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  1. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  6. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

  9. EA-1321: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to upgrade the facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron...

  10. LCLS.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LCLS.pdf LCLS.pdf LCLS.pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - 10 Lee LCLS Lessons Learned PM Workshop Final Compatibility Mode EA-1426: Finding of No...

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-01-01

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  12. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  13. LCLS Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. LCLS Workshop October 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  16. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  17. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  18. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  19. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  20. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications.

  1. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01

    taper mea- surements from LCLS. We ?nd gain lengths of ? 2.9AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D. Ratner † , A. Brachmann,et al. , First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater Sys- tem,

  2. National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1987-10-01

    This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

  3. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; ,

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  4. Hydrogen in the LCLS2 Beamline Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    This note demonstrates that the cold segments of the LCLS2 linac will cryopump hydrogen for long periods of time, mitigating concerns for beam-residual gas interactions.

  5. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-12-10

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  6. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  7. Linac Energy Management for LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Chungming; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard; /SLAC; Krejcik, Patrick; /SLAC; Rogind, Deborah; /SLAC; White, Greg; /SLAC; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  8. LCLS_CDR-ch06

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. LCLS_CDR-ch10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  11. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  12. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  13. Calculation of the Beam Field in the LCLS Bunch Length Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-06-07

    Maintaining a stable bunch length and peak current is a critical step for the reliable operation of a SASE based x-ray source. In the LCLS, relative bunch length monitors (BLM) right after both bunch compressors are proposed based on the coherent radiation generated by the short electron bunch. Due to its diagnostic setup, the standard far field synchrotron radiation formula and well-developed numerical codes do not apply for the analysis of the BLM performance. In this paper, we develop a calculation procedure to take into account the near field effect, the effect of a short bending magnet, and the diffraction effect of the radiation transport optics. We find the frequency response of the BLM after the first LCLS bunch compressor and discuss its expected performance.

  14. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B.

    1997-05-01

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  15. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  16. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  17. Positioning system for the LCLS undulator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trakhenberg, E. M.

    2002-09-12

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Project includes the undulator subsystem that has 33 undulator magnetic structures each 3.4 m long. Positioning of the LCLS undulators along the undulator line with an accuracy of 50 {micro}m in the vertical transverse direction is required. A prototype of the LCLS undulator has been built with a positioning system based on three stages with cam shafts. Each cam shaft produces reciprocating motion with a range of {+-}3 mm. A servomotor with integrated brake, incremental rotary encoder, servo amplifier, and controller is used with a 100:1 ratio gear box to drive each cam shaft. Resolution of the motion control is about 0.05 {micro}m. SmartMotors are connected in parallel through an RS-485 interface to the serial port of the computer. With this approach, the control system is easily expandable; up to 120 motors can be controlled with one serial port. Positioning accuracy of about 10 {micro}m for the LCLS undulator prototype is demonstrated.

  18. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Laser (FEL), LCLS, National Synchrotron Light1-3]. The beamlines for LCLS, NSLS-II, and planned upgrade

  19. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  20. Current-enhanced SASE using an optical laser and its application to the LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Reiche, Sven; Stupakov, Gennady

    2004-01-01

    AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE LCLS £ A.A. Zholents, W.M. Fawleymore fully the potential of ESASE tech- niques at the LCLS.REFERENCES [1] LCLS Conceptual Design Report, SLAC-R-593 (

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10 Lee LCLS Lessons Learned PM Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10 Lee LCLS Lessons Learned PM Workshop Final Compatibility Mode Microsoft PowerPoint - 10 Lee LCLS Lessons Learned PM Workshop Final Compatibility Mode Microsoft PowerPoint -...

  2. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  3. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiche, S.; /UCLA; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2010-12-14

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  4. SSRL and LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6 Commercial8th Annual1-4 HomeSSRL and LCLS

  5. LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule August -

  6. LCLS Policies | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule August -Policies

  7. LCLS Prep Lab Images | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule August

  8. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01

    more than double the coherent, FEL power over the satura-FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D.Figure 11: Post-saturation FEL pulse energy for a taper with

  9. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov, Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-01-01

    resistive-wall wake for a 1-nC LCLS bunch charge propagatingST Accel. Beams, 8, [3] LCLS CDR, SLAC Rpt. SLAC-R-593 (al. , “Optimization of the LCLS X-RAY FEL Performance in the

  10. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, andwas performed in support of the AMO/LCLS project at SLAC. *Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL)

  11. TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION Authors: Xiao,...

  12. TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TTF3 POWER COUPLER THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR LCLS-II CW OPERATION You are...

  13. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, L.

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.

  14. Synchrotron Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Synchrotron Environmental Science-II Speaker Abstracts The Role of Synchrotron Radiation in Advancing Frontiers in Environmental Soil Science Donald L. Sparks, University ofDelaware Over the past. These frontiers in molecular environmental science have major impacts on soil remediation, development

  15. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  16. Femtosecond Operation of the LCLS for User Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; Bostedt, Christoph; /SLAC; Bozek, John; /SLAC; Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Coffee, Ryan; /SLAC; Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC; Emma, Paul; /SLAC; Gilevich, Sasha; /SLAC; Haller, Gunther; /SLAC; Hays, Gregory; /SLAC; Hering, Philippe; /SLAC; Hill, Bruce; /SLAC; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard /SLAC; Kanter, Elliot; /SLAC; Kraessig, Bertold; /SLAC; Loos, Henrik; /SLAC; Miahnahri, Alan; /SLAC; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-09-02

    In addition to its normal operation at 250pC, the LCLS has operated with 20pC bunches delivering X-ray beams to users with energies between 800eV and 2 keV and with bunch lengths below 10 fs FWHM. A bunch arrival time monitor and timing transmission system provide users with sub 50 fs synchronization between a laser and the X-rays for pump/probe experiments. We describe the performance and operational experience of the LCLS for short bunch experiments.

  17. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  18. Molecular imaging and dynamics at the LCLS John C H Spence*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Molecular imaging and dynamics at the LCLS John C H Spence* ASU Physics/LBNL/NSF BioXFEL STC%summary%of%achievements%since% 12/2009%% %%%%%%%%The% LCLS near Stanford was the world s first hard X-ray laser. It produces 9 kV X ! No goniometer ! Our Liquid jet uses gas focusing to make a micron jet from bigger nozzle.. LCLS Rep Rate ~100 Hz

  19. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class of experiments: the simultaneous investigation of a material’s electronic and structural properties.

  20. Wakefield effects of the bypass line in LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K

    2014-01-01

    In LCLS-II, after acceleration and compression and just before entering the undulator, the beam passes through 2.5 km of 24.5 mm (radius) stainless steel pipe. The bunch that passes through the pipe is extremely short---with an rms of 8 um for the nominal 100 pC case. Thus, even though the pipe has a large aperture, the wake that applies is the {\\it short-range} resistive wall wakefield. The bunch distribution is approximately uniform, and therefore the wake induced voltage is characterized by a rather linear voltage chirp. It turns out that the wake supplies needed dechirping to the LCLS-II beam before it enters the undulator. In this note we calculate the wake, discuss the confidence in the calculation, and investigate how to improve the induced chirp linearity and/or strength. Finally, we also study the strength and effects of the transverse (dipole) resistive wall wakefield.

  1. Untrapped HOM Radiation Absorption in the LCLS-II Cryomodules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K; Adolphsen, C; Raubenheimer, T; Saini, A; Solyak, N; Yakovlev, V

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting cavities in the continuous wave (CW) linacs of LCLS-II are designed to operate at 2 K, where cooling costs are very expensive. One source of heat is presented by the higher order mode (HOM) power deposited by the beam. Due to the very short bunch length--especially in L3 the final linac--the LCLS-II beam spectrum extends into the terahertz range. Ceramic absorbers, at 70 K and located between cryomodules, are meant to absorb much of this power. In this report we perform two kinds of calculations to estimate the effectiveness of the absorbers and the amount of beam power that needs to be removed at 2 K.

  2. Way to increase the user access at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS beam is meant for a single user, but the baseline undulator is long enough to serve two users simultaneously. To this end, we propose a setup composed of two elements: an X-ray mirrors pair for X-ray beam deflection, and a 4 m-long magnetic chicane, which creates an offset for mirrors pair installation in the middle of the baseline undulator. The insertable mirrors pair can separate spatially the X-ray beams generated in the first and in the second half of the baseline undulator. Rapid switching of the FEL amplification process allows deactivating one half and activating another half of the undulator. As proposed elsewhere, using a kicker installed upstream of the LCLS baseline undulator and an already existing corrector in the first half of the undulator, it is possible to rapidly switch the X-ray beam from one user to another. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline, and show that it is possible to generate two saturated SASE X-ray beams in the whole 0.8-8 keV photon energy range in the...

  3. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov, Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-01-01

    al. , “Optimization of the LCLS X-RAY FEL Performance in theLCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highlyeld strength, can degrade the FEL process by detun- ing the

  4. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, andLCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford LinearKB mirrors used at the SLAC/FEL AMO beamline. Two mirrors

  5. Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiche, S; Emma, P; Fawley, W M; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Stupakov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

  6. Integration of the Optical Replica Ultrashort Electron Bunch Diagnostics with the Current-Enhanced SASE in the LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Y; Emma, P

    2007-01-01

    Integration of the Optical Replica Ultrashort Electron Bunch Diagnostics with the Current-Enhanced SASE in the LCLS

  7. Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K L F; Tu, J J

    2006-01-01

    Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

  8. LCLS User Check-In Procedures | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule AugustUser

  9. LCLS Users' Organization Executive Committee | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule AugustUserUsers'

  10. LCLS-scheduling-run_6_Ver4.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating ScheduleUser-Assisted 1 2 3

  11. LCLS-scheduling-run_V_Ver9c.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating ScheduleUser-Assisted 1 2 3

  12. LCLS Experimental Run Schedules | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask22 LANSCE Topical UserLAPACKNewLCLS

  13. THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Alan S; /SLAC, LCLS; Durr, Hermann; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Reis, David; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Dept. Appl. Phys.; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; /SLAC, LCLS; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Fuchs, Matthias; /SLAC, PULSE; Ghimire, Shambhu; /SLAC, PULSE; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

  14. Cost-effective way to enhance the capabilities of the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential for enhancing the LCLS hard X-ray FEL capabilities. In the hard X-ray regime, a high longitudinal coherence will be the key to such performance upgrade. The method considered here to obtain high longitudinal coherence is based on a novel single-bunch self-seeding scheme exploiting a single crystal monochromator, which is extremely compact and can be straightforwardly installed in the LCLS baseline undulator. We present simulation results dealing with the LCLS hard X-ray FEL, and show that this method can produce fully-coherent X-ray pulses at 100 GW power level. With the radiation beam monochromatized down to the Fourier transform limit, a variety of very different techniques leading to further improvements of the LCLS performance become feasible. In particular, we describe an efficient way for obtaining full polarization control at the LCLS hard X-ray FEL. We also propose to exploit crystals in the Bragg reflection geometry as movable deflectors for the LCLS X-ray transport...

  15. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  16. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2011-06-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  17. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  18. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  19. Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Akre, Ron; /SLAC; Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Craft, Jim; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC; Emma, Paul; /SLAC; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard; /SLAC; Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC; Loos, Henrik; /SLAC; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; /SLAC; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC; Turner, James; /SLAC; Welch, James; /SLAC; White, William; /SLAC; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.

  20. Synchrotrons in cyclotron territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.J.; Gough, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    Synchrotrons and cyclotrons have an overlap in their particle and energy ranges. In proton radiotherapy, synchrotrons are proposed at 250 MeV, an energy usually served by cyclotrons. Heavy ion therapy has been synchrotron territory, but cyclotrons may be competitive. In nuclear science, heavy ion synchrotrons can be used in the cyclotron energy range of 10-200 MeV/u. Storage rings are planned to increase the flexibility of several cyclotrons. For atomic physics research, several storage rings are under construction for the energy range of 10 MeV/u and below.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped 9-Cell Cavity Performance in a Test Cryomodule for LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnella, Dan; Furuta, Fumio; Ge, Mingqi; Hall, Daniel; Ho, Vivian; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Liepe, Matthias; O'Connell, Tim; Posen, Sam; Quigley, Peter; Sears, James; Veshcherevich, Vadim; Grassellino, Anna; Romanenko, Alexander; Sergatskov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting RF linac for LCLS-II calls for 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities with an average intrinsic quality factor Q0 of 2.7x10^10 at 2 K and 16 MV/m accelerating gradient. Two niobium 9-cell cavities, prepared with nitrogen-doping at Fermilab, were assembled into the Cornell Horizontal Test Cryomodule (HTC) to test cavity performance in a cryomodule that is very similar to a full LCLS-II cryomodule. The cavities met LCLS-II specifications with an average quench field of 17 MV/m and an average Q0 of 3x10^10. The sensitivity of the cavities' residual resistance to ambient magnetic field was determined to be 0.5 nOhm/mG during fast cool down. In two cool downs, a heater attached to one of the cavity beam tubes was used to induce large horizontal temperature gradients. Here we report on the results of these first tests of nitrogen-doped cavities in cryomodule, which provide critical information for the LCLS-II project.

  2. Roughness Tolerance Studies for the Undulator Beam Pipe Chamber of LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of wall roughness on the wakefield-induced energy variation in the undulator beam pipe of LCLS-II. We find that a wall roughness equivalent to an rms surface slope of 30 mr increases the total induced energy variation within the bunch (due to the resistive wall wake) by a modest 20%.

  3. S-Band Waveguide Reconfiguration Options for the LCLS RF Gun and L0 Klystron Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, P.

    2005-01-28

    This note highlights the possible re-configuration options for the existing WR284 S-band waveguide in the klystron gallery, to enable those existing 5045 klystrons to power the RF Gun and the L0 accelerating structures for LCLS. A reconfiguration decision based on the pros and cons for each option is subsequently identified.

  4. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for ?-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ? 180°, as observed in connection with ?-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  5. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only constitutes a stepping stone to what we believe is needed over a longer time scale. At present, a practical time horizon for planning is about 15 years into the future, matching that of worldwide planning activities for competitive X-FEL facilities in Europe and Asia. We therefore envision LCLS-II as an important stage in development to what is required by about 2025, tentatively called LCLS-2025, for continued US leadership even as new facilities around the world are being completed. We envision LCLS primarily as a hard x-ray FEL facility with some soft x-ray capabilities. A survey of planned X-FEL facilities around the world suggests that US planning to 2025 needs to include an internationally competitive soft x-ray FEL facility which complements the LCLS plans outlined in this document.

  6. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL:USA 4 Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaldevelopment of bendable x-ray optics used for focusing of

  7. Self-seeded operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL in the long-bunch mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    Self-seeding options for the LCLS baseline were recently investigated using a scheme which relies on a single-crystal monochromator in Bragg-transmission geometry. The LCLS low-charge (0.02 nC) mode of operation was considered in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. The wakefield effects from the linac and from the undulator vacuum chamber are much reduced at such low charge, and can be ignored. In this paper we extend our previous investigations to the case of the LCLS mode of operation with nominal charge. Based on the LCLS start-to-end simulation for an electron beam charge of 0.25 nC, and accounting for the wakefields from the undulator vacuum chamber we demonstrate that the same simplest self-seeding system (two undulators with a single-crystal monochromator in between) is appropriate not only for short (few femtosecond) bunches, but for longer bunches too.

  8. Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brachmann, Axel; Dowell, David; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

  9. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Bunch-Length Monitor using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. One of the most critical diagnostic devices is the bunch length monitor (BLM), which is to be installed right after each compressor utilizing coherent radiation from the last bending magnet. We describe the components and the optical layout of such a BLM. Based on the setup geometry, we discuss some issues about the coherent radiation signal.

  10. Circular polarization control for the LCLS baseline in the soft X-ray regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS baseline includes a planar undulator system, producing linearly polarized light in the range 0.15-1.5 nm. Polarization control in the soft X-ray region from linear to circular is highly desirable. Several schemes using helical undulators have been discussed for the LCLS. One consists in replacing three of the last planar undulator segments by APPLE III. A second proposal, the 2nd harmonic helical afterburner, uses short, crossed undulators tuned to the second harmonic. This last scheme is expected to be the better one. Its advantages are a high and stable degree of circular polarization and a low cost. Its disadvantage is a small output power and a narrow wavelength range. We propose a novel method to generate 10 GW level power at the fundamental harmonic with 99% degree of circular polarization from the LCLS baseline. Its merits are low cost, simplicity and easy implementation. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is sent through a 40 m long straight section, and subsequently passes throu...

  11. X-ray Vision for Aerosol Scientists: LCLS Snapshots of Soot (Narrated)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-03

    This short conceptual animation depicts how scientists can now simultaneously capture fractal morphology (structure), chemical composition and nanoscale imagery of individual aerosol particles in flight. These particles, known as "PM2.5" because they are smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter, affect climate by interacting with sunlight and impact human health by entering the lungs. The single LCLS laser pulses travel to the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (AMO) laboratory in the Near Experimental Hall. As we zoom in, we see deep inside a simplified aerosol inlet, where the complex fractal structure of the soot particles, each one completely unique, is shown. Individual soot particles are then delivered into the pulses of the LCLS beam, which destroys them. X-rays are scattered to the detector before the particle is destroyed, giving information about the morphology of the particle. Ion fragments released in the explosion are sent into a mass spectrometer, which measures their mass-to-charge ratio -- giving scientists information about the chemical composition of the particle. Many different particles are analyzed in this manner, allowing scientists to probe variations in the particles due to changes in their environment before being sent through the aerosol inlet. The final visual of aerosols emitted from a factory is representative of the goal that such LCLS aerosol dynamics experiments can provide critical feedback into modeling and understanding combustion, aerosol processes in manufacturing or aerosol effects on climate change.

  12. electronic reprint Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or institutional repository provided that this cover page is retained. Republication of this article or its storage the IUCr. For further information see http://journals.iucr.org/services/authorrights.html Synchrotron radiation research is rapidly expanding with many new sources of radiation being created globally

  13. electronic reprint Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    (s) of this paper may load this reprint on their own web site or institutional repository provided that this cover as specified above is not permitted without prior permission in writing from the IUCr. For further information expanding with many new sources of radiation being created globally. Synchrotron radiation plays a leading

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    and participation in the LCLS commissioning at SLAC. LDRDfree electron laser, the LCLS. The 1 st set of experimentsof microstructure in real LCLS cathodes, using UV induced

  15. Index of /lcls/workshops/2004-09-22_diag_comm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218in a V2O5IonicIndependentLCLS

  16. LCLS-schedul_run-II_10_05_6-detail.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating ScheduleUser-Assisted

  17. Reducing the Heat Load on the LCLS 120 Hz RF Gun with RF Pulse Shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmerge, J.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS injector must operate at 120 Hz repetition frequency but to date the maximum operating frequency of an S-band rf gun has been 50 Hz. The high fields desired for the LCLS gun operation limit the repetition frequency due to thermal expansion causing rf detuning and field redistribution. One method of addressing the thermal loading problem is too reduce the power lost on the cavity walls by properly shaping the rf pulse incident on the gun. The idea is to reach the steady state field value in the gun faster than the time constant of the gun would allow when using a flat incident rf pulse. By increasing the incident power by about a factor of three and then decreasing the incident power when the field reaches the desired value in the gun, the field build up time can be decreased by more than a factor of three. Using this technique the heat load is also decreased by more than a factor of three. In addition the rf coupling coefficient can be increased from the typical critically coupled designs to an overcoupled design which also helps reduce the field build up time. Increasing the coupling coefficient from 1 to 2 reduces the heat load by another 25% and still limits the reflected power and coupling hole size to manageable levels.

