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  1. LB CRAC Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Load-Based (LB) CRAC Power Rate Adjustment Workshop Materials Related Links: Power Rate Adjustments > Load-Based (LB) CRAC December 13, 2006 LB CRAC Workshop Materials (updated...

  2. Load-Based (LB) CRAC (rates/adjustments)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absolutely will change. June 10, 2003 LB CRAC Workshop: Presentation on Impacts of the Enron Settlement on LB CRAC (PDF, 6 pages, 24 kb, posted June 11, 2003) Related follow-up...

  3. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  4. MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb: Massive planetary companion to galactic-disk host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Bond, I. A.; Hundertmark, M.; Monard, L. A. G.; Porritt, I.; Nelson, P.; Bozza, V.; Albrow, M. D.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Lee, C.-U.; McCormick, J.; Collaboration: μFUN Collaboration),; MOA Collaboration),; OGLE Collaboration),; RoboNet Collaboration),; and others

    2014-07-20

    We report the discovery of MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb, which has a super-Jupiter mass ratio q = 3.01 ± 0.02 × 10{sup –3} relative to its host. The proper motion, μ = 12.5 ± 1 mas yr{sup –1}, is one of the highest for microlensing planets yet discovered, implying that it will be possible to separately resolve the host within ∼7 yr. Two separate lines of evidence imply that the planet and host are in the Galactic disk. The planet could have been detected and characterized purely with follow-up data, which has important implications for microlensing surveys, both current and into the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) era.

  5. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  6. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  7. Record production on Gary No. 13 blast furnace with 450 lb./THM co-injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuett, K.J.; White, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Coal injection was initiated on No. 13 Blast Furnace in 1993 with 400 lb/THM achieved in 9 months. In early 1994, cold weather and coal preparation upsets led to the use of a second injectant, oil atomized by natural gas, to supplement the coal. Various combinations of coal and oil were investigated as total injection was increased to 450 lb/THM. Beginning in the last half of 1994, a continuing effort has been made to increase furnace production while maintaining this high co-injection level. Typical furnace production is now in excess of 10,000 THM/day compared with about 8500 THM/day in late 1993.

  8. U. S. Attic Grsrgy 'bmiss~o3 U. S. Atomic lb-al-w CamLf3sion December 27, S.957

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    a . - 3 U. S. Attic Grsrgy 'bmiss~o3 U. S. Atomic lb-al-w CamLf3sion December 27, S.957

  9. OGLE-2008-BLG-355Lb: A massive planet around a late-type star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshimoto, N.; Sumi, T.; Fukagawa, M.; Shibai, H.; Udalski, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Rattenbury, N.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Fukui, A.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; and others

    2014-06-20

    We report the discovery of a massive planet, OGLE-2008-BLG-355Lb. The light curve analysis indicates a planet:host mass ratio of q = 0.0118 ± 0.0006 at a separation of 0.877 ± 0.010 Einstein radii. We do not measure a significant microlensing parallax signal and do not have high angular resolution images that could detect the planetary host star. Therefore, we do not have a direct measurement of the host star mass. A Bayesian analysis, assuming that all host stars have equal probability to host a planet with the measured mass ratio, implies a host star mass of M{sub h}=0.37{sub −0.17}{sup +0.30} M{sub ⊙} and a companion of mass M{sub P}=4.6{sub −2.2}{sup +3.7}M{sub J}, at a projected separation of r{sub ⊥}=1.70{sub −0.30}{sup +0.29} AU. The implied distance to the planetary system is D {sub L} = 6.8 ± 1.1 kpc. A planetary system with the properties preferred by the Bayesian analysis may be a challenge to the core accretion model of planet formation, as the core accretion model predicts that massive planets are far more likely to form around more massive host stars. This core accretion model prediction is not consistent with our Bayesian prior of an equal probability of host stars of all masses to host a planet with the measured mass ratio. Thus, if the core accretion model prediction is right, we should expect that follow-up high angular resolution observations will detect a host star with a mass in the upper part of the range allowed by the Bayesian analysis. That is, the host would probably be a K or G dwarf.

  10. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection Project—Waste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling

  11. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of January 1, 1992 through March 31, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The design of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II retort was completed and fabrication is ready to begin. Data from the cold-flow model of the system and operating experience from the 5-lb/hr unit were used as the basis for the design. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors was continued. A mathematical model was implemented to characterize the important mass transfer effects of the system. This model will be eventually broadened to become a general fluidized bed coking model. In addition, experiments were performed to examine the effects of surface area, initial carbon content and steam treatment on coking activity. From the data that has been collected to-date, it appears that the coking activity of the tested substrates can be explained in terms of porosity (surface area and pore volume) and the initial carbon content of the solid.

  12. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  13. Low-Income Weatherization: The Human Dimension

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation focuses on how the human dimension saves energy within low-income weatherization programs.

  14. Identification and In-vivo Characterization of a Novel OhrR Transcriptional Regulator in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Tinh T.; Mart-Arbona, Ricardo; Hall, Richard S.; Maity, Tuhin; Valdez, Yolanda E.; Dunbar, John M.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-05-21

    Transcriptional regulators (TRs) are an important and versatile group of proteins, yet very little progress has been achieved towards the discovery and annotation of their biological functions. We have characterized a previously unknown organic hydroperoxide resistance regulator from Burkholderia xenovoransLB400, Bxe_B2842, which is homologous to E. colis OhrR. Bxe_B2842 regulates the expression of an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (OsmC). We utilized frontal affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (FAC-MS) and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays (EMSA) to identify and characterize the possible effectors of the regulation by Bxe_B2842. Without an effector, Bxe_B2842 binds a DNA operator sequence (DOS) upstream of osmC. FAC-MS results suggest that 2-aminophenol binds to the protein and is potentially an effector molecule. EMSA analysis shows that 2-aminophenol also attenuates the Bxe_B2842s affinity for its DOS. EMSA analysis also shows that organic peroxides attenuate Bxe_B2842/DOS affinity, suggesting that binding of the TR to its DOS is regulated by the two-cysteine mechanism, common to TRs in this family. Bxe_B2842 is the first OhrR TR to have both oxidative and effector-binding mechanisms of regulation. Our paper reveals further mechanistic diversity TR mediated gene regulation and provides insights into methods for function discovery of TRs.

  15. Identification and In-vivo Characterization of a Novel OhrR Transcriptional Regulator in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, Tinh T.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo; Hall, Richard S.; Maity, Tuhin; Valdez, Yolanda E.; Dunbar, John M.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-05-21

    Transcriptional regulators (TRs) are an important and versatile group of proteins, yet very little progress has been achieved towards the discovery and annotation of their biological functions. We have characterized a previously unknown organic hydroperoxide resistance regulator from Burkholderia xenovoransLB400, Bxe_B2842, which is homologous to E. coli’s OhrR. Bxe_B2842 regulates the expression of an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (OsmC). We utilized frontal affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (FAC-MS) and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays (EMSA) to identify and characterize the possible effectors of the regulation by Bxe_B2842. Without an effector, Bxe_B2842 binds a DNA operator sequence (DOS) upstream ofmore » osmC. FAC-MS results suggest that 2-aminophenol binds to the protein and is potentially an effector molecule. EMSA analysis shows that 2-aminophenol also attenuates the Bxe_B2842’s affinity for its DOS. EMSA analysis also shows that organic peroxides attenuate Bxe_B2842/DOS affinity, suggesting that binding of the TR to its DOS is regulated by the two-cysteine mechanism, common to TRs in this family. Bxe_B2842 is the first OhrR TR to have both oxidative and effector-binding mechanisms of regulation. Our paper reveals further mechanistic diversity TR mediated gene regulation and provides insights into methods for function discovery of TRs.« less

  16. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [70 W/lb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This second annual report under Contract No. 31-109-39-4200 covers the period July 1, 1978 through August 31, 1979. The program demonstrates the feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The program is divided into seven distinct but highly interactive tasks collectively aimed at the development and commercialization of nickel-zinc technology. These basic technical tasks are separator development, electrode development, product design and analysis, cell/module battery testing, process development, pilot manufacturing, and thermal management. A Quality Assurance Program has also been established. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of separator failure mechanisms, and a generic category of materials has been specified for the 300+ deep discharge (100% DOD) applications. Shape change has been reduced significantly. A methodology has been generated with the resulting hierarchy: cycle life cost, volumetric energy density, peak power at 80% DOD, gravimetric energy density, and sustained power. Generation I design full-sized 400-Ah cells have yielded in excess of 70 W/lb at 80% DOD. Extensive testing of cells, modules, and batteries is done in a minicomputer-based testing facility. The best life attained with electric vehicle-size cell components is 315 cycles at 100% DOD (1.0V cutoff voltage), while four-cell (approx. 6V) module performance has been limited to about 145 deep discharge cycles. The scale-up of processes for production of components and cells has progressed to facilitate component production rates of thousands per month. Progress in the area of thermal management has been significant, with the development of a model that accurately represents heat generation and rejection rates during battery operation. For the balance of the program, cycle life of > 500 has to be demonstrated in modules and full-sized batteries. 40 figures, 19 tables. (RWR)

  17. Positioner with long travel in two dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trumper, David L.; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-12-23

    A precision positioning system is provided which provides long travel in two of the linear dimensions, while using non-contact bearings for both a first subassembly which provides long travel in one of the linear dimension and a second subassembly which provides long travel in the second linear dimension. The first or upper subassembly is preferably a magnetic subassembly which, in addition to providing long travel, also compensates or positions in three rotary dimensions and in the third linear dimension. The second subassembly is preferably either an air bearing or magnetic subassembly and is normally used only to provide long travel. Angled surfaces may be provided for magnetic bearings and capacitive or other gap sensing probes may be mounted to the stage and ground flush with the bearing actuators to provide more precise gap measurements.

  18. Shape invariant potentials in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhya, R.; Sree Ranjani, S.; Kapoor, A.K.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the shape invariance property of a potential in one dimension. We show that a simple ansatz allows us to reconstruct all the known shape invariant potentials in one dimension. This ansatz can be easily extended to arrive at a large class of new shape invariant potentials in arbitrary dimensions. A reformulation of the shape invariance property and possible generalizations are proposed. These may lead to an important extension of the shape invariance property to Hamiltonians that are related to standard potential problems via space time transformations, which are found useful in path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.

