describe TRNDiff, an open source system supporting the comparative analysis and visualization of TRNs (and similarly structured data) from many genomes, allowing rapid identification of functional variations within species. The approach is demonstrated through a small scale multiple TRN analysis of the Fur iron-uptake system of Yersinia, suggesting a number of candidate virulence factors; and through a larger study exploiting integration with the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov; [2]) - a collection of hundreds of manually curated and predicted transcription factor regulons drawn from across the entire spectrum of prokaryotic organisms.

  13. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  14. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  15. Adaptive Optics Imaging of IRAS 18276-1431: a bipolar pre-planetary nebula with circumstellar "searchlight beams" and "arcs"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras, C S; Sahai, R; De Paz, A G; Morris, M

    2006-01-01

    We present high-angular resolution images of the post-AGB nebula IRAS18276-1431 (also known as OH17.7-2.0) obtained with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system in its Natural Guide Star (NGS) mode in the Kp, Lp, and Ms near-infrared bands. We also present supporting optical F606W and F814W HST images as well as interferometric observations of the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and 2.6mm continuum emission with OVRO. The envelope of IRAS18276-1431 displays a clear bipolar morphology in our optical and NIR images with two lobes separated by a dark waist and surrounded by a faint 4.5"x3.4" halo. Our Kp-band image reveals two pairs of radial ``searchlight beams'' emerging from the nebula center and several intersecting, arc-like features. From our CO data we derive a mass of M>0.38[D/3kpc]^2 Msun and an expansion velocity v_exp=17km/s for the molecular envelope. The density in the halo follows a radial power-law proportional to r^-3, which is consistent with a mass-loss rate increasing with time. Analysis of the NIR ...

  16. INVESTIGATION INTO THE RATE OF TRIOCTYLAMINE PARTITIONING INTO THE MCU AQUEOUS PHASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Couture, A.

    2013-07-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has examined the issue of trioctylamine (TOA) losses at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) solvent. For this study, SRNL used partitioning and radiolysis data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as actual MCU operational data. From the radiolysis data, SRNL prepared a model on the rate of TOA degradation. From the combined sets of data, SRNL has calculated the largest possible value of TOA (although this value is not credible) in the Strip Effluent (SE) and also calculated two different conservative, more realistic values for TOA in the SE. Even under conservative assumptions, such as all of the TOA losses partitioning solely into the Strip Effluent (SE), the MCU operational data suggests that the maximum realistic TOA concentration in the SE is < 0.6 mg/L. Furthermore, from understanding the chemical differences between the old and new strip solutions, SRNL does not believe that the TOA will deplete from the blended BOBCalixC6 – Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) at a rate higher than previously experienced. Finally, SRNL recommends pursuing analytical development of a method for TOA with a superior precision compared to the current method. However, as the TOA in the blended solvent will continuously decline during MCU operations, further improvements in the development of the understanding of TOA losses may not be cost effective.

  17. Mapping analysis of scaffold/matrix attachment regions (s/MARs) from two different mammalian cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilus, Nur Shazwani Mohd; Ahmad, Azrin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Johari, Norazfa [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are potential element that can be integrated into expression vector to increase expression of recombinant protein. Many studies on S/MAR have been done but none has revealed the distribution of S/MAR in a genome. In this study, we have isolated S/MAR sequences from HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO DG44) using two different methods utilizing 2 M NaCl and lithium-3,5-diiodosalicylate (LIS). The isolated S/MARs were sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Based on reference mapping analysis against human genome database, a total of 8,994,856 and 8,412,672 contigs of S/MAR sequences were retrieved from 2M NaCl and LIS extraction of HEK293 respectively. On the other hand, reference mapping analysis of S/MAR derived from CHO DG44 against our own CHO DG44 database have generated a total of 7,204,348 and 4,672,913 contigs from 2 M NaCl and LIS extraction method respectively.