  18. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower sl...

  19. Characterization and use of the spent beam for serial operation of LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Foucar, Lutz; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason E.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Williams, Garth J.

    2015-04-11

    X-ray free-electron laser sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source offer very exciting possibilities for unique research. However, beam time at such facilities is very limited and in high demand. This has led to significant efforts towards beam multiplexing of various forms. One such effort involves re-using the so-called spent beam that passes through the hole in an area detector after a weak interaction with a primary sample. This beam can be refocused into a secondary interaction region and used for a second, independent experiment operating in series. The beam profile of this refocused beam was characterized for a particular experimental geometry at the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at LCLS. A demonstration of this multiplexing capability was performed with two simultaneous serial femtosecond crystallography experiments, both yielding interpretable data of sufficient quality to produce electron density maps.

  20. Characterization and use of the spent beam for serial operation of LCLS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Foucar, Lutz; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason E.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Seibert, M. Marvin; et al

    2015-04-11

    X-ray free-electron laser sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source offer very exciting possibilities for unique research. However, beam time at such facilities is very limited and in high demand. This has led to significant efforts towards beam multiplexing of various forms. One such effort involves re-using the so-called spent beam that passes through the hole in an area detector after a weak interaction with a primary sample. This beam can be refocused into a secondary interaction region and used for a second, independent experiment operating in series. The beam profile of this refocused beam was characterized for amore »particular experimental geometry at the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at LCLS. A demonstration of this multiplexing capability was performed with two simultaneous serial femtosecond crystallography experiments, both yielding interpretable data of sufficient quality to produce electron density maps.« less

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  2. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    the existing coax through a shielding wall. · All the 8973's are supplied with ion pumps. These pumps have all oscillator would be used as the LLRF source locked to the tank resonance. The frequency would remain within

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  4. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

  5. EIGHT-TESLA SYNCHROTRON DIPOLES -- DESIGN ALTERNATIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, W.S.

    2011-01-01

    14, 1979 LBL -8410 EIGHT-TESLA SYNCHROTRON DIPOLES -- DESIGNprivately owned rights. EIGHT-TESLA SYNCHROTRON DIPOLES --bending magnets in the 4 to 5 tesla field range have been,

  6. Some wakefield effects in the superconducting RF cavities of LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K; Yakovlev, V

    2014-01-01

    For LCLS-II we estimate the power of radiated wakefields generated in the SRF cavities (including the 3rd harmonic cavities) and in the end transitions. Much of this power will pass through and reflect in the strings of cryomodules that comprise linacs L1, L2, or L3. Presumably, some of it will be absorbed by the higher order mode (HOM) couplers, or by the absorbers at warmer temperatures situated between the cryomodules. We investigate where such power gets generated, but not where it ends up. As such the results can serve as a pessimistic calculation of the extra power that needs to be removed by the cryosystem. Finally, we also estimate---under the assumption that all the wake power ends up in the SRF walls---the wall heating and the extent of Cooper pair breaking in L3, where the bunch is most intense. Note that all calculations here are of single bunch effects; thus resonant interactions are not included.

  7. ePix: a class of architectures for second generation LCLS cameras

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dragone, A.; Caragiulo, P.; Markovic, B.; Herbst, R.; Reese, B.; Herrmann, S. C.; Hart, P. A.; Segal, J.; Carini, G. A.; Kenney, C. J.; et al

    2014-03-31

    ePix is a novel class of ASIC architectures, based on a common platform, optimized to build modular scalable detectors for LCLS. The platform architecture is composed of a random access analog matrix of pixel with global shutter, fast parallel column readout, and dedicated sigma-delta analog-to-digital converters per column. It also implements a dedicated control interface and all the required support electronics to perform configuration, calibration and readout of the matrix. Based on this platform a class of front-end ASICs and several camera modules, meeting different requirements, can be developed by designing specific pixel architectures. This approach reduces development time andmore »expands the possibility of integration of detector modules with different size, shape or functionality in the same camera. The ePix platform is currently under development together with the first two integrating pixel architectures: ePix100 dedicated to ultra low noise applications and ePix10k for high dynamic range applications.« less

  8. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  9. current events 686 doi:10.1107/S0909049511022898 J. Synchrotron Rad. (2011). 18, 686687

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    keV photon energy on 7 June. This is the world's second hard X-ray laser after the LCLS of the SLAC, used in both LCLS and the softer X-rays laser FLASH at DESY, to obtain the high-density electron bunch length of the linear accelerator in comparison with the S-band (2.856 GHz) for LCLS and the L-band (1

  10. Confined Thermal Multicharged Ions Produced by Synchrotron Radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, David A.; Kravis, S. D.; Sellin, I. A.; Levin, J. C.; Short, R. T.; Meron, M.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, K. W.

    1987-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (Received 2 April 1987) Synchrotron x rays have been used to produce a confined multicharged ion gas near room tem- perature. Comparison of charge-state-number observations characteristic of ion... formation and of ion storage, together with measurements of Ar-to-Ar~+ electron-transfer rate coefficients, provide information to estimate time constants for relaxation to thermal equilibrium and other stored-ion properties important to further...

  11. Performance of an LPD prototype detector at MHz frame rates under Synchrotron and FEL radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Andreas; Nicholls, Tim; Angelsen, Christian; Coughlan, John; French, Marcus; Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Sztuk-Dambietz, Jolanta; Turcato, Monica; Carini, Gabriella A; Chollet, Matthieu; Herrmann, Sven C; Lemke, Henrik T; Nelson, Silke; Song, Sanghoon; Weaver, Matt; Zhu, Diling; Meents, Alke; Fischer, Pontus

    2013-01-01

    A MHz frame rate X-ray area detector (LPD - Large Pixel Detector) is under development by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the European XFEL. The detector will have 1 million pixels and allows analogue storage of 512 images taken at 4.5 MHz in the detector front end. The LPD detector has 500 mm thick silicon sensor tiles that are bump bonded to a readout ASIC. The ASICs preamplifier provides relatively low noise at high speed which results in a high dynamic range of 10^5 photons over an energy range of 5-20 keV. Small scale prototypes of 32x256 pixels (LPD 2-Tile detector) and 256x256 pixels (LPD supermodule detector) are now available for X-ray tests. The performance of prototypes of the detector is reported for first tests under synchrotron radiation (PETRA III at DESY) and Free-Electron-Laser radiation (LCLS at SLAC). The initial performance of the detector in terms of signal range and noise, radiation hardness and spatial and temporal response are reported. The main result is that the 4.5 MHz sampli...

  12. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Coherent Light Source (LCLS). d) Architectures with largeCoherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Acceleratorto chart new directions. At LCLS, the short duration of hard

  13. SSRLUO 2008 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource User's Organization Oct 2005-Oct 2006; and Chair, Synchrotron and Neutron User's Group Advocacy Committee since October 2005. email: joy.andrews@csueastbay.edu...

  14. SSRLUO 2009 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation and its Applications, as well as the semester-long course "Synchrotron Radiation for Materials Science Applications" at UC-Berkeley. In addition to conducting...

  15. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With LivermoreSustainable Land Lab TourSwitch SwitchSynchrotron

  16. Synchrotron-driven spallation sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, P J

    1996-01-01

    The use of synchrotrons for pulsed neutron spallation sources is an example of scientific and technological spin-off from the accelerator development for particle physics. Accelerator-driven sources provide an alternative to the continuous-flux, nuclear reactors that currently furnish the majority of neutrons for research and development. Although the present demand for neutrons can be adequately met by the existing reactors, this situation is unlikely to continue due to the increasing severity of safety regulations and the declared policies of many countries to close down their reactors within the next decade or so. Since the demand for neutrons as a research tool is, in any case,expected to grow, there has been a corresponding interest in sources that are synchrotron-driven or linac-driven with a pulse compression ring and currently several design studies are being made. These accelerator-driven sources also have the advantage of a time structure with a high peak neutron flux. The basic requirement is for a...

  17. Relativistic Blastwaves and Synchrotron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Downes; P. Duffy; S. Komissarov

    2002-01-22

    Relativistic shocks accelerate particles by the first order Fermi mechanism. These particles then emit synchrotron emission in the post shock gas. We have developed a numerical code which integrates the relativistic Euler equations for fluid dynamics with a general equation of state, together with the Liouville equation for the accelerated particles. We present tests of this code and, in addition, we use it to study the gamma ray burst afterglow predicted by the fireball model, along with the hydrodynamics of a relativistic blastwave. We find that, while, broadly speaking, the behaviour of the emission is similar to that already predicted with semi-analytic approaches, the detailed behaviour is somewhat different. The ``breaks'' in the synchrotron spectrum behave differently with time, and the spectrum above the final break is harder than previously expected. These effects are due to the incorporation of the geometry of the (spherical) blastwave, along with relativistic beaming and adiabatic cooling of the energetic particles leading to a mix, in the observed spectrum, between recently injected "uncooled" particles and the older "cooled" population in different parts of the evolving, inhomogeneous flow.

  18. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

  19. ON THE DURATION OF BLAZAR SYNCHROTRON FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichmann, B.; Schlickeiser, R.; Rhode, W.

    2012-01-10

    A semi-analytical model is presented that describes the temporal development of a blazar synchrotron flare for the case of a broadband synchrotron power spectrum. We examine three different injection scenarios and present its influence on the synchrotron flare. An accurate approximation of the half-life of a synchrotron flare is analytically computed and we give some illustrative examples of the time evolution of the emergent synchrotron intensity by using a numerical integration method. The synchrotron flare starts at all photon energies right after the injection of ultrarelativistic electrons into the spherical emission volume of radius R and its duration exceeds the light travel time 2R/c in the low energy regime. Furthermore, the flare duration extends by the period of injection of relativistic electrons into the emission knot. However, the energetic and spatial distribution of these injected electrons has no significant influence on the flare duration. We obtain a temporal behavior that agrees most favorably with the observations of PKS 2155-304 on 2006 July 29-30 and it differs considerably from the results that were recently achieved by using a monochromatic approximation of the synchrotron power.

  20. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01

    and Phase Diagnostics, SLAC Report LCLS-TN-00-12. Emma P.al. 2009, First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater System, PACLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report,

  1. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  2. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  4. Joint Research Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    the reformation of the national universities. The decision of the president office was made the staff members of nano-particles and real time observation of magnetic domains and of chemical reaction at catalytic

  5. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    to synchrotron-radiation detector systems, as well. As inWorkshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation held intwo-day Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation in

  6. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor. Here we propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source ...

  7. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  8. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at SLAC National Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologies |

  9. April 9, 2014 FY 2015 Budget Request to Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials at fast time scales (e.g., LCLS) and with near-atomic resolution (synchrotron x-ray sources

  10. EBIS, an option for medical synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prelec, K.

    1993-12-31

    Light ion beams have been used for cancer therapy for about twenty years; several dedicated facilities are presently either planned or under construction. In addition, several synchrotrons designed for other purposes are now considered for medical applications as well. A medical synchrotron needs a preaccelerator to produce and inject a range of different light ions, preferably fully stripped, into the ring. The size, cost and complexity of the preaccelerator depend on the performance of its first element, the ion source, and these features will be optimized if the source itself produces fully stripped ions. An EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source) is capable of producing fully stripped light ions up to argon with intensities sufficient for medical applications. As it has been pointed out in the past, this source option may require just one stage of preacceleration, an RFQ linac, thus making it very simple and compact. The AGS Department has a separate project already under way to develop a very high intensity EBIS for our nuclear physics program. It is, however, our plan first to construct and test an intermediate size device and then to proceed to the design of the final, full scale device. Parameters of that intermediate model are close to those that would be needed for a medical synchrotron. This paper describes the BNL program and considers parameters of EBIS devices for possible use in synchrotron facilities serving as sources of high energy light ions for cancer therapy.

  11. SYNCHROTRON AGING IN FILAMENTED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eilek, Jean

    SYNCHROTRON AGING IN FILAMENTED MAGNETIC FIELDS J. A. EILEK 1;2 , D. B. MELROSE 2 and M.A. WALKER 2 radio sources whose dynamical ages are known to be significantly greater than the ages inferred from; In addition, it is becoming increasingly clear that radio galaxies suffer from an ``aging problem

  12. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H2015Tray and| NationalLinac Coherent

  13. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  14. Irradiation Induced Precipitation and Dissolution of Intermetallics in Zr Alloys Studied Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur T. Motta

    2004-09-21

    The overall aim of this project is to investigate the irradiation induced precipitation of alloying elements and dissolution of second phase particles in Zr alloys using a combination of (1) synchrotron radiation examination of bulk samples using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and (2) in-situ irradiation of model alloys using the IVEM/Tandem Facility also located at Argonne

  15. Identification and quantification of hydride phases in Zircaloy-4 cladding using synchrotron X-ray diffraction q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Identification and quantification of hydride phases in Zircaloy-4 cladding using synchrotron X-ray diffraction q R.S. Daum a,1 , Y.S. Chu b,2 , A.T. Motta c,* a Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National, IL 60439, United States c Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIDES FORMED ON MODEL ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS IN 360C WATER USING MICRO-BEAM SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIDES FORMED ON MODEL ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS IN 360°C WATER USING MICRO National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439, USA Keywords: Zirconium alloys, oxides, synchrotron radiation cycle applications. To undertake such research, model zirconium alloys (Zr-xCr-yFe, Zr-xCu-yMo, Zr

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 cost and schedule performance, completing 65% of the project by the end of October with about 32 the current status of the conventional construction, updated magnet production and accelerator installation

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance. The cumulative Schedule Perform- ance Index (SPI) improved to 0.97 from 0.96 in June and the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.02. The current month SPI is 1.17, due to excellent progress in the ring building and LOB construction, and improvements

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 and management reserve for the remaining Budget At Completion (BAC). The cumulative Schedule Performance Index.01. Construction of the ring building continues with beneficial occupancy for pentant 5, the last section

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.00. Construction of the ring building continues its excellent progress with beneficial occupancy for pentant 4 of the ring building occurring in December and rapid progress in construction of all five lab­office buildings

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .95 in previous month while the cumulative cost index remaining at 0.95. The Project was 86% complete with 48 excellent progress in January with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for overall project and concurred at the DOE mini-review held in December 2012. Conventional construction activities continue

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . The cumulative schedule index is 0.97 and the cumulative cost index is 1.02, both well within the acceptable. The project is 48% complete with 30% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go range. The current-month schedule variance is negative due to conventional construction being slowed

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    progress with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for the overall project at 1.39 (+$2.1M). The cumulative cost and schedule indices for the overall project are 0.99 and 0.96. The project was 85% (88 construction activities are nearly complete, while work to address punchlist items continues. Proposals

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    with conventional construction, the monthly schedule perfor- mance index for the overall project was 0 progress in August, maintaining its satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and management reserve for the remaining Estimate at Completion. Conventional construction continued to wind down

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .............................................................................15 Energy Recovery Linac (ERL); Beamlines Beyond the Building Envelope; General Facility...........................................................................................20 5.8 Radiological Characteristics

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    a reasonable level of cost and schedule contingencies. At the end of March, the project is 52% complete, with over 32% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go. The cumulative cost water piping, and main substation expan- sion, enables all major utility services to be delivered

  7. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  8. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation for Laminar Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern S. Schmekel; Richard V. E. Lovelace

    2006-11-16

    We investigate the effect of shear in the flow of charged particle equilibria that are unstable to the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) instability. Shear may act to quench this instability because it acts to limit the size of the region with a fixed phase relation between emitters. The results are important for the understanding of astrophysical sources of coherent radiation where shear in the flow is likely.

  9. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory Economic Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    economic climate, the greatest opportunities for local, national, and global growth rest with the time-tested National Laboratory The Economic Engine of World-Class Science National Synchrotron Light Sources NSLS Media & Communications Office (631) 344-2345 Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC smashes particles

  11. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    experiments at synchrotrons. Conventionally, the task has been achieved by locking a harmonic frequency of the laser oscillator to the storage ring master radio-frequency (RF)....

  12. Workshop: New Advances in Crystallography with Synchrotrons and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Synchrotrons and X-FELs Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  13. APS and Synchrotron-related Employment Opportunities | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Synchrotron-related Employment Opportunities Groundbreaking science and engineering at the APS has a real and positive impact on our technologies, our health, our economy, and...

  14. In operando Investigation of SOFC Electrodes Using Synchrotron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In operando Investigation of SOFC Electrodes Using Synchrotron-based Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) in a Novel Two- Environment Chamber. Citation...

  15. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  16. The LCLS Design Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(activeInforum LIFT ModelThe IronThe LANLR-593

  17. LCLS AMO web page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions to

  18. LCLS CDR Chapter 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA1 1

  19. LCLS CDR Chapter 14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA1 134

  20. LCLS CDR Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. LCLS CDR Preface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762ContributionsCPreface

  2. Experimental Opportunities with LCLS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  4. Analysis of Coherence Properties of 3rd Generation Synchrotron Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics 0907.4009 ########### Analysis of Coherence Properties of 3­rd Generation Synchrotron is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3­rd generation synchrotron sources [physics.optics] 23 Jul 2009 #12; 1 Introduction With the construction of 3­rd generation, hard x

  5. Blazar synchrotron emission of instantaneously power-law injected electrons under linear synchrotron, non-linear SSC, and combined synchrotron-SSC cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacharias, M

    2010-01-01

    The broadband SEDs of blazars show two distinct components which in leptonic models are associated with synchrotron and SSC emission of highly relativistic electrons. In some sources the SSC component dominates the synchrotron peak by one or more orders of magnitude implying that the electrons mainly cool by inverse Compton collisions with their self-made synchrotron photons. Therefore, the linear synchrotron loss of electrons, which is normally invoked in emission models, has to be replaced by a nonlinear loss rate depending on an energy integral of the electron distribution. This modified electron cooling changes significantly the emerging radiation spectra. It is the purpose of this work to apply this new cooling scenario to relativistic power-law distributed electrons, which are injected instantaneously into the jet. We will first solve the differential equation of the volume-averaged differential number density of the electrons, and then discuss their temporal evolution. Since any non-linear cooling will...

  6. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  7. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  8. Simulated synchrotron emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Del Zanna; Delia Volpi; Elena Amato; Niccolo' Bucciantini

    2006-03-03

    A complete set of diagnostic tools aimed at producing synthetic synchrotron emissivity, polarization, and spectral index maps from relativistic MHD simulations is presented. As a first application we consider here the case of the emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe). The proposed method is based on the addition, on top of the basic set of MHD equations, of an extra equation describing the evolution of the maximum energy of the emitting particles. This equation takes into account adiabatic and synchrotron losses along streamlines for the distribution of emitting particles and its formulation is such that it is easily implemented in any numerical scheme for relativistic MHD. Application to the axisymmetric simulations of PWNe, analogous to those described by Del Zanna et al. (2004, A&A, 421, 1063), allows direct comparison between the numerical results and observations of the inner structure of the Crab Nebula, and similar objects, in the optical and X-ray bands. We are able to match most of the observed features typical of PWNe, like the equatorial torus and the polar jets, with velocities in the correct range, as well as finer emission details, like arcs, rings and the bright knot, that turn out to arise mainly from Doppler boosting effects. Spectral properties appear to be well reproduced too: detailed spectral index maps are produced for the first time and show softening towards the PWN outer borders, whereas spectral breaks appear in integrated spectra. The emission details are found to strongly depend on both the average wind magnetization (here approximately 2%), and on the magnetic field shape.

