National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ldi ngs tha

  1. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  2. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physical Models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural Physical Models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural Physical Models Purpose: Treatment-planning systems rely on computer intensive optimization algorithms in order to provide radiation dose localization. We are investigating a new optimization paradigm based on natural physical modeling and

  3. NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

    2013-03-22

    Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  4. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Williams, M.

    2013-09-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

  5. Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to Fuel Your NGS Research ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carter, Jennifer [Agilent

    2013-03-22

    Jennifer Carter on "Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to fuel your NGS Research" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  7. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomicsmore » system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.« less

  8. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the Globus Genomics system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  10. Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  11. Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-Fast Clustering Algorithms (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Li, Weizhong [San Diego Supercomputer Center

    2013-01-22

    San Diego Supercomputer Center's Weizhong Li on "Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-fast Clustering Algorithms" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  12. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory

    2013-03-22

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. Using GC-FID to Quantify the Removal of 4-sec-Butylphenol from NGS Solvent by NaOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Jr., Frederick V.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-01

    A caustic wash of the solvent used in the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process was found to remove the modifier breakdown product 4-sec-butylphenol (SBP) with varying efficiency depending on the aqueous NaOH concentration. Recent efforts at ORNL have aimed at characterizing the flowsheet chemistry and reducing the technical uncertainties of the NG-CSSX process. One technical uncertainty has been the efficacy of caustic washing of the solvent for the removal of lipophilic anions, in particular, the efficient removal of SBP, an important degradation product of the solvent modifier, Cs-7SB. In order to make this determination, it was necessary to develop a sensitive and reliable analytical technique for the detection and quantitation of SBP. This report recounts the development of a GC-FID-based (Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection) technique for analyzing SBP and the utilization of the technique to subsequently confirm the ability of the caustic wash to efficiently remove SBP from the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) used in NG-CSSX. In particular, the developed technique was used to monitor the amount of SBP removed from a simple solvent and the full NGS by contact with sodium hydroxide wash solutions over a range of concentrations. The results show that caustic washing removes SBP with effectively the same efficiency as it did in the original Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process.

  15. Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-04-29

    Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent work underway with simulants in SRNL as well as any DWPF CPC testing done with the new SE stream to ascertain whether any need develops that could result in modification of any currently planned F/H Laboratory testing protocols.

  16. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD and satisfying dose limits to critical structures. This project is funded by MCubed and grant R01-CA132834.

  17. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into ... Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; GEOMETRY; KERNELS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; ...

  18. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y; Bai, T; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research in Strategic Emerging Industry, Guangdong, China (2011A081402003)

  19. TH-A-18C-06: A Scatter Elimination Scheme for Cone Beam CT Using An Oscillating Narrow Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Xu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: While cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used in image guided radiation therapy, its low image quality, primarily caused by scattered x-rays, hinders advanced clinical applications, e.g., CBCT based on-line adaptive re-planning. We propose in this abstract a new scheme called oscillating narrow beam CBCT (ONB-CBCT) to eliminate scatter signals. Methods: ONB-CBCT consists of two major components. 1) Oscillating narrow beam (ONB) scan and 2) partitioned flat panel containing multiple individual detector strips and their own readouts. Both the beam oscillation and detector partition are along the superior-inferior (SI) direction. During data acquisition, at a given projection, the narrow beam sweep through the detector region, and different portions of the detector acquires projection data in synchrony with the narrow beam. ONB can be generated by a rotating slit collimator design with conventional tube with single focal spot, or by directly using a new source with multiple focal spots. A proof-of-principle study via Monte Carlo simulation is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ONB-CBCT. Results: As the beam becomes narrower, more and more scatter signals are eliminated. For the case with a bowtie filter and using 15 ONBs, the maximum and the average intensity error due to scatter are below 20 and 10 HU, respectively. Conclusion: ONB yields a narrowed exposure field at each snapshot and hence an inherently negligible scatter effect. Meanwhile, the individualized detector units guarantee high frame rate detection and hence a same large volume coverage as that in conventional CBCT. In summary, ONB-CBCT is a promising design to achieve high-quality CBCT imaging. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  20. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain trauma imaging at the point of care in sports and military applications. Research grant from Carestream Health. JY is an employee of Carestream Health.

  1. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low-dose CBCT.