  18. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

  19. Large Scale Comparative Visualisation of Regulatory Networks with TRNDiff

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chua, Xin-Yi; Buckingham, Lawrence; Hogan, James M.; Novichkov, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has seen explosive growth in genomic datasets, and dense coverage of related organisms, supporting study of subtle, strain-specific variations as a determinant of function. Such data collections present fresh and complex challenges for bioinformatics, those of comparing models of complex relationships across hundreds and even thousands of sequences. Transcriptional Regulatory Network (TRN) structures document the influence of regulatory proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs) on associated Target Genes (TGs). TRNs are routinely inferred from model systems or iterative search, and analysis at these scales requires simultaneous displays of multiple networks well beyond thosemore »of existing network visualisation tools [1]. In this paper we describe TRNDiff, an open source system supporting the comparative analysis and visualization of TRNs (and similarly structured data) from many genomes, allowing rapid identification of functional variations within species. The approach is demonstrated through a small scale multiple TRN analysis of the Fur iron-uptake system of Yersinia, suggesting a number of candidate virulence factors; and through a larger study exploiting integration with the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov; [2]) - a collection of hundreds of manually curated and predicted transcription factor regulons drawn from across the entire spectrum of prokaryotic organisms.« less

  20. Reduction of photosynthetically active radiation under extreme stratospheric aerosol loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Zardecki, A.

    1981-08-01

    The recently published hypothesis that the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions might be caused by an obstruction of sunlight is tested by model calculations. First we compute the total mass of stratospheric aerosols under normal atmospheric conditions for four different (measured) aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. For comparison, the stratospheric dust masses after four volcanic eruptions are also evaluated. Detailed solar radiative transfer calculations are then performed for artificially increased aerosol amounts until the postulated darkness scenario is obtained. Thus we find that a total stratospheric aerosol mass between 1 and 4 times 10/sup 1/ g is sufficient to reduce photosynthesis to 10/sup -3/ of normal. We also infer from this result tha the impact of a 0.4- to 3-km-diameter asteroid or a close encounter with a Halley-size comet may deposit that amount of particulates into the stratosphere. The darkness scenario of Alvarez et al. is thus shown to be a possible extinction mechanism, even with smaller size asteroids of comets than previously estimated.

  1. Ocular Brachytherapy Dosimetry for 103Pd and 125I in The Presence of Gold Nanoparticles: Monte Carlo Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asadi, S; Vahidian, M; Marghchouei, M; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present Monte Carlo study is to evaluate the variation of energy deposition in healthy tissues in the human eye which is irradiated by brachytherapy sources in comparison with the resultant dose increase in the gold nanoparticle(GNP)-loaded choroidal melanoma. The effects of these nanoparticles on normal tissues are compared between 103Pd and 125I as two ophthalmic brachytherapy sources. Dose distribution in the tumor and healthy tissues have been taken into account for both mentioned brachytherapy sources. Also, in a certain point of the eye, the ratio of the absorbed dose by the normal tissue in the presence of GNPs to the absorbed dose by the same point in the absence of GNPs has been calculated. In addition, differences observed in the comparison of simple water phantom and actual simulated human eye in presence of GNPs are also a matter of interest that have been considered in the present work. The results show that the calculated dose enhancement factor in the tumor for 125I is higher tha...

  2. A radio-map of the colliding winds in the very massive binary system HD 93129A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benaglia, Paula; Moldon, Javier; Nelan, Ed; De Becker, Michael; Dougherty, Sean M; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2015-01-01

    Radio observations are an effective tool to discover particle acceleration regions in colliding-wind binaries, through detection of synchrotron radiation; these regions are natural laboratories for the study of relativistic particles. Wind-collision region (WCR) models can reproduce the radio continuum spectra of massive binaries that contain both thermal and non-thermal radio emission; however, key constraints for models come from high-resolution imaging. Only five WCRs have been resolved to date at radio frequencies at milliarcsec (mas) angular scales. The source HD 93129A, prototype of the very few known O2 I stars, is a promising target for study: recently, a second massive, early-type star about 50 mas away was discovered, and a non-thermal radio source detected in the region. Preliminary long-baseline array data suggest that a significant fraction of the radio emission from the system comes from a putative WCR. We sought evidence that HD 93129A is a massive binary system with colliding stellar winds tha...

  3. Turning intractable counting into sampling: computing the granular entropy of three-dimensional jammed packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiniani, Stefano; Stevenson, Jacob D; Wales, David J; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    We report a numerical calculation of the total number of disordered jammed configurations $\\Omega$ of $N$ repulsive, three-dimensional spheres in a fixed volume $V$. To make these calculations tractable, we increase the computational efficiency of the approach of Xu et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 245502 (2011)) and Asenjo et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098002 (2014)) and we extend the method to allow computation of the granular entropy as a function of pressure. The approach that we use computes the granular entropy by sampling the absolute volume of basins of attraction of the stable packings in the potential energy landscape. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the pressure of a configuration and the volume of its basin of attraction in the potential energy landscape. This relation is well described by a power law. Our methodology to compute the number of stable packings should be applicable to a wide range of other enumeration problems that aims to find the extrema of a scalar cost function tha...

