National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lcf latent cancer

  1. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarasaki, Y.

    1996-05-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; (1) so-called cold fusion (CF), (2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and (3) accelerator-based D-T (D) neutron source. Through the comparison of the characteristics among ICF, LCF, and MCF, the feasibility of the LCFs is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Latent effects decision analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J. Arlin; Werner, Paul W.

    2004-08-24

    Latent effects on a system are broken down into components ranging from those far removed in time from the system under study (latent) to those which closely effect changes in the system. Each component is provided with weighted inputs either by a user or from outputs of other components. A non-linear mathematical process known as `soft aggregation` is performed on the inputs to each component to provide information relating to the component. This information is combined in decreasing order of latency to the system to provide a quantifiable measure of an attribute of a system (e.g., safety) or to test hypotheses (e.g., for forensic deduction or decisions about various system design options).

  3. ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time ...

  4. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Linda Anne; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  5. Fluctuations, Phase Transitions, and Latent Heat in Short Diblock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase Transitions, and Latent Heat in Short Diblock Copolymers: Comparison of Experiment, Simulation, and Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluctuations, Phase...

  6. Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for supercritical CO2 power cycles for concentrated solar power Title Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat...

  7. Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO₃ films by strain control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO films by strain control of Fermi-surface topology Prev Next Title: Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO films by strain control ...

  8. Search tool plug-in: imploements latent topic feedback

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-23

    IRIS is a search tool plug-in that is used to implement latent topic feedback for enhancing text navigation. It accepts a list of returned documents from an information retrieval wywtem that is generated from keyword search queries. Data is pulled directly from a topic information database and processed by IRIS to determine the most prominent and relevant topics, along with topic-ngrams, associated with the list of returned documents. User selected topics are then used tomore » expand the query and presumabley refine the search results.« less

  9. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  10. Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO₃ films by strain control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LaNiO films by strain control of Fermi-surface topology Prev Next Title: Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO films by strain control of Fermi-surface topology ...

  11. Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Great Plains Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the Southern Great Plains Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Biraud, Sebastien Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Vegetation strongly influences the spatial distribution of surface sensible and latent

  12. Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Salts for CSP Plants | Department of Energy Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Terrafore logo Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP plants. Approach This diagram shows how Terrafore is using a molten salt slurry to improve the

  13. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  14. Latent morpho-semantic analysis : multilingual information retrieval with character n-grams and mutual information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, Brett William; Chew, Peter A.; Abdelali, Ahmed

    2008-08-01

    We describe an entirely statistics-based, unsupervised, and language-independent approach to multilingual information retrieval, which we call Latent Morpho-Semantic Analysis (LMSA). LMSA overcomes some of the shortcomings of related previous approaches such as Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). LMSA has an important theoretical advantage over LSA: it combines well-known techniques in a novel way to break the terms of LSA down into units which correspond more closely to morphemes. Thus, it has a particular appeal for use with morphologically complex languages such as Arabic. We show through empirical results that the theoretical advantages of LMSA can translate into significant gains in precision in multilingual information retrieval tests. These gains are not matched either when a standard stemmer is used with LSA, or when terms are indiscriminately broken down into n-grams.

  15. Primary Energy Efficiency Analysis of Different Separate Sensible and Latent Cooling Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Separate Sensible and Latent cooling (SSLC) has been discussed in open literature as means to improve air conditioning system efficiency. The main benefit of SSLC is that it enables heat source optimization for the different forms of loads, sensible vs. latent, and as such maximizes the cycle efficiency. In this paper I use a thermodynamic analysis tool in order to analyse the performance of various SSLC technologies including: multi-evaporators two stage compression system, vapour compression system with heat activated desiccant dehumidification, and integrated vapour compression with desiccant dehumidification. A primary coefficient of performance is defined and used to judge the performance of the different SSLC technologies at the design conditions. Results showed the trade-off in performance for different sensible heat factor and regeneration temperatures.

  16. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation processmore » including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different

  17. Indirectly heated fluidized bed biomass gasification using a latent heat ballast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletka, R.; Brown, R.; Smeenk, J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this study is to improve the heating value of gas produced during gasification of biomass fuels using an indirectly heated gasifier based on latent heat ballasting. The latent heat ballast consists of lithium fluoride salt encased in tubes suspended in the reactor. The lithium fluoride has a melting point that is near the desired gasification temperature. With the ballast a single reactor operating in a cyclic mode stores energy during a combustion phase and releases it during a pyrolysis phase. Tests were carried out in a fluidized bed reactor to evaluate the concept. The time to cool the reactor during the pyrolysis phase from 1,172 K (1,650 F) to 922 K (1,200 F) increased 102% by use of the ballast system. This extended pyrolysis time allowed 33% more biomass to be gasified during a cycle. Additionally, the total fuel fraction pyrolyzed to produce useful gas increased from 74--80%. Higher heating values of 14.2 to 16.6 MJ/Nm{sup 3} (382--445 Btu/scf) on a dry basis were obtained from the ballasted gasifier.

  18. A Framework for Incorporating General Domain Knowledge into Latent Dirichlet Allocation using First-Order Logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrzejewski, D; Zhu, X; Craven, M; Recht, B

    2011-01-18

    Topic models have been used successfully for a variety of problems, often in the form of application-specific extensions of the basic Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model. Because deriving these new models in order to encode domain knowledge can be difficult and time-consuming, we propose the Fold-all model, which allows the user to specify general domain knowledge in First-Order Logic (FOL). However, combining topic modeling with FOL can result in inference problems beyond the capabilities of existing techniques. We have therefore developed a scalable inference technique using stochastic gradient descent which may also be useful to the Markov Logic Network (MLN) research community. Experiments demonstrate the expressive power of Fold-all, as well as the scalability of our proposed inference method.

  19. Considerations and measurements of latent-heat-storage salts for secondary thermal battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, A.A.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Armijo, J.R.

    1988-05-16

    Given its potential benefits, the practicality of using a latent heat-storage material as the basis for a passive thermal management system is being assessed by Chloride Silent Power Ltd. (CSPL) with technical assistance from Beta Power, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Based on the experience gained in large-scale solar energy storage programs, fused salts were selected as the primary candidates for the heat-storage material. The initial phase of this assessment was directed to an EV battery being designed at CSPL for the ETX-II program. Specific tasks included the identification and characterization of potential fused salts, a determination of placement options for the salts within the battery, and an assessment of the ultimate benefit to the battery system. The results obtained to date for each of these tasks are presented in this paper.

  20. Genetic disruption of KSHV major latent nuclear antigen LANA enhances viral lytic transcriptional program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Qiuhua; Zhou Fuchun; Ye Fengchun; Gao Shoujiang

    2008-09-30

    Following primary infection, KSHV establishes a lifelong persistent latent infection in the host. The mechanism of KSHV latency is not fully understood. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNA) encoded by ORF73 is one of a few viral genes expressed during KSHV latency, and is consistently detected in all KSHV-related malignancies. LANA is essential for KSHV episome persistence, and regulates the expression of viral lytic genes through epigenetic silencing, and inhibition of the expression and transactivation function of the key KSHV lytic replication initiator RTA (ORF50). In this study, we used a genetic approach to examine the role of LANA in regulating KSHV lytic replication program. Deletion of LANA did not affect the expression of its adjacent genes vCyclin (ORF72) and vFLIP (ORF71). In contrast, the expression levels of viral lytic genes including immediate-early gene RTA, early genes MTA (ORF57), vIL-6 (ORF-K2) and ORF59, and late gene ORF-K8.1 were increased before and after viral lytic induction with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium butyrate. This enhanced expression of viral lytic genes was also observed following overexpression of RTA with or without simultaneous chemical induction. Consistent with these results, the LANA mutant cells produced more infectious virions than the wild-type virus cells did. Furthermore, genetic repair of the mutant virus reverted the phenotypes to those of wild-type virus. Together, these results have demonstrated that, in the context of viral genome, LANA contributes to KSHV latency by regulating the expression of RTA and its downstream genes.

  1. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  2. Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, Consuelo Juanita

    2006-12-01

    Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

  3. An indirect latent informational conformity social influence choice model: Formulation and case study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maness, Michael; Cirillo, Cinzia

    2016-11-01

    The current state-of-the-art in social influence models of travel behavior is conformity models with direct benefit social influence effects. Indirect effects have seen limited development, but this paper presents a latent class discrete choice model of an indirect informational conformity hypothesis. Moreover, class membership depends on the proportion of group members who adopt a behavior. Membership into the more informed class causes changes in the preferences of those individuals thus making adoption more attractive. Equilibrium properties are derived for this model showing the possibility of multiple equilibria but under different conditions than the direct-benefit formulations. Social influence elasticity is derivedmore » for both models types. The informational conformity model can represent non-linear elasticity behavior unlike the direct-benefit formulation. Additionally, a two-stage control function is developed to obtain consistent parameter estimates in the presence of an endogenous class membership model covariate that is correlated with choice model unobservables. A case study to study social influence in bicycle ownership in the United States is presented. Our results showed that more informed households had a greater chance of owning a bike due to preference changes with less sensitivity to smaller home footprints and limited incomes. The behavioral hypothesis of positive preference change due to information transfer was confirmed. Observed ownership share closely matched predicted local-level equilibrium in some metropolitan areas but was unable to achieve expected prediction rate within confidence intervals. Finally, the elasticity of social influence was found to range locally from about 0.5% to 1.0%.« less

  4. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating

  5. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables

  6. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  7. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  8. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  9. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  10. Nuclear War Against Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear War Against Cancer 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:March 2016 past issues All Issues submit Nuclear War Against Cancer Los Alamos, in ...