  19. Supersymmetric {sigma}-models in 2-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zumino, B. |

    1997-02-01

    The author gives a brief introduction to supersymmetric {sigma}-models in two space-time dimensions. The topics he covers are: the bosonic {sigma}-model; supersymmetry in two dimensions; complex manifolds; the Kaehler and hyper-Kaehler case; and chiral supersymmetries. The lesson to be learned from the lecture is that the number of supersymmetries is intimately related to the geometric structure of the target space manifold: more geometric structure corresponds to more supersymmetries.

  20. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  1. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions You are ...

  2. Widget:RemovePDFImageDimensions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from PDF images. This is a temporary measure until PdfHandler extension properly gets landscapeportrait dimensions from PDF files. Usage: Widget:RemovePDFImageDimensions...

  3. Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions The WZW ...

  4. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Authors: Hill, ...

  5. Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension Authors: Black, Jennifer M ...

  6. Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension Authors: Black, Jennifer M ...

  7. FLRW and LTB Cosmology in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gueham, A.; Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    Two models of 4+1 dimensions are discussed and some new exact solutions are found. Moreover, a dynamical study of a 4+1 homogeneous FLRW model is made. It is shown that the LTB inhomogeneous case leads to a scenario of the universe similar to that of Turok's cyclic model but with different mechanism.

  8. Broken Scale Invariance and Anomalous Dimensions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Wilson, K. G.

    1970-05-01

    Mack and Kastrup have proposed that broken scale invariance is a symmetry of strong interactions. There is evidence from the Thirring model and perturbation theory that the dimensions of fields defined by scale transformations will be changed by the interaction from their canonical values. We review these ideas and their consequences for strong interactions.

  9. Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels are disclosed. In some implementations, a method includes: at a computer, obtaining a dimensional hierarchy associated with a dataset, wherein the dimensional hierarchy includes at least one dimension and a sub-dimension of the at least one dimension; and populating information representing data included in the dataset into a visual table having a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis corresponds to the at least one dimension and the second axis corresponds to the sub-dimension of the at least one dimension.

  10. Spherical gravitational collapse in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate here spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in a space-time with an arbitrary number of dimensions and with a general type I matter field, which is a broad class that includes most of the physically reasonable matter forms. We show that given the initial data for matter in terms of the initial density and pressure profiles at an initial surface t=t{sub i} from which the collapse evolves, there exist the rest of the initial data functions and classes of solutions of Einstein equations which we construct here, such that the space-time evolution goes to a final state which is either a black hole or a naked singularity, depending on the nature of initial data and evolutions chosen, and subject to validity of the weak energy condition. The results are discussed and analyzed in the light of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in black hole physics. The formalism here combines the earlier results on gravitational collapse in four dimensions in a unified treatment. Also the earlier work is generalized to higher-dimensional space-times to allow a study of the effect of the number of dimensions on the possible final outcome of the collapse in terms of either a black hole or naked singularity. No restriction is adopted on the number of dimensions, and other limiting assumptions such as self-similarity of space-time are avoided, in order to keep the treatment general. Our methodology allows us to consider to an extent the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse.

  11. Instantons and Massless Fermions in Two Dimensions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Callan, C. G. Jr.; Dashen, R.; Gross, D. J.

    1977-05-01

    The role of instantons in the breakdown of chiral U(N) symmetry is studied in a two dimensional model. Chiral U(1) is always destroyed by the axial vector anomaly. For N = 2 chiral SU(N) is also spontaneously broken yielding massive fermions and three (decoupled) Goldstone bosons. For N greater than or equal to 3 the fermions remain massless. Realistic four dimensional theories are believed to behave in a similar way but the critical N above which the fermions cease to be massive is not known in four dimensions.

  12. Rotating black lens solution in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Yu; Teo, Edward

    2008-09-15

    It has recently been shown that a stationary, asymptotically flat vacuum black hole in five space-time dimensions with two commuting axial symmetries must have an event horizon with either a spherical, ring or lens-space topology. In this paper, we study the third possibility, a so-called black lens with L(n,1) horizon topology. Using the inverse scattering method, we construct a black-lens solution with the simplest possible rod structure, and possessing a single asymptotic angular momentum. Its properties are then analyzed; in particular, it is shown that there must either be a conical singularity or a naked curvature singularity present in the space-time.

  13. Nonuniform black strings in various dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorkin, Evgeny

    2006-11-15

    The nonuniform black-strings branch, which emerges from the critical Gregory-Laflamme string, is numerically constructed in dimensions 6{<=}D{<=}11 and extended into the strongly nonlinear regime. All the solutions are more massive and less entropic than the marginal string. We find the asymptotic values of the mass, the entropy and other physical variables in the limit of large horizon deformations. By explicit metric comparison we verify that the local geometry around the waist of our most nonuniform solutions is conelike with less than 10% deviation. We find evidence that in this regime the characteristic length scale has a power-law dependence on a parameter along the branch of the solutions, and estimate the critical exponent.

  14. On partially massless theory in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Deffayet, Cédric

    2015-03-24

    We analyze the first-order formulation of the ghost-free bigravity model in three-dimensions known as zwei-dreibein gravity. For a special choice of parameters, it was argued to have an additional gauge symmetry and give rise to a partially massless theory. We provide a thorough canonical analysis and identify that whether the theory becomes partially massless depends on the form of the stability condition of the secondary constraint responsible for the absence of the ghost. Generically, it is found to be an equation for a Lagrange multiplier implying that partially massless zwei-dreibein gravity does not exist. However, for special backgrounds this condition is identically satisfied leading to the presence of additional symmetries, which however disappear at quadratic order in perturbations.

  15. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  16. Dimensions of invariant measures for continuous random dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bielaczyc, Tomasz; Horbacz, Katarzyna

    2015-03-10

    We consider continuous random dynamical systems with jumps. We estimate the dimension of the invariant measures and apply the results to a model of stochastic gene expression.

  17. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) ...

  18. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, ... Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);High Energy Physics (HEP);National ...

  19. Single Particle Database of Natural Ice Crystals: Dimensions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Database of Natural Ice Crystals: Dimensions and Aspect Ratios For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights...

  20. SN1987A Constraints on Large Compact Dimensions (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dimensions of space, which are accessible to gravity but not to Standard Model particles. ... GRAVITATIONAL INTERACTIONS; GRAVITONS; STANDARD MODEL; SUPERNOVAE; LIMITING VALUES Word ...

  1. SN1987A Constraints on Large Compact Dimensions (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scale. The observed weakness of gravitational interactions is then explained by the existence of extra compact dimensions of space, which are accessible to gravity but not to...

  2. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; BFKL representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; DGLAP representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  3. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. ... faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt ...

  4. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising ...

  5. Affordability Contest Adds New Dimension to Solar Decathlon 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Affordability Contest Adds New Dimension to Solar Decathlon 2011 Affordability Contest Adds New Dimension to Solar Decathlon 2011 September 27, 2011 - 10:20am Addthis Matt Hansen reviews each team’s design drawings and construction specifications to estimate the total construction cost of its house. (Credit: Alexis Power/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Matt Hansen reviews each team's design drawings and construction specifications to estimate the total

  6. Radiation characterization summary : ACRR 44-inch lead-boron bucket located in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parma, Edward J.,; Quirk, Thomas J.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick Joseph; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael

    2013-04-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the 44-inch-long lead-boron bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray flux profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse and steady-state operations are presented with conversion examples.

  7. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2014-12-10

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the Tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign in mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. Dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, dimension of major axis divided by dimension of minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased as temperature increased. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' or L') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50±1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32±1.34 (5.46±1.34; 4.95±1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < −35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L–W relationships of columns

  8. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2015-04-15

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign at mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. The dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, the dimension of the major axis divided by the dimension of the minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased with temperature. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' orL') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50 ± 1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32 ± 1.34 (5.46 ± 1.34; 4.95 ± 1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < -35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L

  9. A Key Role for Dimension in the Neutrino Mechanism of Core-Collapse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to demonstrate an important role for spatial dimension and instabilities in the ... ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; BLACK HOLES; DIMENSIONS; EXPLOSIONS; NEUTRINOS; NEUTRON STARS; ...

  10. (Meeting on human dimensions of global environmental change)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-12-18

    Traveler attended the meeting of the Standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change of the International Social Science Council (ISSC) and the Scientific Symposium organized by the Standing Committee. The purpose of the meeting and symposium was to discuss the Draft Framework and the Workplan of the Standing Committee prior to its presentation to the 1990 Congress of the ISSC on November 28--30, 1990. The meetings indicate that ORNL Global Environmental Studies Center is on the international leading edge of human dimensions research, except in the area of human dimensions data systems. This weakness could be rectified by close collaboration with the efforts of the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) in Michigan.

  11. On the selection of dimension reduction techniques for scientific applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Y J; Kamath, C

    2012-02-17

    Many dimension reduction methods have been proposed to discover the intrinsic, lower dimensional structure of a high-dimensional dataset. However, determining critical features in datasets that consist of a large number of features is still a challenge. In this paper, through a series of carefully designed experiments on real-world datasets, we investigate the performance of different dimension reduction techniques, ranging from feature subset selection to methods that transform the features into a lower dimensional space. We also discuss methods that calculate the intrinsic dimensionality of a dataset in order to understand the reduced dimension. Using several evaluation strategies, we show how these different methods can provide useful insights into the data. These comparisons enable us to provide guidance to a user on the selection of a technique for their dataset.

  12. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  13. Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, A.; Zen, Freddy P.

    2015-04-16

    Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator is investigated. The systems are two coupled harmonic oscillator with the different masses. The dissipative effect is studied based on the quantum state diffusion formalism. The result show that the anharmonic effect increase the amplitude but the lifetime of the oscillation depend on the damping coefficient and do not depend on the temperature.

  14. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  15. Quantum Dimension of Photosynthesis Revealed by Angular Resolved Coherent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Dimension of Photosynthesis Revealed by Angular Resolved Coherent Imaging September 29, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Ian Mercer Department of Physics, University College Dublin mercer abstract: Understanding the role of coherent electronic motion is expected to resolve general questions of importance in macromolecular energy transfer, in nature and in devices. Significant progress has been made using coherent optical four wave-mixing, however the

  16. Team Massachusetts Brings a Fourth Dimension to the Solar Decathlon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Team Massachusetts is bringing a unique perspective to the Solar Decathlon this fall. You might say it is a fourth dimension because of the team’s newly constructed 4D Home. But it could also be argued that it is because the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and University of Massachusetts Lowell are collaborating for the team’s first entry into the biannual competition, and they’re both public institutions.