  2. TH-A-19A-08: Intel Xeon Phi Implementation of a Fast Multi-Purpose Monte Carlo Simulation for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souris, K; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of graphics processing units (GPUs) to compute dose distributions using Monte Carlo (MC) methods within clinical time constraints. However, GPUs have a rigid vectorial architecture that favors the implementation of simplified particle transport algorithms, adapted to specific tasks. Our new, fast, and multipurpose MC code, named MCsquare, runs on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. This technology offers 60 independent cores, and therefore more flexibility to implement fast and yet generic MC functionalities, such as prompt gamma simulations. Methods: MCsquare implements several models and hence allows users to make their own tradeoff between speed and accuracy. A 200 MeV proton beam is simulated in a heterogeneous phantom using Geant4 and two configurations of MCsquare. The first one is the most conservative and accurate. The method of fictitious interactions handles the interfaces and secondary charged particles emitted in nuclear interactions are fully simulated. The second, faster configuration simplifies interface crossings and simulates only secondary protons after nuclear interaction events. Integral depth-dose and transversal profiles are compared to those of Geant4. Moreover, the production profile of prompt gammas is compared to PENH results. Results: Integral depth dose and transversal profiles computed by MCsquare and Geant4 are within 3%. The production of secondaries from nuclear interactions is slightly inaccurate at interfaces for the fastest configuration of MCsquare but this is unlikely to have any clinical impact. The computation time varies between 90 seconds for the most conservative settings to merely 59 seconds in the fastest configuration. Finally prompt gamma profiles are also in very good agreement with PENH results. Conclusion: Our new, fast, and multi-purpose Monte Carlo code simulates prompt gammas and calculates dose distributions in less than a minute, which complies with clinical time constraints. It has been successfully validated with Geant4. This work has been financialy supported by InVivoIGT, a public/private partnership between UCL and IBA.

  3. Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  4. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  5. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  6. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  7. Thailand: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Thailand Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TH 3-letter ISO code THA Numeric ISO code...

  8. California Institute of Technology Caltech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of higher learning tha investigates the most challenging, fundamental problems in science and technology. Coordinates: 29.690847, -95.196308 Show Map Loading map......

  9. Building America Best Practices Series, Vol. 10 - Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing, A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM R Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 12, 2010 April 12, 2010 * PNNL-19284 BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 10. BuiLDiNG AmERiCA BEST PRACTiCES SERiES Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory michael

  10. Engineered Polymerases Enable Novel Sequencing Applications ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Appel, Maryke [Kappa Biosystems

    2013-03-22

    Maryke Appel on "Engineered polymerases provide improved NGS library amplification and enable novel sequencing applications" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. Mutation Detection with Next-Generation Resequencing through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major limitation for this approach is the need for an a-priori sequenced reference genome for the WT organism, as the short reads of most current NGS approaches usually prohibit ...

  12. II-GRR at GRC - Analyses slides.pptx

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for development of materials and upcoming meetings Roadmap D evelopment S tatus Mee2ngs* 25% 50% 75% 100% Reviewed & P rinted Mee4ng 1 Agency Follow--- up Mee4ng 2 Federal 53 6...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 20090425RIKEN-PetaProject-web-mod.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryutaro Himeno Japan's 10 Peta FLOPS Supercomputer Development Project and its energy saving designs 1) Group Director of R&D group, NGS R&D Center 2) Deputy Program Director for ...

  14. Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel DOE Technical Standards /Ownership APPENDIX B: Non-Government Standards (NGS) Committee Activity and Participating Personnel PDF icon NGS Committee Activity and Participating Personnel More Documents & Publications DOE-TSL-4-99 Technical Standards Newsletter - February 2001 Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2003

  15. Microsoft Word - CMOS7_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4822P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using the la support for alidation. ies d IO cells w esis, IP) Module , PLLs, acros y macros ed ASIC tha ment costs, a C is a metal- logy. Sandi ich also allow nt, and phot...

  16. Cosan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsidiary of Cosan Limited. Tha company is one of the largest ethanol producers in the world. References: Cosan1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  17. Potl,,]) u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... REASON: o Proposed action filS within a categorical exclusion but involves a high profi le or controversial issue thaI warrants Field Office Manager's attention. o Proposed action ...

  18. SSRL Accelerator Phycics Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at.gif (15297 bytes) BeamOptics.gif (29047 bytes) ICFA2000t.gif (31362 bytes) Home Page LCLS Accelerator Physics at SSRL The field tha t can be covered by the Accelerator Physics...

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may be made by telegram or tetter, provided each telegram or letter makes reference to tha solicitation and this amendment, and is received prior to the opening hour and date...

  20. Building America Puts Residential Research Results To Work; Building America Research That Works (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Residential buildings use more than 20% of the energy consumed annually in the United States. To help reduce that energy use, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its Building America partners conduct research to develop advanced building energy systems tha

  1. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and...