  11. Targeting ILK and {beta}4 integrin abrogates the invasive potential of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Kim, Baek Gil; Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul ; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kang, Suki; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of targeting ILK and integrins for highly aggressive ovarian cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unanticipated synergistic effect for the combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin effectively inhibited the PI3K/Akt/Rac1 cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting of {beta}4 integrin/ILK had potent inhibitory effects in ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Integrins and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are essential to cancerous invasion because they mediate physical interactions with the extracellular matrix, and regulate oncogenic signaling pathways. The purpose of our study is to determine whether deletion of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK, alone or in combination, has antitumoral effects in ovarian cancer. Expression of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 196 ovarian cancer tissue samples. We assessed the effects of depleting these molecules with shRNAs in ovarian cancer cells by Western blot, conventional RT-PCR, cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vitro Rac1 activity assays, and in vivo xenograft formation assays. Overexpression of {beta}4 integrin and ILK in human ovarian cancer specimens was found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. Depletion of these targets efficiently suppresses ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and xenograft tumor formation in vivo. We also demonstrated that single depletion of ILK or combination depletion of {beta}4 integrin/ILK inhibits phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets, p-Ser 473 Akt and p-Thr202/Tyr204 Erk1/2, and activation of Rac1, as well as reduce expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and increase expression of caspase-3 in vitro. In conclusion, targeting {beta}4 integrin combined with ILK can instigate the latent tumorigenic potential and abrogate the invasive potential in ovarian cancer.

  12. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Convergence of the Uncertainty Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, Nathan E.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Mattie, Patrick D.; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the convergence of MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) probabilistic results of offsite consequences for the uncertainty analysis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The consequence metrics evaluated are individual latent-cancer fatality (LCF) risk and individual early fatality risk. Consequence results are presented as conditional risk (i.e., assuming the accident occurs, risk per event) to individuals of the public as a result of the accident. In order to verify convergence for this uncertainty analysis, as recommended by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, a ‘high’ source term from the original population of Monte Carlo runs has been selected to be used for: (1) a study of the distribution of consequence results stemming solely from epistemic uncertainty in the MACCS2 parameters (i.e., separating the effect from the source term uncertainty), and (2) a comparison between Simple Random Sampling (SRS) and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) in order to validate the original results obtained with LHS. Three replicates (each using a different random seed) of size 1,000 each using LHS and another set of three replicates of size 1,000 using SRS are analyzed. The results show that the LCF risk results are well converged with either LHS or SRS sampling. The early fatality risk results are less well converged at radial distances beyond 2 miles, and this is expected due to the sparse data (predominance of “zero” results).

  13. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Beheshti, Afshin; Manickam, Krishnan; Thapar, Upasna; Pena, Louis; Natarajan, Mohan; Hlatky, Lynn; et al

    2015-07-24

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells ’ differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction ofmore » Apurinic Endonucle- ase-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of pro- tons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. In conclusion, the oligoden- drocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendro- cytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects« less

  14. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Beheshti, Afshin; Manickam, Krishnan; Thapar, Upasna; Pena, Louis; Natarajan, Mohan; Hlatky, Lynn; Demple, Bruce; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-07-24

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells ’ differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction of Apurinic Endonucle- ase-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of pro- tons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. In conclusion, the oligoden- drocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendro- cytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects

  15. cancer | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cancer NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer World Cancer Day encourages citizens worldwide to take action, raise awareness, and garner support in the campaign to end cancer. Inherent in NNSA's missions are technological developments for detection, computation, and chemistry-with benefits for cancer research. Scientists at NNSA's laboratories

  16. Bismuth 213 Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    See how INL scientists are increasing supplies of radioactive medical isotopes to treat cancer. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Bismuth 213 Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    See how INL scientists are increasing supplies of radioactive medical isotopes to treat cancer. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Cancer Facts & Figures - 2010

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... among smokers), certain metals (chromium, cadmium, arsenic), 16 Cancer Facts & Figures 2010 some organic chemicals, radiation, air pollution, and a history of tuberculosis. ...

  19. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  20. Role for a region of helically unstable DNA within the Epstein-Barr virus latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP in origin function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polonskaya, Zhanna; Benham, Craig J.; Hearing, Janet . E-mail: jhearing@ms.cc.sunysb.edu

    2004-10-25

    The minimal replicator of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP is composed of two binding sites for the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and flanking inverted repeats that bind the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2. Although not required for minimal replicator activity, additional binding sites for EBNA-1 and TRF2 and one or more auxiliary elements located to the right of the EBNA-1/TRF2 sites are required for the efficient replication of oriP plasmids. Another region of oriP that is predicted to be destabilized by DNA supercoiling is shown here to be an important functional component of oriP. The ability of DNA fragments of unrelated sequence and possessing supercoiled-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) structures, but not fragments characterized by helically stable DNA, to substitute for this component of oriP demonstrates a role for the SIDD region in the initiation of oriP-plasmid DNA replication.

  1. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  2. Early Lung Cancer Detection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

  3. Man o' War Mutation in UDP-α-D-Xylose Synthase Favors the Abortive Catalytic Cycle and Uncovers a Latent Potential for Hexamer Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Jr., Richard M.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Howard, Wesley W.; Wood, Zachary A.

    2015-03-17

    The man o’ war (mow) phenotype in zebrafish is characterized by severe craniofacial defects due to a missense mutation in UDP-α-D-xylose synthase (UXS), an essential enzyme in proteoglycan biosynthesis. The mow mutation is located in the UXS dimer interface ~16 Å away from the active site, suggesting an indirect effect on the enzyme mechanism. We have examined the structural and catalytic consequences of the mow mutation (R236H) in the soluble fragment of human UXS (hUXS), which shares 93% sequence identity with the zebrafish enzyme. In solution, hUXS dimers undergo a concentration-dependent association to form a tetramer. Sedimentation velocity studies show that the R236H substitution induces the formation of a new hexameric species. Using two new crystal structures of the hexamer, we show that R236H and R236A substitutions cause a local unfolding of the active site that allows for a rotation of the dimer interface necessary to form the hexamer. The disordered active sites in the R236H and R236A mutant constructs displace Y231, the essential acid/base catalyst in the UXS reaction mechanism. The loss of Y231 favors an abortive catalytic cycle in which the reaction intermediate, UDP-α-D-4-keto-xylose, is not reduced to the final product, UDP-α-D-xylose. Surprisingly, the mow-induced hexamer is almost identical to the hexamers formed by the deeply divergent UXS homologues from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori (21% and 16% sequence identity, respectively). The persistence of a latent hexamer-building interface in the human enzyme suggests that the ancestral UXS may have been a hexamer.

  4. SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cancer Diagnostics: Combining SQUID-Based Ultra-Low Field MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer ...

  5. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  6. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  7. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  8. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein...

  9. Cancer incidence in the Love Canal area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janerich, D.T.; Burnett, W.S.; Feck, G.; Hoff, M.; Nasca, P.; Polednak, A.P.; Greenwald, P.; Vianna, N.

    1981-06-01

    Data from the New York Cancer Registry show no evidence for higher cancer rates associated with residence near the Love Canal toxic waste burial site in comparison with the entire state outside of New York City. Rates of liver cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia, which were selected for special attention, were not consistently elevated. Among the other cancers studied, a higher rate was noted only for respiratory cancer, but it was not consistent across age groups and appeared to be related to a high rate for the entire city of Niagara Falls. There was no evidence that the lung cancer rate was associated with the toxic wastes buried at the dump site.