  17. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.; Miller, Wayne J.

    1982-01-01

    A method of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  18. Levinson theorem for the Dirac equation in D+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Xiaoyan; Ma Zhongqi; Dong Shihai

    2003-06-01

    In terms of the generalized Sturm-Liouville theorem, the Levinson theorem for the Dirac equation with a spherically symmetric potential in D+1 dimensions is uniformly established as a relation between the total number of bound states and the sum of the phase shifts of the scattering states at E={+-}M with a given angular momentum. The critical case, where the Dirac equation has a half bound state, is analyzed in detail. A half bound state is a zero-momentum solution if its wave function is finite but does not decay fast enough at infinity to be square integrable.

  19. Tracking single particle rotation: Probing dynamics in four dimensions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Yu, Yan

    2015-04-29

    Direct visualization and tracking of small particles at high spatial and temporal resolution provides a powerful approach to probing complex dynamics and interactions in chemical and biological processes. Analysis of the rotational dynamics of particles adds a new dimension of information that is otherwise impossible to obtain with conventional 3-D particle tracking. In this review, we survey recent advances in single-particle rotational tracking, with highlights on the rotational tracking of optically anisotropic Janus particles. Furthermore, strengths and weaknesses of the various particle tracking methods, and their applications are discussed.

  20. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, P.R.; Miller, W.J.

    1981-02-11

    A method is disclosed of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  1. Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineros, R.A.; Santos, F.A. Pereira dos E-mail: fabio.alex@fis.puc-rio.br

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza–Klein mode of an real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza–Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

  2. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  3. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  4. Friedmann's equations in all dimensions and Chebyshev's theorem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shouxin; Gibbons, Gary W.; Li, Yijun; Yang, Yisong E-mail: gwg1@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: yisongyang@nyu.edu

    2014-12-01

    This short but systematic work demonstrates a link between Chebyshev's theorem and the explicit integration in cosmological time t and conformal time η of the Friedmann equations in all dimensions and with an arbitrary cosmological constant Λ. More precisely, it is shown that for spatially flat universes an explicit integration in t may always be carried out, and that, in the non-flat situation and when Λ is zero and the ratio w of the pressure and energy density in the barotropic equation of state of the perfect-fluid universe is rational, an explicit integration may be carried out if and only if the dimension n of space and w obey some specific relations among an infinite family. The situation for explicit integration in η is complementary to that in t. More precisely, it is shown in the flat-universe case with Λ ≠ 0 that an explicit integration in η can be carried out if and only if w and n obey similar relations among a well-defined family which we specify, and that, when Λ = 0, an explicit integration can always be carried out whether the space is flat, closed, or open. We also show that our method may be used to study more realistic cosmological situations when the equation of state is nonlinear.

  5. Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlasner, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200—500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels — some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU’ s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450°F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures

  6. Sparse matrix transform for fast projection to reduced dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Cao, Guangzhi; Bouman, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate three algorithms that use the sparse matrix transform (SMT) to produce variance-maximizing linear projections to a lower-dimensional space. The SMT expresses the projection as a sequence of Givens rotations and this enables computationally efficient implementation of the projection operator. The baseline algorithm uses the SMT to directly approximate the optimal solution that is given by principal components analysis (PCA). A variant of the baseline begins with a standard SMT solution, but prunes the sequence of Givens rotations to only include those that contribute to the variance maximization. Finally, a simpler and faster third algorithm is introduced; this also estimates the projection operator with a sequence of Givens rotations, but in this case, the rotations are chosen to optimize a criterion that more directly expresses the dimension reduction criterion.

  7. Extra dimensions and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Faessler, Amand [Theoretical Physics Department, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Institute fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the few phenomena, belonging to the nonstandard physics, which is extensively being sought for in experiments. In the present paper the link between the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay and theories with large extra dimensions is explored. The use of the sensitivities of currently planned 0{nu}2{beta} experiments: DAMA, CANDLES, COBRA, DCBA, CAMEO, GENIUS, GEM, MAJORANA, MOON, CUORE, EXO, and XMASS, gives the possibility for a nondirect 'experimental' verification of various extra dimensional scenarios. We discuss also the results of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration. The calculations are based on the Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanism in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model.

  8. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  9. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  10. Dirac equation in low dimensions: The factorization method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Monroy, J.A.; Quimbay, C.J.

    2014-11-15

    We present a general approach to solve the (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equations in the presence of static scalar, pseudoscalar and gauge potentials, for the case in which the potentials have the same functional form and thus the factorization method can be applied. We show that the presence of electric potentials in the Dirac equation leads to two KleinGordon equations including an energy-dependent potential. We then generalize the factorization method for the case of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. Additionally, the shape invariance is generalized for a specific class of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. We also present a condition for the absence of the Klein paradox (stability of the Dirac sea), showing how Dirac particles in low dimensions can be confined for a wide family of potentials. - Highlights: The low-dimensional Dirac equation in the presence of static potentials is solved. The factorization method is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The shape invariance is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The stability of the Dirac sea is related to the existence of supersymmetric partner Hamiltonians.

  11. Dimensions of Usability: Cougaar, Aglets and Adaptive Agent Architecture (AAA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haack, Jereme N.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Gorton, Ian

    2004-06-20

    Research and development organizations are constantly evaluating new technologies in order to implement the next generation of advanced applications. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, agent technologies are perceived as an approach that can provide a competitive advantage in the construction of highly sophisticated software systems in a range of application areas. An important factor in selecting a successful agent architecture is the level of support it provides the developer in respect to developer support, examples of use, integration into current workflow and community support. Without such assistance, the developer must invest more effort into learning instead of applying the technology. Like many other applied research organizations, our staff are not dedicated to a single project and must acquire new skills as required, underlining the importance of being able to quickly become proficient. A project was instigated to evaluate three candidate agent toolkits across the dimensions of support they provide. This paper reports on the outcomes of this evaluation and provides insights into the agent technologies evaluated.

  12. Social impact assessment - new dimensions in project planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.G.; Hartog, J.J.; Sykes, R.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Objective of the presentation is to provide understanding of how to improve attention to the social dimensions of EP projects. Social Impacts are the consequences to human populations, communities or individuals resulting from a project or activity. Such impacts may change the way in which people live, relate to one another, organize and cope as members of society. There is an increasing demand and expectation that Exploration and Production activities will both understand their impacts and define benefits for the local communities. Social Impact Assessment can be considered a branch of Environmental Impact Assessment. It has become a tool in its own fight due to the focus that was paid to the natural and physical issues within the EIA process. However there are still strong alignments and the wise project planner will integrate social and environmental issues within their project planning process. This can be done through a combination of studies but can result in a single report. The benefits of SIA will be demonstrated to include: (1) obtaining approvals (2) forward planning and design (3) increased project success-benefits to local community (4) economic benefits (5) decision making by management The types of impacts including demographic, socioeconomic, health, social infrastructure, resources, psychological and community, cultural and social equity will be reviewed. Methods and techniques to identify and assess impacts will be addressed. One of the main challenges in SIA is to reach the right audience. Methods to scope studies and implement consultation will be addressed.

  13. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  14. Global Fits of the Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Kong, Kyoungchul; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Trotta, Roberto; /Imperial Coll., London

    2012-06-22

    In theories with Universal Extra-Dimensions (UED), the {gamma}{sub 1} particle, first excited state of the hypercharge gauge boson, provides an excellent Dark Matter (DM) candidate. Here we use a modified version of the SuperBayeS code to perform a Bayesian analysis of the minimal UED scenario, in order to assess its detectability at accelerators and with DM experiments. We derive in particular the most probable range of mass and scattering cross sections off nucleons, keeping into account cosmological and electroweak precision constraints. The consequences for the detectability of the {gamma}{sub 1} with direct and indirect experiments are dramatic. The spin-independent cross section probability distribution peaks at {approx} 10{sup -11} pb, i.e. below the sensitivity of ton-scale experiments. The spin-dependent cross-section drives the predicted neutrino flux from the center of the Sun below the reach of present and upcoming experiments. The only strategy that remains open appears to be direct detection with ton-scale experiments sensitive to spin-dependent cross-sections. On the other hand, the LHC with 1 fb{sup -1} of data should be able to probe the current best-fit UED parameters.

  15. Rajesh Maingi adds a new strategic dimension to fusion and plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rajesh Maingi adds a new strategic dimension to fusion and plasma physics research By John ... gas that fuels fusion reactions in donut-shaped magnetic facilities called tokamaks. ...

  16. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rubakov, Valery [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, Russia

    2010-09-01

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  17. DIMENSION STABILIZED FIXED PHOTOGRAPHIC TYPE EMULSION AND A METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, F.C.

    1962-03-13

    A process is given for stabilizing the dimensions of fixed gelatin-base photographic type emulsions containing silver halide, and particularly to such emulsions containing large amounts of silver chloride for use as nuclear track emulsions, so that the dimensions of the final product are the same as or in a predetermined fixed ratio to the dimensions of the emulsions prior to exposure. The process comprises contacting an exposed, fixed emulsion with a solution of wood rosin dissolved in ethyl alcohol for times corresponding to the dimensions desired, and thereafter permitting the alcohol to evaporate. (AEC)

  18. Human dimensions in cyber operations research and development priorities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsythe, James Chris; Silva, Austin Ray; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Bradshaw, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Within cyber security, the human element represents one of the greatest untapped opportunities for increasing the effectiveness of network defenses. However, there has been little research to understand the human dimension in cyber operations. To better understand the needs and priorities for research and development to address these issues, a workshop was conducted August 28-29, 2012 in Washington DC. A synthesis was developed that captured the key issues and associated research questions. Research and development needs were identified that fell into three parallel paths: (1) human factors analysis and scientific studies to establish foundational knowledge concerning factors underlying the performance of cyber defenders; (2) development of models that capture key processes that mediate interactions between defenders, users, adversaries and the public; and (3) development of a multi-purpose test environment for conducting controlled experiments that enables systems and human performance measurement. These research and development investments would transform cyber operations from an art to a science, enabling systems solutions to be engineered to address a range of situations. Organizations would be able to move beyond the current state where key decisions (e.g. personnel assignment) are made on a largely ad hoc basis to a state in which there exist institutionalized processes for assuring the right people are doing the right jobs in the right way. These developments lay the groundwork for emergence of a professional class of cyber defenders with defined roles and career progressions, with higher levels of personnel commitment and retention. Finally, the operational impact would be evident in improved performance, accompanied by a shift to a more proactive response in which defenders have the capacity to exert greater control over the cyber battlespace.