  4. The Age Distribution of Potential Intelligent Life in the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legassick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the habitability of the Milky Way, making use of recent observational analysis on the prevalence of Earth-sized planets, in order to estimate where and when potentially habitable star systems may have formed over the course of the Galaxy's history. We were then able to estimate the age distribution of potential intelligent life in our Galaxy using our own evolution and the age of the Sun as a proxy. To do this we created a galactic chemical evolution model and applied the following habitability constraints to the Sun-like (G-type) stars formed in our model: an environment free from life-extinguishing supernovae, a high enough metallicity for Earth-sized planet formation and sufficient time for the evolution of complex life. We determined a galactic habitable zone as the region containing all the potentially habitable star systems in our model. Our galactic habitable zone contains stars formed between 11 and 3.8 billion years ago at radial distances of between 7 and 14 kiloparsecs. We found tha...

  5. BAL QSOs and Extreme UFOs: the Eddington connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubovas, Kastytis

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a common physical origin connecting the fast, highly ionized winds (UFOs) seen in nearby AGN, and the slower and less ionized winds of BAL QSOs. The primary difference is the mass loss rate in the wind, which is ultimately determined by the rate at which mass is fed towards the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) on large scales. This is below the Eddington accretion rate in most UFOs, and slightly super-Eddington in extreme UFOs such as PG1211+143, but ranges up to $\\sim 10-50$ times this in BAL QSOs. For UFOs this implies black hole accretion rates and wind mass loss rates which are at most comparable to Eddington, giving fast, highly-ionized winds. In contrast BAL QSO black holes have mildly super-Eddington accretion rates, and drive winds whose mass loss rates are significantly super-Eddington, and so are slower and less ionized. This picture correctly predicts the velocities and ionization states of the observed winds, including the recently-discovered one in SDSS J1106+1939. We suggest tha...

  6. Internal water and microsecond dynamics in myoglobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaieda, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) binds diatomic ligands, like O$_2$, CO, and NO, in a cavity that is only transiently accessible. Crystallography and molecular simulations show that the ligands can migrate through an extensive network of transiently connected cavities, but disagree on the locations and occupancy of internal hydration sites. Here, we use water $^2$H and $^{17}$O magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) to characterize the internal water molecules in Mb under physiological conditions. We find that equine carbonmonoxy Mb contains 4.5 $\\pm$ 1.0 ordered internal water molecules with a mean survival time of 5.6 $\\pm$ 0.5 $\\mu$s at 25 $^\\circ$C. The likely location of these water molecules are the four polar hydration sites, including one of the xenon-binding cavities, that are fully occupied in all high-resolution crystal structures of equine Mb. The finding that water escapes from these sites, located 17 -- 31 {\\AA} apart in the protein, on the same $\\mu$s time scale suggests a global exchange mechanism. We propose tha...

  7. Warm molecular Hydrogen at high redshift with the James Webb Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillard, P; Lehnert, M D; Appleton, P N; Forêts, G Pineau des

    2015-01-01

    The build-up of galaxies is regulated by a complex interplay between gravitational collapse, galaxy merging and feedback related to AGN and star formation. The energy released by these processes has to dissipate for gas to cool, condense, and form stars. How gas cools is thus a key to understand galaxy formation. \\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope} infrared spectroscopy revealed a population of galaxies with weak star formation and unusually powerful H$_2$ line emission. This is a signature of turbulent dissipation, sustained by large-scale mechanical energy injection. The cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium is associated with emission in the H$_2$ lines. These results have profound consequences on our understanding of regulation of star formation, feedback and energetics of galaxy formation in general. The fact that H$_2$ lines can be strongly enhanced in high-redshift turbulent galaxies will be of great importance for the \\textit{James Webb Space Telescope} observations which will unveil the role tha...

  8. Associations of water and methanol masers at milli-arcsec angular resolution in two high-mass young stellar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Goddi; L. Moscadelli; A. Sanna; R. Cesaroni; V. Minier

    2006-10-16

    Most previous high-angular (methanol masers. While high-angular resolution observations have clarified that water masers originate from shocks associated with protostellar jets, different environments have been proposed in several sources to explain the origin of methanol masers. Tha aim of the paper is to investigate the nature of the methanol maser birthplace in SFRs and the association between the water and methanol maser emission in the same young stellar object. We have conducted phase-reference Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of water and methanol masers toward two high-mass SFRs, Sh 2-255 IR and AFGL 5142. In Sh 2-255 IR water masers are aligned along a direction close to the orientation of the molecular outflow observed on angular scales of 1-10 arcsec, tracing possibly the disk-wind emerging from the disk atmosphere. In AFGL 5142 water masers trace expansion at the base of a protostellar jet, whilst methanol masers are more probably tracing infalling than outflowing gas. The results for AFGL 5142 suggest that water and methanol masers trace different kinematic structures in the circumstellar gas.