  10. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends to produce a higher precipitation rate over some topical regions, it actually well captures the variations in the zonal and meridional means. Among the three reanalyses, ERA-Interim seems to have values close to those of the satellite retrievals especially for GPCP. It is interesting to note that the MMF obtained the best results in the rain forest of Africa even better than those of CFSR and ERA-Interim, when compared to CMORPH. MERRA fails to capture the precipitation in this region. We are now collaborating with Steve Rutledge (CSU) to validate the model results for AMMA 6. MC3E and the diurnal variation of precipitation processes The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a joint field campaign between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. It took place in central Oklahoma during the period April 22 _ June 6, 2011. Some of its major objectives involve the use of CRMs in precipitation science such as: (1) testing the fidelity of CRM simulations via intensive statistical comparisons between simulated and observed cloud properties and latent heating fields for a variety of case types, (2) establishing the limits of CRM space-time integration capabilities for quantitative precipitation estimates, and (3) supporting the development and refinement of physically-based GMI, DPR, and DPR-GMI combined retrieval algorithms using ground-based GPM GV Ku-Ka band radar and CRM simulations. The NASA unified WRF model (nu-WRF) was used for real time forecasts during the field campaign, and ten precipitation events were selected for post mission simulations. These events include well-organized squall lines, scattered storms and quasi-linear storms. A paper focused on the diurnal variation of precipitation will be

  11. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Stratton, Kayla L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  13. Novel targeted therapy for stomach cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel targeted therapy for stomach cancer Novel targeted therapy for stomach cancer This finding has the potential to save thousand of lives a year by delivering a more effective, targeted treatment for cancer patients. October 29, 2015 New research at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute shows a molecular fingerprint in stomach cancer that shows it can be treated with platinum drugs and/or molecular inhibitors known as PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase). New

  14. HIV/Cancer DB Match Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COLLECTION AND VERIFICATION OF DATA FOR MATCHED RECORDS FROM US CANCER AND HIV/AIDS REGISTRIES Janice Watkins, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, T. Borges, Robert Stafford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Robert Biggar, James Goedert, National Cancer Institute Janice Watkins, ORAU, MS 45, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Key Words: AIDS, HIV/AIDS Registry, Cancer Registry, data verification, record matching BACKGROUND Data for investigating cancer rates, cofactors, and disease progression in HIV

  15. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  16. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  18. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2010-01-08

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  19. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  20. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  1. Isotopes for cancer and cardiac care

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotopes for cancer Isotopes for cancer and cardiac care Eva Birnbaum is interviewed on KSFR radio on the Lab's Isotope Program February 4, 2016 hot cell facility A worker uses remote manipulator arms to handle a highly radioactive target inside the Lab's radiochemistry hot cell facility. Isotopes from Los Alamos are used for the diagnosis of cardiac disease, for the calibration of PET scanners which in turn diagnose cancer, neurological disease, inflammatory diseases, trauma, and other

  2. GE Cancer Research | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology "Relay Race" Against Cancer Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Technology "Relay Race" Against Cancer To commemorate National Cancer Research Month, eight researchers joined together in a technology "relay race" against cancer. This video explains some of the

  3. SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining SQUID-Based ... Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: LDRD Country of ...

  4. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print Tuesday, 23 June 2015 13:00 The cancer drug...

  5. Structures of Lung Cancer-Derived EGFR Mutants and Inhibitor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structures of Lung Cancer-Derived EGFR Mutants and Inhibitor Complexes: Mechanism of ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structures of Lung Cancer-Derived EGFR Mutants ...

  6. Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    T3 rectal cancer combined with an endorectal boost Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer combined with ...

  7. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: ...

  8. Cornell dots research collaboration leads to $10M cancer center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at MSKCC in New York City - will focus on melanoma (skin) and malignant brain cancers. ... Assessment of particles in brain tumors for cancer therapy. C dots successfully have ...

  9. Los Alamos researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer Los Alamos researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer Ludmil Alexandrov made strong points this week in the journal Science winning a...

  10. Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major ...

  11. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional ... made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron ...

  12. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein...

  13. Magnetic relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and superparamagnetic nanoparticles for cancer detection. Using SPMR, we sensitively and specifically detect nanoparticles conjugated to biomarkers for various types of cancer. ...

  14. Understanding the origins of human cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, L. B.

    2015-12-04

    All cancers originate from a single cell that starts to behave abnormally, to divide uncontrollably, and, eventually, to invade adjacent tissues (1). The aberrant behavior of this single cell is due to somatic mutations—changes in the genomic DNA produced by the activity of different mutational processes (1). These various mutational processes include exposure to exogenous or endogenous mutagens, abnormal DNA editing, the incomplete fidelity of DNA polymerases, and failure of DNA repair mechanisms (2). Early studies that sequenced TP53, the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer, provided evidence that mutational processes leave distinct imprints of somatic mutations on the genome of a cancer cell (3). For example, C:G>A:T transversions predominate in smoking-associated lung cancer, whereas C:G>T:A transitions occurring mainly at dipyrimidines and CC:GG>TT:AA double-nucleotide substitutions are common in ultraviolet light–associated skin cancers. Moreover, these patterns of mutations matched the ones induced experimentally by tobacco mutagens and ultraviolet light, respectively, the major, known, exogenous carcinogenic influences in these cancer types, and demonstrated that examining patterns of mutations in cancer genomes can yield information about the mutational processes that cause human cancer (4).

  15. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  16. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  17. Understanding the origins of human cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrov, L. B.

    2015-12-04

    All cancers originate from a single cell that starts to behave abnormally, to divide uncontrollably, and, eventually, to invade adjacent tissues (1). The aberrant behavior of this single cell is due to somatic mutations—changes in the genomic DNA produced by the activity of different mutational processes (1). These various mutational processes include exposure to exogenous or endogenous mutagens, abnormal DNA editing, the incomplete fidelity of DNA polymerases, and failure of DNA repair mechanisms (2). Early studies that sequenced TP53, the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer, provided evidence that mutational processes leave distinct imprints of somatic mutations on themore » genome of a cancer cell (3). For example, C:G>A:T transversions predominate in smoking-associated lung cancer, whereas C:G>T:A transitions occurring mainly at dipyrimidines and CC:GG>TT:AA double-nucleotide substitutions are common in ultraviolet light–associated skin cancers. Moreover, these patterns of mutations matched the ones induced experimentally by tobacco mutagens and ultraviolet light, respectively, the major, known, exogenous carcinogenic influences in these cancer types, and demonstrated that examining patterns of mutations in cancer genomes can yield information about the mutational processes that cause human cancer (4).« less

  18. Diet and Cancer Are Cooked Meats Involved

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01

    Diet has been associated with differences in cancer rates in human populations for many years. Mark Knize presents the latest research on cancer causes including work performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory investigating some interesting chemical products created when meat is cooked and how to reduce them. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 11542

  19. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy Technology available for licensing: A successful and cost-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive areas of the body. Cost-effective Can treat cancer in inoperable or radiation-sensitive areas PDF icon e-beam_cancer_therapy

  1. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  2. NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) work aids in fight against cancer Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 4:51pm World Cancer Day encourages citizens worldwide to take action, raise awareness, and garner support in the campaign to end cancer. Inherent in NNSA's missions are technological developments for detection, computation, and chemistry-with benefits for cancer research. Scientists at NNSA's laboratories receive both federal and private recognition for their work that has a huge impact on cancer research.

  3. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein kinases found in normal, healthy cells. It has been widely used to fight colon cancers and chronic myeloid leukemia. The protein kinase Abl is involved in regulating cell growth. Protein kinases have in general been the target of many cancer drug designs, since

  4. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein kinases found in normal, healthy cells. It has been widely used to fight colon cancers and chronic myeloid leukemia. The protein kinase Abl is involved in regulating cell growth. Protein kinases have in general been the target of many cancer drug designs, since

  5. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein kinases found in normal, healthy cells. It has been widely used to fight colon cancers and chronic myeloid leukemia. The protein kinase Abl is involved in regulating cell growth. Protein kinases have in general been the target of many cancer drug designs, since

  6. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein kinases found in normal, healthy cells. It has been widely used to fight colon cancers and chronic myeloid leukemia. The protein kinase Abl is involved in regulating cell growth. Protein kinases have in general been the target of many cancer drug designs, since

  7. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print Tuesday, 23 June 2015 13:00 The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein kinase Blc-Abl, while not targeting homologous protein kinases found in normal, healthy cells. It has been widely used to fight colon cancers and chronic myeloid leukemia. The protein kinase Abl is involved in regulating cell

  8. WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with Tumor Radioresistence: An Indication for Individualized Breast Cancer Therapy Adapted to Cancer Stem Cell Fractions ...

  9. Breast Density and Cancer | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breast Cancer Awareness Series: Understanding Breast Density Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in ...

  10. Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. August 20, 2012 Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin foil target. Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin foil target. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano

  11. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the

  12. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the doseresponse relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched casecontrol study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ?5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation doseresponse relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear doseresponse relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  13. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  14. Occult Breast Cancer: Scintimammography with High-Resolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Occult Breast Cancer: Scintimammography with High-Resolution Breast-specific Gamma Camera in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Occult ...