  2. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  3. bpv60e1.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    f . ./l \ NANOFLUID TECHNOLOGY: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE RESEARCH Stephen U.-S. Choi Energy Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 1- Tha subnsitfad manuacrip4 haa beancreatedby tha Univaraify of Chksgo as OpsraforofArgcrrneNatiial Laboratory (%rgonne") underContraof No. W-31-109-ENG- 3S * the U.S. Oaparimsnt of Energy.The U.S. Governmentrataiia forilaaif,and otharaacfingcmits bshaff, a @d-up, norsasdusiva, irrevocabfs woddwfde I&me in aa'darfkfs to

  4. I:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    076181 .-. -. ,- _- ,^, - THIS AGmmmiT, entered into this & day of MCUV I: 1991, effective as of the - day of , 1991 betvse; TIE UNITED STATES OF ANERICA, (hereinafter called tha %ovarnmanta) , acting through tha DEPARTKENT OP RNRRC!( (harsinaftsr called VOEn), and LCR-PSW PARTtmEm P (hereinafter callsd the "Licenser") uho is the fee owner of the parcel of land (hereinafter called the Premises) vhich is described in the deed title no. 43% R-01817 filed in the New York County Clerks

  5. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  6. Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-02-13

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  7. Imision, Sohmso~ operatlonr Offloe

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3ayslde, Long fElti, 8. Y. Sylvaaia'o prooorr for pa-oduofng unmiunr pwdor by rtoaimtloa ir rtU1 .kr tha amly mpertal rtqpr and ot thllr tlma it la nof poirible to supply pou with...

  8. M E M O R A N D U M D A T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    iH: GL!LdiJ a- -----------e M E M O R A N D U M D A T E d e - S U B J E C T : A L T E R N A T E ' N A M E : ---------------------- O W N E R (S) -----w-m P a It: ------------------------ Current: -------------------------- O w n e r contacted 0 yes O n o ; if y-s, drtr contacted ------w-----m T Y P E O F O P E R A T IO N ----------------- 0 R e s e a r c h 8 1 D e v e l o p m m t K Facility T y p e 0 Production scale tasting 0 P ilot S c a l e 0 B e n c h S c a l o Process 0 T h e o r e tical S

  9. Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J.

    2014-09-15

    In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a k?{sub D} range of 0.15?LDI) is present. The SRS risk is shown to be highest for k?{sub D} between 0.2 and 0.3. SRS re-scattering processes are found to be unimportant under conditions relevant to ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Large-scale simulations of the hohlraum plasma show that the SRS wavelength spectrum peaks below 600?nm, consistent with most measured NIF spectra, and that nonlinear trapping in the presence of plasma gradients determines the SRS spectral peak. Collisional effects on SRS, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

  10. Air quality studies in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, T.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos investigators participated in SCENES, WHITEX, Winter Intensive Tracer Experiments conducted from January 7 through February 18, 1987, in the area 400 km (east-west) /times/ 250 km (north-south) centered around Page, Arizona. The purpose of the experiment was to quantify the attribution of a local source (Navajo Generating Station) and remote sources (copper smelters in southern Arizona, Mojave generating station, power plants and large urban areas) to the haze occurrences in the Grand Canyon and Canyonlands National Parks, and Glen Canyon National Recreation area. In order to ''tag'' plumes emitted from the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a trace gas was released from the NGS stack during the entire experimental period. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, by using Los Alamos three-dimensional atmospheric flow models, large diurnal and spatial variations of wind, turbulence and plume characteristics over complex topographic areas. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Tara E.; Scherman, Carl; Martin, David; Suggs, Patricia

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  12. Mutation Detection with Next-Generation Resequencing through a Mediator

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genome (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Mutation Detection with Next-Generation Resequencing through a Mediator Genome Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mutation Detection with Next-Generation Resequencing through a Mediator Genome The affordability of next generation sequencing (NGS) is transforming the field of mutation analysis in bacteria. The genetic basis for phenotype alteration can be identified directly by sequencing the entire genome of the mutant and comparing it to

  13. CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    620: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Real Waste Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), Savannah River National Laboratory will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend to selectively remove cesium from caustic waste. PDF icon CX-009620.pdf More

  14. Statistical Analysis.indd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications June 2014 Page 1 OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefi ngs, news releases, telephone, e-mail, informational materials, and through the LM website. To assess the effectiveness of LM's communication with stakeholders across the nation, an analysis of stakeholder interaction was performed.

  15. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTERIM SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 8 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L.

    2015-01-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 8 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and several Extraction-Scrub- Strip (ESS) tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). No issues with the projected Salt Batch 8 strategy are identified. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (MST) (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable average decontamination factors for plutonium of 2.62 (4 hour) and 2.90 (8 hour); and average strontium decontamination factors of 21.7 (4 hour) and 21.3 (8 hour). These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ARP tests. The two ESS tests also showed acceptable performance with extraction distribution ratios (D{sub (Cs)}) values of 52.5 and 50.4 for the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend (from MCU) and NGS (lab prepared), respectively. These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests. Even though the performance is acceptable, SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed in order to improve our predictive capabilities for the ESS tests.