  9. Dynamical Heating Induced by Dwarf Planets on Cold Kuiper Belt-like Debris Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, Marco A; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Peimbert, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    With the use of long-term numerical simulations, we study the evolution and orbital behavior of cometary nuclei in cold Kuiper belt-like debris disks under the gravitational influence of dwarf planets (DPs); we carry out these simulations with and without the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet. This exploratory study shows that in the absence of a giant planet, 10 DPs are enough to induce strong radial and vertical heating on the orbits of belt particles. On the other hand, the presence of a giant planet close to the debris disk, acts as a stability agent reducing the radial and vertical heating. With enough DPs, even in the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet some radial heating remains; this heating grows steadily, re-filling resonances otherwise empty of cometary nuclei. Specifically for the solar system, this secular process seems to be able to provide material that, through resonant chaotic diffusion, increase the rate of new comets spiraling into the inner planetary system, but only if more tha...

  10. Bright Lyman Break Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Weinberg, D H; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of six compact, starburst galaxies with redshifts 2.3 < z < 2.8 and r-band magnitudes 19.8-20.5 in the Quasar Catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release (SDSS DR1). The SDSS spectra of these objects resemble the composite spectrum of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z \\approx 3, but the galaxies are 4-5 magnitudes brighter than an ``L*'' LBG and 2-3 magnitudes brighter than the most luminous objects in typical LBG spectroscopic surveys. Star formation rates inferred from the UV continuum luminosities are about 300-1000 M_sun yr^-1 with no correction for dust extinction. Such rates are similar to those inferred for ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but in these UV-bright objects the star formation is evidently not obscured by high dust column densities. The SDSS images show no evidence of multiple imaging or foreground lensing structures, but amplification by gravitational lensing (as in the case of MS 1512-cB58) cannot be ruled out with the present data. Assuming tha...

  11. Effect of training characteristics on object classification: an application using Boosted Decision Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We present an application of a particular machine-learning method (Boosted Decision Trees, BDTs using AdaBoost) to separate stars and galaxies in photometric images using their catalog characteristics. BDTs are a well established machine learning technique used for classification purposes. They have been widely used specially in the field of particle and astroparticle physics, and we use them here in an optical astronomy application. This algorithm is able to improve from simple thresholding cuts on standard separation variables that may be affected by local effects such as blending, badly calculated background levels or which do not include information in other bands. The improvements are shown using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9, with respect to the type photometric classifier. We obtain an improvement in the impurity of the galaxy sample of a factor 2-4 for this particular dataset, adjusting for the same efficiency of the selection. Another main goal of this study is to verify the effects tha...

  12. Interpreting gains and losses in conceptual test using Item Response Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamine, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual tests are widely used by physics instructors to assess students' conceptual understanding and compare teaching methods. It is common to look at students' changes in their answers between a pre-test and a post-test to quantify a transition in student's conceptions. This is often done by looking at the proportion of incorrect answers in the pre-test that changes to correct answers in the post-test -- the gain -- and the proportion of correct answers that changes to incorrect answers -- the loss. By comparing theoretical predictions to experimental data on the Force Concept Inventory, we shown that Item Response Theory (IRT) is able to fairly well predict the observed gains and losses. We then use IRT to quantify the student's changes in a test-retest situation when no learning occurs and show that $i)$ up to 25\\% of total answers can change due to the non-deterministic nature of student's answer and that $ii)$ gains and losses can go from 0\\% to 100\\%. Still using IRT, we highlight the conditions tha...

  13. Simulating the 21-cm signal from reionisation including non-linear ionisations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Sultan; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G

    2015-01-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionisation and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionisation, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into a semi-numerical code, SimFast21, that evolves reionisation on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parameterize the ionisation rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion is super-linearly dependent on halo mass (Rion ~ Mh^1.41), in contrast to previous assumptions. We implement these scalings into SimFast21 to identify the ionized regions. We tune our models to be consistent with recent observations of the optical depth, ionizing emissivity, and neutral fraction by the end of reionisation. We require an average photon escape fraction fesc=0.04 within ~ 0.5 cMpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, to simultaneously match these data. We present predictions for the 21cm power spectrum, and show tha...