  15. Our Role in the War on Cancer | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Role in the War on Cancer Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share ... Our Role in the War on Cancer Ernest Kovacs 2011.05.26 This year marks the 40th ...

  16. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Wednesday, 27 February 2008 00:00 The veil has ...

  17. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme...

  18. Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Print Thursday, 12 December 2013 11:55 ras protein The new...

  19. Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility New capability expands existing program, creates treatment product in quantity. April 13, 2012 Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward - Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Research indicates that it

  20. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  1. Study Finds Potential New Biomarker for Cancer Patient Prognosis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Finds Potential New Biomarker for Cancer Patient Prognosis A new study links the overexpression of 14 genes related to cell division to cancer patients' prognosis and response to specific treatments. The findings could be used to develop a biomarker used to make more informed decisions about cancer therapy. ← Previous

  2. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  3. Colon Cancer Mapping | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vanderbilt, GE Team Seek Deeper Understanding of Colon Cancer Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Vanderbilt, GE Team Seek Deeper Understanding of Colon Cancer Vanderbilt University has partnered with GE Global Research, the technology development arm for the General Electric Company (NYSE: GE), to better

  4. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  5. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  6. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2012-04-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  7. Downregulation of tumor suppressor QKI in gastric cancer and its implication in cancer prognosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, Yongqian [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Wang, Li; Lu, Huanyu; Yang, Guodong [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Zhang, Zhang [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Fu, Haiyan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wei, Mengying [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Sun, Jianyong; Zhao, Qingchuan [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Dong, Guanglong, E-mail: gldong301@gmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China) [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Department of General Surgery, The General Hospital of the PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Lu, Zifan, E-mail: luzfliuq@fmmu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI expression is decreased in gastric cancer samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Promoter hyper methylation contributes to the downregulation of QKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased QKI expression predicts poor survival. -- Abstract: Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. RNA-binding protein Quaking (QKI) is a newly identified tumor suppressor in multiple cancers, while its role in GC is largely unknown. Our study here aimed to clarify the relationship between QKI expression with the clinicopathologic characteristics and the prognosis of GC. In the 222 GC patients' specimens, QKI expression was found to be significantly decreased in most of the GC tissues, which was largely due to promoter hypermethylation. QKI overexpression reduced the proliferation ability of GC cell line in vitro study. In addition, the reduced QKI expression correlated well with poor differentiation status, depth of invasion, gastric lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage, and poor survival. Multivariate analysis showed QKI expression was an independent prognostic factor for patient survival.

  8. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  9. Translating the cancer genome: Going beyond p values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Lynda; Chin, Lynda; Gray, Joe W.

    2008-04-03

    Cancer cells are endowed with diverse biological capabilities driven by myriad inherited and somatic genetic and epigenetic aberrations that commandeer key cancer-relevant pathways. Efforts to elucidate these aberrations began with Boveri's hypothesis of aberrant mitoses causing cancer and continue today with a suite of powerful high-resolution technologies that enable detailed catalogues of genomic aberrations and epigenomic modifications. Tomorrow will likely bring the complete atlas of reversible and irreversible alteration in individual cancers. The challenge now is to discern causal molecular abnormalities from genomic and epigenomic 'noise', to understand how the ensemble of these aberrations collaborate to drive cancer pathophysiology. Here, we highlight lessons learned from now classical examples of successful translation of genomic discoveries into clinical practice, lessons that may be used to guide and accelerate translation of emerging genomic insights into practical clinical endpoints that can impact on practice of cancer medicine.

  10. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  11. Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Harrison, R.J. ; Vzquez-Mayagoitia, A. ; Hammond, J.R. 1 ; Stony Brook University) 2 + Show Author Affiliations (LCF) LCF ( Publication Date: 2013-09-16 OSTI ...

  12. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  13. COLLOQUIUM: Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenges | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab May 25, 2016, 1:30pm to 2:45pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium, PPPL (284 cap.) COLLOQUIUM: Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges Dr. Dennis Mah ProCure Proton Therapy Center This presentation will provide a physicist's perspective on a proton therapy for cancer treatment. It will include a context of how radiation therapy fits into cancer management overall with an emphasis on the differences between proton and conventional

  14. Los Alamos researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer Los Alamos researcher pens prizewinning essay on cancer Ludmil Alexandrov made strong points this week in the journal Science winning a 2015 Science & SciLifeLab Prize, on "Understanding the Origins of Human Cancer." December 6, 2015 The international prize is awarded annually to four young scientists for outstanding life science research for which he or she earned a doctoral degree in the previous two years. The international prize is

  15. Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major quantities of a new cancer-treatment agent, actinium 225 (Ac-225). April 11, 2012 Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments.

  16. Jefferson Lab Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer PEM This PEM image shows two cancerous lesions. The one on the right was depicted by conventional mammography, but the one on the left was only identified by the PEM unit. Image courtesy: Eric Rosen, Duke University Medical Center Jefferson Lab Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer March 3, 2005 Newport News, VA - A study published in the February issue of the journal Radiology shows that a positron emission mammography (PEM) device designed and built by Jefferson

  17. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  18. Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy PurposeTo ...

  19. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE ...

  20. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Print Immortality is not a ... it more rigid, essentially locking it in the correct geometry for target interactions. ...

  1. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally ... transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. ...

  2. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment Technology available for licensing: A 3D technique to detect early skin changes due to radiation treatment in breast...

  3. World Cancer Day 2015: Not Beyond Us | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World Cancer Day 2015: Not Beyond Us Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) World Cancer Day 2015: Not Beyond Us Mark Frontera 2015.02.05 Yesterday, Feb. 4, marked World Cancer Day, a day set aside each year to raise awareness about cancer worldwide. This year's theme, "not beyond us," speaks to the

  4. Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to spin-off field: Development of new radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and cancer therapy. The Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) runs parasitically off of the Brookhaven ...

  5. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  6. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  7. Protocadherin-7 induces bone metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ai-Min; Tian, Ai-Xian; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Ge, Jie; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Xu-Chen; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: PCDH7 is overexpression in high bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. PCDH7 is up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues. Suppression of PCDH7 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. PCDH7 induces breast cancer bone metastasis in vivo. -- Abstract: Breast cancer had a propensity to metastasize to bone, resulting in serious skeletal complications associated with poor outcome. Previous study showed that Protocadherin-7 (PCDH7) play an important role in brain metastatic breast cancer, however, the role of PCDH7 in bone metastatic breast cancer has never been explored. In the present study, we found that PCDH7 expression was up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry assays. Furthermore, suppression of PCDH7 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro by MTT, scratch, and transwell assays. Most importantly, overexpression of PCDH7 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and formation of bone metastasis in vivo. These data provide an important insight into the role of PCDH7 in bone metastasis of breast cancer.

  8. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves...

  9. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  10. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  11. Using HEP Technology to Fight Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Du, Patrick

    2004-06-30

    Many engineering and physics HEP groups are now collaborating with medical doctors and biomedical scientists to develop new modern and 'state of the art' radiation instruments for cancer diagnostics and treatment. This presentation will review some of these studies, oriented towards the imaging fields for diagnostic (Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography) and particle therapy for tumor treatment (from proton to light ions). I will try, using appropriate examples, to show what are the challenges and where the development of HEP concepts, tools and techniques can be used.

  12. Endoscopic Radiation Revolutionizes Cancer Treatment - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Endoscopic Radiation Revolutionizes Cancer Treatment Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> <em>Conventional X-ray radiation and electron beam therapy: a comparison</em></p> <p> <em>Left: Conventional treatment depositing energy into tissue as a function of distance for three 250-kV X-ray beams; Right: Electron beam treatment depositing energy into tissue for a 3-MeV electron beam as a function of distance, with the zero

  13. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment Technology available for licensing: A 3D technique to detect early skin changes due to radiation treatment in breast cancer patients. Lowers medical costs due to lessened side effects Noninvasive, enhances healing and detects other conditions PDF icon thermal_tomography

  14. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Leung, Suet Yi; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer and demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.