  9. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.K. (comp.)

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design. (GHT)

  11. CERN 6 Tesla superconducting persistent dipole/Filming an experiment/Synchrotron radiation from protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01

    CERN 6 Tesla superconducting persistent dipole/Filming an experiment/Synchrotron radiation from protons

  12. The Synchrotron Boiler a Thermalizer in Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisellini, G; Svensson, R; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Haardt, Francesco; Svensson, Roland

    1996-01-01

    There are difficulties in understanding what keeps the plasma thermalized in compact sources, especially during rapid variations of the emitted flux. Particle-particle collisions are too inefficient in hot rarefied plasmas, and a faster process is called for. Synchrotron absorption is such a process. We show that relativistic electrons can thermalize in a few synchrotron cooling times by emitting and absorbing cyclo-synchrotron photons. The resulting equilibrium distribution is a Maxwellian at low energies, with a high energy power law tail when Compton cooling is important. Assuming that the particles emit completely self absorbed synchrotron radiation while they at the same time Compton scatter ambient UV photons, we calculate the time dependent behavior of the distribution function, and the final high energy spectra.

  13. Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techniques Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based X-ray Techniques Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008...

  14. Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorito, R.

    We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, ...

  15. Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based X-ray Techniques and the Studies of Li-Air Batteries 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review...

  16. The Synchrotron Boiler: a Thermalizer in Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriele Ghisellini; Francesco Haardt; Roland Svensson

    1996-12-09

    There are difficulties in understanding what keeps the plasma thermalized in compact sources, especially during rapid variations of the emitted flux. Particle-particle collisions are too inefficient in hot rarefied plasmas, and a faster process is called for. Synchrotron absorption is such a process. We show that relativistic electrons can thermalize in a few synchrotron cooling times by emitting and absorbing cyclo-synchrotron photons. The resulting equilibrium distribution is a Maxwellian at low energies, with a high energy power law tail when Compton cooling is important. Assuming that the particles emit completely self absorbed synchrotron radiation while they at the same time Compton scatter ambient UV photons, we calculate the time dependent behavior of the distribution function, and the final high energy spectra.

  17. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for sustainable energy solutions | LBNL Overview | 18 NSLS-II Storage Rings ps ns nJpulse NGLS will produce fully coherent X-ray pulses at MHz rates 5 to 300 fs LCLS-II mJ...

  18. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Grischa R. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bond, Charles S. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Buckle, Ashley M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Androulakis, Steve, E-mail: steve.androulakis@monash.edu [Monash Bioinformatics Platform, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (?1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  19. Focusing monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suortti, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Bent crystals are introduced as monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation. The reflectivity of the crystal can be calculated reliably from a model where the bent crystal is approximated by a stack of lamellas, which have a gradually changing angle of reflection. The reflectivity curves of a 4 mm thick, asymmetrically cut ({chi}=9.5{degree}) Si(220) crystal are measured using 150 keV radiation and varying the bending radius from 25 to 140 m. The width of the reflectivity curve is up to 50 times the Darwin width of the reflection, and the maximum reflectivity exceeds 80%. The crystal is used as a monochromator in Compton scattering measurements. The source is on the focusing circle, so that the resolution is limited essentially by the detector/analyzer. A wide bandpass, sharply focused beam is attained when the source is outside the focusing circle in the transmission geometry. In a test experiment. 10{sup 12} photons on an area of 2 mm{sup 2} was observed. The energy band was about 4 keV centered at 40 keV. A powder diffraction pattern of a few reflections of interest was recorded by an intrinsic Ge detector, and this demonstrated that a structural transition can be followed at intervals of a few milliseconds.

  20. Asymmetrically cut crystals for synchrotron radiation monochromators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. ); Cerrina, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetrically cut crystals are interesting for use in synchrotron radiation monochromators because of their good energy resolution characteristics and their focusing properties. Ray tracing codes, such as SHADOW, are very efficient in the design and development of new optical devices. In order to determine the convenience of using asymmetrically cut crystals for x-ray monochromators, SHADOW has been extended to include these kinds of crystals. The physical approach to ray tracing asymmetrically cut crystals is based on the coexistence of two periodic structures. One of these is the bulk periodic structure of the Bragg planes. Such a structure determines the existence of a rocking curve near the Bragg condition, and is implemented in SHADOW following the Darwin--Prins formalism of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The second periodic structure is a one-dimensional grating on the crystal surface, formed by the truncation of the lattice planes with the surface. This grating is responsible for the focusing properties of these crystals and plays an essential role in determining the trajectory of the rays. The combination of an asymmetric crystal and a nonplanar surface can be easily achieved by bending (Johann case) to provide improved properties. More complex cases such as the ground-bent crystals (i.e., Johansson geometry) can be considered as a particular case of asymmetrical crystals in which the angle between the Bragg planes and the surface change along the crystal surface. All these cases have been implemented in SHADOW.

  1. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; ANERELLA,M.; GHOSH,A.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; AGAPOV,N.; KHODZHIBAGIYAN,H.; KOVALENKO,A.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; WILSON,M.N.

    2001-06-18

    The concept for the new GSI accelerator facilities is based on a large synchrotron designed for operation at BR=200 Tm and with the short cycle-time of about one second to achieve high average beam intensities. Superconducting magnets may reduce considerably investment and operating costs in comparison with conventional magnets. A R and D program was initiated to develop these magnets for a maximum field of 2-4 Tesla and a ramp rate of 4 T/s. In collaboration with JINR (Dubna), the window-frame type Nuclotron dipole, which has been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses and to improve the magnetic field quality. Another collaboration with BNL (Brookhaven) was established to develop the one-layer-coil cos{theta}-type RHIC arc dipole designed for operation at 3.5 Tesla with a rather slow ramp-rate of 0.07 T/s towards the design ramp-rate of 4 T/s. The design concepts for both R and D programs are reported.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences -National Synchrotron Light Source Beamline Hazard Analysis -Beamline X3A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    chest level Using the LN2 Fill Station or pressurized transfer Y Y LS-PROC-LN2FILL-MANL training for fill station Use full face shield along with goggles or safety glasses Long pants and sleeves - avoid is operating Ergonomics concerns ­ pinch points/sharp edges ­ Lift table Training Cutting/razor blades Y Y

  3. X22B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    ) downstream of Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) 5. Lead shield downstream of Exclusion Zone (EZ #2) 6. Vacuum Bellows #1 wrapped in lead upstream of Exclusion Zone (EZ #3) 7. Exclusion Zone (EZ #3) upstream downstream of Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 2). X23A2/A3 SIDE OF BEAMLINE 10. Vacuum Bellows #2 wrapped

  4. U15A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    from the TGM monochromator tank to Bremsstrahlung shielding #2; in place, secure, and photographed shielding and exclusion zones are in place and secured. Refer to U15A Beamline Diagram. Note: Bremsstrahlung Shielding #1 is not part of the Safety checklist and can only be viewed from the VUV mezzanine staircase

  5. X24A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    by checking the document effective date on the NSLS QA website. 1. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) between GV1 tank is covered by lead glass. 4. Exclusion Zone # 2 (EZ#2) between monochromator and GV4, defined by polystyrene is identified and secured. 5. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 2) between the monochromator and GV4

  6. X15B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    1. 4. Scatter shield on parts of Slits tank as per photo 1. 5. Three viewports on Slits tank on X16 side of X15. 6. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 2) secured in place. 7. Pre mirror tank covered on some parts with scatter shield as per photo 2. 8. Five viewports on pre mirror tank. All VP covered

  7. X9A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    as per photo. 8. Leaded glass on 6 mirror tank view ports and shielded as per photo. 9. Bremsstrahlung. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS-1) banded in place as per photo 4. Scatter shield on bellows secured as per photo. 5. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS-2) banded in place as per photo. 7. Perforated metal barrier in place and secure

  8. X16A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    shielding on Mirror tank in place and secure as per photo. 8. Exclusion Zone # 2 (EZ - 2) in place. 16. Mono tank shielded as per photo. 17. Bremsstrahlung Shielding # 5 (BS -5) banded and secure 2. Lead Exclusion Zone # 1 (EZ - 1) in place and secure as per photo. 3. Bremsstrahlung Shielding

  9. X1A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    shielding wrapped around the rear section of the X1B mirror tank and the initial section of the X1A beam the X1A mirror tank and valve V2 and the lead shield covering the 8" bellows between the X1A and X1B line. 1. Check from X1A side. Optical covers over the 2.75" and 8" viewports on the X1A mirror tank

  10. X21A3 SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    2. Exclusion Zone (EZ # 1) between the front end and the graphite tank in place and secure. 3. Lead wrapped around graphite filter tank as per photo, and view port covered with leaded glass. 4. Water and secure 6. Lead shielding covering burst disk. 7. Lead shielding on Monochromator #1 including leaded

  11. X21A1 SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    2. Exclusion Zone (EZ # 1) between the front end and the graphite tank in place and secure. 3. Lead wrapped around graphite filter tank as per photo, and view port covered with leaded glass. 4. Water and secure 6. Lead shielding covering burst disk. 7. Lead shielding on Monochromator #1 including leaded

  12. X25A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    2. Scatter shield with Exclusion Zone #1 and Vacuum Bellows under lead. See photo 1 3. Lead wrapped around graphite filter tank, lead glass covering viewport secured. See photo 1 4. Water cooled Beryllium wrapped around mirror tank flange port tubing and water feed through bellows (on the top of the mirror

  13. X22C SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    shielding. see photo 6 21. Water cooled Beryllium window #2C wrapped in lead upstream of Monochrometer tank and log, no locks open. 2. Exclusion Zone (EZ #1) between Isolation Valve and Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1). 3. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place and banded see photo 1. 4. Exclusion Zone (EZ #2

  14. X7B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    of the beamline. 6. Viewport on T section covered with leaded glass. 7. Shielding on Slit tank assembly 3. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 1) in place and banded. 4. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 2) in place and banded. 5. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 3) in place and banded. Checkpoints 6-10 are on the X8 side

  15. X1B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    shielding wrapped around the rear section of the X1B mirror tank and the initial section of the X1A beam the X1A mirror tank and valve V2 and the lead shield covering the 8" bellows between the X1A and X1B line. 1. Check from X1A side. Optical covers over the 2.75" and 8" viewports on the X1A mirror tank

  16. X14A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    of mirror tank) as per photo. 6. Lead shielding on Mirror tank in place as per photo 7. Lead shielding of the monochromator tank). 15. Bremsstrahlung shield #3 (mounted on the stand downstream of the monochromator see open 2. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) imbedded in the concrete shield wall 3. Exclusion zone # 1

  17. X6A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    . Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #2) in place and secured. as per photo 3. 11. Phosphor Screen tank wrapped in lead shield wall to Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) As per photo 1 3. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place. Located on mirror tank. 9. View port (VP #3) covered with lead and secured. Located on mirror tank. 10

  18. X3A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    photo 10. Mirror tank view ports (2) covered with leaded glass. 11. Lead shielding in place around X3B open. THE FOLLOWING MUST BE CHECKED STARTING FROM THE SHIELD WALL 2. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS-1) in place and secure. 5. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS-2) in place and secure as per photo. 6. Exclusion Zone

  19. X19C SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    in lead and banded and Scatter Shield as in photo 5. 9. Mirror tank and 4 Viewports with lead glass and banded as in photo 1. 3. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place and banded as in photo 1. 4. Vacuum as in photo 2. 5. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 2), Vacuum Bellows (VB #2) wrapped in lead and banded

  20. X20C SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    on observation cross #1 and spacer cross, as in photo 7. 10. Lead shielding on mirror tank, as in photo 8. 11 at upstream end. Best access to 2-7 is between X19&X20. 2. Bremsstrahlung shield 1A, B, C (BS #1) (built into ring sawtooth wall), as in photo 1. 3. Lead scatter shielding A, B, C around beamline pipes

  1. X11A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    shields BS # 2 and BS #3 under lead, not visible), 7. Lead shielding above the monochromator tank covered with lead sheet. 3. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place and banded as per photo 4. Lead scatter shielding as per photo 5. Exclusion Zones (EZ #3) and (EZ #4) in place and secured. 6. Viewport

  2. U1A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    . 8. Bremsstrahlung shielding (BS # 2) banded and secure. 9. Refocusing Mirror Tank view port covered by checking the document effective date on the NSLS QA website. 1. Mirror Tank glass view port covered 2. Mirror Tank glass view port covered 3. Exclusion Zone (EZ#1) in place and secure. 4. Bremsstrahlung

  3. X19A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    and banded 2. Bremsstrahlung shield BS#3 in place and banded, as in photograph 3. Straight-through Valve V1A open 4. Perforated aluminum exclusion zone EZ#1 in place and banded 5. Collimating mirror tank wrapped. Straight-through Valve V2A open 8. Bremsstrahlung shield BS#4 in place and banded, as in photograph 9

  4. X20A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    , as in photo 8. 11. Lead shielding on mirror tank, as in photo 9. 12. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS # 5 at upstream end. Best access to 2-17 is between X19&X20. 2. Bremsstrahlung shield 1A, B, C (BS #1) (built into ring sawtooth wall), as in photo 1. 3. Lead scatter shielding A, B, C around beamline pipes

  5. X13A/B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    and secure, as per photo. 3. Mirror Tank shielded and (3) view ports secured with screwed lead covers as per. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #3) in place and banded as per photo. 9. Leaded glass on X13B monochromator tank view hutch) On X12 side of beamline: 2. Exclusion Zone #1 (EZ1) and Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place

  6. U3C SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    are covered (5 on U2 side of tank, 2 on top) 3. Bremsstrahlung Shielding (BS #2A, 2B, 2C) in place and secure Shielding (BS #1)/Front end shielding in place as per photo. 2. Glass View ports on mirror chamber. 4. Exclusion Zone (EZ #1), blue cage, in place and secure. 5. Bremsstrahlung Shielding (BS #3A

  7. X29A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    around bellows downstream of mirror tank. 7. Bremsstrahlung shields (BS #1) and lead bricks around white. 2. Exclusion Zone (EZ #1) metal encasement in place and locked. See photo 1 3. Scatter Shield covering Exclusion Zone (EZ #2) lead shield in place and banded around bellows upstream of monochromator

  8. X11B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    assembly tank in place and secured as per photo 6. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #2) in place and banded photo 4. Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #1) in place and banded as per photo 5. Lead shielding of slit as per photo 7. Lead shielding of 3-way cross in place and secured as per photo 8. Lead shielding of 5

  9. X22A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    #1. 5. Lead shield on mask tank. 6. Lead shield on bellows between Mask Tank and Mirror Tank. 7. Lead shield on mirror tank. 8. Exclusion Zone (EZ #2) upstream of Bremsstrahlung shield (BS #2). Lead upstream of monochromator tank. 14. Lead shield skirt and leaded glass on Viewport on monochromator tank

  10. U3B SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    are covered (5 on U2 side of tank, 2 on top) 3. Bremsstrahlung Shielding (BS #2A, 2B, 2C) in place and secure Shielding (BS #1)/Front end shielding in place as per photo. 2. Glass View ports on mirror chamber. 4. Exclusion Zone (EZ #1), blue cage, in place and secure. 5. Bremsstrahlung Shielding (BS #3A

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences -National Synchrotron Light Source Beamline Hazard Analysis -Beamline X8A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Y Y Limit quantities at beamline to Ergonomics concerns ­ moving/lifting Y Y Be aware of body posture, Ask for help in moving or lifting Ergonomics

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences -National Synchrotron Light Source Beamline Hazard Analysis -Beamline X16A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Y Y Limit quantities at beamline to Ergonomics concerns ­ moving/lifting Y Y Be aware of body posture, Ask for help in moving or lifting Ergonomics

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory -Photon Sciences -National Synchrotron Light Source Beamline Hazard Analysis -Beamline X14A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    a cylinder cart Properly secure cylinders Wear safety glasses with side shields while connecting lines Leak-out, turbo pump set- up, set-up displex Y Y Be aware of body posture, Ask for help in moving or lifting

  14. X18A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    aperture and the Beryllium window in place and secure. 5. Water cooled Beryllium window #1 wrapped in lead and banded. 6. Perforated metal scatter barrier acting as Exclusion Zone (EZ #3) in place between Beryllium and secured as per photo. 14. Mirror chamber View port covered with leaded plastic. 15. Exclusion Zone (EZ

  15. X12A SAFETY CHECKLIST BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    exclusion zone EZ1 (part 1) in place and secure. 5. Water is flowing through the beryllium window (check Bremsstrahlung shield in place and secure (acts as X12A exclusion zone) 7. Perforated aluminum exclusion zone EZ1 shield. 3. Bremsstrahlung shield BS1 in place and secure, as in photograph 4. Perforated aluminum

  16. Synchrotron radiation from a runaway electron distribution in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, A; Papp, G; Hollmann, E; Fülöp, T

    2013-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation emitted by runaway electrons in a fusion plasma provides information regarding the particle momenta and pitch-angles of the runaway electron population through the strong dependence of the synchrotron spectrum on these parameters. Information about the runaway density and its spatial distribution, as well as the time evolution of the above quantities, can also be deduced. In this paper we present the synchrotron radiation spectra for typical avalanching runaway electron distributions. Spectra obtained for a distribution of electrons are compared to the emission of mono-energetic electrons with a prescribed pitch-angle. We also examine the effects of magnetic field curvature and analyse the sensitivity of the resulting spectrum to perturbations to the runaway distribution. The implications for the deduced runaway electron parameters are discussed. We compare our calculations to experimental data from DIII-D and estimate the maximum observed runaway energy.

  17. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  18. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, J.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hogan, A.; King, M.; Rowe, W.; Watson, S.; Von Zanthier, C. ); Briggs, D.D. ); Levi, M. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  20. Energy recovery linacs as synchrotron radiation sources ,,invited... Sol M. Grunera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Qun

    , Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Don Bilderback Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source York 14853 Ken Finkelstein Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, Ithaca, New York 14853 Qun Shen Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and Department of Materials

  1. NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But the low energy of the laser photons raises, which should be stronger the lower the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron? Further studies is equivalent to a `pole singularity' in the Green's function. Phil Anderson argues that in the strange metal

  2. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics or astrophysics · Experience with the radiation modeling of nonthermal sources and/or the propagation of cosmic radiation (cosmic rays, neutrinos, gamma- rays), or experience in neutrino physics be send to recruitment@desy.de Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Human Resources Department | Code: EP

  3. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Adam, J. F. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, B.P. 217, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38043 (France); Martinez-Rovira, I. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fois, G. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada Provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy); Thengumpallil, S. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Fisica E. Amaldi, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, 84 Via della Vasca Navale, 00146 Roma (Italy); Edouard, M.; Deman, P. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Vautrin, M. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France)

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  4. REVISION OF ZELENOGRAD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    600 Linac, RF systems, synchronisation 300 Vacuum monitoring 150 Temperature monitoring 450 Ethernet of control of executive devices and modules of monitoring of synchrotron parameters. Table 1: Channels of control and monitoring. Accelerators equipment Number of channel Magnet systems of booster and main ring

  5. Science Highlight September 2003 Synchrotron Mesodiffraction: A Tool for Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    : 62-203, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720 roritchie@lbl.gov Aircraft turbine engines routinely be used to improve existing design methodologies for turbine engine components and inspection regimensScience Highlight ­ September 2003 Synchrotron Mesodiffraction: A Tool for Understanding Turbine

  6. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  7. APS 1999 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interest to the APS researcher community. Workshop on Scientific Applications of the LCLS. (Jan. 12-14) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSLC) Stanford, CA Workshop on...