  16. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-11-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-06

    At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

  18. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  19. Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

    2012-11-14

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

  20. Visit us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec 14-18th> us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 | Dec 14-18th - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  1. Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials (Book)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Authors: Lanzirotti, A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168411 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals

  2. Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Book) | SciTech Connect Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science Authors: Rivers, M. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168409 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha

  3. Draft Greater Than Class C EIS Public Hearings to Come to Pasco, WA and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portland, WA May 17th and 19th.> The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLRW). The EIS evaluates potential alternatives involving various disposal methods for application at six federally owned sites and generic commercial sites. (See Overview Below). Upcoming Public Hearings DOE will hold hearings in the following

  4. Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-09-07

    This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

  5. Software Based DIAS and FACET Training Guide

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-01

    The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is an ANL- developed framework fo developing multidisciplinary simulation systems. It is copyrighted (ANL-SF-96-130 and ANL-SF-98-127) and licensed software and the invention is patented (ANL-IN-95-146). This Developer's Guide and accompanying Farm Tax tutorial provides software based system and documentation tha supports the DIAS licenses.

  6. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieffer, Gregg

    2010-12-15

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

  7. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  8. Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adibi, Sara [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Branicio, Paulo S., E-mail: branicio@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Joshi, Shailendra P., E-mail: Shailendra@nus.edu.sg [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-07-28

    Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15?nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5?nm for Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} and 3?nm for Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36}. The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} yield/flow stress: 2.54?GPa/1.29?GPa and Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} yield/flow stress: 3.57?GPa /1.58?GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

  9. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  10. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    So/, r eusable s tamps a re f abricated a nd u sed t o pa:ern nanoscale triangular prisms and cones for o p&cal a pplica&ons i ncluding R aman s ensing, an&reflec&ve coa&ngs for solar cells, and photolithography. Significance and Impact We offer a quicker and easier approach with a more diverse range of achievable pa:erns and substrates than other techniques, applied to applica&ons requiring precise control of light--- ma:er i nterac&ons. Research D etails - We

  11. Safety analysis of optically ignited explosive and pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Holswade, S.

    1994-05-01

    The future of optical ordnance depends on the acceptance, validation and verification of the stated safety enhancement claims of optical ordnance over existing electrical explosive devices (EED`s). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance, with the primary motivation of this effort being the enhancement of explosive safety by specifically reducing the potential of premature detonation that can occur with low energy electrically ignited explosive devices. By using semiconductor laser diodes for igniting these devices, safety improvements can be made without being detrimental to current system concerns since the inputs required for these devices are similar to electrical systems. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) of the energetic material provides the opportunity to remove the bridgewire and electrically conductive pins from the charge cavity, creating a Faraday cage and thus isolating the explosive or pyrotechnic materials from stray electrical ignition sources. Recent results from our continued study of safety enhancements are presented. The areas of investigation which are presented include: (1) unintended optical source analysis, specifically lightning insensitivity, (2) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and electrostatic discharge (ESD) insensitivity analysis, and (3) powder safety.

  12. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  13. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  14. ORNL/RASA-85/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    e?Ll ( U o't /u/ / ORNL/RASA-85/ 4I 4 RESULTS 0FRADI0L0GICALMEASUREMENTSTMENNEA OF BUFFALO AVENUE A'ID HYffi PARK BLVD. IN NIAGARA FALLS' NET{ YORK Access to the inlormation in thit rtport ir limitcd to tho!' ino-icateo on tha distribution list and to oepartmsnt of Encrgy tnd Oepartment ol Enoqy Contracton F This report was prepared as an accountof work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedstatesGovernment.NeithertheUnitedstatesGovernmentnoranyagency thereo|, nor any o| the.r employees, makes any

  15. L I II C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l

  16. Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-05-03: Pursuant 10 the United States Department of Energy "DOE") Order No. 102-05-3, issued December 20, 2005 ("DOE Potomac River Order''), Pepco hereby files this Further Notice Of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages serving the Potomac River Substation, and through thaI station, the District of Columbia. PDF icon Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned

  17. Indigenous Sustainability

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Indigenous S ustainability Image by Jonathan Thunder Climate Change Impacts Tar Sands 86% Food Economy Food Dollars Spent On the Food Dollars Spent On the "the staEsEcs showed tha ReservaEon ReservaEon only 1 million dollars or 14% of the reservaEon households' food dollars stayed on the reservaEon, while 7 million or 86% le6 the reservaEon." ---WELRP Food Sovereignty Report 2008 14 14% 86% Indigenous Corn RestoraEon Project Seneca Pink Lady Flour Corn with Sue Wika Pawnee Eagle Corn