  15. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-01-01

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  16. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2013-05-29

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  17. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  18. Method for detecting the presence of prostate cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karin, Michael; Luo, Jun-Li; Tan, Wei

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for cancer diagnosis, treatment and drug screening. In particular, the present invention provides compositions and methods for targeting the nuclear translocation of IkB kinase-.alpha. (IKK.alpha.) and the IKK.alpha.-mediated suppression of Maspin expression observed in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  19. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Leung, Suet Yi; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer andmore » demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.« less

  20. BRCA1-linked marker in postmenopausal breast cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folsom, A.R.; Chen, P.L.; Sellers, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    A majority of breast and ovarian cancer families and half of the early-onset breast cancer families are linked to markers on 17q (BRCA1). While linkage has been demonstrated in families with premenopausal disease, few studies have tested these markers in families with postmenopausal breast cancer. In the Iowa Women`s Health Study, a population-based study of over 42,000 women, an association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was found predominantly in women with a positive family history -- this interaction was associated with a 3.2-fold elevated risk. This effect was even more pronounced when the definition of family history included breast and ovarian cancer, known to be linked to 17q markers. We evaluated evidence for linkage with D17S579, a BRCA-1-linked marker, in 13 families in which the index case had postmenopausal breast cancer. Genotyping for alleles at D17S579 was performed on 84 blood samples. Linkage analysis assumed that the breast cancer trait had an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with a penetrance of 80%. For the 13 families studied, the maximum lod score was 0.29 at a theta of 0.27. There was significant evidence against tight linkage of breast cancer with D17S579 (theta<0.4). Heterogeneity analysis suggested evidence for the presence of both linked and unlinked families. Partitioning informative families on WHR of the index case suggested heterogeneity. These data suggest that, in a subset of families identified by a postmenopausal breast cancer proband, risk of breast cancer may be mediated by BRCA1, with heterogeneity defined by WHR.

  1. Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2007-10-09

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

  2. Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Ken-ichirou . E-mail: mken@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ogata, Seiji; Tahara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Shoko; Sakata, Masahiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2007-04-27

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In our previous study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating Rho activation [K. Hashimoto, K. Morishige, K. Sawada, M. Tahara, S. Shimizu, M. Sakata, K. Tasaka, Y. Murata, Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro. Cancer 103 (2005) 1529-1536.]. In the present study, GGA treatment inhibited ovarian cancer progression in vitro and suppressed the tumor growth and ascites in the in vivo ovarian cancer model. In vitro analysis, treatment of cancer cells by GGA resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the inactivation of Ras, and the suppression of tyrosine phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, this is the first report that GGA inhibited ovarian cancer progression and the anti-tumor effect by GGA is, at least in part, derived not only from the suppression of Rho activation but also Ras-MAPK activation.

  3. Practice Patterns of Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer Among Member Groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nick; Toita, Takafumi; Pignata, Sandro; Blake, Peter; Portelance, Lorraine; Sadoyze, Azmat; Poetter, Richard; Colombo, Alessandro; Randall, Marcus; Mirza, Mansoor R.; Trimble, Edward L.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. Results: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy (mean + SD) and 79.1 + 7.9 Gy, respectively. Point A doses were not different between the North American cooperative groups compared with the others (p = 0.103). All groups used concomitant chemotherapy, with 30 of 36 respondents using weekly cisplatin. Of 33 respondents, 31 intervened for a low hemoglobin level. For a para-aortic field, the upper border was most commonly (15 of 24) at the T12-L1 interspace. Maintenance chemotherapy (after radiotherapy) was not performed by 68% of respondents. For vaginal brachytherapy after hysterectomy, 23 groups performed HDR brachytherapy and four groups used LDR brachytherapy. In the use of brachytherapy, there was no uniformity in dose prescription. Conclusions: Radiotherapy practices among member groups of the GCIG are similar in terms of both doses and use of chemotherapy.

  4. The Kauai Skin Cancer Study--1983 to 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reizner, G.T. )

    1993-05-01

    The Kauai Skin Cancer Study began as a modest effort in 1983 to look at this island's skin cancer incidence. David Elpern MD, Kauai's only dermatologist at the time, was interested in the large number of these tumors in his practice. He first enlisted his office staff to help keep track of the numbers and type of these skin cancers. Along with this information, the basic demographic data on each patient was collected. These records became the first entries into what has become a decade-long project.

  5. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  6. Protein Modifications as Potential Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-11-30

    A variety of post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) are known to be altered as a result of cancer development. Thus, these PTMs are potentially useful biomarkers for breast cancer. Mass spectrometry, antibody microarrays and immunohistochemistry techniques have shown promise for identifying changes in PTMs. In this review, we summarize the current literature on PTMs identified in the plasma and tumor tissue of breast-cancer patients or in breast cell lines. We also discuss some of the analytical techniques currently being used to evaluate PTMs.

  7. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minafra, L.; Bravat, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  8. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  10. Saving Adam With Pediatric Cancer Research | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pediatric Cancer Research Increases the Odds of Saving Adam Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in ...

  11. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the...

  12. Cancer mortality and residence near petrochemical industries in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Chiu, Jeng-Fen

    1997-02-21

    An ecologic study design was used to investigate the relationship between cancer risks and residence in communities adjacent to petrochemical industrial counties (PICs). Directly age-adjusted mortality rates for cancer during 1982-1991 among 16 counties characterized by a heavy concentration of petrochemical industries were compared to rates among 16 matched counties with similar concentration of nonpetrochemical manufacturing industries, urbanization level, and demographic characteristics. An excess rate for liver cancer among males was found in the so-called PICs. The correlation could not be explained by confounding variables such as urbanization, socioeconomic class, or employment in nonpetrochemical industries. No other increased cancer risks were found to be associated with residence near petrochemical industries. 30 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on ...

  14. Doctor Patient Conversation Around Breast Cancer | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doctor Patient Conversation Around Breast Cancer Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window)...

  15. Technology Relay Race in Cancer Prevention Research | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Relay Race in Cancer Prevention Research Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  16. Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software speeds detection of diseases Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets The Lab has released an updated version of software that is now capable of ...

  17. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and...

  18. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 13, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle Medicines Mark E. Davis Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology CNMS D D I I...

  19. 6.21 Improving Neutron Beams for Cancer Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 612011 6.21 Improving Neutron Beams for Cancer Treatment Beams of neutrons long have been used in scientific experiments, but recently, for the first time, a novel type of...

  20. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism...

  1. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Print Immortality is not a good thing for cells, and in fact, cells will destroy themselves in a process called...

  2. Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 9, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges Dr. Dennis Mah ProCure Proton Therapy Center Colloquium...

  3. Scanxiety: Waiting anxiously for childhood cancer test results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results that could change your life Mark Frontera 2015.09.18 September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and we are publishing a series of blog posts to share stories about...

  4. Genomics at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Johar

    2010-06-02

    Johar Ali of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research discusses genomics and next-gen applications at the OICR on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  5. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martineau, Rebecca M

    2012-07-26

    In the United States, one in eight women will be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed - as well as the second most fatal - cancer in American women. It is estimated that there will be nearly 200,000 diagnoses of breast cancer this year; more than 40,000 of these will be fatal. Although advances in medical technologies have greatly increased the odds of surviving the disease, the increase in screenings has not resulted in a significant reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate. Moreover, recent studies have even suggested that an increase in these methods might, in itself, cause cancer. A new tool for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, supported by an award from the Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs of Department of Defense, could give women a new advantage in the fight against breast cancer. This LANL-led project will integrate ultrasound tomography (UST) with recent discoveries in the field of cell and tissue biomechanics to improve breast cancer detection and characterization. UST uses ultrasound waves instead of X-rays to identify and characterize breast tumors. This technology reveals small mechanical-property changes within the breast. These changes are often the earliest signs of breast cancer. Additionally, UST is effective for women with dense breast tissue, who have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Because the technology does not use radiation, UST can also be used as frequently as needed for women with a high risk of developing breast cancer. In contrast, mammography, the only routine breast-cancer screening tool currently available, is not effective for women with dense breast tissue and may come with unwanted side-effects caused by ionizing radiation. UST has great potential to become an alternative breast-cancer screening tool because of UST's advantages and benefits over mammography

  6. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belinsky, Steven A.; Palmisano, William A.

    2007-05-08

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  7. OSTIblog Articles in the pancreatic cancer Topic | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pancreatic cancer Topic Where Do New Scientists Come From? by Philip Ellis 07 Feb, 2013 in ... Thus the reality is that "new" scientists come from the general public fortuitously, and ...

  8. New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) A better way to screen chemicals that may cause cancer is under development. This image shows in two dimensions what Berkeley lab scientists are working to achieve in three dimensions: cultures containing diverse cell types (seen here using

  9. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  10. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  11. Research Sheds Light on Workings of Anti-cancer Drug

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Sheds Light on Workings of Anti-cancer Drug The copper sequestering drug tetrathiomolybdate (TM) has been shown in studies to be effective in the treatment of Wilson disease, a disease caused by an overload of copper, and certain metastatic cancers. That much is known. Very little, however, is known about how the drug works at the molecular level. A new study led by Northwestern University researchers now has provided an invaluable clue: the three-dimensional structure of TM bound to

  12. Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Calculations Run at NERSC Pinpoint Rare Mutants More Quickly November 3, 2014 Contact: David Cameron, 617.432.0441, david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu cancermutations3 Heat map of the average magnitude of interaction energies projected onto a structural representation of SH2 domains (white) in complex with phosphopeptide (green). SH2 (Src Homology 2) is a protein domain found in many

  13. Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment At the Bradbury Latest Issue:September 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment The insights from this study could provide the needed chemical information to develop ways to bind actinium so that it can be safely transported through the body to the tumor cell. September 1, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the

  14. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  15. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  16. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  17. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  18. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight

  19. Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment The insights from this study could provide the needed chemical information to develop ways to bind actinium so that it can be safely transported through the body to the tumor cell. August 17, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  20. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  1. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braeuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Claus E.; Sorensen, Mette; Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana; Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen ; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  2. Microsatellite instability is rare in sporadic ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.S.; Han, H.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII, 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.