  8. Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | CenterPress Releases | National Nuclear

  9. Foreign Users | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »FirstCurrent ScienceNationalForForeign

  10. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)); Vis, R.D. (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States)); Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Bowen, D.K. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom))

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  11. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Vis, R.D. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bowen, D.K. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  12. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  13. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki,S.

    2009-05-04

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  14. Diffuse Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Cosmic Ray Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo; Gaggero, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron diffuse radiation (SDR) emission is one of the major Galactic components, in the 100 MHz up to 100 GHz frequency range. Its spectrum and sky map provide valuable measure of the galactic cosmic ray electrons (GCRE) in the relevant energy range, as well as of the strength and structure of the Galactic magnetic fields (GMF), both regular and random ones. This emission is an astrophysical sky foreground for the study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and the extragalactic microwave measurements, and it needs to be modelled as better as possible. In this regard, in order to get an accurate description of the SDR in the Galaxy, we use - for the first time in this context - 3-dimensional GCRE models obtained by running the DRAGON code. This allows us to account for a realistic spiral arm pattern of the source distribution, demanded to get a self-consistent treatment of all relevant energy losses influencing the final synchrotron spectrum.

  15. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  16. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  17. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  18. Clusters and Large-Scale Structure: the Synchrotron Keys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, L; Andernach, H; Battaglia, N; Brown, S; Brunetti, Gf; Burns, J; Clarke, T; Dolag, K; Farnsworth, D; Giovannini, G; Hallman, E; Johnston-Hollit, M; Jones, T W; Kang, H; Kassim, N; Kravtsov, A; Lazio, J; Lonsdale, C; McNamara, B; Myers, S; Owen, F; Pfrommer, C; Ryu, D; Sarazin, C; Subrahmanyan, R; Taylor, G; Taylor, R

    2009-01-01

    For over four decades, synchrotron-radiating sources have played a series of pathfinding roles in the study of galaxy clusters and large scale structure. Such sources are uniquely sensitive to the turbulence and shock structures of large-scale environments, and their cosmic rays and magnetic fields often play important dynamic and thermodynamic roles. They provide essential complements to studies at other wavebands. Over the next decade, they will fill essential gaps in both cluster astrophysics and the cosmological growth of structure in the universe, especially where the signatures of shocks and turbulence, or even the underlying thermal plasma itself, are otherwise undetectable. Simultaneously, synchrotron studies offer a unique tool for exploring the fundamental question of the origins of cosmic magnetic fields. This work will be based on the new generation of m/cm-wave radio telescopes now in construction, as well as major advances in the sophistication of 3-D MHD simulations.

  19. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  20. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore »synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in biological tissues at ultraspatial resolutions.« less

  1. An Enhanced GINGER Simulation Code with Harmonic Emission and HDF5 IO Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, William M.

    2006-01-01

    S. Reiche. I also thank the LCLS project of?ce at SLAC for ?1 (2004); see also http://www- ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/lcls tech notes.html/LCLS-TN- 04-3.pdf . [2] National Center

  2. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; ,

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  3. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benesch, Jay F.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Quinn, Brian P.; Paschke, Kent D.

    2015-11-30

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab’s Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5more »T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.« less

  4. LCLS - Activities of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762

  5. LCLS - Conceptual Design Report for the LCLS Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask22 LANSCE Topical UserLAPACKNew

  6. LCLS Operations Schedule January February...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Schedule January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 Run 1 Oct. 1-Dec. 17 2010 Run 2 Run 3 May 6 - Sep. 13 Oct. 7 - Dec....

  7. LCLS CDR Chapter 11 - Controls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA1 1 1

  8. LCLS CDR Chapter 2 - Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. LCLS CDR Chapter 7 - Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. LCLS CDR Chapter 8 - Undulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. LUSI :: LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. TH SSRL SCHOOL ON SYNCHROTRON X-RAY SCATTERING TECHNIQUES IN...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TH SSRL SCHOOL ON SYNCHROTRON X-RAY SCATTERING TECHNIQUES IN MATERIALS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: THEORY AND APPLICATION TUESDAY 03 JUNE THURSDAY 05 JUNE 2014 Last update: 02...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  14. High-current, low-energy synchrotrons and compressor rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kustom, R.L.

    1984-05-01

    The primary application of high-current, low-energy synchrotrons and linac compressor rings is as proton drivers for pulsed-spallation neutron sources. They operate in the range of 500 to 1500 MeV with extracted beam repetition rates between 12 to 100 Hz. The time-averaged currents on target are a few tens of microamperes today, soon will be a few thousand in the future. The characteristics for the accelerators and compressor rings, their limitations, and existing and proposed major facilities are described. 22 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongxiu (Williamsburg, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  16. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, Tim; Hooper, Dan; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  17. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W.K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  19. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  20. Synchrotron emission from relativistic parsec-scale jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Beresnyak; Ya. N. Istomin; V. I. Pariev

    1997-04-04

    We developed theory of particle acceleration inside the relativistic rotating electron-positron force-free jet with spiral magnetic field. We considered perturbation of stationary magnetic field structure and found that acceleration takes place in the regions where the Alfven resonant condition with the eigenmodes in the jet is fulfilled. Acceleration process and synchrotron losses combined together form power law energy spectrum of ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons with index between 2 and 3 depending upon initial energy of injected particles. Synchrotron emission of these electrons and positrons in spiral magnetic field of rotating force-free jet has been calculated. Polarization properties of the radiation has been obtained and compared with existing VLBI polarization measurements of parsec-scale jets in BL Lac sources and quasars. Our results give explanation of observed bimodality in alignment between electric field vector and jet axis. Degree of polarization and velocity of observed proper motion of bright knots depend upon angular rotational velocity of the jet. Thus, comparing them to each other, we can estimate angular rotational velocity in jets. We obtain that the fact, that generally in BL Lac objects electric field vector is oriented parallel to the jet axis while in quasars perpendicular to the jet axis, may be due to intrinsically larger angular rotational velocity and large winding of magnetic field in BL Lac jets than in quasar jets.

  1. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  2. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore »beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  3. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  4. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  5. Hyperfine Interactions 125 (2000) 328 3 Monochromatization of synchrotron radiation for nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    2000-01-01

    Hyperfine Interactions 125 (2000) 3­28 3 Monochromatization of synchrotron radiation for nuclear­30 keV is presented for applications involving nuclear resonant scattering. The relevant relationships for a variety of nuclear resonances in this energy range. 1. Introduction Synchrotron radiation sources have

  6. A New Course for Fall 1999 Quarter (Physics 409) Synchrotron Radiation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A New Course for Fall 1999 Quarter (Physics 409) Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Lasers Instructor: Kwang-Je Kim (kwangje@aps.anl.gov) Synchrotron radiation is the electromagnetic radiation emitted for basic and applied studies of physical and biological systems. A number of major research institutions

  7. A DEDICATED INFRARED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE AT W. Barry, A. Biocca, J. M. Byrd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DEDICATED INFRARED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE AT THE ALS * W. Barry, A. Biocca, J. M. Byrd , W ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of synchrotron radiation over the infrared]. This paper describes ideas for the design of a storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production

  8. A velocity map imaging spectrometer for electron?ion and ion?ion coincidence experiments with synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolles, D.; Advanced Light Source

    2008-01-01

    map imaging (VMI) spectrometer optimized for angle-resolved photoionization experiments with synchrotron radiation (map imaging spectrometer for electron-ion and ion-ion coincidence experiments with synchrotron radiation

  9. Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the past decade, a suite of synchrotron-based analytical techniques has been developed to study efficiency-limiting

  10. Strains in Thermally Growing Alumina Films Measured in-situ usingSynchrotron X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, P.Y.; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

    2006-01-02

    Strains in thermally grown oxides have been measured in-situ, as the oxides develop and evolve. Extensive data have been acquired from oxides grown in air at elevated temperatures on different model alloys that form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using synchrotron x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source (Beamline 12BM, Argonne National Laboratory), Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from the oxidizing specimen were recorded every 5 minutes during oxidation and subsequent cooling. The diffraction patterns were analyzed to determine strains in the oxides, as well as phase changes and the degree of texture. To study a specimen's response to stress perturbation, the oxidizing temperature was quickly cooled from 1100 to 950 C to impose a compressive thermal stress in the scale. This paper describes this new experimental approach and gives examples from oxidized {beta}-NiAl, Fe-20Cr-10Al, Fe-28Al-5Cr and H{sub 2}-annealed Fe-28Al-5Cr (all at. %) alloys to illustrate some current understanding of the development and relaxation of growth stresses in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  11. Synchrotron characterization of nanograined UO2 grain growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Yun, Di; Jamison, Laura M.; Lian, Jie; Yao, Tiankei

    2015-09-30

    This activity is supported by the US Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Product Line (FPL) and aims at providing experimental data for the validation of the mesoscale simulation code MARMOT. MARMOT is a mesoscale multiphysics code that predicts the coevolution of microstructure and properties within reactor fuel during its lifetime in the reactor. It is an important component of the Moose-Bison-Marmot (MBM) code suite that has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to enable next generation fuel performance modeling capability as part of the NEAMS Program FPL. In order to ensure the accuracy of the microstructure based materials models being developed within the MARMOT code, extensive validation efforts must be carried out. In this report, we summarize our preliminary synchrotron radiation experiments at APS to determine the grain size of nanograin UO2. The methodology and experimental setup developed in this experiment can directly apply to the proposed in-situ grain growth measurements. The investigation of the grain growth kinetics was conducted based on isothermal annealing and grain growth characterization as functions of duration and temperature. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy for grain growth for UO2 with different stoichiometry are obtained and compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  12. Upgrade Strategies for the Proton Synchrotron Booster Dump at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarrio Martinez, A; Maglioni, C

    2012-01-01

    CERN’s LHC Injection chain Upgrade (LIU) involves a revision of the Proton Synchrotron Booster dump, which was designed in the 1960’s to cope with beam energies reaching 800 MeV and intensities of 1e+13 particles per pulse. Thermo-mechanical studies highlighted the need for an upgrade of the dump, so that it is capable of withstanding energies in the order of 2 GeV and intensities up to 1e+14 particles per pulse. This paper proposes a new design of the dump in the light of various constraints and choices such as the geometry, materials and the integration of the required cooling system. Further topics discussed include the strategy for dismantling the old device, which has been continuously irradiated for almost 40 years and presents a difficult access. Therefore, a detailed ALARA procedure is being prepared in order to carry out the upgrade works in the area.

  13. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    General relativity (GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This is the first confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without additional assumption...

  14. Sagittal focusing of synchrotron x radiation with curved crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ice, G.E.; Wong, J.; Batterman, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the sagittal focusing of x rays with singly bent crystals that accept the meridian plane divergence from a similar but flat crystal to form a pair in a nondispersive two-crystal Bragg monochromator. Curved crystals can intercept from 5 to 20 times the sagittal divergence of curved mirrors at x-ray energies above 10 keV. Anticlastic (transverse) bending of the crystal is made negligible in the meridian plane with reinforcing ribs cut parallel to the plane of scattering. Results show that at energies of 10, 20, and 30 keV the bent crystal performs efficiently and images the source size at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source.

  15. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  16. Protein Characterisation by Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, B.

    2009-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of proteins. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy extends the utility of conventional CD spectroscopy (i.e. using laboratory-based instruments) because the high light flux from a synchrotron enables collection of data to lower wavelengths, detection of spectra with higher signal-to-noise levels and measurements in the presence of strongly absorbing non-chiral components such as salts, buffers, lipids and detergents. This review describes developments in instrumentation, methodologies and bioinformatics that have enabled new applications of the SRCD technique for the study of proteins. It includes examples of the use of SRCD spectroscopy for providing static and dynamic structural information on molecules, including determinations of secondary structures of intact proteins and domains, assessment of protein stability, detection of conformational changes associated with ligand and drug binding, monitoring of environmental effects, examination of the processes of protein folding and membrane insertion, comparisons of mutant and modified proteins, identification of intermolecular interactions and complex formation, determination of the dispositions of proteins in membranes, identification of natively disordered proteins and their binding partners and examination of the carbohydrate components of glycoproteins. It also discusses how SRCD can be used in conjunction with macromolecular crystallography and other biophysical techniques to provide a more complete picture of protein structures and functions, including how proteins interact with other macromolecules and ligands. This review also includes a discussion of potential new applications in structural and functional genomics using SRCD spectroscopy and future instrumentation and bioinformatics developments that will enable such studies. Finally, the appendix describes a number of computational/bioinformatics resources for secondary structure analyses that take advantage of the improved data quality available from SRCD. In summary, this review discusses how SRCD can be used for a wide range of structural and functional studies of proteins.

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6AerosolsofMarshallMissionScience

  1. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  2. Project planning workshop 6-GeV synchrotron light source: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A series of work sheets, graphs, and printouts are given which detail the work breakdown structure, cost, and manpower requirements for the 6 GeV Synchrotron Light Source. (LEW)

  3. Recent developments in instrumentation and bioinformatics show that the technique of synchrotron radiation circular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janes, Bob

    567 Recent developments in instrumentation and bioinformatics show that the technique conventional lab-based circular dichroism instruments. Addresses *School of Crystallography, Birkbeck College for protein studies are available at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS; UK) (http

  4. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 23 (2007) 253260 Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 23 (2007) 253­260 Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR analyses, and portability. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Biosensors; Cell adhesion

  5. The X-ray synchrotron emission of RCW 86 and the implications for its age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink; Johan Bleeker; Kurt van der Heyden; Andrei Bykov; Aya Bamba; Ryo Yamazaki

    2006-07-13

    We report here X-ray imaging spectroscopy observations of the northeastern shell of the supernova remnant RCW 86 with Chandra and XMM-Newton. Along this part of the shell the dominant X-ray radiation mechanism changes from thermal to synchrotron emission. We argue that both the presence of X-ray synchrotron radiation and the width of the synchrotron emitting region suggest a locally higher shock velocity of V_s = 2700 km/s and a magnetic field of B = 24+/-5 microGauss. Moreover, we also show that a simple power law cosmic ray electron spectrum with an exponential cut-off cannot explain the broad band synchrotron emission. Instead a concave electron spectrum is needed, as predicted by non-linear shock acceleration models. Finally, we show that the derived shock velocity strengthens the case that RCW 86 is the remnant of SN 185.

  6. The synchrotron peak shift during high-energy flares of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Boettcher

    1999-02-10

    A prediction for the energy shift of the synchrotron spectrum of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) during high-energy flares is presented. If the $\\gamma$-ray emission of FSRQs is produced by Comptonization of external radiation, then the peak of the synchrotron spectrum is predicted to move to lower energies in the flare state. This is opposite to the well-known broadband spectral behavior of high-frequency peaked BL-Lac objects where the external radiation field is believed to be weak and synchrotron-self Compton scattering might be the dominant $\\gamma$-ray radiation mechanism. The synchrotron peak shift, if observed in FSRQs, can thus be used as a diagnostic to determine the dominant radiation mechanism in these objects. I suggest a few FSRQs as promising candidates to test the prediction of the external-Comptonization model.

  7. Sodium sulfate heptahydrate: a synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction study of an elusive metastable hydrated salt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Andrea; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We describe an unusual application of synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction with hard X-rays to obtain structural information on metastable sodium sulfate heptahydrate. This hydrate was often mentioned in nineteenth ...

  8. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of themore »newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.« less

  9. Synchrotron-Loss Spectral Breaks in Pulsar-Wind Nebulae and Extragalactic Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, S P

    2009-01-01

    Flows of synchrotron-emitting material can be found in several astrophysical contexts, including extragalactic jets and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe). For X-ray synchrotron emission, flow times are often longer than electron radiative lifetimes, so the effective source size at a given X-ray energy is the distance electrons radiating at that energy can convect before they burn off. Since synchrotron losses vary strongly with electron energy, the source size drops with increasing X-ray energy, resulting in a steepening of the synchrotron spectrum. For homogeneous sources, this burnoff produces the well-known result of a steepening by 0.5 in the source's integrated spectral index. However, for inhomogeneous sources, different amounts of steepening are possible. I exhibit a simple phenomenological picture of an outflow of relativistic electrons with bulk nonrelativistic flow speed, with transverse flow-tube radius, magnetic-field strength, matter density, and flow velocity all varying as different powers of distance...

  10. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Interfaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project obectives: Utilize synchrotron X-ray measurements, to monitor all aspects of atomic to nanoscale structural changes resulting from chemical interactions of scCO2-H2O binary fluids with rocks under environments directly relevant to EGS.

  11. Synchrotron and Inverse Compton Constraints on Lorentz Violations for Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett Altschul

    2006-08-31

    We present a method for constraining Lorentz violation in the electron sector, based on observations of the photons emitted by high-energy astrophysical sources. The most important Lorentz-violating operators at the relevant energies are parameterized by a tensor c^{nu mu) with nine independent components. If c is nonvanishing, then there may be either a maximum electron velocity less than the speed of light or a maximum energy for subluminal electrons; both these quantities will generally depend on the direction of an electron's motion. From synchrotron radiation, we may infer a lower bound on the maximum velocity, and from inverse Compton emission, a lower bound on the maximum subluminal energy. With observational data for both these types of emission from multiple celestial sources, we may then place bounds on all nine of the coefficients that make up c. The most stringent bound, on a certain combination of the coefficients, is at the 6 x 10^(-20) level, and bounds on the coefficients individually range from the 7 x 10^(-15) level to the 2 x 10^(-17) level. For most of the coefficients, these are the most precise bounds available, and with newly available data, we can already improve over previous bounds obtained by the same methods.

  12. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1996-04-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors. 9 figs.

  13. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (13027 Arroyo de Vista, Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors.

  14. Capacitive energy storage and recovery for synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koseki, K.

    2014-06-15

    Feasibility studies on capacitive energy storage and recovery in the main-ring synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex were conducted by circuit simulation. The estimated load fluctuation was 96 MVA in total for dipole magnets, which is likely to induce a serious disturbance in the main grid. It was found that the energy stored in the magnets after the excitation period can be recovered to the storage capacitor by controlling the voltage across the energy-storage capacitor using a pulse-width-modulation converter and reused in the next operational cycle. It was also found that the power fluctuation in the main grid can be reduced to 12 MVA. An experimental evaluation of an aluminum metalized film capacitor revealed that capacitance loss was induced by a fluctuating voltage applied to the storage capacitor when applying the proposed method. The capacitance loss was induced by corona discharge around the edges of segmented electrodes of a self-healing capacitor. The use of aluminum-zinc alloy was evaluated as a countermeasure to mitigate the effect induced by the corona discharge. For a zinc content of 8%, which was optimized experimentally, a capacitor with a sufficient life time expectancy of 20 years and a working potential gradient of 250 V/?m was developed.