  18. WASH-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . .

  19. MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2, .* -' .l-.; . . *' ,. .:, ,-i&CLEAR METALS, INC. MA ,y 155 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r, 4-5200 blr. Saul Strauch Technical Liason Division United States Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office 70 Columbus Avenue New York 23, New York SUBJECT:- Program for Uranium Recovery (Ref: S. Strauch to A. R. Kaufmnnn, B/30/55) Dear Mr. Strauch: With reference to Mr. K. E. Field's confidential memorandum of August 22, 1956, this is to advise tha.t

  20. NOIS 2112 Shepherd St., FI.lC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WEST ,CHICAGO,' ILLI' NOIS 2112 Shepherd St., FI.lC. .Waahingtmn 18, D. 0. Jenuery 1' 15-Y WP. Ei J. Lintnen Kunitlone .Board Tha ikmtngm Washington, D. C. Dcmr Mr; Lintnntl Purpuopt to pew verbel requaot dwring our meeting n ooupte OP weekto a@!, I will try hcreiri to mower BOIUO of the quastlono brought wt relntivo to 0u.r ohmloo! proace+& OP monazite emdi our piooent plent oapsoity, our aucitomom, whooe Gnd uco of ram earth prodmte im ponoib' ty otratcgLc , and, finally, informtim

  1. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE, . . . . . ..-..__. _ --.-.__.. .-..I............ !..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Q~~~ds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel&~ will be require& In : 'ri~ofthehereiabefor6notedeopreodo~ of puriata~tio.aadap :, Iv ve unbntend you vi11 not obj.& to:tha aoe " ai spoh +ant+lea of the mirloua real&es ,, ', ',"" ': ., .,.. i. : /~. ,".. .I,: /, . . ' .* ,; ., ,' ,:.' . .-;. ,-Y .b4 P-0 : ,.

  2. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  4. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2011-11-30

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

  5. A=17C (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17C) A Q-value measurement of the 48Ca(18O, 17C)49Ti reaction leads to an atomic mass excess of 21.039 ± 20 keV (1982FI10; E(18O) = 112 MeV) for 17C, using the (1985WA02) a.m.e. values for 18O, 48Ca and 49Ti. See also (1982AJ01). 17C is then stable with respect to 16C + n by 0.73 MeV. Eβ-(max) to 17Ng.s. = 13.17 MeV. See also (1984KL06). The half-life of 17C is 202 ± 17 msec (1986CU01). An excited state of 17C is reported at Ex = 292 ± 20 keV [see

  6. A=17C (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17C) The atomic mass excess given by (1988WA18) for 17C is 21035 ± 17 keV. See also (1986AN07). 17C is then stable with respect to 16C + n by 0.73 MeV. Eβ- (max) to 17Ng.s. = 13.16 MeV. See also (1986BI1A). The half-life of 17C has been measured to be 202 ± 17 msec (1986CU01), 220 ± 80 msec (1986DU07), 180 ± 31 msec (1988SA04), and 174 ± 31 msec (1991RE02). Relative intensities of β-delayed gammas were measured by (1986DU07, 1986HU1A, 1986JEZY) [see