  14. Mathematical Model for the Optimal Utilization Percentile in M/M/1 Systems: A Contribution about Knees in Performance Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Horta, Francisco A; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan M; Martinez-Carballido, Jorge; Buenfil-Alpuche, Eldamira

    2011-01-01

    Performance curves of queueing systems can be analyzed by separating them into three regions: the flat region, the knee region, and the exponential region. Practical considerations, usually locate the knee region between 70-90% of the theoretical maximum utilization. However, there is not a clear agreement about where the boundaries between regions are, and where exactly the utilization knee is located. An open debate about knees in performance curves was undertaken at least 20 years ago. This historical debate is mainly divided between those who claim that a knee in the curve is not a well defined term in mathematics, or it is a subjective and not really meaningful concept, and those who define knees mathematically and consider their relevance and application. In this paper, we present a mathematical model and analysis for identifying the three mentioned regions on performance curves for M/M/1 systems; specifically, we found the knees, or optimal utilization percentiles, at the vertices of the hyperbolas tha...

  15. T-Negative Issue 9 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1975-01-01

    m e , a n d f o r m y s e l f , t h e c a s e w a s c e r t a i n l y h e a v i l y o v e r s t a t e d . P e r h a p s fo r o t h e r p e o p l e i t w a s n ' t . P e r h a p s c e r t a i n p e o p l e d i s a g r e e w i t h w h a t w e w e r e... s a y i n g . M r . R o d d e n b e r r y w r o t e tha t sho w h i m s e l f , an d h e f e l t i t v e r y d e e p l y . An d h e sa t t h r o u g h an d p e r s o n a l l y s u p e r v i s e d t h e e d i t i n g o f t h a t s h o w . T h e r e...

  16. Approach to nitinol power plant cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNichols, J.L. Jr.; Cory, J.S.; Curtis, E.H.

    1982-11-01

    The objective of this paper is tof provide a method for cost evaluation of low grade thermal energy conversion by Nitinol power plants. To accomplish this objective Nitinol power plant costs are subdivided int those which can be obtained through conventional cost analysis, and those which are associated with the Nitino heat engine and are not subject to conventional analysis. Analytic expressions are provided for the Nitinol heat engine capital costs and Nitinol replacement costs in terms of Nitinol performance, heat engine configuration, plant operating factors, material costs, and the cost of capital. Nitinol working material factors are identified that require further definition before firm and reliable costs can be determined. Where data are lacking, plausible assumptions and estimates are utilized tof perform a first-cut analysis. It is found that the Nitinol heat engine capital costs per unit power generating capacity are approximately $0.15/W, and that the cost of produced energy for the Nitinol heat engine portion of the power plant is approximately 0.74 /kWh, includin operation, maintenance, Nitinol replacements and the cost of capital for the heat engine. It is concluded tha Nitinol power plants for the conversion of low grade thermal energy may have a significant economical advantage over conventionally fueled power plants.

  17. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud, F; Emsellem, E; Agertz, O; Athanassoula, E; Combes, F; Elmegreen, B; Kraljic, K; Motte, F; Teyssier, R

    2015-01-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find tha...

  18. Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-09-01

    In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

  19. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESA—European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (–2.7 ? [Fe/H] ? –1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5 ?m post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC 10, NGC 185, and NGC 147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = –1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  20. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  1. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore »large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  2. Geothermal Progress Monitor, report No. 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Issue No. 13 documents that most related factors favor the growth and geographic expansion of the US geothermal industry and that the industry is being technologically prepared to meet those challenges into the next century. It is the function of GPM to identify trends in the use of this resource and to provide a historical record of its development pathway. The information assembled for this issue of GPM indicates that trends in the use of geothermal energy in this country and abroad continue to be very positive. Favorable sentiments as well as pertinent actions on the part of both government and industry are documented in almost every section. The FEDERAL BEAT points up that the National Energy Strategy (NES) developed at the highest levels of the US government recognizes the environmental and energy security advantages of renewable energy, including geothermal, and makes a commitment to substantial diversification'' of US sources of energy. With the announcement of the construction of several new plants and plant expansions, the INDUSTRY SCENE illustrates industry's continued expectation tha the use of geothermal energy will prove profitable to investors. In DEVELOPMENT STATUS, spokesmen for both an investor-owned utility and a major geothermal developer express strong support for geothermal power, particularly emphasizing its environmental advantages. DEVELOPMENT STATUS also reports that early successes have been achieved by joint DOE/industry R D at The Geysers which will have important impacts on the future management of this mature field. Also there is increasing interest in hot dry rock. Analyses conducted in support of the NES indicate that if all the postulated technology developments occur in this field, the price of energy derived from hot dry rock in the US could drop.