  19. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the Fermi-LAT (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may

  20. A Key Role for Dimension in the Neutrino Mechanism of Core-Collapse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrino Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Key Role for Dimension in the Neutrino Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernova ...

  1. Apparatus and method for tracking a molecule or particle in three dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Lessard, Guillaume

    2009-03-03

    An apparatus and method were used to track the movement of fluorescent particles in three dimensions. Control software was used with the apparatus to implement a tracking algorithm for tracking the motion of the individual particles in glycerol/water mixtures. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the tracking algorithms in combination with the apparatus may be used for tracking the motion of single fluorescent or fluorescently labeled biomolecules in three dimensions.

  2. Quantum quenches in two spatial dimensions using chain array matrix product states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    A. J. A. James; Konik, R.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a method for simulating the real time evolution of extended quantum systems in two dimensions (2D). The method combines the benefits of integrability and matrix product states in one dimension to avoid several issues that hinder other applications of tensor based methods in 2D. In particular, it can be extended to infinitely long cylinders. As an example application we present results for quantum quenches in the 2D quantum [(2+1)-dimensional] Ising model. As a result, in quenches that cross a phase boundary we find that the return probability shows nonanalyticities in time.

  3. The Next Dimension of Mapping the Universe: The Dark Energy Spectroscopic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instrument | Department of Energy Dimension of Mapping the Universe: The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument The Next Dimension of Mapping the Universe: The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument June 11, 2015 - 10:24am Addthis Zoomed-in image from the Dark Energy Camera of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365, in the Fornax cluster of galaxies, which lies about 60 million light years from Earth -- in other words, far, far away. | Photo courtesy of the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration. Zoomed-in

  4. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Akhadov, Elshan A.

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  5. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W. [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  6. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  7. Reconstruction of ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2010-07-15

    We present an analytical inversion technique, which can be used to recover ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in an N-dimensional detection scheme. The solution is given as a power series in intensity. For this reason, we call this technique a multiphoton expansion (MPE). The MPE formalism was verified with an exactly solvable inversion problem in two dimensions, and probabilities in the postsaturation region, where the intensity-selective scanning approach breaks down, were recovered. In three dimensions, ionization probabilities of Xe were successfully recovered with MPE from simulated (using the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunneling theory) ion yields. Finally, we tested our approach with intensity-resolved benzene-ion yields, which show a resonant multiphoton ionization process. By applying MPE to this data (which were artificially averaged), the resonant structure was recovered, which suggests that the resonance in benzene may have been observed in spatially averaged data taken elsewhere.

  8. On exact statistics and classification of ergodic systems of integer dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guralnik, Zachary Guralnik, Gerald; Pehlevan, Cengiz

    2014-06-01

    We describe classes of ergodic dynamical systems for which some statistical properties are known exactly. These systems have integer dimension, are not globally dissipative, and are defined by a probability density and a two-form. This definition generalizes the construction of Hamiltonian systems by a Hamiltonian and a symplectic form. Some low dimensional examples are given, as well as a discretized field theory with a large number of degrees of freedom and a local nearest neighbor interaction. We also evaluate unequal-time correlations of these systems without direct numerical simulation, by Pad approximants of a short-time expansion. We briefly speculate on the possibility of constructing chaotic dynamical systems with non-integer dimension and exactly known statistics. In this case there is no probability density, suggesting an alternative construction in terms of a Hopf characteristic function and a two-form.

  9. Flavor ratios of extragalactic neutrinos and neutrino shortcuts in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeikens, Elke; Päs, Heinrich; Pakvasa, Sandip; Sicking, Philipp

    2015-10-02

    The recent measurement of high energy extragalactic neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration has opened a new window to probe non-standard neutrino properties. Among other effects, sterile neutrino altered dispersion relations (ADRs) due to shortcuts in an extra dimension can significantly affect astrophysical flavor ratios. We discuss two limiting cases of this effect, first active-sterile neutrino oscillations with a constant ADR potential and second an MSW-like resonant conversion arising from geodesics oscillating around the brane in an asymmetrically warped extra dimension. We demonstrate that the second case has the potential to suppress significantly the flux of specific flavors such as ν{sub μ} or ν{sub τ} at high energies.

  10. Spherically symmetric self-dual Yang-Mills instantons on curved backgrounds in all even dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radu, Eugen; Tchrakian, D. H.; Yang Yisong

    2008-02-15

    We present several different classes of self-dual Yang-Mills instantons in all even d-dimensional backgrounds with Euclidean signature. In d=4p+2 the only solutions we found are on constant curvature dS (de Sitter) and AdS (anti-de Sitter) backgrounds and are evaluated in closed form. In d=4p an interesting class of instantons are given on black hole backgrounds. One class of solutions are (Euclidean) time-independent and spherically symmetric in d-1 dimensions, and the other class are spherically symmetric in all d dimensions. Some of the solutions in the former class are evaluated numerically, all the rest being given in closed form. Analytic proofs of existence covering all numerically evaluated solutions are given. All instantons studied have finite action and vanishing energy momentum tensor and do not disturb the geometry.

  11. Green functions for generalized point interactions in one dimension: A scattering approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M.; Cheng, B.K.; Luz, M.G.E. da

    2002-12-01

    Recently, general point interactions in one dimension has been used to model a large number of different phenomena in quantum mechanics. Such potentials, however, require some sort of regularization to lead to meaningful results. The usual ways to do so rely on technicalities that may hide important physical aspects of the problem. In this work we present a method to calculate the exact Green functions for general point interactions in one dimension. Our approach differs from previous ones because it is based only on physical quantities, namely, the scattering coefficients R and T to construct G. Renormalization or particular mathematical prescriptions are not invoked. The simple formulation of the method makes it easy to extend to more general contexts, such as for lattices of N general point interactions, on a line, on a half-line, under periodic boundary conditions, and confined in a box.

  12. Fractal dimensions of niobium oxide films probed by protons and lithium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pehlivan, Esat; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2006-09-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to determine fractal surface dimensions of sputter deposited niobium pentoxide films. Peak currents were determined by CV measurements. Power spectral densities obtained from AFM measurements of the films were used for calculating length scale dependent root mean square roughness. In order to compare the effect of Li and H ion intercalation at the fractal surfaces, LiClO{sub 4} based as well as propionic acid electrolytes were used. The CV measurements gave a fractal dimension of 2.36 when the films were intercalated by Li ions and 1.70 when the films were intercalated by protons. AFM measurements showed that the former value corresponds to the fractal surface roughness of the films, while the latter value is close to the dimensionality of the distribution of hillocks on the surface. We conclude that the protons are preferentially intercalated at such sites.

  13. Use of metallic glasses for fabrication of structures with submicron dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiley, John D.; Perepezko, John H.

    1986-01-01

    Patterned structures of submicron dimension formed of supported or unsupported amorphous metals having submicron feature sizes characterized by etching behavior sufficient to allow delineation of sharp edges and smooth flat flanks, resistance to time-dependent dimensional changes caused by creep, flow, in-diffusion of unwanted impurities, out-diffusion of constituent atoms, void formation, grain growth or phase separation and resistance to phase transformations or compound formation.

  14. Simple thermodynamics of strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Khrapak, Alexey G.

    2014-10-15

    Simple analytical approximations for the internal energy of the strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions are discussed. As a result, new practical expressions for the internal energy in the fluid phase are proposed. Their accuracy is checked by evaluating the location of the fluid-solid phase transition from the free energy consideration. Possible applications to other related systems are briefly discussed.

  15. The effect of dimension limits on the performance indices of Stirling engine MAC-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abenavoli, R.I.; Carlini, M.; Kormanski, H.; Rudzinska, K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a comparative study of different Stirling engine MAC-02 specifications. The MAC-02 is the engine of beta configuration with heater and cooler tubes drilled inside the cylinder wall and connected by an annular regenerator of wire mesh type, surrounding the cylinder. Piston and displacer are driven by Ericsson linkage, which brings some advantages with respect to other conventional drives, however, for its complexity it has not been considered yet in published Stirling engine optimization codes. The most difficult aspects in designing such an engine configuration is the strong interdependence among constructional parameters particularly drive rod angularity, rod, cylinder, piston and heat exchanger dimensions. For this reason a special method for the optimal engine synthesis was elaborated and presented in Impero Abenavoli, R., et al. (1993). The corresponding computer code SE-OPT was used to obtain results discussed in this paper. A number of the engine design specifications were calculated and compared one to another. Each of the cases under consideration was determined as the optimal solution of non-linear programming problem defined with different engine dimension boundaries. The maximum of indicated power was chosen as the objective function. Although several tens of constraints were included into the optimization problems, only the limits imposed on the total engine length and cylinder diameter are analyzed in this paper. The two parameters were considered as variables dependent on the other ones (free and fixed parameters). The effect of these main engine dimension limits on selected performance indices (indicated power and efficiency) and the optimal values of other ensure parameters such as heat exchanger dimensions, linkage parameters and piston phrase angles were investigated.

  16. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {yields} {infinity} and r {yields} const > 0 as l {yields} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {yields} 0 as l {yields} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {Gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {Gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  17. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {sup {yields}} {infinity} and r {sup {yields}} const > 0 as l {sup {yields}} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {sup {yields}} 0 as l {sup {yields}} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  18. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS? space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H ? ?? decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemoreof gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H ? ?? rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. We perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.less

  19. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  20. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS? space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H ? ?? decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H ? ?? rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. We perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  1. Word Pro - S1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase a Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase b Heavy-Duty Trucks c All Motor ...

  2. Effect of ammonia plasma treatment on graphene oxide LB monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Gulbagh; Botcha, V. Divakar; Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sutar, D. S.; Talwar, S. S.; Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2013-02-05

    Graphene oxide monolayer sheets were transferred on Si and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and were exposed to ammonia plasma at room temperature. The monolayer character of both graphene oxide and plasma treated graphene oxide sheets were ascertained by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ammonia plasma treatment results in enhancement of graphitic carbon content along with the incorporation of nitrogen. The conductivity of graphene oxide monolayers, which was in the range of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} S/cm, increased to 10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} S/cm after the ammonia plasma treatment. These results indicate that the graphene oxide was simultaneously reduced and N-doped during ammonia plasma treatment, without affecting the morphological stability of sheets.