  7. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  8. Haze in the Grand Canyon: An evaluation of the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of the most spectacular natural sights on earth. Approximately 4 million visitors travel to Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) each year to enjoy its majestic geological formations and intensely colored views. However, visibility in GCNP can be impaired by small increases in concentrations of fine suspended particles that scatter and absorb light; the resulting visibility degradation is perceived as haze. Sulfate particles are a major factor in visibility impairment at Grand Canyon in summer and winter. Many wintertime hazes at GCNP are believed to result from the accumulation of emissions from local sources during conditions of air stagnation, which occur more frequently in winter than in summer. In January and February 1987, the National Park Service (NPS) carried out a large-scale experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX) to investigate the causes of wintertime haze in the region of GCNP and Canyonlands National Park. The overall objective of WHITEX was to assess the feasibility of attributing visibility impairment in specific geographic regions to emissions from a single point source. The experiment called for the injection of a tracer, deuterated methane (CD{sub 4}), into one of the stacks of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a major coal-fired power plant located 25 km from the GCNP boundary and 110 km northeast of Grand Canyon Village. A network of field stations was established in the vicinity -- mostly to the northeast of GCNP and NGS -- to measure CD{sub 4} concentrations, atmospheric aerosol and optical properties, and other chemical and physical attributes. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Proceedings of the DOE standards managers workshop, Gaithersburg, Maryland, October 26--28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    On May 19, 1992, the Secretary of Energy signed the revised DOE Order 1300.2A, Department of Energy Technical Standards Program, which set the policy and assigned responsibility for activities within the program. The purpose of the revision to the order was to place greater emphasis on the use of technical standards for design, construction, testing, modification, operation, decommissioning, decontamination, and remediation of DOE`s facilities and activities. Within the context of this order, Standards Managers have been assigned for each DOE Secretarial office, each DOE Field Office, and each management and operating (M&O) contractor or site manager to be responsible for and provide the appropriate amount of emphasis on consistent use of standards at DOE facilities. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119 also stresses the importance of the use of standards within Government facilities and directs that activities first attempt to locate and adopt non-Government standards (NGSs) for DOE use. If an NGS is not complete enough for the intended application, it should be adopted for the activity and tailored for the need by development of a Government (DOE) standard. When these NGS documents are unavailable, DOE components will develop an appropriate Government standard to satisfy the need. This expanded DOE program will provide all the information necessary to adopt, tailor, or develop these standards and track the activities. A key to the proper implementation of technical standards and governing requirements is establishing a culture of knowledge and commitment. The workshop provided an in-depth orientation on the Technical Standards Program to participating DOE and M&O Standards Managers.

  10. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

  11. Cryogenic Current Lead Analysis Model Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    CCLAMP was developed to provide a tool for tha analysis of superconducting or normal current leads used to supply electricity from a warm interface (usually room temperature) to a device at cryogenic temperatures. It determines the heat leak to the cryogenic connection and the mass flow of the cryogen (typically helium) for the lead and installation modelled. It may be used to thermally optimize a lead design for a particular application. The user provides relevantmore » geometry details to model the electrical (length, diameter, superconducting length) and heat exchanger design of the lead (heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer area). It has a transient analysis capability so that lead transients such as cool down, current ramping, flow disruptions, and control simulations can be performed.« less

  12. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Microsoft Word - WIPP9000.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C I T u th Z m w A a o S U.S. D Carls Waste P.O. B Carls CARLSBA Isolation P Tuesday e up the lega "This he defense Ziemianski. manner tha The 9 waste, arri Advanced accounts f Since of defense Site, the R Department bad Field Of e Isolation P Box 3090 bad, New M AD, N.M., O Pilot Plant ( evening, m acy of the s significan e legacy T . "The WIP at is protec 9,000 th shi ved at WIP Mixed Wa for nearly h e 1999, W e-related T Rocky Flats of Energy ffice Pilot Plant Mexico 88221 Fo WIPP r

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?am-3 . ,' .*. . - yp: -.* : .- ., ._ ' Yi * <. ? :+". thfa prcbputir. 80,UUU lb. of tmmiuu, J.m,cDu lb. of 3wukdlw crper' tiwu 5.8 t&i8 l atr:irur ral u&d i.Wttd&?# Bir;n8 i;orammant end rUl rid nrtrlcial by uo&utboFlwd putqlm. ). The ~&&a, ' 8m ;altielJ 79 p-rmlt arrgora ted and ttw tap t.ha aikalini~, . L pokotlal brlf)r, bU88M 8-i .ii.i co# sat8 awtaet wltb the mBtmtl8a. aada q*iast fb a8v0-*..u @ow +.ta p-?Y h&al. . .; . ' 6 G.. ..*... . ,,z.. ,. ..*,::

  15. Ou,I~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .. .._ . . -m ~ I *-,~ . ..L.-----.--.' . : P , .I. I- SYW3OLt Dr. c, Slm3BC, dnting Chief, Offior of _ -h 3, lti n&mnatLmr Control (b Publioatianr; Dr . 2. s. ' flolf, 3.3., LbdicA Civision WEXLY ACTIVITY RERXI - POyD. 2.6 TO UAUXi 3 ilax&11 3Y. - 4 . . ;.,,. ; ._ _- * -3 ,... 8 A tt;omuTjh &dy if the ha8ardi of t+FtUIk &hining Q;wrddorra % -5' * th3 ChfL* TulYw !:y&3w Sbotion~ * Us. Eq&m, cs,1 .- 1acpeot1on d tha 1___.. - - . . . ..- . . .-_- -__ .--* ..^_ Cm .uraa

  17. ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were

  18. B

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;;;. plf. t& -b ,,::";:,I. , P- ^' ' I- $ : / 7 ! I T,f , - . -.. .._...__ _ ___. ___ yL." j";;e,.i.--ey- g-- .._ ___...._ fi' B res ~...: j w CWies, Series-, __.__ CtASlfKATION MAi%- TO: NOT ClAsUFlED huCsuso u 1944 -1, ,- ,ciiT 7 t-ff hi .A a To: c. I?. Daniel8 T-7 In m3: <&dit y n&u-d\mre CorIpeqly Aftax ounmroation xlth Dr. Stona, it %Z3S d85Li0d t!lUt WX!TJdQtO tar;~inul phyolaul sx~?~inations x-ill not be IIeOasaWX'y On la:tirldtiti who had wrked less tha E

  19. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E.