  3. Assessment of Latent Heat Reservoirs for Thermal Management of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    During the early portion of the pulse, heating of the diode and its surrounding material ... Subject: 42 ENGINEERING; CAPACITY; FUSION HEAT; GALLIUM; HEAT FLUX; HEAT TRANSFER; ...

  4. Assessment of Latent Heat Reservoirs for Thermal Management of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... During the early portion of the pulse, heating of the diode and its surrounding material ... Subject: 42 ENGINEERING; CAPACITY; FUSION HEAT; GALLIUM; HEAT FLUX; HEAT TRANSFER; ...

  5. Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terrafore logo Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP ...

  6. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  7. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan)] [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  9. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  11. Subclonal diversification of primary breast cancer revealed by multiregion sequencing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yates, Lucy R.; Gerstung, Moritz; Knappskog, Stian; Desmedt, Christine; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Aas, Turid; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Larsimont, Denis; Davies, Helen; et al

    2015-06-22

    Sequencing cancer genomes may enable tailoring of therapeutics to the underlying biological abnormalities driving a particular patient's tumor. However, sequencing-based strategies rely heavily on representative sampling of tumors. To understand the subclonal structure of primary breast cancer, we applied whole-genome and targeted sequencing to multiple samples from each of 50 patients' tumors (303 samples in total). The extent of subclonal diversification varied among cases and followed spatial patterns. No strict temporal order was evident, with point mutations and rearrangements affecting the most common breast cancer genes, including PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, BRCA2 and MYC, occurring early in some tumors and latemore » in others. In 13 out of 50 cancers, potentially targetable mutations were subclonal. Landmarks of disease progression, such as resistance to chemotherapy and the acquisition of invasive or metastatic potential, arose within detectable subclones of antecedent lesions. These findings highlight the importance of including analyses of subclonal structure and tumor evolution in clinical trials of primary breast cancer.« less

  12. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruheim, Kjersti, E-mail: Kjersti.bruheim@medisin.uio.n [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Guren, Marianne G. [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Dahl, Alv A. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Skovlund, Eva [School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Balteskard, Lise [University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromso (Norway); Carlsen, Erik [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Fossa, Sophie D. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  13. Subclonal diversification of primary breast cancer revealed by multiregion sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, Lucy R.; Gerstung, Moritz; Knappskog, Stian; Desmedt, Christine; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Aas, Turid; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Larsimont, Denis; Davies, Helen; Li, Yilong; Ju, Young Seok; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Lilleng, Peer Kaare; Nik-Zainal, Serena; McLaren, Stuart; Butler, Adam; Martin, Sancha; Glodzik, Dominic; Menzies, Andrew; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jonathan; Jones, David; Mudie, Laura J.; Jiang, Bing; Vincent, Delphine; Greene-Colozzi, April; Adnet, Pierre -Yves; Fatima, Aquila; Maetens, Marion; Ignatiadis, Michail; Stratton, Michael R.; Sotiriou, Christos; Richardson, Andrea L.; Lønning, Per Eystein; Wedge, David C.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-06-22

    Sequencing cancer genomes may enable tailoring of therapeutics to the underlying biological abnormalities driving a particular patient's tumor. However, sequencing-based strategies rely heavily on representative sampling of tumors. To understand the subclonal structure of primary breast cancer, we applied whole-genome and targeted sequencing to multiple samples from each of 50 patients' tumors (303 samples in total). The extent of subclonal diversification varied among cases and followed spatial patterns. No strict temporal order was evident, with point mutations and rearrangements affecting the most common breast cancer genes, including PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, BRCA2 and MYC, occurring early in some tumors and late in others. In 13 out of 50 cancers, potentially targetable mutations were subclonal. Landmarks of disease progression, such as resistance to chemotherapy and the acquisition of invasive or metastatic potential, arose within detectable subclones of antecedent lesions. These findings highlight the importance of including analyses of subclonal structure and tumor evolution in clinical trials of primary breast cancer.

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  15. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory ...

  16. Pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3'UTR promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3'UTR promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer Highlights: * A new ... were studied. * The mechanism provides new insights for the breast cancer progression. ...

  17. Linkage analysis of 19 French breast cancer families, with five chromosome 17q markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazoyer, S.; Jamot, B.; Sobol, H. ); Lalle, P.; Bignon, Y.J.; Courjal, F. ); Narod, S.A. ); Dutrillaux, B.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D. )

    1993-04-01

    Nineteen French breast and breast-ovarian cancer families were tested for linkage with five chromosome 17q markers. The five breast-ovarian cancer families as a group give positive evidence for linkage, whereas the 14 breast cancer-only families do not. Heterogeneity of linkage of breast and breast-ovarian cancers is significant in France and supports the existence of more than one susceptibility gene. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Science on the Hill: Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treatment Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment A new study at LANL and in collaboration with Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource greatly improves scientists' understanding of the element actinium whose short offers opportunity for new alpha-emitting drugs to treat cancer. August 22, 2016 Molecule Hot cell facility Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment A new study at Los

  19. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment (ANL-IN-07-170)

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2012-02-07

    Because they grow more quickly than healthy cells, cancer cells are typically a few degrees higher in temperature. This attribute makes it possible to detect cancer cells through thermal imaging. In active thermal imaging, heat or cold is applied to an object and an infrared camera is used to observe the resulting temperature change. For this reason, thermal imaging is helpful in detecting breast cancer and determining skin damage as a result of radiation cancer treatment. A recent...

  20. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Maihle, Nita J.

    2011-11-01

    The stark difference in clinical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed at early stages (95% at 5 years) versus late stages (27.6% at 5 years) has driven a decades-long quest for effective biomarkers that will enable earlier detection of ovarian cancer. Yet despite intense efforts, including the application of modern high throughput technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, there has been little improvement in performance compared to the gold standard of quantifying serum CA125 immunoreactivity paired with transvaginal ultrasound. This review describes the strategies that have been used for identification of ovarian cancer biomarkers, including the recent introduction of novel bioinformatic approaches. Results obtained using high throughput-based vs. biologically rational approaches for the discovery of diagnostic early detection biomarkers are compared and analyzed for functional enrichment.

  1. Magnetic relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection and localization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    De Haro, Leyma P.; Karaulanov, Todor; Vreeland, Erika C.; Anderson, Bill; Hathaway, Helen J.; Huber, Dale L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nettles, Christopher P.; Price, Andrew D.; Monson, Todd C.; et al

    2015-06-02

    Here we describe superparamagnetic relaxometry (SPMR), a technology that utilizes highly sensitive magnetic sensors and superparamagnetic nanoparticles for cancer detection. Using SPMR, we sensitively and specifically detect nanoparticles conjugated to biomarkers for various types of cancer. SPMR offers high contrast In SPMR measurements, a brief magnetizing pulse is used to align superparamagnetic nanoparticles of a discrete size. Following the pulse, an array of superconducting quantum interference detectors (SQUID) sensors detect the decaying magnetization field. NP size is chosen so that, when bound, the induced field decays in seconds. They are functionalized with specific biomarkers and incubated with cancer cellsmore » As a result, superparamagnetic NPs developed here have small size dispersion. Cell incubation studies measure specificity for different cell lines and antibodies with very high contrast.« less

  2. Biofunctionalized magnetic vortex microdisks for targeted cancer cell destruction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.-H.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Ulasov, I. V.; Bader, S. D.; Rajh, T.; Lesniak, M. S.; Novosad, V.; Univ. of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2010-01-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics and activating mechanosensitive ion channels, as well as for advancing cancer therapies. Most experimental works so far have used superparamagnetic materials. This report describes a first approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs that possess a spin-vortex ground state. When an alternating magnetic field is applied the microdisc vortices shift, creating an oscillation, which transmits a mechanical force to the cell. Because reduced sensitivity of cancer cells toward apoptosis leads to inappropriate cell survival and malignant progression, selective induction of apoptosis is of great importance for the anticancer therapeutic strategies. We show that the spin-vortex-mediated stimulus creates two dramatic effects: compromised integrity of the cellular membrane, and initiation of programmed cell death. A low-frequency field of a few tens of hertz applied for only ten minutes was sufficient to achieve {approx}90% cancer-cell destruction in vitro.