  15. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin [Australian Synchrotron Company, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2010-07-23

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the 'Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1 - monochromatic and white - to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  16. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billinghurst, B E; Baribeau, C; Batten, T; Dallin, L; May, T E; Vogt, J M; Wurtz, W A; Warnock, R; Bizzizero, D A; Kramer, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of $0.074 ~\\textrm{cm}^{-1}$, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by RF diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less ...

  17. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments Hugh T. Philipp a,, Marianne Hromalik c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory [3]. The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The PAD was made by fabricating custom CMOS electronics using a commercial 0

  18. Simulating Electron Transport and Synchrotron Emission in Radio Galaxies: Shock Acceleration and Synchrotron Aging in Three-Dimensional Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. L. Tregillis; T. W. Jones; Dongsu Ryu

    2001-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional MHD radio galaxy simulations that explicitly model transport of relativistic electrons, including diffusive acceleration at shocks as well as radiative and adiabatic cooling in smooth flows. We discuss three simulations of light Mach 8 jets, designed to explore the effects of shock acceleration and radiative aging on the nonthermal particle populations that give rise to synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiations. We also conduct detailed synthetic radio observations of our simulated objects. We have gained several key insights from this approach: 1. The jet head in these multidimensional simulations is extremely complex. The classical jet termination shock is often absent, but motions of the jet terminus spin a ``shock-web complex'' within the backflowing jet material of the head. 2. Understanding the spectral distribution of energetic electrons in these simulations relies partly upon understanding the shock-web complex, for it can give rise to distributions that confound interpretation in terms of the standard model for radiative aging of radio galaxies. 3. The magnetic field outside of the jet itself becomes very intermittent and filamentary in these simulations, yet adiabatic expansion causes most of the cocoon volume to be occupied by field strengths considerably diminished below the nominal jet value. Thus population aging rates vary considerably from point to point.

  19. Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chumakov, Aleksandr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France

    2010-01-08

    Vibrational dynamics of glasses remains a point of controversial discussions. In particular, the density of vibrational states (DOS) reveals an excess of states above the Debye model called "boson peak." Despite the fact that this universal feature for all glasses has been known for more than 35 years, the nature of the boson peak is still not understood. The application of nuclear inelastic scattering via synchrotron radiation perhaps provides a clearer, more consistent picture of the subject. The distinguishing features of nuclear inelastic scattering relative to, e.g., neutron inelastic scattering, are ideal momentum integration and exact scaling of the DOS in absolute units. This allows for reliable comparison to data from other techniques such as Brillouin light scattering. Another strong point is ideal isotope selectivity: the DOS is measured for a single isotope with a specific low-energy nuclear transition. This allows for special "design" of an experiment to study, for instance, the dynamics of only center-of-mass motions. Recently, we have investigated the transformation of the DOS as a function of several key parameters such as temperature, cooling rate, and density. In all cases the transformation of the DOS is sufficiently well described by a transformation of the continuous medium, in particular, by changes of the macroscopic density and the sound velocity. These results suggest a collective sound-like nature of vibrational dynamics in glasses and cast doubts on microscopic models of glass dynamics. Further insight can be obtained in combined studies of glass with nuclear inelastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Applying two techniques, we have measured the energy dependence of the characteristic correlation length of atomic motions. The data do not reveal localization of atomic vibrations at the energy of the boson peak. Once again, the results suggest that special features of glass dynamics are related to extended motions and not to local models.

  20. Extreme Synchrotron Blazars in Outburst: the Potentiality of INTEGRAL Imaging and Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Pian; Giuseppe Malaguti; Laura Maraschi; Gabriele Ghisellini; Giorgio G. C. Palumbo

    1998-11-10

    Only ~10 blazars have been detected in soft gamma-rays by OSSE and the PDS, often in flaring state. We investigate the impact of the imaging and spectral capabilities of the IBIS instrument on board INTEGRAL on the study of blazars. The objectives are: 1) to remove ambiguities in the identification of some blazars as soft gamma-ray emitters; 2) to determine the spectral shape of "extreme synchrotron" blazars, namely sources with high F_X/F_radio ratios, for which the synchrotron component peaks at far UV-soft X-ray frequencies. We expect that in these sources the synchrotron peak shifts to higher energies during outbursts, making them strong soft gamma-ray emitters, and therefore possible targets for INTEGRAL wide band X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  1. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  2. Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes in swelling soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes-energy synchrotron X ray to measure, for the first time, the water content and bulk density changes during the fast soils and materials is hampered by the difficulty of accurately mea- suring both the water content

  3. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Microtubules Buckling and Bundling under Osmotic Stress: A Probe of Interprotofilament Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Microtubules Buckling and Bundling under Osmotic Stress the microtubule wall. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction of microtubules under increasing osmotic stress shows (SAXRD) study of MTs subjected to osmotic stress [5] and depletion attraction [6] due to added poly

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 57, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2010 3795 Femtosecond Radiation Experiment Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The detector is designed to collect X-rays scattered from monochromatic fem- tosecond pulses produced by the LCLS X-ray laser at framing rates up to 120 Hz) of the LCLS at SLAC and DOE-BER under Grant DEFG-02-97ER62443. PAD detector development at Cornell University

  5. HIGH FLUENCE SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MICROPROBE EFFECTS ON STARDUST INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES. A. Simionovici1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    to the interstellar dust stream. Analysis of these candidates from both low density aerogel capture cells and Al]. The aerogel samples were analyzed in situ in their pico- keystones by synchrotron radiation focused microprobe thickness slabs of aerogel containing the IS particles for further analysis. The ISPE team has implemented

  6. Structure of zirconium alloy oxides formed in pure water studied with synchrotron radiation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    SPP size is also needed in the Zircaloys for resistance to nodular corrosion in boiling water reactors of Zirca- loy-4 in pressurized water reactors (PWR) is improved when the size of the second-phase particlesStructure of zirconium alloy oxides formed in pure water studied with synchrotron radiation

  7. Study of Synchrotron Radiation for the Electron Beam Polarimeter for the MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.

    2015-08-06

    This is a look at the synchrotron radiation coming from the chicane in the electron beam line for the MEIC design. The power density on the beam pipe as well as transmission through the beam pipe is studied. The optics design is version 12.

  8. The measurement and analysis of the magnetic field of a synchrotron light source magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Udo Werner

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis a unique system is used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting synchrotron light source magnet. The magnet measured is a superferric dipole C-magnet designed to produce a magnetic field up to 3 Tesla in magnitude. Its...

  9. DYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    ) in a TeV muon col- lider present major challenges as heat loads to the super- conducting magnetsDYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER* P. McIntyre and A problems are mitigated. 1 MUON DECAY IN A MUON COLLIDER Ankenbrandt et al. [1] summarize the design

  10. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  11. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON G. Moritz, C. Muehle, GSI, Darmstadt, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , UK Work supported in part by U. S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Abstract been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses accelerator expansion is a dual-ring synchrotron in one tunnel with maximum rigidities of 100 and 200 Tm

  12. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  13. In-situ metal speciation in soils using synchrotron based techniques David McNear1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    In-situ metal speciation in soils using synchrotron based techniques David McNear1 , Markus Gräfe1 remediation and legislative strategies. To provide an accurate description of the fate of metal contaminants the physicochemical properties of the contaminating heavy metals, is a valuable alternative for more expensive

  14. Characterizing Three-Dimensional Textile Ceramic Composites Using Synchrotron X-Ray Micro-Computed-Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    , Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 Three-dimensional (3-D) images of two ceramic-matrix textile composites were studied represent a new class of integrally woven ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature appliCharacterizing Three-Dimensional Textile Ceramic Composites Using Synchrotron X-Ray Micro

  15. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  16. High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

  17. Observation of second-phase particles in bulk zirconium alloys using synchrotron radiation q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Observation of second-phase particles in bulk zirconium alloys using synchrotron radiation q Abstract To further advance the mechanistic understanding of microstructural evolution in zirconium alloys the growth kinetics of second-phase particles in zirconium alloys. The high energy ¯ux, energy resolution

  18. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction Olivier F fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold

  19. Theory of Microwave Instability and Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Electron Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    Bursting of coherent synchrotron radiation has been observed and in fact used to generate THz radiation in many electron storage rings. In order to understand and control the bursting, we return to the study of the microwave instability. In this paper, we will report on the theoretical understanding, including recent developments, of the microwave instability in electron storage rings. The historical progress of the theories will be surveyed, starting from the dispersion relation of coasting beams, to the work of Sacherer on a bunched beam, and ending with the Oide and Yokoya method of discretization. This theoretical survey will be supplemented with key experimental results over the years. Finally, we will describe the recent theoretical development of utilizing the Laguerre polynomials in the presence of potential-well distortion. This self-consistent method will be applied to study the microwave instability driven the impedances due to the coherent synchrotron radiation. Over the past quarter century, there has been steady progress toward smaller transverse emittances in electron storage rings used for synchrotron light sources, from tens of nm decades ago to the nm range recently. In contrast, there is not much progress made in the longitudinal plane. For an electron bunch in a typical ring, its relative energy spread {sigma}{sub {delta}} remains about 10{sup -3} and its length {sigma}{sub z} is still in between 5 mm to 10 mm. Now the longitudinal emittance ({sigma}{sub {delta}}{sigma}{sub z}) becomes a factor of thousand larger than those in the transverse dimensions. In this paper, we will address questions of: How short a bunch can be? What is the fundamental limit? If there is a limit, is there any mitigation method? Since the synchrotron radiation is so fundamental in electron storage rings, let us start with the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR).

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beniamini, Paz; Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: paz.beniamini@mail.huji.ac.il, E-mail: tsvi.piran@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute for Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-05-20

    We reexamine the general synchrotron model for gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs') prompt emission and determine the regime in the parameter phase space in which it is viable. We characterize a typical GRB pulse in terms of its peak energy, peak flux, and duration and use the latest Fermi observations to constrain the high-energy part of the spectrum. We solve for the intrinsic parameters at the emission region and find the possible parameter phase space for synchrotron emission. Our approach is general and it does not depend on a specific energy dissipation mechanism. Reasonable synchrotron solutions are found with energy ratios of 10{sup -4} < {epsilon}{sub B}/{epsilon}{sub e} < 10, bulk Lorentz factor values of 300 < {Gamma} < 3000, typical electrons' Lorentz factor values of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} < {gamma}{sub e} < 10{sup 5}, and emission radii of the order 10{sup 15} cm < R < 10{sup 17} cm. Most remarkable among those are the rather large values of the emission radius and the electron's Lorentz factor. We find that soft (with peak energy less than 100 keV) but luminous (isotropic luminosity of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53}) pulses are inefficient. This may explain the lack of strong soft bursts. In cases when most of the energy is carried out by the kinetic energy of the flow, such as in the internal shocks, the synchrotron solution requires that only a small fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic velocities by the shocks. We show that future observations of very high energy photons from GRBs by CTA could possibly determine all parameters of the synchrotron model or rule it out altogether.

  1. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 October 29, 2010 Issued to Lawrence...

  2. Review of the National Research Council report ''Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The National Research Council-National Academy of Sciences report on ''Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines'' recommends that new facilities and upgrades of existing facilities are very important to the nation. At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the Energy Research Advisory Board has reviewed this report and finds that the Department of Energy is responsible for the majority of these projects to carry out its missions in energy, national defense, and science and technology. Therefore, we recommend that the Department should place a high priority on requesting the new funds necessary to fulfill these responsibilities in the next decade. The energy and defense missions of the Department will be best served by this approach. This responsibility requires strong coordination with other funding agencies through a shared advisory and decision-making process. The review recommends immediate implementation of new capabilities at existing DOE facilities (the neutron experimental halls at Brookhaven and Los Alamos and the new synchrotron insertion devices at Stanford and Brookhaven) as a cost effective way of maintaining the Nation's leading role in neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation research. It also recommends the immediate initiation of non-site-specific research and development for the proposed 6 GeV synchrotron and advanced steady state neutron source. This pre-construction work should be sufficient to ensure that these facilities will be constructed in a timely fashion at design goals and with well identified costs. Other recommendations concern advancing the Nation's leading capabilities in synchrotron produced ultraviolet radiation and spallation neutron research. A budget scenario is developed.

  3. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  4. Optimization of the LCLS Single Pulse Shutter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adera, Solomon; /Georgia Tech., Atlanta /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A mechanical shutter which operates on demand is used to isolate a single pulse from a 120 Hz X-ray source. This is accomplished with a mechanical shutter which is triggered on demand with frequencies ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. The single pulse shutter is an iron blade that oscillates on a pivot in response to a force generated by a pair of pulsed electromagnets (current driven teeter-totter). To isolate an individual pulse from the X-ray beam, the motion of the mechanical shutter should be synchronized in such a way that it allows a single pulse to pass through the aperture and blocks the other incoming pulses. Two consecutive pulses are only {approx} 8 ms apart and the shutter is required to complete one full cycle such that no two pulses pass through the opening. Also the opening of the shutter blade needs to be at least 4 mm so that a 1 mm diameter rms Gaussian beam can pass through without modulation. However, the 4 mm opening is difficult to obtain due to blade rebound and oscillation of the blade after colliding with the electromagnet. The purpose of this project is to minimize and/or totally eliminate the rebound of the shutter blade in pursuit of maximizing the aperture while keeping the open window interval < {approx}12 ms.

  5. Workshop on Scientific Applications of the LCLS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubictheThepresentedlynda.com AgendaTradingWORKSHOP ON

  6. LCLS CDR Appendix A - Parameter Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA

  7. LCLS CDR Chapter 1 - Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA

  8. LCLS CDR Chapter 3 - Scientific Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA1

  9. LCLS CDR Chapter 4 - FEL Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA14

  10. LCLS Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job

  11. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask22 LANSCE Topical UserLAPACKNewLCLSLCLS

  12. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS...

  13. Andrzej Joachimiak | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joachimiak Director of Structural Biology Center and Midwest Center for Structural Genomics - Biosciences Andrzej Joachimiak is an expert in synchrotron-based X-ray...

  14. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  15. Synchrotron-based microanalysis of iron distribution after thermal processing and predictive modeling of resulting solar cell efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P.

    2013-04-10

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy is applied to study the evolution of iron silicide precipitates during phosphorus diffusion gettering and low-temperature annealing. Heavily Fe-contaminated ingot border ...

  16. IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Marcelli, Augusto; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2008-04-26

    IKNO (Innovation and KNOwledge) is a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range, and of broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation (SR) ranging from the IR to the VUV. IKNO can be operated in an ultra-stable CSR mode with photon flux in the terahertz frequency region up to nine orders of magnitude higher than in existing 3rd generation light sources. Simultaneously to the CSR operation, broadband incoherent SR up to VUV frequencies is available at the beamline ports. The main characteristics of the IKNO storage and its performance in terms of CSR and incoherent SR are described in this paper. The proposed location for the infrastructure facility is in Sardinia, Italy.

  17. The synchrotron boiler and the spectral states of black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malzac, Julien

    2008-01-01

    We study the effects of synchrotron self-absorption on the Comptonising electron distribution in the magnetised corona of accreting black holes. We solve the kinetic equations assuming that power is supplied to the coronal electrons through Coulomb collisions with a population of hot protons and/or through the injection of non-thermal energetic electrons by some unspecified acceleration process. We compute numerically the steady state particle distributions and escaping photon spectra. These numerical simulations confirm that synchrotron self-absorption, together with e-e Coulomb collisions, constitute an efficient thermalising mechanism for the coronal electrons. When compared to the data, they allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona independently of any dynamical accretion flow model or geometry. A preliminary comparison with the Low Hard State (LHS) spectrum of Cygnus X-1 indicates a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the cor...

  18. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

  19. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Bie, B. X. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L., E-mail: qiml@whut.edu.cn [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Material Science Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gong, X. L., E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  20. Production of a keV X-Ray Beam from Synchrotron Radiation in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Production of a keV X-Ray Beam from Synchrotron Radiation in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interaction-Heine-Universitaet, Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany. 4 De´partement de Physique The´orique et Applique´e, CEA/DAM Ile- de of synchrotron radiation, which has keV energy and lies within a narrow (50 mrad) cone angle. DOI: 10.1103/Phys

  1. In-situ synchrotron microtomography reveals multiple reaction pathways during soda-lime glass synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuelle Gouillart; Michael J. Toplis; Julien Grynberg; Marie. -Helene Chopinet; Elin Sondergard; Luc Salvo; Michel Suéry; Marco Di Michiel; Gael Varoquaux

    2012-01-11

    Ultrafast synchrotron microtomography has been used to study in-situ and in real time the initial stages of silicate glass melt formation from crystalline granular raw materials. Significant and unexpected rearrangements of grains occur below the nominal eutectic temperature, and several drastically different solid-state reactions are observed to take place at different types of intergranular contacts. These reactions have a profound influence on the formation and the composition of the liquids produced, and control the formation of defects.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray Investigations of Mineral-Microbe-Metal Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2008-06-06

    Interactions between microbes and minerals can play an important role in metal transformations (i.e. changes to an element's valence state, coordination chemistry, or both), which can ultimately affect that element's mobility. Mineralogy affects microbial metabolism and ecology in a system; microbes, in turn, can affect the system's mineralogy. Increasingly, synchrotron-based X-ray experiments are in routine use for determining an element's valence state and coordination chemistry, as well as for examining the role of microbes in metal transformations.

  3. An asymmetrical synchrotron model for knots in the 3C 273 jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wen-Po

    2015-01-01

    To interpret the emissions of knots in the 3C 273 jet from radio to X-rays, we propose a synchrotron model: considering the shock compression effect, the injection spectra from a shock to upstream and downstream emission regions are asymmetric. Our model could well explain the spectral energy distributions (SED) of knots in the 3C 273 jet, and the predictions on the spectra of knots could be tested by future observations.

  4. Shining New Light on Protein Structure and Function thru Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace,B.

    2005-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy has been employed for more than 50 years for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins. It is now a workhorse of structural biology, finding applications in the determination of protein secondary structures, monitoring and deciphering protein folding, examining macromolecular interactions, and defining and quantitating protein-ligand binding. For the most part, CD studies have used laboratory-based instruments to measure electronic transitions in the far (190-250 nm), near ultraviolet (UV) (250-300 nm) and visible (> 400 nm) wavelength ranges, which have enabled studies of polypeptide backbones, aromatic amino acids and colored chromophores, respectively. Additional transitions exist at lower wavelengths in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region (<190 nm); however, these transitions tend to be inaccessible to conventional CD instruments, due to the low intensity of their Xenon arc lamp light sources at wavelengths below190 nm. In 1980, the first synchrotron-based CD instruments were constructed, which took advantage of the high photon flux available from synchrotron light sources at these wavelengths. However, the technique of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) did not really take off until enabling studies had been done to show that additional data were obtainable for proteins in the VUV region, that these data were readily accessible with modern beamlines, and most importantly, that new applications of these data existed in structural molecular biology.