  3. Microsoft Word - M2FT-12LB0811021_Final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory September, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000295 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

  4. Microsoft Word - M2FT-12LB0811021_Final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... ...... 7 3.1.4 Task B1: HE-E Heater Test at Mont Terri URL, Switzerland (Focus: EBS ......... 20 3.2.2 FE Heater Test (Focus: both NBS and EBS) ...

  5. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  6. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  7. Analytical solutions of a generalized non-central potential in N-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durmus, Aysen; zfidan, Aysel

    2014-10-15

    We present that N-dimensional non-relativistic wave equation for the generalized non-central potential with arbitrary angular momentum is analytically solvable in the hyperspherical coordinates. Asymptotic iteration method as a different approach is applied to obtain N-dimensional energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions. In hyperspherical coordinates, the wave function solutions are obtained in terms of hypergeometric functions and Jacobi polynomials. The bound states of quantum systems under consideration for some special cases, such as Hartmann and Makarov potentials, have been discussed in N-dimensions.

  8. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  9. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  10. Ground-state energy of the interacting Bose gas in two dimensions: An explicit construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beane, Silas R.

    2010-12-15

    The isotropic scattering phase shift is calculated for nonrelativistic bosons interacting at low energies via an arbitrary finite-range potential in d space-time dimensions. Scattering on a (d-1)-dimensional torus is then considered, and the eigenvalue equation relating the energy levels on the torus to the scattering phase shift is derived. With this technology in hand, and focusing on the case of two spatial dimensions, a perturbative expansion is developed for the ground-state energy of N identical bosons which interact via an arbitrary finite-range potential in a finite area. The leading nonuniversal effects due to range corrections and three-body forces are included. It is then shown that the thermodynamic limit of the ground-state energy in a finite area can be taken in closed form to obtain the energy per particle in the low-density expansion by explicitly summing the parts of the finite-area energy that diverge with powers of N. The leading and subleading finite-size corrections to the thermodynamic limit equation of state are also computed. Closed-form results--some well known, others perhaps not--for two-dimensional lattice sums are included in an Appendix.

  11. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  12. Weapons proliferation and organized crime: The Russian military and security force dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turbiville, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    One dimension of international security of the post-Cold War era that has not received enough attention is how organized crime facilitates weapons proliferation worldwide. The former Soviet Union (FSU) has emerged as the world`s greatest counterproliferation challenge. It contains the best developed links among organized crime, military and security organizations, and weapons proliferation. Furthermore, Russian military and security forces are the principle source of arms becoming available to organized crime groups, participants in regional conflict, and corrupt state officials engaged in the black, gray, and legal arms markets in their various dimensions. The flourishing illegal trade in conventional weapons is the clearest and most tangible manifestation of the close links between Russian power ministries and criminal organizations. The magnitude of the WMD proliferation problem from the FSU is less clear and less tangible. There have been many open reports of small-scale fissile material smuggling out of the FSU. The situation with regard to the proliferation of chemical weapon usually receives less attention but may be more serious. With an acknowledged stockpile of 40,000 metric tons of chemical agents, the potential for proliferation is enormous.

  13. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antipov, S.; Baryshev, Sergey; Butler, J. E.; Antipova, O.; Liu, Zunping; Stoupin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  14. Triviality of the BCS-BEC crossover in extended dimensions: Implications for the ground state energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nussinov, Zohar [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63160-4899 (United States); Nussinov, Shmuel [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2006-11-15

    Cold atom traps and certain neutron star layers may contain fermions with separation much larger than the range of pairwise potentials yet much shorter than the scattering length. Such systems can display universal characteristics independent of the details of the short range interactions. Our main result is that for space dimensions D smaller than two and larger than four a specific extension of this problem is amenable to exact results. In particular, the energy per particle at the BCS-BEC crossover point is equal to the energy of the free fermion system in all D{<=}2 whereas this energy is rigorously nonpositive (and potentially vanishing) in all D{>=}4. We discuss the D=3 case. A particular unjustified recipe suggests {xi}=1/2 in D=3.

  15. Distinguishing Supersymmetry From Universal Extra Dimensions or Little Higgs Models With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    There are compelling reasons to think that new physics will appear at or below the TeV-scale. It is not known what form this new physics will take, however. Although The Large Hadron collider is very likely to discover new particles associated with the TeV-scale, it may be difficult for it to determine the nature of those particles, whether superpartners, Kaluza-Klein modes or other states. In this article, we consider how direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments may provide information complementary to hadron colliders, which can be used to discriminate between supersymmetry, models with universal extra dimensions, and Little Higgs theories. We find that, in many scenarios, dark matter experiments can be effectively used to distinguish between these possibilities.

  16. All bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature theories in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram

    2011-01-15

    We construct all the bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature parity invariant gravity theories in three dimensions in (anti)-de Sitter spaces. For bulk unitarity, our construction is based on the principle that the free theory of the cubic curvature theory reduces to one of the three known unitary theories which are the cosmological Einstein-Hilbert theory, the quadratic theory of the scalar curvature, or the new massive gravity (NMG). Bulk and boundary unitarity in NMG is in conflict; therefore, cubic theories that are unitary both in the bulk and on the boundary have free theories that reduce to the other two alternatives. We also study the unitarity of the Born-Infeld extensions of NMG to all orders in curvature.

  17. Search for large extra dimensions in the exclusive photon + missing energy channel in p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazoflores, Jose A.; /Florida State U.

    2006-04-01

    A search was conducted for evidence of large extra dimensions (LED) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron using the D0 detector. The Tevatron is a p{bar p} collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events with particles escaping into extra dimensions will have large missing energy. The search was carried out using data from a total luminosity of 197 {+-} 13 pb{sup -1} with an observable high transverse momentum photon and a large transverse missing energy. The 70 observed events are consistent with photons produced by standard known reactions plus other background processes produced by cosmic muons. The mass limits on the fundamental mass scale at 95% confidence level for large extra dimensions of 2, 4, 6 and 8 are 500 GeV, 581 GeV, 630 GeV, and 668 GeV respectively.

  18. Fractal dimension of cohesive sediment flocs at steady state under seven shear flow conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Zhongfan; Yu, Jingshan; Wang, Hongrui; Dou, Jie; Wang, Cheng

    2015-08-12

    The morphological properties of kaolin flocs were investigated in a Couette-flow experiment at the steady state under seven shear flow conditions (shear rates of 5.36, 9.17, 14, 24, 31, 41 and 53 s-1). These properties include a one-dimensional (1-D) fractal dimension (D1), a two-dimensional (2-D) fractal dimension (D2), a perimeter-based fractal dimension (Dpf) and an aspect ratio (AR). They were calculated based on the projected area (A), equivalent size, perimeter (P) and length (L) of the major axis of the floc determined through sample observation and an image analysis system. The parameter D2, which characterizes the relationship between the projectedmore » area and the length of the major axis using a power function, A ∝ LD2, increased from 1.73 ± 0.03, 1.72 ± 0.03, and 1.75 ± 0.04 in the low shear rate group (G = 5.36, 9.17, and 14 s-1) to 1.92 ± 0.03, 1.82 ± 0.02, 1.85 ± 0.02, and 1.81 ± 0.02 in the high shear rate group (24, 31, 41 and 53 s-1), respectively. The parameter D1 characterizes the relationship between the perimeter and length of the major axis by the function P ∝ LD1 and decreased from 1.52 ± 0.02, 1.48 ± 0.02, 1.55 ± 0.02, and 1.63 ± 0.02 in the low shear group (5.36, 9.17, 14 and 24 s-1) to 1.45 ± 0.02, 1.39 ± 0.02, and 1.39 ± 0.02 in the high shear group (31, 41 and 53 s-1), respectively. The results indicate that with increasing shear rates, the flocs become less elongated and that their boundary lines become tighter and more regular, caused by more breakages and possible restructurings of the flocs. The parameter Dpf, which is related to the perimeter and the projected area through the function , decreased as the shear rate increased almost linearly. The parameter AR, which is the ratio of the length of the major axis and equivalent diameter, decreased from 1.56, 1.59, 1.53 and 1.51 in the low shear rate group to 1.43, 1.47 and 1.48 in the high shear rate group. These changes in Dpf and AR show that the flocs become

  19. Hamiltonian dynamics of an exotic action for gravity in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escalante, Alberto Manuel-Cabrera, J.

    2014-04-15

    The Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical covariant formalism for an exotic action in three dimensions are performed. By working with the complete phase space, we report a complete Hamiltonian description of the theory such as the extended action, the extended Hamiltonian, the algebra among the constraints, the Diracs brackets and the correct gauge transformations. In addition, we show that in spite of exotic action and tetrad gravity with a cosmological constant give rise to the same equations of motion, they are not equivalent, in fact, we show that their corresponding Diracs brackets are quite different. Finally, we construct a gauge invariant symplectic form which in turn represents a complete Hamiltonian description of the covariant phase space. -- Highlights: We report a detailed Hamiltonian analysis for an exotic action of gravity. We show that Palatini and exotic actions are not equivalent. The exotic action is a non-commutative theory. The fundamental gauge transformations of the theory are ?-deformed Poincar transformations. A Lorentz and gauge invariant symplectic two-form is constructed.

  20. Critical-field theory of the Kondo lattice model in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki-Seok

    2005-05-15

    In the context of the U(1) slave-boson theory we derive a critical-field theory near the quantum-critical point of the Kondo lattice model in two spatial dimensions. First, we argue that strong gauge fluctuations in the U(1) slave-boson theory give rise to confinement between spinons and holons, thus causing 'neutralized' spinons in association with the slave-boson U(1) gauge field. Second, we show that critical fluctuations of Kondo singlets near the quantum-critical point result in a new U(1) gauge field. This emergent gauge field has nothing to do with the slave-boson U(1) gauge field. Third, we find that the slave-boson U(1) gauge field can be exactly integrated out in the low-energy limit. As a result we find a critical-field theory in terms of renormalized conduction electrons and neutralized spinons interacting via the new emergent U(1) gauge field. Based on this critical-field theory we obtain the temperature dependence of the specific heat and the imaginary part of the self-energy of the renormalized electrons. These quantities display non-Fermi-liquid behavior near the quantum-critical point.

  1. A curvilinear, fully implicit, conservative electromagnetic PIC algorithm in multiple dimensions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chacon, L.; Chen, G.