  3. Magnetic relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection and localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Haro, Leyma P.; Karaulanov, Todor; Vreeland, Erika C.; Anderson, Bill; Hathaway, Helen J.; Huber, Dale L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nettles, Christopher P.; Price, Andrew D.; Monson, Todd C.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2015-06-02

    Abstract

    Here we describe superparamagnetic relaxometry (SPMR), a technology that utilizes highly sensitive magnetic sensors and superparamagnetic nanoparticles for cancer detection. Using SPMR, we sensitively and specifically detect nanoparticles conjugated to biomarkers for various types of cancer. SPMR offers high contrast

    In SPMR measurements, a brief magnetizing pulse is used to align superparamagnetic nanoparticles of a discrete size. Following the pulse, an array of superconducting quantum interference detectors (SQUID) sensors detect the decaying magnetization field. NP size is chosen so that, when bound, the induced field decays in seconds. They are functionalized with specific biomarkers and incubated with cancer cells

    As a result, superparamagnetic NPs developed here have small size dispersion. Cell incubation studies measure specificity for different cell lines and antibodies with very high contrast.

  4. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  5. Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Hee-Jin; Kim, Gwangil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven?nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines partly through the MEK?extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Murine xenograft experiments showed that Ell3 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results suggest that Ell3 may play a critical role in promoting oncogenesis in breast cancer by regulating cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  6. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Print Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00 Immortality is not a good thing for cells, and in fact, cells will destroy themselves in a process called apoptosis when they are a danger to other cells. For instance, when a cell is infected by a virus it becomes an unwilling factory for the virus, which uses the cell machinery to produce ever more copies of itself. Eventually, if

  7. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Wednesday, 27 February 2008 00:00 The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II

  8. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  9. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  10. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  11. High performance nanobio photocatalyst for targeted brain cancer therapy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, E.; Ulasov, I.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Lesniak, M.; Rajh, T.; Lai, B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2009-09-01

    We report pronounced and specific antiglioblastoma cell phototoxicity of 5 nm TiO{sub 2} particles covalently tethered to an antibody via a dihydroxybenzene bivalent linker. The linker application enables absorption of a visible part of the solar spectrum by the nanobio hybrid. The phototoxicity is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that initiate programmed death of the cancer cell. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) was applied for direct visualization of the nanobioconjugate distribution through a single brain cancer cell at the submicrometer scale.

  12. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC

  13. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hua-qing; Department of Medical Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin 300060 ; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  14. SU-E-J-10: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate imaging doses and cancer risks to organs-at-risk as a Result of cumulative doses from various radiological imaging procedures in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in a large cohort of cancer patients. Methods: With IRB approval, imaging procedures (computed tomography, kilo-voltage portal imaging, megavoltage portal imaging and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography) of 4832 cancer patients treated during 4.5 years were collected with their gender, age and circumference. Correlations between patient’s circumference and Monte Carlo simulated-organ dose were applied to estimate organ doses while the cancer risks were reported as 1+ERR using BEIR VII models. Results: 80 cGy or more doses were deposited to brain, lungs and RBM in 273 patients (maximum 136, 278 and 267 cGy, respectively), due largely to repetitive imaging procedures and non-personalized imaging settings. Regardless of gender, relative cancer risk estimates for brain, lungs, and RBM were 3.4 (n = 55), 2.6 (n = 49), 1.8 (n = 25) for age group of 0–19; 1.2 (n = 87), 1.4 (n = 98), 1.3 (n = 51) for age group of 20–39; 1.0 (n = 457), 1.1 (n = 880), 1.8 (n=360) for age group of 40–59; 1.0 (n = 646), 1.1 (n = 1400), 2.3 (n = 716) for age group of 60–79 and 1.0 (n = 108),1.1 (n = 305),1.6 (n = 147) for age group of 80–99. Conclusion: The cumulative imaging doses and associated cancer risks from multi-imaging procedures were patient-specific and site-dependent, with up to 2.7 Gy imaging dose deposited to critical structures in some pediatric patients. The associated cancer risks in brain and lungs for children of age 0 to 19 were 2–3 times larger than those for adults. This study indicated a pressing need for personalized imaging protocol to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  15. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  16. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for ?-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dosedependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a ?-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, ?-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  17. ProxiScan?: A Novel Camera for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ralph James

    2010-01-08

    ProxiScan is a compact gamma camera suited for high-resolution imaging of prostate cancer. Developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScan won a 2009 R&D 100 Award, sponsored by R&D Magazine to recognize t

  18. Multiclass cancer diagnosis using tumor gene expression signatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramaswamy, S.; Tamayo, P.; Rifkin, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Yeang, C. -H.; Angelo, M.; Ladd, C.; Reich, M.; Latulippe, E.; Mesirov, J. P.; et al

    2001-12-11

    The optimal treatment of patients with cancer depends on establishing accurate diagnoses by using a complex combination of clinical and histopathological data. In some instances, this task is difficult or impossible because of atypical clinical presentation or histopathology. To determine whether the diagnosis of multiple common adult malignancies could be achieved purely by molecular classification, we subjected 218 tumor samples, spanning 14 common tumor types, and 90 normal tissue samples to oligonucleotide microarray gene expression analysis. The expression levels of 16,063 genes and expressed sequence tags were used to evaluate the accuracy of a multiclass classifier based on a supportmore » vector machine algorithm. Overall classification accuracy was 78%, far exceeding the accuracy of random classification (9%). Poorly differentiated cancers resulted in low-confidence predictions and could not be accurately classified according to their tissue of origin, indicating that they are molecularly distinct entities with dramatically different gene expression patterns compared with their well differentiated counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate, multiclass molecular cancer classification and suggest a strategy for future clinical implementation of molecular cancer diagnostics.« less

  19. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, and which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  20. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  1. Epigenetic regulation leading to induced pluripotency drives cancer development in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnishi, Kotaro; Semi, Katsunori; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Epigenetic regulation of failed reprogramming-associated cancer cells is discussed. • Similarity between pediatric cancer and reprogramming-associated cancer is discussed. • Concept for epigenetic cancer is discussed. - Abstract: Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the transient expression of reprogramming factors. During the reprogramming process, somatic cells acquire the ability to undergo unlimited proliferation, which is also an important characteristic of cancer cells, while their underlying DNA sequence remains unchanged. Based on the characteristics shared between pluripotent stem cells and cancer cells, the potential involvement of the factors leading to reprogramming toward pluripotency in cancer development has been discussed. Recent in vivo reprogramming studies provided some clues to understanding the role of reprogramming-related epigenetic regulation in cancer development. It was shown that premature termination of the in vivo reprogramming result in the development of tumors that resemble pediatric cancers. Given that epigenetic modifications play a central role during reprogramming, failed reprogramming-associated cancer development may have provided a proof of concept for epigenetics-driven cancer development in vivo.

  2. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  3. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  4. Linkage heterogeneity among 59 Dutch hereditary breast cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornelis, R.S.; Vliet, M. van; Leeuwen, I. van

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated 59 Dutch kindreds with at least three first-degree relatives with breast and/or ovarian cancer for linkage to BRCA1 on 17q12-q21, using at least 4 microsatellite markers flanking BRCA1 on either side. Assuming no heterogeneity, the overall multipoint lod score in this group of families was -7.59. A marked clustering of lod scores >0.5 was observed among the 13 families with a mean age of onset lower than 45 (total lod score: +3.36). Among the 8 kindreds with a mean age of onset lower than 45 and {ge}3 cases diagnosed under 45, the lod score was +4.43. Interestingly, most of the evidence against linkage was found in 17 families with a mean age of onset between 45 and 54 (total lod score of -8.72). It was estimated that 28% of the breast-only families might be caused by BRCA1. Over the 16 breast-ovarian cancer families a lod score of -3.78 was obtained under homogeneity. The highest lod score was +0.57, assuming heterogeneity with 33% of the families being linked to BRCA1. One family gave a multipoint lod score of -2.01 and thereby satisfies the conventional criterion of an unlinked family. Our results support the conclusions from earlier work by others, namely that BRCA1 predisposes particularly to early-onset breast cancer. The proportion of breast-ovarian cancer families we found linked to BRCA1 is much lower than that found by the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. This might be caused by the single unlinked family against an insufficient number of families able to give conclusive positive lod scores.

  5. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  6. Interaction of celecoxib with different anti-cancer drugs is antagonistic in breast but not in other cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Awady, Raafat A.; Saleh, Ekram M.; Ezz, Marwa; Elsayed, Abeer M.