  5. The cyclo-synchrotron process and particle heating through the absorption of photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Katarzynski; G. Ghisellini; R. Svensson; J. Gracia

    2006-02-08

    We propose a new approximation for the cyclo-synchrotron emissivity of a single electron. In the second part of this work, we discuss a simple application for our approximation, and investigate the heating of electrons through the self-absorption process. Finally, we investigate the self-absorbed part of the spectrum produced by a power-law population of electrons. In comparison to earlier approximations, our formula provides a few significant advantages. Integration of the emissivity over the whole frequency range, starting from the proper minimal emitting frequency, gives the correct cooling rate for any energy particle. Further, the spectrum of the emission is well approximated over the whole frequency range, even for relatively low particle energies (beta energy particles, independent of the shape of the particle distribution responsible for the self-absorbed synchrotron emission. We find that the energy gains for low energy particles are always higher than energy losses by cyclo-synchrotron emission. We show also that the spectral index of the self-absorbed part of the spectrum at very low frequencies differs significantly from the well known standard relation I(nu) ~ nu^(5/2).

  6. Real time synchrotron X-ray observations of solidification in hypoeutectic Al–Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogita, Kazuhiro [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yasuda, Hideyuki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Prasad, Arvind [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); McDonald, Stuart D., E-mail: s.mcdonald1@uq.edu.au [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Nagira, Tomoya; Nakatsuka, Noriaki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); StJohn, David H. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    This paper demonstrates how recent advances in synchrotron technology have allowed for the real-time X-ray imaging of solidification in Al–Si alloys, despite the small difference in atomic number of these elements. The experiments performed at the SPring-8 synchrotron, involved imaging the solidification of Al–1wt.%Si and Al–4wt.%Si alloys under a low-temperature gradient and a cooling rate of around 0.3 °C/s. The nucleation and growth of the primary aluminum grains as well as the onset of eutectic solidification were clearly observed. In the alloys containing Al–4wt.%Si, contrast was sufficient to characterize the nucleation rate and growth velocity of the aluminum grains. The importance of improving observation of solidification in the Al–Si system by increasing the time resolution during critical events is discussed. - Highlights: • A synchrotron technique was used to observe solidification of Al-Si alloys. • Nucleation, coarsening, and the onset of eutectic solidification were observed. • Images captured are suitable for quantitative analysis. • The resolution that was obtained should be possible for most aluminum alloys.

  7. Gamma-ray polarization of the synchrotron self-compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization ? ? 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most ?-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching ? ? 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  8. Prompt GeV emission in the synchrotron self-Compton model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Panaitescu

    2008-11-07

    The detection in 10 bursts of an optical counterpart emission (i.e. during the prompt GRB phase) that is 10-10000 brighter than the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to optical frequencies suggests a synchrotron self-Compton origin for the GRB emission, synchrotron producing the optical counterpart emission. In this model, the second upscattering of the burst photons yields a prompt GeV-TeV emission, whose brightness depends strongly on an unknown quantity, the peak energy of the primary synchrotron spectrum. Measurements of the optical, gamma-ray, and GeV prompt fluxes can be used to test the synchrotron self-Compton model for GRBs and to determine directly the total radiative output of GRBs. For a set of 29 GRBs with optical counterpart detections, we find that the expected GeV photon flux should correlate with the fluence of the sub-MeV emission and should anticorrelate with the brightness of the optical counterpart, the strength of these correlations decreasing for an increasing width of the synchrotron peak energy distribution. The detection of a GeV prompt emission consistent with the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to higher energies would rule out the synchrotron self-Compton model if the sub-MeV burst emission were very bright and the (intrinsic) optical counterpart were very dim.

  9. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a modified United Nations Test for Oxidizing Solids protocol. * 2010 burn-rate tests at New Mexico Tech performed on two types of surrogates of the buried Rocky Flats salt...

  10. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  11. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical absorption of deuterium into palladium by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron-wiggler radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, D.D.; Hagans, P.L.; Skelton, E.F.; Qadri, S.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    With low energy x-rays, such as those from a Cu x-ray tube, only the outer few microns of a metallic sample can be probed. This low penetrating power prohibits structural studies from being carried out on the interior of an electrode in an electrochemical cell because of absorption by the cell material, electrodes and the electrolyte. The work described in this paper circumvents this problem by utilizing high energy, high brightness x-rays produced on the superconducting wiggler beam line, X-17C, at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The penetrating power of the higher energy x-rays allowed Pd diffraction spectra to be obtained in-situ on a 1 mm diameter Pd wire cathode during electrolysis of heavy water. Moreover, the beam (28 x 28 {micro}m in cross-section) allowed diffraction spectra to be acquired as a function of distance across the sample. Spectra were recorded in 50 {micro}m steps from the edge of the Pd wire to its core. This was done at 2 minute intervals as a function of electrolysis time. The {alpha}-{beta} phase transition induced in the Pd while deuterium was electrochemically absorbed was observed by monitoring the Pd-(422) diffraction peaks. Results allowed the diffusion rate and the diffusivity of deuterium atoms in the Pd wire to be determined. Other features of the structural changes associated with the absorption of deuterium into Pd are reported.

  12. National synchrotron light source user's manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines: Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains information on the following topics: A Word on the Writing of Beamline Descriptions; Beamline Equipment Utilization for General Users; the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Storage Ring and Beamlines; VUV Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; VUV Beamline Descriptions; X-Ray Storage Ring and Beamlines; X-Ray Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; and X-Ray Beamline Descriptions.

  13. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  14. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Bhat, C.; Blokland, W.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Flora, R.; Hahn, A.; Hansen, S.; Kiper, T.; Para, A.; Pordes, S.; Tollestrup, A. V.

    2011-10-17

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This study describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  15. rac-6-Hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxamide from synchrotron data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Baj, Aneta; Walejko, Piotr; Witkowski, Stanislaw

    2012-05-29

    The crystal structure of the title water-soluble analogue of vitamin E, trolox amide, C{sub 14}H{sub 19}NO{sub 3}, solved and refined against synchrotron diffraction data, contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. In both molecules, the heterocyclic ring is in a half-chair conformation. The crystal packing features a herring-bone pattern generated by N-H...O hydrogen bonds between the hydroxy and amide groups. O-H...O hydrogen bonds also occur.

  16. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; Williams, Jason J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Robinson, Mathew W. C.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  17. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of Our Solar System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen R. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.

  18. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Bhat, C.; Blokland, W.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Flora, R.; Hahn, A.; Hansen, S.; Kiper, T.; et al

    2011-10-01

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This article describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  19. Two-color X-rays Give Scientists 3-D View of the Unknown | U...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). They incorporated a series of advances to hit samples with a pair of precisely tuned...

  20. On proton synchrotron blazar models: the case of quasar 3C 279

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petropoulou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we propose an innovative estimation method for the minimum Doppler factor and energy content of the gamma-ray emitting region of quasar 3C 279, using a standard proton synchrotron blazar model and the principles of automatic photon quenching. The latter becomes relevant for high enough magnetic fields and results in spontaneous annihilation of gamma-rays. The absorbed energy is then redistributed into electron-positron pairs and soft radiation. We show that as quenching sets an upper value for the source rest-frame gamma-ray luminosity, one has, by neccessity, to resort to Doppler factors that lie above a certain value in order to explain the TeV observations. The existence of this lower limit for the Doppler factor has also implications on the energetics of the emitting region. In this aspect, the proposed method can be regarded as an extension of the widely used one for estimating the equipartition magnetic field using radio observations. In our case, the leptonic synchrotron component i...

  1. Local Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and synchrotron modulation in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Bucciantini; L. Del Zanna

    2006-03-17

    We present here a series of numerical simulations of the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a relativistically hot plasma. The physical parameters in the unperturbed state are chosen to be representative of local conditions encountered in Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), with a main magnetic field perpendicular to a mildly relativistic shear layers. By using a numerical code for Relativistic MHD, we investigate the effect of an additional magnetic field component aligned with the shear velocity, and we follow the evolution of the instability to the saturation and turbulent regimes. Based on the resulting flow structure, we then compute synchrotron maps in order to evaluate the signature of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the emission and we investigate how the time scale and the amplitude of the synchrotron modulations depend on shear velocity and magnetic field. Finally we compare our results to the observed variable features in the Crab Nebula. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability cannot account for the wisps variability, but it might be responsible for the time dependent filamentary structure observed in the main torus.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy - An Enhanced Method for Examining Protein Conformations and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B Wallace; R Janes

    2011-12-31

    CD (circular dichroism) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. SRCD (synchrotron radiation circular dichroism) spectroscopy extends the utility and applications of conventional CD spectroscopy (using laboratory-based instruments) because the high flux of a synchrotron enables collection of data at lower wavelengths (resulting in higher information content), detection of spectra with higher signal-to-noise levels and measurements in the presence of absorbing components (buffers, salts, lipids and detergents). SRCD spectroscopy can provide important static and dynamic structural information on proteins in solution, including secondary structures of intact proteins and their domains, protein stability, the differences between wild-type and mutant proteins, the identification of natively disordered regions in proteins, and the dynamic processes of protein folding and membrane insertion and the kinetics of enzyme reactions. It has also been used to effectively study protein interactions, including protein-protein complex formation involving either induced-fit or rigid-body mechanisms, and protein-lipid complexes. A new web-based bioinformatics resource, the Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB), has been created which enables archiving, access and analyses of CD and SRCD spectra and supporting metadata, now making this information publicly available. To summarize, the developing method of SRCD spectroscopy has the potential for playing an important role in new types of studies of protein conformations and their complexes.

  3. A compact design for a magnetic synchrotron to store beams of hydrogen atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Poel, Aernout P P; Softley, Timothy P; Bethlem, Hendrick L

    2015-01-01

    We present a design for an atomic synchrotron consisting of 40 hybrid magnetic hexapole lenses arranged in a circle. We show that for realistic parameters, hydrogen atoms with a velocity up to 600 m/s can be stored in a 1-meter diameter ring, which implies that the atoms can be injected in the ring directly from a pulsed supersonic beam source. This ring can be used to study collisions between stored hydrogen atoms and molecular beams of many different atoms and molecules. The advantage of using a synchrotron is two-fold: (i) the collision partners move in the same direction as the stored atoms, resulting in a small relative velocity and thus a low collision energy, and (ii) by storing atoms for many round-trips, the sensitivity to collisions is enhanced by a factor of 100-1000. In the proposed ring, the cross-sections for collisions between hydrogen, the most abundant atom in the universe, with any atom or molecule that can be put in a beam, including He, H$_2$, CO, ammonia and OH can be measured at energies...

  4. Calibration of the AXAFHRC UV/Ion shields at Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G.S.Vaiana: III Synchrotron measurements of XANES in aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plates from UV radiation and low energy ionized particles. After that BESSY synchrotron measurements had already been completed, UV measurements conducted at the X­ray Astronomy Calibration and Testing facility to the redesign of the HRC UV/Ion shields and therefore the synchrotron measurements will be repeated on the new

  5. National Institutes of Health Current National Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Library of Medicine John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in National Center National Institute of Nursing Research National Library of Medicine John E. Fogarty International CenterNational Institutes of Health Current National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin

  6. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  7. In-situ study of hydride precipitation kinetics and re-orientation in Zircaloy using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    In-situ study of hydride precipitation kinetics and re- orientation in Zircaloy using synchrotron. Banchik4 , P. Vizcaino4 and J. R. Santisteban5 1. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn, Argonne, IL, USA 3. Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, ON

  8. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing of Aqueous Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water, such as freeze-induced destabilization of biological systems, and laboratory or industrial practices

  9. Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Qun

    Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source-ray optics, energy-recovery linac, high brilliance 1. INTRODUCTION As one of the pioneer synchrotron in the area of high heat load and high x-ray flux optics [1-5] since the high critical-energy wigglers

  10. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  11. Heavy MetalMineral Associations in Coeur d'Alene River Sediments: A Synchrotron-Based Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavy Metal­Mineral Associations in Coeur d'Alene River Sediments: A Synchrotron-Based Analysis. Heavy metal concentrations in sediments of the Coeur d'Alene watershed have been shown to be inversely proportional to the sediment size fraction; thus, analysis on a very small scale is essential to determine

  12. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar PhotovoltaicBWXT Y-12 is preserving Y-12'sNational

  13. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar PhotovoltaicBWXT Y-12 is preserving Y-12'sNational

  14. National Laboratory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: AchievementsTemperatures Year 6 -FINALEnergy,Pacific Mort hwest National

  15. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems AgencyCompany Organization: United...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear weapons Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge Sandia National Laboratories chemist Mark Allendorf, shown here at...

  17. Applications of Laminar Weak-Link Mechanisms for Ultraprecision Synchrotron Radiation Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.; Maser, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Lee, P. L.; Narayanan, S.; Long, G. G. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-01-19

    Unlike traditional kinematic flexure mechanisms, laminar overconstrained weak-link mechanisms provide much higher structure stiffness and stability. Using a laminar structure configured and manufactured by chemical etching and lithography techniques, we are able to design and build linear and rotary weak-link mechanisms with ultrahigh positioning sensitivity and stability for synchrotron radiation applications. Applications of laminar rotary weak-link mechanism include: high-energy-resolution monochromators for inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray analyzers for ultra-small-angle scattering and powder-diffraction experiments. Applications of laminar linear weak-link mechanism include high-stiffness piezo-driven stages with subnanometer resolution for an x-ray microscope. In this paper, we summarize the recent designs and applications of the laminar weak-link mechanisms at the Advanced Photon Source.

  18. Search for critical behavior of strongly interacting matter at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazdzicki, Marek

    2015-01-01

    History, status and plans of the search for critical behavior of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron is reviewed. In particular, it is expected that the search should answer the question whether the critical point of strongly interacting matter exists and, if it does, where it is located. First, the search strategies are presented and a short introduction is given to expected fluctuation signals and to the quantities used by experiments to detect th The most important background effects are also discussed. Second, relevant experimental results are summarized and discussed. It is intriguing that both the fluctuations of quantities integrated over the full experimental acceptance (event multiplicity and transverse momentum) as well as the bin size dependence of the second factorial moment of pion and proton multiplicities in medium-sized Si+Si collisions at 158A GeV/c suggest critical behaviour of the created matter. These results provide strong...

  19. B-Mode contamination by synchrotron emission from 3-years WMAP data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Carretti; G. Bernardi; S. Cortiglioni

    2006-09-11

    We study the contamination of the B-mode of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) by Galactic synchrotron in the lowest emission regions of the sky. The 22.8-GHz polarization map of the 3-years WMAP data release is used to identify and analyse such regions. Two areas are selected with signal-to-noise ratio S/Ncontamination better than that of the whole high Galactic latitude sky found by the WMAP team (T/S>0.3). Such regions allow $T/S \\sim 10^{-3}$ to be measured directly which approximately corresponds to the limit imposed by using a sky coverage of 15%. This opens interesting perspectives to investigate the inflationary model space in lowest emission regions.

  20. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, William A. [Dept. of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Synchrotron radiation sources have had a profound effect on both science and technology from their beginnings decades ago as parasitic operations on accelerators for high energy physics. Now the general area of photon science has opened up new experimental techniques which have become the mainstay tools of materials science, surface physics, protein crystallography, and nanotechnology. With the promise of ultra-bright beams from the latest generation of storage rings and free electron lasers with full coherence, the tools of photon science promise to open a new area of mesoscale science and technology as well as prove to be a disruptive wildcard in the search for sustainable energy technologies. This review will survey a range of applications and explore in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy.

  1. Synchrotron radiation imaging is a powerful tool to image brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Mengqi; Sun, Danni; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xia, Jian; Long, Hongyu; Hu, Kai; Xiao, Bo; Peng, Guanyun

    2014-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging is a powerful experimental tool for micrometer-scale imaging of microcirculation in vivo. This review discusses recent methodological advances and findings from morphological investigations of cerebral vascular networks during several neurovascular pathologies. In particular, it describes recent developments in SR microangiography for real-time assessment of the brain microvasculature under various pathological conditions in small animal models. It also covers studies that employed SR-based phase-contrast imaging to acquire 3D brain images and provide detailed maps of brain vasculature. In addition, a brief introduction of SR technology and current limitations of SR sources are described in this review. In the near future, SR imaging could transform into a common and informative imaging modality to resolve subtle details of cerebrovascular function.

  2. Development of a synchrotron biaxial tensile device for in situ characterization of thin films mechanical response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geandier, G.; Thiaudiere, D.; Bouaffad, A.; Randriamazaoro, R. N.; Chiron, R.; Castelnau, O.; Faurie, D.; Djaziri, S.; Lamongie, B.; Diot, Y.; Le Bourhis, E.; Renault, P. O.; Goudeau, P.; Hild, F.

    2010-10-15

    We have developed on the DIFFABS-SOLEIL beamline a biaxial tensile machine working in the synchrotron environment for in situ diffraction characterization of thin polycrystalline films mechanical response. The machine has been designed to test compliant substrates coated by the studied films under controlled, applied strain field. Technological challenges comprise the sample design including fixation of the substrate ends, the related generation of a uniform strain field in the studied (central) volume, and the operations from the beamline pilot. Preliminary tests on 150 nm thick W films deposited onto polyimide cruciform substrates are presented. The obtained results for applied strains using x-ray diffraction and digital image correlation methods clearly show the full potentialities of this new setup.

  3. Commissioning and first results of scanning type EXAFS beamline (BL-09) at INDUS-2 synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K. Agrawal, A. Yadav, A. K. Nayak, C. Basu, S. Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, C. K.

    2014-04-24

    An Energy Scanning X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy beamline has recently been installed and commissioned at BL-09 bending magnet port of INDUS-2 synchrotron source, Indore. The beamline uses an UHV compatible fixed exit double crystal monochromator (DCM) with two Si (111) crystals. Two grazing incidence cylindrical mirrors are also used in this beamline; the pre-mirror is used as a collimating mirror while the post mirror is used for vertical focusing and higher harmonic rejection. In this beamline it is possible to carry out EXAFS measurements both in transmission and fluorescence mode on various types of samples, using Ionization chamber detectors and solid state drift detector respectively. In this paper, results from first experiments of the Energy Scanning EXAFS beamline are presented.

  4. Automatic quenching of high energy gamma-ray sources by synchrotron photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Stawarz; J. G. Kirk

    2007-03-26

    We investigate a magnetized plasma in which injected high energy gamma-rays annihilate on a soft photon field, that is provided by the synchrotron radiation of the created pairs. For a very wide range of magnetic fields, this process involves gamma-rays between 0.3 GeV and 30 TeV. We derive a simple dynamical system for this process, analyze its stability to runaway production of soft photons and paris, and find conditions for it to automatically quench by reaching a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity. We discuss applications to broad-band gamma-ray emitters, in particular supermassive black holes. Automatic quenching limits the gamma-ray luminosity of these objects and predicts substantial pair loading of the jets of less active sources.