    2016-04-19

    Here, we extend a recently proposed fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions (Chen and Chacón (2015) [1]) to curvilinear geometry. As in the Cartesian case, the approach is based on a potential formulation (Φ, A), and overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. Conservation theorems for local charge and global energy are derived in curvilinear representation, and then enforced discretely by a careful choice of the discretization of field and particle equations. Additionally, the algorithm conserves canonical-momentum in any ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge ∇ • A = 0 exactly. Anmore » asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with numerical experiments in mapped meshes in 1D-3V and 2D-3V.« less

  2. Microscopic description of anisotropic low-density dipolar Bose gases in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macia, A.; Mazzanti, F.; Boronat, J.; Zillich, R. E.

    2011-09-15

    A microscopic description of the zero-energy two-body ground state and many-body static properties of anisotropic homogeneous gases of bosonic dipoles in two dimensions at low densities is presented and discussed. By changing the polarization angle with respect to the plane, we study the impact of the anisotropy, present in the dipole-dipole interaction, on the energy per particle, comparing the results with mean-field predictions. We restrict the analysis to the regime where the interaction is always repulsive, although the strength of the repulsion depends on the orientation with respect to the polarization field. We present a series expansion of the solution of the zero-energy two-body problem, which allows us to find the scattering length of the interaction and to build a suitable Jastrow factor that we use as a trial wave function for both a variational and diffusion Monte Carlo simulation of the infinite system. We find that the anisotropy has an almost negligible impact on the ground-state properties of the many-body system in the universal regime where the scattering length governs the physics of the system. We also show that scaling in the gas parameter persists in the dipolar case up to values where other isotropic interactions with the same scattering length yield different predictions.

  3. The application of light-cone quantization to quantum chromodynamics in one-plus-one dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornbostel, K.J.

    1988-12-01

    Formal and computational aspects of light cone quantization are studied by application to quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in one spatial plus one temporal dimension. This quantization scheme, which has been extensively applied to perturbative calculations, is shown to provide an intuitively appealing and numerically tractable approach to non-perturbative computations as well. In the initial section, a light-cone quantization procedure is developed which incorporates fields on the boundaries. This allows for the consistent treatment of massless fermions and the construction of explicitly conserved momentum and charge operators. The next section, which comprises the majority of this work, focuses on the numerical solution of the light-cone Schrodinger equation for bound states. The state space is constructed and the Hamiltonian is evaluated and diagonalized by computer for arbitrary number of colors, baryon number and coupling constant strength. As a result, the full spectrum of mesons and baryons and their associated wavefunctions are determined. These results are compared with those which exist from other approaches to test the reliability of the method. The program also provides a preliminary test for the feasibility of, and an opportunity to develop approximation schemes for, an attack on three-plus-one dimensional QCD. Finally, analytic results are presented which include a discussion of integral equations for wavefunctions and their endpoint behavior. Solutions for hadronic masses and wavefunctions in the limits of both large and small quark mass are discussed. 49 refs., 32 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert Paul; Ross, Michael P.

    2013-08-01

    Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inches-typically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

  5. Nonlinear quantum-mechanical system associated with Sine-Gordon equation in (1 + 2) dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarmi, Yair

    2014-10-15

    Despite the fact that it is not integrable, the (1 + 2)-dimensional Sine-Gordon equation has N-soliton solutions, whose velocities are lower than the speed of light (c = 1), for all N ≥ 1. Based on these solutions, a quantum-mechanical system is constructed over a Fock space of particles. The coordinate of each particle is an angle around the unit circle. U, a nonlinear functional of the particle number-operators, which obeys the Sine-Gordon equation in (1 + 2) dimensions, is constructed. Its eigenvalues on N-particle states in the Fock space are the slower-than-light, N-soliton solutions of the equation. A projection operator (a nonlinear functional of U), which vanishes on the single-particle subspace, is a mass-density generator. Its eigenvalues on multi-particle states play the role of the mass density of structures that emulate free, spatially extended, relativistic particles. The simplicity of the quantum-mechanical system allows for the incorporation of perturbations with particle interactions, which have the capacity to “annihilate” and “create” solitons – an effect that does not have an analog in perturbed classical nonlinear evolution equations.

  6. Geometrical properties of the trans-spherical solutions in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2009-06-15

    We investigate the geometrical properties of static vacuum p-brane solutions of Einstein gravity in D=n+p+3 dimensions, which have spherical symmetry of S{sup n+1} orthogonal to the p directions and which are invariant under the translation along them. The solutions are characterized by the mass density and p number of tension densities. The causal structure of the higher-dimensional solutions is essentially the same as that of the five-dimensional ones. Namely, a naked singularity appears for most solutions except for the Schwarzschild black p-brane and the Kaluza-Klein bubble. We show that some important geometric properties such as the area of S{sup n+1} and the total spatial volume are characterized only by the three parameters (the mass density, the sum of tension densities, and the sum of tension density squares), rather than individual tension densities. These geometric properties are analyzed in detail in this parameter space and are compared with those of the five-dimensional case.

  7. Group-invariant solutions of semilinear Schrdinger equations in multi-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anco, Stephen C.; Feng, Wei; Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014

    2013-12-15

    Symmetry group methods are applied to obtain all explicit group-invariant radial solutions to a class of semilinear Schrdinger equations in dimensions n ? 1. Both focusing and defocusing cases of a power nonlinearity are considered, including the special case of the pseudo-conformal power p = 4/n relevant for critical dynamics. The methods involve, first, reduction of the Schrdinger equations to group-invariant semilinear complex 2nd order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with respect to an optimal set of one-dimensional point symmetry groups, and second, use of inherited symmetries, hidden symmetries, and conditional symmetries to solve each ODE by quadratures. Through Noether's theorem, all conservation laws arising from these point symmetry groups are listed. Some group-invariant solutions are found to exist for values of n other than just positive integers, and in such cases an alternative two-dimensional form of the Schrdinger equations involving an extra modulation term with a parameter m = 2?n ? 0 is discussed.

  8. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  9. Critical Dimensions of Water-tamped Slabs and Spheres of Active Material

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Greuling, E.; Argo, H.: Chew, G.; Frankel, M. E.; Konopinski, E.J.; Marvin, C.; Teller, E.

    1946-08-06

    The magnitude and distribution of the fission rate per unit area produced by three energy groups of moderated neutrons reflected from a water tamper into one side of an infinite slab of active material is calculated approximately in section II. This rate is directly proportional to the current density of fast neutrons from the active material incident on the water tamper. The critical slab thickness is obtained in section III by solving an inhomogeneous transport integral equation for the fast-neutron current density into the tamper. Extensive use is made of the formulae derived in "The Mathematical Development of the End-Point Method" by Frankel and Goldberg. In section IV slight alterations in the theory outlined in sections II and III were made so that one could approximately compute the critical radius of a water-tamper sphere of active material. The derived formulae were applied to calculate the critical dimensions of water-tamped slabs and spheres of solid UF{sub 6} leaving various (25) isotope enrichment fractions. Decl. Dec. 16, 1955.

  10. A PRECISION TEST FOR AN EXTRA SPATIAL DIMENSION USING BLACK-HOLE-PULSAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonetti, John H.; Minic, Djordje; Surani, Umair; Vijayan, Vipin; Kavic, Michael

    2011-08-20

    We discuss the observable effects of enhanced black hole mass loss in a black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binary, due to the presence of a warped extra spatial dimension of curvature radius L in the braneworld scenario. For some masses and orbital parameters in the expected ranges the binary components would outspiral-the opposite of the behavior due to energy loss from gravitational radiation alone. If the NS is a pulsar, observations of the rate of change of the orbital period with a precision obtained for the binary pulsar B1913+16 could easily detect the effect of mass loss. For M{sub BH} = 7 M{sub sun}, M{sub NS} = 1.4 M{sub sun}, eccentricity e = 0.1, and L = 10 {mu}m, the critical orbital period dividing systems that inspiral from systems that outspiral is P {approx} 6.5 hr, which is within the range of expected orbital periods; this value drops to P {approx} 4.2 hr for M{sub BH} = 5 M{sub sun}. Observations of a BH-pulsar system could set considerably better limits on L in these braneworld models than could be determined by torsion-balance gravity experiments in the foreseeable future.

  11. Physics-based dimension reduction in uncertainty quantification for radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzler, A. C.; Adams, M. L.; Stripling Iv, H. F.; Hawkins, W. D.

    2013-07-01

    We present a physics-based methodology for quantifying the uncertainty in a given quantity of interest (QOI) that is contributed by uncertainties in opacities in radiation transport problems. Typically, opacities are tabulated as a function of density, temperature, and photon energy group. The size of this table makes a study of uncertainties at this level challenging because of the well-known 'curse of dimensionality.' We address this by studying uncertain parameters in the underlying physical model that generates the opacity tables. At this level, there are fewer uncertain parameters but still too many to analyze directly through computationally expensive radiation transport simulations. In order to explore this large uncertain parameter space, we develop two simplified radiation transport problems that are much less computationally demanding than the target problem of interest. An emulator is created for each QOI for each simplified problem using Bayesian Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (BMARS). This emulator is used to create a functional relationship between the QOIs and the uncertain parameters. Sensitivity analysis is performed using the emulator to determine which parameters contribute significantly to the uncertainty. This physics-based screening process reduces the dimension of the parameter space that is then studied via the computationally expensive radiation transport calculation to generate distributions of quantities of interest. Results of this research demonstrate that the QOIs for the target problem agree for varying screening criteria determined by the sensitivity analysis, and the QOIs agree well for varying Latin Hypercube Design (LHD) sample sizes for the uncertain space. (authors)

  12. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Cannell; Adrian S. Sabau

    2005-09-30

    the shell mold. A model for thermal radiation within the shell mold was developed, and the thermal model was successfully validated using ProCAST. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The prefiring of the empty shell mold was considered in the model, and the shell mold was limited to a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations only with coupled shell-alloy systems. The alloy dimensions were in excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data, validating the deformation module. For actual parts, however, the creep properties of the shell molds must also be obtained, modeled, and validated.