  3. Towards MQGP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansi Dhuria; Aalok Misra

    2015-03-19

    For the Ouyang embedding we calculate the chemical potential mu_C due to a U(1) gauge field on the w.v. of N_f D7-branes wrapped around a 4-cycle in a resolved warped deformed conifold with (M)N (fractional)D3-branes of [1], and show the possible thermodynamical stability up to linear order in the embedding parameter. In the spirit of [2] we obtain the local type IIA mirror using SYZ mirror symmetry near (theta_{1,2},psi)=(,{0,2pi,,4pi}) and then oxidize the same to M theory. We take two limits of this uplift:(i)g_s,g_sN_f,g_sM^2/N,g_s^2M N_f>1 similar to [1] effected by M eps^{-3d/2}, N eps^{-19d},g_s epsn^d,d>0 and eps>1 for finite g_s,M, effected by: g_s eps, M eps^{-3d/2},N eps^{-39d},d>0, epsuplift gives a black M3-brane solution whose near-horizon geometry near theta_{1,2}=0,pi-branches, preserves 1/8 SUSY. We obtain eta/s=1/4pi for the uplift and the diffusion constant for types IIB/IIA backgrounds comes out to be ~1/T, for both limits. The D=11 SUGRA action up to O(R^4,|G_4|^2) is expected to receive dominant contributions near =0,pi due to poles. Introducing a small-angle cut-off c and using the =c,(pi-c)-local uplift the specific heat from the IR-finite part of the action (c-independent) turns out to be positive indicative of the thermodynamical stability of the uplift. An ALD-gravity-type interpretation can be given to the counter-terms for(i). Its verified that the black M3-brane entropy S r_h^3 from M-theoretic thermodynamical methods and the horizon areas of types IIB/IIA/M3-brane solutions.

  4. Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards:Safeguards-by-Design at Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Jon D.; McGinnis, Brent R; Morgan, James B; Whitaker, Michael; Lockwood, Mr. Dunbar; Shipwash, Jacqueline L

    2011-01-01

    The Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards (NGS3) was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) in Washington, D.C. on 14-15 December 2010; this meeting focused on the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) concept. There were approximately 100 participants from 13 countries, comprised of safeguards policy and technical experts from government and industry. Representatives also were present from the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the European Atomic Energy Agency (Euratom), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The primary objective of this meeting was to exchange views and provide recommendations on implementation of the SBD concept for four specific nuclear fuel cycle facility types: gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), GEN III and GEN IV reactors, aqueous reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities. The general and facility-specific SBD documents generated from the four working groups, which were circulated for comment among working group participants, are intended to provide a substantive contribution to the IAEA's efforts to publish SBD guidance for these specific types of nuclear facilities in the near future. The IAEA has described the SBD concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the DOE is working to establish SBD as a global norm through DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. This paper describes the discussion topics and final recommendations of the Enrichment Facilities Working Group. The working group participants were tasked with providing recommendations for facility operators and designers, while promoting the IAEA's objectives of: (1) avoiding costly and time-consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear facilities and (2) providing for more effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards.

  5. RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-09

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

  6. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties alter s particle dispersion. The joint particle - temperature dispersion leads to a distribution of temperature histories predicted by the ODT . Predictions are shown for the lower moments an d the full distributions of the particle positions, particle - observed gas temperatures and particle temperatures. An analysis of the time scales affecting particle - temperature interactions covers Lagrangian integral time scales based on temperature autoco rrelations, rates of temperature change associated with particle motion relative to the temperature field and rates of diffusional change of temperatures. These latter two time scales have not been investigated previously; they are shown to be strongly in termittent having peaked distributions with long tails. The logarithm of the absolute value of these time scales exhibits a distribution closer to normal. A cknowledgements This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under their Counter - Weapons of Mass Destruction Basic Research Program in the area of Chemical and Biological Agent Defeat under award number HDTRA1 - 11 - 4503I to Sandia National Laboratories. The authors would like to express their appreciation for the guidance provi ded by Dr. Suhithi Peiris to this project and to the Science to Defeat Weapons of Mass Destruction program.