  5. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  6. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

    2012-07-28

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  7. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  8. MICROANALYSIS OF NY/NJ HARBOR SEDIMENTS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.FENG,H.LANZIROTTI,A.MARINKOVIC,N.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Sediments found in the New York/New Jersey Harbor are widely contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds of anthropogenic origin. As a result, the environmental health of the Harbor has deteriorated and the efficient operation of the Port compromised by difficulties in disposing of sediments resulting from maintenance and improvements of navigational channels. Knowledge of the properties of the sediments on a micro-scale is useful in understanding the transport of contaminants through the environment, for developing effective methods for sediment decontamination, and for subsequent beneficial use of the cleaned sediments. We have investigated several properties of these sediments using synchrotron radiation techniques. These include computed microtomography using absorption and fluorescence contrast mechanisms, x-ray microscopy, microbeam x-ray fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for measurements of microstructure, distribution of metals on individual sediment particles, and chemical forms of the contaminants on a micrometer scale. Typical results obtained with these techniques are presented.

  9. Synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry study of intermediates in fuel-rich 1,2-dimethoxyethane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Z. K.; Han, D. L.; Li, S. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Yuan, T.

    2009-04-21

    Intermediates in a fuel-rich premixed laminar 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) flame are studied by molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. About 30 intermediate species are identified in the present work, and their mole fraction profiles are evaluated. The experimental results show that the formations of intermediates, both hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons, are closely linked to the structure of fuel, which is consistent with the previous reports. Species produced from H atom abstraction and beta scission of DME usually have much higher concentrations than others. The oxygen atoms in DME are considered to act as partitions of the primary intermediates; therefore farther reactions among these primary intermediates are difficult to occur, resulting in absence of most large intermediate species.

  10. Application of Synchrotron Radiation-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectromicroscopy to the Investigation of Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Snake River Plain Aquifer below the Test Area North (TAN) facility of the Idaho National Engineering

  11. X-Ray Synchrotron Emitting Fe-Rich Ejecta in SNR RCW 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeonghee Rho; Kristy K. Dyer; Kazimierz J. Borkowski; Stephen P. Reynolds

    2002-07-31

    Supernova remnants may exhibit both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission. We present Chandra observations of RCW 86. Striking differences in the morphology of X-rays below 1 keV and above 2 keV point to a different physical origin. Hard X-ray emission is correlated fairly well with the edges of regions of radio emission, suggesting that these are the locations of shock waves at which both short-lived X-ray emitting electrons, and longer-lived radio-emitting electrons, are accelerated. Soft X-rays are spatially well-correlated with optical emission from nonradiative shocks, which are almost certainly portions of the outer blast wave. These soft X-rays are well fit with simple thermal plane-shock models. Harder X-rays show Fe K alpha emission and are well described with a similar soft thermal component, but a much stronger synchrotron continuum dominating above 2 keV, and a strong Fe K alpha line. Quantitative analysis of this line and the surrounding continuum shows that it cannot be produced by thermal emission from a cosmic-abundance plasma; the ionization time is too short, as shown both by the low centroid energy (6.4 keV) and the absence of oxygen lines below 1 keV. Instead, a model of a plane shock into Fe-rich ejecta, with a synchrotron continuum, provides a natural explanation. This requires that reverse shocks into ejecta be accelerating electrons to energies of order 50 TeV. We show that maximum energies of this order can be produced by radiation-limited diffusive shock acceleration at the reverse shocks.

  12. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in GRB afterglows (analytical treatment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T. [Space and Remote Sensing, MS B244, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows from high-energy photons (above 100 MeV), assuming a power-law photon spectrum C {sub ?}??{sup –2} and considering only the pairs generated from primary high-energy photons. The essential properties of these pairs (number, minimal energy, cooling energy, distribution with energy) and of their emission (peak flux, spectral breaks, spectral slope) are set by the observables GeV fluence ?(t) = Ft and spectrum, and by the Lorentz factor, ?, and magnetic field, B, of the source of high-energy photons, at observer time, t. Optical and X-ray pseudo light curves, F {sub ?}(?), are calculated for the given B; proper synchrotron self-Compton light curves are calculated by setting the dynamics ?(t) of the high-energy photon source to be that of a decelerating, relativistic shock. It is found that the emission from pairs can accommodate the flux and decays of the optical flashes measured during the prompt (GRB) phase, but it decays faster than the X-ray plateaus observed during the delayed (afterglow) phase. The brightest pair optical emission is obtained for 100 < ? < 500, and depends mostly on the GeV fluence, being independent of the source redshift. Emission from pairs formed during the GRB phase offers an alternate explanation to reverse-shock optical flashes. These two models may be distinguished based on their corresponding flux decay index-spectral slope relations, different correlations with the Large Area Telescope fluence, or through modeling of the afterglow multiwavelength data.

  13. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain in detail the electronic structure and dynamics of the investigated species [1, 3].

  14. The synchrotron boiler and the spectral states of black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Malzac; Renaud Belmont

    2008-10-24

    We study the effects of synchrotron self-absorption on the Comptonising electron distribution in the magnetised corona of accreting black holes. We solve the kinetic equations assuming that power is supplied to the coronal electrons through Coulomb collisions with a population of hot protons and/or through the injection of non-thermal energetic electrons by some unspecified acceleration process. We compute numerically the steady state particle distributions and escaping photon spectra. These numerical simulations confirm that synchrotron self-absorption, together with e-e Coulomb collisions, constitute an efficient thermalising mechanism for the coronal electrons. When compared to the data, they allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona independently of any dynamical accretion flow model or geometry. A preliminary comparison with the Low Hard State (LHS) spectrum of Cygnus X-1 indicates a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). However, in the LHS of Cygnus X-1 and other sources, our results also point toward proton temperatures substantially lower than what predicted by the ADAF-like models. In contrast, in the High Soft State (HSS) both the proton temperature and magnetic field could be much higher. We also show that in both spectral states the magnetised corona could be powered essentially through acceleration of non-thermal particles. The main differences between the LHS and HSS coronal emission can then be understood as the consequence of the much stronger radiative cooling in the HSS caused by the soft thermal radiation coming from the geometrically thin accretion disc.

  15. The flat synchrotron spectra of partially self-absorbed jets revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian R. Kaiser

    2006-01-05

    Flat radio spectra with large brightness temperatures at the core of AGN and X-ray binaries are usually interpreted as the partially self-absorbed bases of jet flows emitting synchrotron radiation. Here we extend previous models of jets propagating at large angles to our line of sight to self-consistently include the effects of energy losses of the relativistic electrons due to the synchrotron process itself and the adiabatic expansion of the jet flow. We also take into account energy gains through self-absorption. Two model classes are presented. The ballistic jet flows, with the jet material travelling along straight trajectories, and adiabatic jets. Despite the energy losses, both scenarios can result in flat emission spectra, however, the adiabatic jets require a specific geometry. No re-acceleration process along the jet is needed for the electrons. We apply the models to observational data of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1. Both models can be made consistent with the observations. The resulting ballistic jet is extremely narrow with a jet opening angle of only 5". Its energy transport rate is small compared to the time-averaged jet power and therefore suggests the presence of non-radiating protons in the jet flow. The adiabatic jets require a strong departure from energy equipartition between the magnetic field and the relativistic electrons. These models also imply a jet power two orders of magnitude higher than the Eddington limiting luminosity of a 10 solar mass black hole. The models put strong constraints on the physical conditions in the jet flows on scales well below achievable resolution limits.

  16. Spatial variations in the spectral index of polarized synchrotron emission in the 9 yr WMAP sky maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.; Næss, S. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K., E-mail: unnif@astro.uio.no, E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no, E-mail: s.k.nass@astro.uio.no, E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We estimate the spectral index, ?, of polarized synchrotron emission as observed in the 9 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps using two methods, linear regression ({sup T}-T plot{sup )} and maximum likelihood. We partition the sky into 24 disjoint sky regions and evaluate the spectral index for all polarization angles between 0° and 85° in steps of 5°. Averaging over polarization angles, we derive a mean spectral index of ?{sup all-sky} = –2.99 ± 0.01 in the frequency range of 23-33 GHz. We find that the synchrotron spectral index steepens by 0.14 from low to high Galactic latitudes, in agreement with previous studies, with mean spectral indices of ?{sup plane} = –2.98 ± 0.01 and ?{sup high-lat} = –3.12 ± 0.04. In addition, we find a significant longitudinal variation along the Galactic plane with a steeper spectral index toward the Galactic center and anticenter than toward the Galactic spiral arms. This can be well modeled by an offset sinusoidal, ?(l) = –2.85 + 0.17sin (2l – 90°). Finally, we study synchrotron emission in the BICEP2 field, in an attempt to understand whether the claimed detection of large-scale B-mode polarization could be explained in terms of synchrotron contamination. Adopting a spectral index of ? = –3.12, typical for high Galactic latitudes, we find that the most likely bias corresponds to about 2% of the reported signal (r = 0.003). The flattest index allowed by the data in this region is ? = –2.5, and under the assumption of a straight power-law frequency spectrum, we find that synchrotron emission can account for at most 20% of the reported BICEP2 signal.

  17. LINE Commission Visits Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating3ledp/ The4, LINE Commission

  18. BNL-52351-2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Management Process-Enhancementof Brain Patterns in PET Images .................................................................................................... 21 Development of CZT Array Detector Technology for Synchrotron Radiation Applications.......25 New

  19. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  20. SXST 2014 - 7th SSRL School on Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Information Visiting SLAC SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Visiting SLAC Climate Temperate climate - more Accomodations Stanford...

  1. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, P.

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

  2. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (1912 MacArthur St., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90732)

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  3. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); McGlynn, S. [Exzellence Cluster "Universe," Technische Universitt Mnchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Meegan, C. A. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Dermer, C. D. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Iyyani, S. [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kocevski, D., E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov, E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: shabuiyyani@gmail.com, E-mail: baring@rice.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-20

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index ? is consistent with a synchrotron component with ? = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of ? = –2/3 and ? = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  4. United Nations Programme on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    United Nations Programme on Space Applications UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR OUTER SPACE, Sputnik 1. Soon after that event, the Member States of the United Nations declared that space should and natural resources management. At the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses

  5. CCD(charge-coupled device)-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10/sup 4/ x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm/sup 2/ detector is expected to be >10/sup 9/ photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10/sup 6/ could be obtained in approx.0.5 s. With an additional approx.0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be approx.1 s so that ninety 1/sup 0/ diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON SHOCK MODEL FOR THE FERMI GRB 090820A OBSERVED BY GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Baring, Matthew G.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fishman, Gerald J.; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the {nu}F{sub {nu}} peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  7. EDDY CURRENT EFFECT OF THE BNL-AGS VACUUM CHAMBER ON THE OPTICS OF THE BNL-AGS SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.A.; GLENN,J.W.; GARDNER,K.

    1999-03-29

    During the acceleration cycle of the AGS synchrotron, eddy currents are generated within the walls of the vacuum chambers of the AGS main magnets. The vacuum chambers have elliptical cross section, are made of inconel material with a wall thickness of 2 mm and are placed within the gap of the combined-function main magnets of the AGS synchrotron. The generation of the eddy currents in the walls of the vacuum chambers, creates various magnetic multipoles, which affect the optics of the AGS machine. In this report these magnetic multipoles are calculated for various time interval starting at the acceleration cycle, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is {approx}0.1 T, and ending before the beam extraction process, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is almost constant at {approx}1.1 T. The calculations show that the magnetic multipoles generated by the eddy-currents affect the optics of the AGS synchrotron during the acceleration cycle and in particular at low magnetic fields of the main magnet. Their effect is too weak to affect the optics of the AGS machine during beam extraction at the nominal energies.

  8. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne, Jennifer [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Edwards, Nicholas P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wogelius, Roy A. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sellers, William I. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); van Veelen, Arjen [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Bergmann, Uwe [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Alonso-Mori, Roberto [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ignatyev, Konstantin [Diamond Light Source (United Kingdom); Egerton, Victoria M. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Manning, Phillip L. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-23

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning–X-ray fluorescence (SRS–XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20–100 ?m) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS–XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2–20 ?m) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue.

  9. Development of high-repetition-rate laser pump/x-ray probe methodologies for synchrotron facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, Anne Marie; Doumy, Gilles; Kanter, Elliot P.; Kraessig, Bertold; Southworth, Stephen H.; Attenkofer, Klaus; Kurtz, Charles A.; Young, Linda [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stickrath, Andrew [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, Lin X. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    We describe our implementation of a high repetition rate (54 kHz-6.5 MHz), high power (>10 W), laser system at the 7ID beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for laser pump/x-ray probe studies of optically driven molecular processes. Laser pulses at 1.06 {mu}m wavelength and variable duration (10 or 130 ps) are synchronized to the storage ring rf signal to a precision of {approx}250 fs rms. Frequency doubling and tripling of the laser radiation using nonlinear optical techniques have been applied to generate 532 and 355 nm light. We demonstrate that by combining a microfocused x-ray probe with focused optical laser radiation the requisite fluence (with <10 {mu}J/pulse) for efficient optical excitation can be readily achieved with a compact and commercial laser system at megahertz repetition rates. We present results showing the time-evolution of near-edge x-ray spectra of a well-studied, laser-excited metalloporphyrin, Ni(II)-tetramesitylporphyrin. The use of high repetition rate, short pulse lasers as pump sources will dramatically enhance the duty cycle and efficiency in data acquisition and hence capabilities for laser-pump/x-ray probe studies of ultrafast structural dynamics at synchrotron sources.

  10. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, Christopher D.; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  11. Synchrotron Radiation {mu}-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Colombatti, M.; Monti, F.

    2003-01-24

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR {mu}-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  12. Search for critical behavior of strongly interacting matter at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Gazdzicki; Peter Seyboth

    2015-06-26

    History, status and plans of the search for critical behavior of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron is reviewed. In particular, it is expected that the search should answer the question whether the critical point of strongly interacting matter exists and, if it does, where it is located. First, the search strategies are presented and a short introduction is given to expected fluctuation signals and to the quantities used by experiments to detect th The most important background effects are also discussed. Second, relevant experimental results are summarized and discussed. It is intriguing that both the fluctuations of quantities integrated over the full experimental acceptance (event multiplicity and transverse momentum) as well as the bin size dependence of the second factorial moment of pion and proton multiplicities in medium-sized Si+Si collisions at 158A GeV/c suggest critical behaviour of the created matter. These results provide strong motivation for the ongoing systematic scan of the phase diagram by the NA61/SHINE experiment at the SPS and the continuing search at the Brookhaven Relativistic Hadron Collider.

  13. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  14. Synchrotron radiation-based Mössbauer spectra of {sup 174}Yb measured with internal conversion electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Ryo Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Shinji; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Saito, Makina; Mitsui, Takaya; Iga, Fumitoshi; Seto, Makoto

    2014-02-24

    A detection system for synchrotron-radiation (SR)-based Mössbauer spectroscopy was developed to enhance the nuclear resonant scattering counting rate and thus increase the available nuclides. In the system, a windowless avalanche photodiode (APD) detector was combined with a vacuum cryostat to detect the internal conversion (IC) electrons and fluorescent X-rays accompanied by nuclear de-excitation. As a feasibility study, the SR-based Mössbauer spectrum using the 76.5?keV level of {sup 174}Yb was observed without {sup 174}Yb enrichment of the samples. The counting rate was five times higher than that of our previous system, and the spectrum was obtained within 10 h. This result shows that nuclear resonance events can be more efficiently detected by counting IC electrons for nuclides with high IC coefficients. Furthermore, the windowless detection system enables us to place the sample closer to the APD elements and is advantageous for nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measurements. Therefore, this detection system can not only increase the number of nuclides accessible in SR-based Mössbauer spectroscopy but also allows the nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measurements of small single crystals or enzymes with dilute probe nuclides that are difficult to measure with the previous detection system.

  15. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  16. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  17. Growth dynamics of pentacene thin films: Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, Alex C.; Ruiz, Ricardo; Malliaras, George G. [Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L. [Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); Kazimirov, Alexander [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering in the anti-Bragg configuration was used to monitor the dynamics of pentacene film growth on inert substrates. A distributed-growth model, according to which pentacene molecules adsorbed on the nth layer can either nucleate and contribute to the growth of the (n+1)th layer or transfer downward and contribute to the growth of the nth layer, gave a good description of the data. For molecules adsorbed on the first and second layers, the probability of downward transfer was found to be dependent on the substrate, and independent of temperature within the range from 25 to 60 deg. C. For films grown on SiO{sub 2}, an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier of the order of 70 meV dominated downward transfer of pentacene molecules in layers away from the substrate. For films grown on an alkylated self-assembled monolayer, significant desorption of pentacene molecules from the substrate at elevated temperatures forced the growth mode toward the three-dimensional limit.

  18. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anne, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.; Sellers, William I.; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; et al

    2014-04-23

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning–X-ray fluorescence (SRS–XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20–100 ?m) and the ability to scan large specimensmore »(decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS–XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2–20 ?m) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue.« less

  19. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and elemental mapping from biological samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Rao; M Swapna; R Cesareo; A Brunetti; T Akatsuka; T Yuasa; T Takeda; G Gigante

    2011-12-31

    The present study utilized the new hard X-ray microspectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA, for elemental mapping. This facility provided the primary beam in a small spot of the order of {approx}10 {mu}m, for focussing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescent intensities for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ti and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The sample is scanned in a 'step-and-repeat' mode for fast elemental mapping measurements and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV, from a small animal shell (snail). The accumulated trace elements, from these biological samples, in small areas have been identified. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other elements.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of CNT-Based Smart Tips for Synchrotron Assisted STM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Hui; Cummings, Marvin; Camino, Fernando; Xu, Weihe; Lu, Ming; Tong, Xiao; Shirato, Nozomi; Rosenmann, Daniel; Rose, Volker; Nazaretski, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Determination of chemical composition along with imaging at the atomic level provides critical information towards fundamental understanding of the surface of materials and, hence, yields the capability to design new materials by tailoring their ultimate functionalities. Synchrotron X-ray assisted scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM) is a promising new technique to achieve real space chemically specific atomic mapping. Chemical sensitivity of SX-STM relies on excitation of core electrons by incident X-rays when their energy is tuned to an absorption edge of a particular element. However, along with core-level electrons, photoelectrons are also excited, which yield additional current and interfere with the tunnelingmore »current. To reduce the background photoelectron current and to improve ultimate resolution of SX-STM, we have developed and fabricated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) based “smart tips” using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and focused ion beam milling. The newly developed CNT-based smart tips, characterized step by step by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) during the fabrication process, demonstrate good performance and provide opportunity for realizing atomic chemical mapping.« less

  1. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Aaron; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M; Reynolds, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths ~1--5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths ~50--...