  13. Influence of store dimensions and auxiliary volume configuration on the performance of medium-sized solar combisystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundh, Magdalena; Zass, Katrin; Wilhelms, Claudius; Vajen, Klaus; Jordan, Ulrike

    2010-07-15

    To increase the fractional energy savings achieved with solar thermal combisystems the store volume may be increased. Installation of large stores in single-family houses is, however, often limited by space constraints. In this article the influence of the store dimensions, as well as internal and external auxiliary volume configurations, are investigated for large solar water stores by annual dynamic TRNSYS simulations. The results show that store sizes up to 4 m{sup 3} may be used in solar heating systems with 30 m{sup 2} collector area. It is further shown that well-insulated stores are rather insensitive to the geometry. Stores deviating from the conventional dimensions still yield high fractional energy savings. Furthermore, the simulations show that the performance of an internal auxiliary volume configuration in most cases exceeds that of a solution with an external auxiliary unit. The practical limitations of very thin auxiliary volumes must, however, be further investigated. (author)

  14. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  15. A non-linear dimension reduction methodology for generating data-driven stochastic input models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2008-06-20

    Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media (polycrystalline materials, porous media, functionally graded materials) provides information of significance only if realistic input models of the topology and property variations are used. This paper proposes a framework to construct such input stochastic models for the topology and thermal diffusivity variations in heterogeneous media using a data-driven strategy. Given a set of microstructure realizations (input samples) generated from given statistical information about the medium topology, the framework constructs a reduced-order stochastic representation of the thermal diffusivity. This problem of constructing a low-dimensional stochastic representation of property variations is analogous to the problem of manifold learning and parametric fitting of hyper-surfaces encountered in image processing and psychology. Denote by M the set of microstructures that satisfy the given experimental statistics. A non-linear dimension reduction strategy is utilized to map M to a low-dimensional region, A. We first show that M is a compact manifold embedded in a high-dimensional input space R{sup n}. An isometric mapping F from M to a low-dimensional, compact, connected set A is contained in R{sup d}(d<

  16. Study of. lambda. parameters and crossover phenomena in SU(N) x SU(N) sigma models in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigemitsu, J; Kogut, J B

    1981-01-01

    The spin system analogues of recent studies of the string tension and ..lambda.. parameters of SU(N) gauge theories in 4 dimensions are carried out for the SU(N) x SU(N) and O(N) models in 2 dimensions. The relations between the ..lambda.. parameters of both the Euclidean and Hamiltonian formulation of the lattice models and the ..lambda.. parameter of the continuum models are obtained. The one loop finite renormalization of the speed of light in the lattice Hamiltonian formulations of the O(N) and SU(N) x SU(N) models is calculated. Strong coupling calculations of the mass gaps of these spin models are done for all N and the constants of proportionality between the gap and the ..lambda.. parameter of the continuum models are obtained. These results are contrasted with similar calculations for the SU(N) gauge models in 3+1 dimensions. Identifying suitable coupling constants for discussing the N ..-->.. infinity limits, the numerical results suggest that the crossover from weak to strong coupling in the lattice O(N) models becomes less abrupt as N increases while the crossover for the SU(N) x SU(N) models becomes more abrupt. The crossover in SU(N) gauge theories also becomes more abrupt with increasing N, however, at an even greater rate than in the SU(N) x SU(N) spin models.

  17. Microstructure for ferroelastic transitions from strain pseudo-spin clock models in two and three dimensions: a mean field analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lookman, Turab; Vasseur, Romain

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the microstructure of ferroelastic transitions in two and three dimensions from the solution of their corresponding discrete pseudo-spin models. In two dimensions we consider two transitions each from the high symmetry square and triangle symmetries: square-to-rectangle (SR), square-to-oblique (SO), triangle-to-centered rectangle (TR) and triangle-to-oblique (TO). In three dimensions we study the corresponding spin model for the cubic to tetragonal transition. The Landau free energies for these transitions result in N+ I states clock models (Z{sub N}) with long range interactions and we derive mean-field self-consistency equations for the clock model Hamiltonians. The microstructures from the mean-field solutions of the models are very similar to those obtained from the original continuum models or Monte Carlo simulations on the spin models (in the SR case), illustrating that these discrete models capture the salient physics. The models, in the presence of disorder, provide the basis for the study of the strain glass phase observed in martensitic alloys.

  18. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ? 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  19. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I.

    2013-01-15

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  20. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

  1. Trigonometrical sums connected with the chiral Potts model, Verlinde dimension formula, two-dimensional resistor network, and number theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chair, Noureddine

    2014-02-15

    We have recently developed methods for obtaining exact two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. We use these methods to obtain closed formulas of certain trigonometrical sums that arise in connection with one-dimensional lattice, in proving Scotts conjecture on permanent of Cauchy matrix, and in the perturbative chiral Potts model. The generalized trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are shown to satisfy recursion formulas that are transparent and direct, and differ from those of Gervois and Mehta. By making a change of variables in these recursion formulas, the dimension of the space of conformal blocks of SU(2) and SO(3) WZW models may be computed recursively. Our methods are then extended to compute the corner-to-corner resistance, and the Kirchhoff index of the first non-trivial two-dimensional resistor network, 2N. Finally, we obtain new closed formulas for variant of trigonometrical sums, some of which appear in connection with number theory. -- Highlights: Alternative derivation of certain trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are given. Generalization of these trigonometrical sums satisfy recursion formulas. The dimension of the space of conformal blocks may be computed from these recursions. Exact corner-to-corner resistance, the Kirchhoff index of 2N are given.

  2. Developing and bounding ice particle mass- and area-dimension expressions for use in atmospheric models and remote sensing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erfani, Ehsan; Mitchell, David L.

    2016-04-07

    Here, ice particle mass- and projected area-dimension (m-D and A-D) power laws are commonly used in the treatment of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties and the remote sensing of ice cloud properties. Although there has long been evidence that a single m-D or A-D power law is often not valid over all ice particle sizes, few studies have addressed this fact. This study develops self-consistent m-D and A-D expressions that are not power laws but can easily be reduced to power laws for the ice particle size (maximum dimension or D) range of interest, and they are valid overmore » a much larger D range than power laws. This was done by combining ground measurements of individual ice particle m and D formed at temperature T < –20 °C during a cloud seeding field campaign with 2-D stereo (2D-S) and cloud particle imager (CPI) probe measurements of D and A, and estimates of m, in synoptic and anvil ice clouds at similar temperatures. The resulting m-D and A-D expressions are functions of temperature and cloud type (synoptic vs. anvil), and are in good agreement with m-D power laws developed from recent field studies considering the same temperature range (–60 °C < T < –20 °C).« less

  3. A strict test of stellar evolution models: The absolute dimensions of the massive benchmark eclipsing binary V578 Mon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pavlovski, K.; Hensberge, H.; Chew, Y. Gmez Maqueo; Claret, A.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P = 2.40848 days) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of 5.41 0.04 R{sub ?} and 4.29 0.05 R{sub ?}, and temperatures of 30,000 500 K and 25,750 435 K, respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well with previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of 14.54 0.08 M{sub ?} and 10.29 0.06 M{sub ?} are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of the Granada group. We find that all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within the uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrones. However, there are some apparent age discrepancies for the corresponding mass-radius isochrones. Models with larger convective overshoot, >0.35, worked best. Combined with our previously determined apsidal motion of 0.07089{sub ?0.00013}{sup +0.00021} deg cycle{sup 1}, we compute the internal structure constants (tidal Love number) for the Newtonian and general relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion as log k {sub 2} = 1.975 0.017 and log k {sub 2} = 3.412 0.018, respectively. We find the relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion to be small, <4%. We find that the prediction of log k {sub 2,theo} = 2.005 0.025 of the Granada models fully agrees with our observed log k {sub 2}.

  4. Analytical Formulation for Sizing and Estimating the Dimensions and Weight of Wind Turbine Hub and Drivetrain Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; King, R.; Dykes, K.; Veers, P.

    2015-06-09

    This report summarizes the theory, verification, and validation of a new sizing tool for wind turbine drivetrain components, the Drivetrain Systems Engineering (DriveSE) tool. DriveSE calculates the dimensions and mass properties of the hub, main shaft, main bearing(s), gearbox, bedplate, transformer if up-tower, and yaw system. The level of fi¬ delity for each component varies depending on whether semiempirical parametric or physics-based models are used. The physics-based models have internal iteration schemes based on system constraints and design criteria. Every model is validated against available industry data or finite-element analysis. The verification and validation results show that the models reasonably capture primary drivers for the sizing and design of major drivetrain components.

  5. Generation of high-amplitude soliton waves in crystalline materials of different dimensions under high radiative, dynamic, and temperature loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovsky, O. A. Orlov, A. V.

    2011-12-15

    It is shown that beams of high-amplitude supersonic breather solitons, phonons, and subsonic excitations of new type (torsions) are generated in crystalline materials of different dimensions under high radiative and dynamic loads near the stability threshold. The dispersion dependences of solitons and phonons in 1D crystals are presented. It is shown that, in 2D crystals beams consisting of six or two (depending on the bombarding particle direction), breather solitons are generated and propagate in certain crystallographic directions. The masses of soliton excitations as particles (coupled complexes of massless phonons) have been determined. It is shown that the subsonic soliton waves of a new type with torsion atomic vibrations are generated in 3D nanotubes, along with supersonic soliton waves of longitudinal vibrations.

  6. Report on subcontract from Lawrence Livermore National Lab, "Development of Large-Dimension Configuration-Interaction Shell-Model Code"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C W

    2012-01-24

    The project period was devoted to several developments in the technical capabilities of the BIGSTIC large-dimension configuration-interaction shell-model code, written in Fortran 90. The specific computational goals for the project period were: (1) store Lanczos vectors on core in RAM to minimize I/O; (2) rewrite reorthogonalization with Lanczos vectors stored in core, consult with personnel at LLNL, LBL, ORNL, Iowa State University to maximize performance; (3) restrict creation of N-body jumps to those needed by an individual node; and (4) distribute 3-body interaction over many cores. Significant progress was made towards these goals, especially (1) and (2), although in the process they discovered intermediate tasks that had to be accomplished first. The achievements were as follows - I put into place structures and algorithms to facility fragmenting very large-dimension Lanczos intermediate vectors. Only by fragmenting the vectors can we carry out (1) and (2). In addition, I reorganized the action of the Hamiltonian matrix and created a new division of operations for MPI. Based upon earlier work, I made plans of a revised algorithm for distribution of work with MPI, with a particular eye towards breaking up the Lanczos vectors. I introduce a new derived type (opbundles) which collects the parameters for the Hamiltonian, and rewrote the application routines to use it. It has been validated and verified. I made progress towards revised MPI parallelization. Using the opbundles, I was able to compute a distribution of work over compute nodes, which should be very efficient. This new distribution is easier to derive and more efficient, in principle, than the old distribution. Furthermore, it should make applications with fragmented Lanczos vectors easier. Implementation is still in progress.