    2008-01-30

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  20. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the first stage D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) predicted equivalent DF for MCU from this testing is greater than 3,500 assuming 95% efficiency during extraction and 80% efficiency during scrub and strip. Hydraulically, the system performed very well in all tests. Target flows were easily obtained and stable throughout testing. Though some issues were encountered with plugging in the coalescer, they were not related to the solvent. No hydraulic upsets due to the solvent were experienced during any of the tests conducted. The first extraction coalescer element used in testing developed high pressure drop that made it difficult to maintain the target flow rates. Analysis showed an accumulation of sodium aluminosilicate solids. The coalescer was replaced with one from the same manufacturers lot and pressure drop was no longer an issue. Concentrations of Isopar L and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the amount of solvent carryover. For low-flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) conditions in stripping, SVOA measured the Isopar L post-contactor concentration to be 25 mg/L, HPLC measured 39 mg/L of Modifier. For moderate-flow (0.54 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar L postcontactor to be ~69 mg/L, while the HPLC measured 56 mg/L for Modifier. For high-flow (0.8 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar L post-contactor to be 39 mg/L. The post-coalescer (pre-decanter) measurements by SVOA for Isopar L were all less than the analysis detection limit of 10 mg/L. The HPLC measured 18, 22 and 20 mg/L Modifier for the low, medium, and high-low rates respectively. In extraction, the quantity of pre-coalescer Isopar L carryover measured by SVOA was ~280-410 mg/L at low flow (4 gpm aqueous), ~400-450 mg/L at moderate flow (8 gpm aqueous), and ~480 mg/L at high flow (12 gpm aqueous). The amount of post coalescer (pre-decanter) Isopar L carryover measured by SVOA was less than 45 mg/L for all flow rates. HPLC results for Modifier were 182, 217 and 22

  1. Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2014-04-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating this. SRNL results support the transition to routine operations.

  2. INVESTIGATION INTO THE RATE OF TRIOCTYLAMINE PARTITIONING INTO THE MCU AQUEOUS PHASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Couture, A.

    2013-07-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has examined the issue of trioctylamine (TOA) losses at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) solvent. For this study, SRNL used partitioning and radiolysis data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as actual MCU operational data. From the radiolysis data, SRNL prepared a model on the rate of TOA degradation. From the combined sets of data, SRNL has calculated the largest possible value of TOA (although this value is not credible) in the Strip Effluent (SE) and also calculated two different conservative, more realistic values for TOA in the SE. Even under conservative assumptions, such as all of the TOA losses partitioning solely into the Strip Effluent (SE), the MCU operational data suggests that the maximum realistic TOA concentration in the SE is < 0.6 mg/L. Furthermore, from understanding the chemical differences between the old and new strip solutions, SRNL does not believe that the TOA will deplete from the blended BOBCalixC6 Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) at a rate higher than previously experienced. Finally, SRNL recommends pursuing analytical development of a method for TOA with a superior precision compared to the current method. However, as the TOA in the blended solvent will continuously decline during MCU operations, further improvements in the development of the understanding of TOA losses may not be cost effective.

  3. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  4. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the microbatches of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  5. Large Scale Comparative Visualisation of Regulatory Networks with TRNDiff

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chua, Xin-Yi; Buckingham, Lawrence; Hogan, James M.; Novichkov, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has seen explosive growth in genomic datasets, and dense coverage of related organisms, supporting study of subtle, strain-specific variations as a determinant of function. Such data collections present fresh and complex challenges for bioinformatics, those of comparing models of complex relationships across hundreds and even thousands of sequences. Transcriptional Regulatory Network (TRN) structures document the influence of regulatory proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs) on associated Target Genes (TGs). TRNs are routinely inferred from model systems or iterative search, and analysis at these scales requires simultaneous displays of multiple networks well beyond thosemore » of existing network visualisation tools [1]. In this paper we describe TRNDiff, an open source system supporting the comparative analysis and visualization of TRNs (and similarly structured data) from many genomes, allowing rapid identification of functional variations within species. The approach is demonstrated through a small scale multiple TRN analysis of the Fur iron-uptake system of Yersinia, suggesting a number of candidate virulence factors; and through a larger study exploiting integration with the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov; [2]) - a collection of hundreds of manually curated and predicted transcription factor regulons drawn from across the entire spectrum of prokaryotic organisms.« less