    2011-09-15

    Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, is being investigated for enhancement of chemotherapy efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study investigates the ability of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to sensitize cells from different origins to several chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of the drug's mechanism of action and sequence of administration are also investigated. The sensitivity, cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage of five different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT116, HepG2, MCF7 and U251) to 5-FU, cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide {+-} celecoxib following different incubation schedules were analyzed. We found antagonism between celecoxib and the four drugs in the breast cancer cells MCF7 following all incubation schedules and between celecoxib and doxorubicin in all cell lines except for two combinations in HCT116 cells. Celecoxib with the other three drugs in the remaining four cell lines resulted in variable interactions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that celecoxib exerts different molecular effects in different cells. In some lines, it abrogates the drug-induced G2/M arrest enhancing pre-mature entry into mitosis with damaged DNA thus increasing apoptosis and resulting in synergism. In other cells, it enhances drug-induced G2/M arrest allowing time to repair drug-induced DNA damage before entry into mitosis and decreasing cell death resulting in antagonism. In some synergistic combinations, celecoxib-induced abrogation of G2/M arrest was not associated with apoptosis but permanent arrest in G1 phase. These results, if confirmed in-vivo, indicate that celecoxib is not a suitable chemosensitizer for breast cancer or with doxorubicin for other cancers. Moreover, combination of celecoxib with other drugs should be tailored to the tumor type, drug and administration schedule. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Celecoxib may enhance effects of anticancer drugs. > Its combination with four drugs was tested in five cancer cell

  7. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a male breast cancer population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, L.S.; Gayther, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.

    1997-02-01

    A population-based series of 54 male breast cancer cases from Southern California were analyzed for germ-line mutations in the inherited breast/ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nine (17%) of the patients had a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer in at least one first-degree relative. A further seven (13%) of the patients reported breast/ovarian cancer in at least one second-degree relative and in no first-degree relatives. No germ-line BRCA1 mutations were found. Two male breast cancer patients (4% of the total) were found to carry novel truncating mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Only one of the two male breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA2 mutation had a family history of cancer, with one case of ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative. The remaining eight cases (89%) of male breast cancer with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives remain unaccounted for by mutations in either the BRCA1 gene or the BRCA2 gene. 23 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Lee, Chang-Woo; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746; Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Yang, Kwangmo; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953; Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-709 ; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ? A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ? The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup ?}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ? The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  9. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successful implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.

  10. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successfulmore » implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.« less

  11. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  12. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during

  13. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during

  14. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during

  15. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during

  16. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehlhaus, Martin W.; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Hogan, Karen A.; Kopylev, Leonid; Schlosser, Paul M.; Kadry, Abdel-Razak

    2011-07-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  17. Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H.; Levin, L.

    1993-12-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Emily F., E-mail: dunn@humonc.wisc.ed [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Moody, John S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  19. Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software speeds detection of diseases Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets The Lab has released an updated version of software that is now capable of identifying DNA from viruses and all parts of the Tree of Life. December 1, 2014 With Sequedex, a laptop computer can analyze DNA sequences faster than any current DNA sequencer can create them. With Sequedex, a laptop computer can analyze DNA sequences faster than any current DNA sequencer can create them. Contact

  20. Mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis with (?)-epigallocatechin gallate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570; Green Tea Laboratory, Saitama Prefectural Agriculture and Forestry Research Center, Saitama 358-0042 ; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Mondal, Anupom; Suzuki, Kaori; Kurusu-Kanno, Miki; Li, Zhenghao; Yamazaki, Takashi; Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 ; Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: EGCG reduced cell motility of highly metastatic human lung cancer cells. EGCG increased cell stiffness of the cells, indicating the inhibition of phenotypes of EMT. EGCG inhibited expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at the leading edge of scratch. Treatment of M?CD increased cell stiffness, and inhibited cell motility and vimentin expression. Inhibition of EMT phenotypes with EGCG is a mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Cell motility and cell stiffness are closely related to metastatic activity of cancer cells. (?)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been shown to inhibit spontaneous metastasis of melanoma cell line into the lungs of mice, so we studied the effects of EGCG on cell motility, cell stiffness, and expression of vimentin and Slug, which are molecular phenotypes of epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT). Treatments of human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines H1299 and Lu99 with 50 and 100 ?M EGCG reduced cell motility to 67.5% and 43.7% in H1299, and 71.7% and 31.5% in Lu99, respectively in in vitro wound healing assay. Studies on cell stiffness using atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that treatment with 50 ?M EGCG increased Youngs modulus of H1299 from 1.24 to 2.25 kPa and that of Lu99 from 1.29 to 2.28 kPa, showing a 2-fold increase in cell stiffness, i.e. rigid elasticity of cell membrane. Furthermore, treatment with 50 ?M EGCG inhibited high expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at a leading edge of scratch. Methyl-?-cyclodextrin, a reagent to deplete cholesterol in plasma membrane, showed inhibition of EMT phenotypes similar that by EGCG, suggesting that EGCG induces inhibition of EMT phenotypes by alteration of membrane organization.

  1. Open questions: The disrupted circuitry of the cancer cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, H. Steven

    2014-10-18

    Every new decade of biology brings with it a change in outlook driven by new technologies and fresh perspectives. Such is the case for cancer and how we consider the disease. The advent of molecular biology led to the identification of altered signaling molecules and 'oncogenes' that were proposed to drive uncontrolled cell proliferation. The rise of cell biology and new imaging and culturing technologies led to the idea that disruptions in the extracellular environment prime cells for transformation. In the current genomics era, cancer is most commonly seen as a genetic disorder where an unstable genome gives rise to a variety of different cell variants that are selected for proliferation and survival. All of these views are partially correct, of course, and are simply different ways of saying that genetic alterations in cancer cells result in a loss of growth homeostasis. They also take the view that molecular changes 'drive' a cell to grow uncontrollably, rather than tip the balance from one normal state (quiescence) to another (proliferation). Underlying this oversimplification is a profound ignorance of what controls homeostatic cell growth in the first place and how specific mutations impact it. Normal, proliferation-competent cells can accurately monitor their environment and respond appropriately to perturbation, whether it is a loss of neighbors or an inflammatory stimulus. Cancer cells either proliferate or refuse to die where and when they should not, which clearly indicates that they have problems in detecting or responding to their environment. Thus, an enormous amount of effort has gone into defining the signaling pathways that can trigger a proliferative response and the biochemical mechanisms underlying these pathways. Far less work has focused on understanding the higher-order logic of these pathways and the roles played by all of the components as part of an integrated system. In other words, we do not really understand how cells process

  2. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  3. A MULTISCALE, CELL-BASED FRAMEWORK FOR MODELING CANCER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIANG, YI

    2007-01-16

    Cancer remains to be one of the leading causes of death due to diseases. We use a systems approach that combines mathematical modeling, numerical simulation, in vivo and in vitro experiments, to develop a predictive model that medical researchers can use to study and treat cancerous tumors. The multiscale, cell-based model includes intracellular regulations, cellular level dynamics and intercellular interactions, and extracellular level chemical dynamics. The intracellular level protein regulations and signaling pathways are described by Boolean networks. The cellular level growth and division dynamics, cellular adhesion and interaction with the extracellular matrix is described by a lattice Monte Carlo model (the Cellular Potts Model). The extracellular dynamics of the signaling molecules and metabolites are described by a system of reaction-diffusion equations. All three levels of the model are integrated through a hybrid parallel scheme into a high-performance simulation tool. The simulation results reproduce experimental data in both avasular tumors and tumor angiogenesis. By combining the model with experimental data to construct biologically accurate simulations of tumors and their vascular systems, this model will enable medical researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions associated with cancer progression and treatment.

  4. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Brinkman, Arie B.; Martin, Sancha; Ramakrishna, Manasa; et al

    2016-05-02

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription,more » DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Lastly, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.« less

  5. Gadolinium metallo nanocongregates as potential magnetosensors for detecting early stage cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-04-27

    Gadolinium chelates and gadolinium based inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively studied, because of the high magnetic moment of gadolinium. Here, metallic gadolinium nanocongregates have been developed. Upon injecting these nanoparticles in the mice, they initially circulate in the blood stream and are localized at the cancer site, which could be visualized upon application of magnetic field hence acting as small magnetic nanosensors searching for even small cancers, detecting cancers at a very early stage.

  6. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory is manufacturing a radioactive treatment that targets tumors, without killing the surrounding healthy tissue. December 20, 2015 Los Alamos physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer NBC News got exclusive access to Los Alamos National Laboratory

  7. Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 26 - A new study has shown that adding boron-nitride nanotubes to the surface of cancer cells can double the effectiveness of Irreversible Electroporation, a minimally invasive treatment for soft tissue tumors in the liver, lung, prostate, head and neck, kidney and pancreas. Although this research is in the very early stages, it could one day lead to

  8. Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Tara O.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S.; Olive, Aliza; Smith, Susan A.; Mertens, Ann; Meadows, Anna; Neglia, Joseph P.; Hammond, Sue; Whitton, John; Inskip, Peter D.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

  9. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  10. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-09-30

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.