  2. Cosmic ray electrons, positrons and the synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardo, Giuseppe Di [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evoli, Carmelo [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Gaggero, Daniele [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, I-56100 Siena (Italy); Maccione, Luca, E-mail: giuseppe.dibernardo@physics.gu.se, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: dgaggero@sissa.it, E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it, E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ?< 1GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4GeV the e{sup ?} source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index ? 2.5. Below 4GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height z{sub t} of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z{sub t} ?< 2kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  3. Raster-scanning serial protein crystallography using micro- and nano-focused synchrotron beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Brewster, Aaron S.; Kapp, Ulrike; Shilova, Anastasya; Weinhausen, Britta; Burghammer, Manfred; Colletier, Jacques -Philippe

    2015-04-25

    High-resolution structural information was obtained from lysozyme microcrystals (20 µm in the largest dimension) using raster-scanning serial protein crystallography on micro- and nano-focused beamlines at the ESRF. Data were collected at room temperature (RT) from crystals sandwiched between two silicon nitride wafers, thereby preventing their drying, while limiting background scattering and sample consumption. In order to identify crystal hits, new multi-processing and GUI-driven Python-based pre-analysis software was developed, named NanoPeakCell, that was able to read data from a variety of crystallographic image formats. Further data processing was carried out using CrystFEL, and the resultant structures were refined to 1.7 Åmore »resolution. The data demonstrate the feasibility of RT raster-scanning serial micro- and nano-protein crystallography at synchrotrons and validate it as an alternative approach for the collection of high-resolution structural data from micro-sized crystals. Advantages of the proposed approach are its thriftiness, its handling-free nature, the reduced amount of sample required, the adjustable hit rate, the high indexing rate and the minimization of background scattering.« less

  4. Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Joel

    2012-01-03

    In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

  5. National Laboratory]; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael Los Alamos National Laboratory Construction and Facility Engineering; Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization(32); Energy Planning, Policy, &...

  6. Mojave National Preserve Joshua Tree National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Forest (SBNF) Angeles National Forest (ANF) Cleveland National Forest (CNF) CNF CNF SBNF ANF CACA 049111°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 33°0'0"N 33°0'0"N California Desert Conservation Area BLM Solar Energy Project Contingent Corridor Deleted Corridor Land Status BLM National Park Service Forest Service Military USFWS

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Security Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Challenges #12;3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY How Will Our Enemies and Homeland Security #12;OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Nonproliferation $27,050 Cleanup $7,481 Science $359M National Security $278M Energy $170M Cleanup $0.8M Total $1.08B

  8. National Environmental Information Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture Contributing to the Australian Government National Plan for Environmental Information initiative #12;National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture v1.1 Environmental Information Programme Publication Series

  9. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States); Zheng, Shao-Liang [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago c/o Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Clardy, Jon, E-mail: jon-clardy@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high-quality data, and will allow construction of chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination.

  10. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others such as {beta}-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm{sup -1}, the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of {alpha}-helices, 14-25% of {beta}-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P < 0.05) proportions of {alpha}-helices (30-34%) than Dolly and Valier ({alpha}-helices 18-23%). Harrington was in between which was 25%. For protein {beta}-sheets, AC Metcalfe, and LP955 consisted of higher proportions (22-25%) than Dolly and Valier (13-17%). Different barley varieties contained different {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratios, ranging from 1.4 to 2.0, although the difference were insignificant (P > 0.05). The ratio of {alpha}-helices to others (0.3 to 1.0, P < 0.05) and that of {beta}-sheets to others (0.2 to 0.8, P < 0.05) were different among the barley varieties. It needs to be pointed out that using a multi-peak modeling for protein structure analysis is only for making relative estimates and not exact determinations and only for the comparison purpose between varieties. The principal component analysis showed that protein amide I Fourier self-deconvolution spectra were different among the barley varieties, indicating that protein internal molecular structure differed. The above results demonstrate the potential of the SFTIRM to localize relatively pure protein areas in barley tissues and reveal protein molecular structure. The results indicated relative differences in protein structures among the barley varieties, which may partly explain the biological differences among the barley varieties. Further study is needed to understand the relationship between barley molecular chemical structure and biological features in terms of nutrient availability and digestive behavior.

  11. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  12. CEMI 2015 National Summit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's (CEMI) 2015 National Summit, stakeholders are invited to share input on national priorities for clean energy manufacturing and explore models for...

  13. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 6, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

  14. Catalysis of PAH Biodegradation by Humic Acid Shown in Synchrotron Infrared Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, UT in the bioremediation of several anthropogenic pollutants, its role in the detoxification of PAHs by microbes remains

  15. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  16. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, Wei

    2009-08-15

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  17. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Internationa...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Unified Combatant Commands, National Nuclear Security Administration, and U.S. industry. Related Links Robotics Weapons-Force Center...

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Life Extension Program Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge SOLAR POWER PURCHASE FOR DOE LABORATORIES More about LLNL...

  20. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collectionmore »times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high-quality data, and will allow construction of chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination.« less

  1. Versatile wide angle diffraction setup for simultaneous wide and small angle x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rueda, D.R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.C.; Nogales, A.; Capitan, M.J.; Ezquerra, T.A.; Labrador, A.; Fraga, E.; Beltran, D.; Juanhuix, J.; Herranz, J.F.; Bordas, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); LLS, BM16-ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-15

    Here we present a novel, simple, and versatile experimental setup aimed to perform wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements alone or in simultaneous combination with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The design of the WAXS goniometer allows one to obtain high resolution diffraction patterns in a broad angular range. The setup can incorporate a hot stage in order to evaluate temperature resolved experiments. The performance of the equipment has been verified in the BM16 beam line of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility with different well known samples such as alumina, isotropic film of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and oriented HPDE fiber.

  2. The Investigations Of Beam Extraction And Collimation At U-70 Proton Synchrotron Of IHEP By Using Short Silicon Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Afonine; V. T. Baranov; V. M. Biryukov; V. N. Chepegin; Y. A. Chesnokov; Y. S. Fedotov; V. I. Kotov; V. A. Maisheev; V. I. Terekhov; E. F. Troyanov; A. Drees; D. Trbojevic; W. Scandale; M. B. H. Breese; V. Guidi; G. Martinelli; M. Stefancich; D. Vincenzi

    2002-07-16

    The new results of using short (2-4mm) bent crystals for extraction and collimation of proton beam at IHEP 70 Gev proton synchrotron are reported. A broad range of energies from 6 to 65 GeV has been studied in the same crystal collimation set-up. The efficiency of extraction more than 85% and intensity more than 10E12 were obtained by using crystal with the length 2-mm and the angle 1 mrad. The new regime of extraction is applied now at the accelerator to deliver the beam for different experimental setups within the range of intensity 10E7-10E12ppp.

  3. Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed by electromigration and studied by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Light Source; UCLA; Chen, Kai; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Valek, Bryan C.; Tu, King-Ning

    2008-05-14

    We report here an in-depth synchrotron radiation based white beam X-ray microdiffraction study of plasticity in individual grains of an Al (Cu) interconnect during the early stage of electromigration. The study shows a rearrangement of the geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) in bamboo typed grains during that stage. We find that about 90percent of the GNDs are oriented so that their line direction is the closest to the current flow direction. In non-bamboo typed grains, the Laue peak positions shift, indicating that the grains rotate. An analysis in terms of force directions has been carried out and is consistent with observed electromigration induced grain rotation and bending.

  4. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  5. Stress-Induced Nitrogen and Oxygen Segregation and Complexing Investigated by High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Ciszek4 1 . Dept. of Materials Science & Eng., North Carolina State University, NC 2 . Dept. of Materials, CA 4 : National Renewable Energy Laboratory, CO Abstract: Nitrogen doped Czochralski (N-CZ) and Float variations and the defect distributions revealed by an Oxygen Precipitate Profiler (OPP), and oxygen

  6. Resonant nuclear scattering of synchrotron radiation: Detector development and specular scattering from a thin layer of {sup 57}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, A.Q.R.

    1995-04-01

    This thesis explores resonant nudear scattering of synchrotron radiation. An introductory chapter describes some useful concepts, such as speedup and coherent enhancement, in the context of some basic physical principles. Methods of producing highly monochromatic synchrotron beams usmg either electronic or nuclear scattering are also discussed. The body of the thesis concentrates on detector development and specular scattering from iynthetic layered materials. A detector employing n-dcrochannel plate electron multipliers is shown to have good ({approximately}50%) effidency for detecting 14.4 key x-rays incident at small ({approximately}0.5 degree) grazing angles onto Au or CsI photocathodes. However, being complicated to use, it was replaced with a large area (>=lan2) avalanche photodiode (APD) detector. The APD`s are simpler to use and have comparable (30--70%) efficiencies at 14.4 key, subnanosecond time resolution, large dynan-dc range (usable at rates up to {approximately}10{sup 8} photons/second) and low (<{approximately}0.01 cts/sec) background rates. Maxwell`s equations are used to derive the specular x-ray reflectivity of layered materials with resonant transitions and complex polarization dependencies. The effects of interfadal roughness are treated with some care, and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) used to describe electronic scattering is generalized to the nuclear case. The implications of the theory are discussed in the context of grazing incidence measurements with emphasis on the kinematic and dynamical aspects of the scattering.

  7. Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

  8. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  9. National Energy Education Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Education Summit is organized by the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL) and will serve as a first-of-its-kind national forum for energy educators, subject...

  10. National Geothermal Summit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) will be holding it’s fifth annual National Geothermal Summit on June 3-4 at the Grand Sierra Resort and Casino in Reno, NV. The National Geothermal Summit is...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    feet underground.

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogbay-area-national-labs-team-tackle-...

  12. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  13. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  14. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  15. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Assessment Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary...

  16. National Geothermal Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geothermal Energy Association hosts its annual National Geothermal Summit in Reno, Nevada, June 3-4, 2015.

  17. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  18. NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop to make it a reality. This Roadmap provides a framework that can make a hydrogen economy a reality

  19. National Center Standardsfor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texts of standards Indexes to millions of industry, national, regional, and international standards U for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 100.975.4040 for an appointment, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.­5:00 p.m. (except Federal holidays). National Institute of Standards

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    samples will then be thinly sliced for state-of-the-art synchrotron X-ray microscopy. (Photo by Jeff McMillan) by Bruce Balfour Sandia researchers have confirmed the...

  1. Oneida Nation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oneida Nation Oneida Nation Oneida Nation More Documents & Publications Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Pueblo de San Ildefonso...

  2. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  3. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    for Environment and National Security Scripps Institution ofMultiplying Threats to National Security Higher temperaturesefforts to protect national security. Page 2 The U.S. Armed

  4. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography,Canada Cronin, J. Keri. Manufacturing National Park Nature:J. Keri Cronin’s book Manufacturing National Park Nature

  5. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  6. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high-quality data, and will allow construction of chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination.

  7. LDAP Browser/Editor: Work Easily with Directories | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating ScheduleUser-Assisted 1

  8. LEP: Extending stockpile life | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating3ledp/ The listing of

  9. LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating3ledp/

  10. ROSAT/ASCA Observations of a Serendipitous BL Lac Object PKS 2316-423: The Variable High-Energy Tail of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui-Jian Xue; You-Hong Zhang; Jian-Sheng Chen

    2000-05-22

    We present the analysis of archival data from ROSAT and ASCA of a serendipitous BL Lac object PKS 2316-423. Because of its featureless non-thermal radio/optical continuum, PKS 2316-423 has been called as a BL Lac candidate in the literature. PKS 2316-423 was evidently variable over the multiple X-ray observations, in particular, a variable high-energy tail of the synchrotron radiation is revealed. The X-ray spectral analysis provides further evidence of the synchrotron nature of its broad-band spectrum: a steep and downward curving spectrum between 0.1--10 keV, typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBL). The spectral energy distribution (SED) through radio-to-X-ray yields the synchrotron radiation peak at frequency Vp=7.3 10^{15} Hz, with integrated luminosity of Lsyn=2.1 10^{44} ergs s^{-1}. The averaged SED properties of PKS 2316-423 are very similar to those ``intermediate'' BL Lac objects (IBL) found recently in several deep surveys, such as Deep X-ray Radio Blazar, Radio-Emitting X-ray, and ROSAT-Green Bank surveys. We suggest that PKS 2316-423 is an IBL though it also shows some general features of a HBL. Actually, this double attribute of PKS 2316-423 provides a good test of the prediction that an IBL object can show either synchrotron or inverse-Compton characteristics in different variability states.

  11. Synchrotron micro-scale measurement of metal distributions in Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia root tissue from an urban brownfield site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Huan; Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank J.; Zhang, Weiguo; Yu, Lizhong; Liu, Chang -Jun; Jones, Keith W.; Tappero, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Liberty State Park in New Jersey, USA, is a “brownfield” site containing various levels of contaminants. To investigate metal uptake and distributions in plants on the brownfield site, Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia were collected in Liberty State Park during the growing season (May–September) in 2011 at two sites with the high and low metal loads, respectively. The objective of this study was to understand the metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn) concentration and spatial distributions in P. australis and T. latifolia root systems with micro-meter scale resolution using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (?XRF) and synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (?CMT)more »techniques. The root structure measurement by synchrotron ?CMT showed that high X-ray attenuation substance appeared in the epidermis. Synchrotron ?XRF measurement showed that metal concentrations and distributions in the root cross-section between epidermis and vascular tissue were statistically different. Significant correlations were found between metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) and Fe in the epidermis, implying that metals were scavenged by Fe oxides. The results from this study suggest that the expression of metal transport and accumulation within the root systems may be element specific. The information derived from this study can improve our current knowledge of the wetland plant ecological function in brownfield remediation.« less

  12. Measuring the Josephson plasma resonance in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 using intense coherent THz synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is produced with orders of magnitude more intensity than conventional thermal and synchrotron sources. Using low-energy region. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.69.092512 PACS number s : 74.72. h, 07.57.Hm, 41.60.Ap, 74 are enabled across a diverse array of disciplines: con- densed matter physics, medicine, manufacturing

  13. A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growingA 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests

  14. Sandia Energy - National SCADA Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National SCADA Testbed Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure National...

  15. Microsoft Word - SSRL_LCLS_User_Shipping_Request_Form_hazmat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Material) Will this be shipped to a location outside of the U.S.? No Yes If yes, user must complete Power of Attorney and certify concurrence with terms and...

  16. LCLS-scheduling-run_6_Ver4.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon...

  17. CSPAD-140k - A Versatile Detector for LCLS Experiments (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLECOMPENSATIONphages in

  18. CSPAD-140k - A Versatile Detector for LCLS Experiments (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLECOMPENSATIONphages inSciTech

  19. LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols(Technical Report) |Connect LC Recommendations

  20. LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols(Technical Report) |Connect LC

  1. Femtosecond Synchronization of Laser Systems for the LCLS (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech Connect Fe AtomicSciTech Connect

  2. Femtosecond Synchronization of Laser Systems for the LCLS (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech Connect Fe AtomicSciTech

  3. PERSONNEL PROTECTION SYSTEM UPGRADE FOR THE LCLS ELECTRON BEAM LINAC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to(Conference) |ofPDV workshop

  4. PERSONNEL PROTECTION SYSTEM UPGRADE FOR THE LCLS ELECTRON BEAM LINAC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to(Conference) |ofPDV workshop(Conference) | SciTech

  5. LCLS-II EA Preliminary Draft 4-1-14

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchensKristinSupplement

  6. LCLS - Contributions to the 20-Year BES Facilities Roadmap Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions to the

  7. LCLS CDR Chapter 13 - Environment Safety and Health and QA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA1 13

  8. LCLS CDR Chapter 5 - FEL Parameters and Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions toA145

  9. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and defect selective etching analysis of threading dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sintonen, Sakari, E-mail: sakari.sintonen@aalto.fi; Suihkonen, Sami; Jussila, Henri; Tuomi, Turkka O.; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Rudzi?ski, Mariusz [Epitaxy Department, Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Knetzger, Michael; Meissner, Elke [Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Danilewsky, Andreas [Kristallographie Institut für Geo- und Umweltnaturwissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-08-28

    The crystal quality of bulk GaN crystals is continuously improving due to advances in GaN growth techniques. Defect characterization of the GaN substrates by conventional methods is impeded by the very low dislocation density and a large scale defect analysis method is needed. White beam synchrotron radiation x-ray topography (SR-XRT) is a rapid and non-destructive technique for dislocation analysis on a large scale. In this study, the defect structure of an ammonothermal c-plane GaN substrate was recorded using SR-XRT and the image contrast caused by the dislocation induced microstrain was simulated. The simulations and experimental observations agree excellently and the SR-XRT image contrasts of mixed and screw dislocations were determined. Apart from a few exceptions, defect selective etching measurements were shown to correspond one to one with the SR-XRT results.

  10. Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeet, Justin; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 \\mbox{eV}$ and $8.8 \\mbox{eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2)\\mbox{s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600)\\mbox{s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  11. Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Jeet; Christian Schneider; Scott T. Sullivan; Wade G. Rellergert; Saed Mirzadeh; A. Cassanho; H. P. Jenssen; Eugene V. Tkalya; Eric R. Hudson

    2015-02-18

    We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 {eV}$ and $8.8 {eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2){s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600){s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  12. Synchrotron based infrared imaging and spectroscopy via focal plane array on live fibroblasts in D2O enriched medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaroni, Luca; Zlateva, Theodora; Sarafimov, Blagoj; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wehbe, Katia; Hegg, Eric L.; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2014-03-26

    We tested the viability of using synchrotron based infrared imaging to study biochemical processes inside living cells. As a model system, we studied fibroblast cells exposed to a medium highly enriched with D2O. We could show that the experimental technique allows us to reproduce at the cellular level measurements that are normally performed on purified biological molecules. We can obtain information about lipid conformation and distribution, kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and the formation of concentration gradients of H and O isotopes in water that are associated with cell metabolism. The implementation of the full field technique in a sequential imaging format gives a description of cellular biochemistry and biophysics that contains both spatial and temporal information.

  13. Cleaning up the Legacy of the Cold War: Plutonium Oxides and the Role of Synchrotron Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, David Lewis

    2015-01-21

    The deceptively simple binary formula of AnO2 belies an incredibly complex structural nature, and propensity to form mixed-valent, nonstoichiometric phases of composition AnO2±x. For plutonium, the very formation of PuO2+x has challenged a long-established dogma, and raised fundamental questions for long-term storage and environmental migration. This presentation covers two aspects of Los Alamos synchrotron radiation studies of plutonium oxides: (1) the structural chemistry of laboratory-prepared AnO2+x systems (An = U, Pu; 0 ? x ? 0.25) determined through a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) and x-ray scattering of laboratory prepared samples; and (2) the application of synchrotron radiation towards the decontamination and decommissioning of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Making the case for particle transport mechanisms as the basis of plutonium and americium mobility, rather than aqueous sorption-desorption processes, established a successful scientific basis for the dominance of physical transport processes by wind and water. The scientific basis was successful because it was in agreement with general theory on insolubility of PuO2 in oxidation state IV, results of ultrafiltration analyses of field water/sediment samples, XAFS analyses of soil, sediment, and concrete samples, and was also in general agreement with on-site monitoring data. This understanding allowed Site contractors to rapidly move to application of soil erosion and sediment transport models as the means of predicting plutonium and americium transport, which led to design and application of site-wide soil erosion control technology to help control downstream concentrations of plutonium and americium in streamflow.

  14. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  15. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications TheScience (SC) National2015 | National Nuclear

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guy" and "a very hard worker." Fanelli began his college education in his native Argentina. By 2005, he was stationed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory...

  17. National Laboratory Geothermal Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can find publications, including technical papers and reports, about geothermal technologies, research, and development at the following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories.

  18. National Women's History Month

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  19. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  20. Seneca Nation- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) will install one 1.8-megawatt (MW) wind turbine on tribal common lands near Lake Erie in New York.