  6. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

  7. Machining Test Specimens from Harvested Zion RPV Segments for Through Wall Attenuation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Nanstad, Randy K

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Units 1 and 2 Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois presents a special opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, the selective procurement of materials, structures, and components from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the cutting of these segments into sections and blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material, the current status of machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for chemical and microstructural (TEM, APT, SANS, and nano indention) characterization, as well as the current test plans and possible collaborative projects. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models (Rosseel et al. (2012) and Rosseel et al. (2015)).

  8. Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-09-01

    In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

  9. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESAEuropean Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Caada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (2.7 ? [Fe/H] ? 1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5?m post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC10, NGC185, and NGC147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = 1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  10. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  11. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  12. Geothermal Progress Monitor, report No. 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Issue No. 13 documents that most related factors favor the growth and geographic expansion of the US geothermal industry and that the industry is being technologically prepared to meet those challenges into the next century. It is the function of GPM to identify trends in the use of this resource and to provide a historical record of its development pathway. The information assembled for this issue of GPM indicates that trends in the use of geothermal energy in this country and abroad continue to be very positive. Favorable sentiments as well as pertinent actions on the part of both government and industry are documented in almost every section. The FEDERAL BEAT points up that the National Energy Strategy (NES) developed at the highest levels of the US government recognizes the environmental and energy security advantages of renewable energy, including geothermal, and makes a commitment to substantial diversification'' of US sources of energy. With the announcement of the construction of several new plants and plant expansions, the INDUSTRY SCENE illustrates industry's continued expectation tha the use of geothermal energy will prove profitable to investors. In DEVELOPMENT STATUS, spokesmen for both an investor-owned utility and a major geothermal developer express strong support for geothermal power, particularly emphasizing its environmental advantages. DEVELOPMENT STATUS also reports that early successes have been achieved by joint DOE/industry R D at The Geysers which will have important impacts on the future management of this mature field. Also there is increasing interest in hot dry rock. Analyses conducted in support of the NES indicate that if all the postulated technology developments occur in this field, the price of energy derived from hot dry rock in the US could drop.

  13. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorbmore » FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.« less

  14. Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards:Safeguards-by-Design at Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Jon D.; McGinnis, Brent R; Morgan, James B; Whitaker, Michael; Lockwood, Mr. Dunbar; Shipwash, Jacqueline L

    2011-01-01

    The Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards (NGS3) was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) in Washington, D.C. on 14-15 December 2010; this meeting focused on the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) concept. There were approximately 100 participants from 13 countries, comprised of safeguards policy and technical experts from government and industry. Representatives also were present from the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the European Atomic Energy Agency (Euratom), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The primary objective of this meeting was to exchange views and provide recommendations on implementation of the SBD concept for four specific nuclear fuel cycle facility types: gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), GEN III and GEN IV reactors, aqueous reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities. The general and facility-specific SBD documents generated from the four working groups, which were circulated for comment among working group participants, are intended to provide a substantive contribution to the IAEA's efforts to publish SBD guidance for these specific types of nuclear facilities in the near future. The IAEA has described the SBD concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the DOE is working to establish SBD as a global norm through DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. This paper describes the discussion topics and final recommendations of the Enrichment Facilities Working Group. The working group participants were tasked with providing recommendations for facility operators and designers, while promoting the IAEA's objectives of: (1) avoiding costly and time-consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear facilities and (2) providing for more effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards.

  15. RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-09

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

  16. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties alter s particle dispersion. The joint particle - temperature dispersion leads to a distribution of temperature histories predicted by the ODT . Predictions are shown for the lower moments an d the full distributions of the particle positions, particle - observed gas temperatures and particle temperatures. An analysis of the time scales affecting particle - temperature interactions covers Lagrangian integral time scales based on temperature autoco rrelations, rates of temperature change associated with particle motion relative to the temperature field and rates of diffusional change of temperatures. These latter two time scales have not been investigated previously; they are shown to be strongly in termittent having peaked distributions with long tails. The logarithm of the absolute value of these time scales exhibits a distribution closer to normal. A cknowledgements This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under their Counter - Weapons of Mass Destruction Basic Research Program in the area of Chemical and Biological Agent Defeat under award number HDTRA1 - 11 - 4503I to Sandia National Laboratories. The authors would like to express their appreciation for the guidance provi ded by Dr. Suhithi Peiris to this project and to the Science to Defeat Weapons of Mass Destruction program.