  7. MO-E-17A-10: Evaluation of Body and Head Dimensions of Pediatric Patients as a Function of Age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seibert, JA; Boone, JM

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Phantom development in medical physics plays an important role in radiation dose assessment and image quality evaluation, and this is especially true in the pediatric patient population. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the relationship between patient age and patient size, focusing on the abdomen-pelvis and head effective diameters, for patients ranging in age from newborn to 18 years. Methods: A dose reporting tool for computed tomography systems was installed at our institution to achieve compliance with state law commencing on July 1, 2012. The software records a number of patient-specific data, and also reports CT dose metrics (CTDIvol and DLP) into the patients interpretive report. The database generated by the software was mined to determine patient effective diameter as a function of age for pediatric patients aged 0–18 years. CT protocols including abdomen-pelvis and routine head were evaluated, and specific to this study the patients age, gender and equivalent diameter were recorded. Results: Six age ranges were evaluated: A(0–3), B(4–6), C(7–9), D(10–12),E(13–15),F(16–18). For the torso in these groups based upon 694 patients, median effective diameters were 147, 167, 184, 214, 231, 246 mm, respectively. For the head (N=1833), median diameters were 143, 157, 162, 168, 174, and 174, respectively. Conclusion: A solid understanding of the approximate dimensions of pediatric patients as a function of age is useful in the development of age-based imaging protocols and dose assessments. CT dose-reporting tools generate a great deal of data with respect to body dimensions automatically. In this study, median equivalent diameters for the abdomen-pelvis and head of pediatric patients were evaluated. These data may prove useful in the development of both mathematical and physical phantoms for dosimetry and image quality assessment.

  8. Word Pro - S1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Note: Through 1965, "Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase" data are included in "Heavy-Duty Trucks." Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlysummary. Source: Table ...

  9. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at s^(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando; /Florida State U.

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D{sup -} detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  10. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  11. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-02-03

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  12. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-24

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d=1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P(t) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, whichmore » occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P(t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d=1 versus d=3). We investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ(r), which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We also demonstrate that, while σ(r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.« less

  13. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-24

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d=1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P(t) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, which occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P(t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d=1 versus d=3). We investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ(r), which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We also demonstrate that, while σ(r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.

  14. Microstructure from ferroelastic transitions using strain pseudospin clock models in two and three dimensions: A local mean-field analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasseur, Romain; Lookman, Turab; Shenoy, Subodh R.

    2010-09-01

    We show how microstructure can arise in first-order ferroelastic structural transitions, in two and three spatial dimensions, through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include anisotropic elastic interactions. Such transitions have symmetry-selected physical strains as their N{sub OP}-component order parameters, with Landau free energies that have a single zero-strain 'austenite' minimum at high temperatures, and spontaneous-strain 'martensite' minima of N{sub V} structural variants at low temperatures. The total free energy also has gradient terms, and power-law anisotropic effective interactions, induced by 'no-dislocation' St Venant compatibility constraints. In a reduced description, the strains at Landau minima induce temperature dependent, clocklike Z{sub N{sub V+1}} Hamiltonians, with N{sub OP}-component strain-pseudospin vectors S-vector pointing to N{sub V}+1 discrete values (including zero). We study elastic texturing in five such first-order structural transitions through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include the power-law interactions. As a prototype, we consider the two-variant square/rectangle transition, with a one-component pseudospin taking N{sub V}+1=3 values of S=0,{+-}1, as in a generalized Blume-Capel model. We then consider transitions with two-component (N{sub OP}=2) pseudospins: the equilateral to centered rectangle (N{sub V}=3); the square to oblique polygon (N{sub V}=4); the triangle to oblique (N{sub V}=6) transitions; and finally the three-dimensional (3D) cubic to tetragonal transition (N{sub V}=3). The local mean-field solutions in two-dimensional and 3D yield oriented domain-wall patterns as from continuous-variable strain dynamics, showing the discrete-variable models capture the essential ferroelastic texturings. Other related Hamiltonians illustrate that structural transitions in materials science can be the source of interesting spin models in

  15. Microsoft Word - M2FT-14LB0811011_International Collab Activities_Sep 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    July 31, 2015 Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation & Energy Efficiency Office of the General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Extension of Deadline for Comments on the Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers Notice of Data Availability Dear Dan, As you are aware, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Data Availability for Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers

  16. MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: A sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furusawa, K.; Abe, F.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Gould, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Harris, P.; Fukui, A. E-mail: liweih@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: rzellem@lpl.arizona.edu; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of M {sub h} = 0.11 ± 0.01 M {sub ☉} and M {sub p} = 9.2 ± 2.2 M {sub ⊕}, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at D {sub L} = 0.81 ± 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 ± 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a priori unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.

  17. Properties of 30 lb/ft{sup 3} rigid polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenski. E.G.; Stinebaugh, R.E.; York, A.R. II

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes tests on five different foams. Two are manufactured at Allied Signal, two at North Carolina Foam Industries, and one at General Plastics. The tests conducted are: thermal conductivity at various temperatures, specific heat at 60{degrees}C, compressive strength at ambient and 60{degrees}C, thermogravimetric analysis to 800{degrees}C, intumescence, and char formation properties. A CHN analysis was also performed. Funding for the testing of rigid polyurethane foams originated from the AT-400A container program at Sandia National Laboratories. This testing supported the development of the AT-400A container. The AT-400A is a storage and transportation container that will be used initially at the Pantex Plant for storage of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons.

  18. Design analysis of 2,000 lb JIB crane for chemical lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZIADA, H.H.

    1999-09-22

    A 2,000 lbf jib crane is needed to replace an existing 1,000 lbf jib crane in the Chemical Lab (Building MO-733). The existing 1,000 lbf jib crane (to be replaced) has a 174 boom (I-beam). The crane is attached to the wall through two brackets (about 8 1/2-ft apart). The boom is attached to the lower bracket, and a supporting rod is attached to the upper bracket. The supporting rod is attached to the boom at about 8-ft from the free end. After preliminary studies and discussions, it was decided to construct the new jib crane from two perpendicular I-beams (L-shape) without a supporting rod. The crane is to be supported on the wall through the two lower existing brackets (about 5-ft apart). The boom is to be 20-ft long cantilever (the horizontal I-beam). The vertical I-beam is to be attached to the lower two existing brackets to support the jib crane to the wall. This construction is to be similar to another existing 1,000 lbf jib crane (L-shape) in the lab. The purpose of this document is to perform a design analysis for the proposed 2,000 lbf jib crane to determine suitable sizes of members and configuration of the new jib crane assembly. After construction, if the as-built assembly differs from the 2,000 lbf jib crane as proposed in this document, a revision of this analysis needs to be performed to confirm the acceptability of the as-built assembly.

  19. Microsoft Word - M2FT-14LB0811011_International Collab Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Table 2-1 summarizes the status of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) management ... in international organizations, working groups, committees, and expert panels. ...

  20. MOA-2011-BLG-293LB: First microlensing planet possibly in the habitable zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, V.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Gaudi, B. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Beaulieu, J.-P. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 Bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Fukui, A. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Udalski, A., E-mail: virginie@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jyee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: beaulieu@iap.fr, E-mail: bennett@nd.edu, E-mail: afukui@oao.nao.ac.jp, E-mail: sumi@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-01-01

    We used Keck adaptive optics observations to identify the first planet discovered by microlensing to lie in or near the habitable zone, i.e., at projected separation r = 1.1 0.1 AU from its M{sub L} = 0.86 0.06 M {sub ?} host, being the highest microlensing mass definitely identified. The planet has a mass m{sub p} = 4.8 0.3 M {sub Jup}, and could in principle have habitable moons. This is also the first planet to be identified as being in the Galactic bulge with good confidence: D{sub L} = 7.72 0.44 kpc. The planet/host masses and distance were previously not known, but only estimated using Bayesian priors based on a Galactic model. These estimates had suggested that the planet might be a super-Jupiter orbiting an M dwarf, a very rare class of planets. We obtained high-resolution JHK images using Keck adaptive optics to detect the lens and so test this hypothesis. We clearly detect light from a G dwarf at the position of the event, and exclude all interpretations other than that this is the lens with high confidence (95%), using a new astrometric technique. The calibrated magnitude of the planet host star is H{sub L} = 19.16 0.13. We infer the following probabilities for the three possible orbital configurations of the gas giant planet: 53% to be in the habitable zone, 35% to be near the habitable zone, and 12% to be beyond the snow line, depending on the atmospherical conditions and the uncertainties on the semimajor axis.

  1. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  2. Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S{sub 1} state of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. I. Methodology and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changala, P. Bryan

    2014-01-14

    The bending and torsional degrees of freedom in S{sub 1} acetylene, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, are subject to strong vibrational resonances and rovibrational interactions, which create complex vibrational polyad structures even at low energy. As the internal energy approaches that of the barrier to cis-trans isomerization, these energy level patterns undergo further large-scale reorganization that cannot be satisfactorily treated by traditional models tied to local minima of the potential energy surface for nuclear motion. Experimental spectra in the region near the cis-trans transition state have revealed these complicated new patterns. In order to understand near-barrier spectroscopic observations and to predict the detailed effects of cis-trans isomerization on the rovibrational energy level structure, we have performed reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S{sub 1} state. In this paper, we present the methodological details, several of which require special care. Our calculation uses a high accuracy ab initio potential surface and a fully symmetrized extended complete nuclear permutation inversion group theoretical treatment of a multivalued internal coordinate system that is appropriate for large amplitude bending and torsional motions. We also discuss the details of the rovibrational basis functions and their symmetrization, as well as the use of a constrained reduced dimension rovibrational kinetic energy operator.

  3. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  4. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scalemoreparameter $M_\\mathrm{D}$ in the ADD model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter $\\Lambda_\\mathrm{U}$. The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.less

  5. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter $M_\\mathrm{D}$ in the ADD model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter $\\Lambda_\\mathrm{U}$. The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  6. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parametermore » MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.« less

  7. Quantum chaos in one dimension?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ujfalusi, Laszlo; Varga, Imre; Schumayer, Daniel [Elmeleti Fizika Tanszek, Fizikai Intezet, Budapesti Muszaki es Gazdasagtudomanyi Egyetem, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Physics, University of Otago, 730 Cumberland Street, Dunedin 9016 (New Zealand)

    2011-07-15

    In this work we investigate the inverse of the celebrated Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture. Using two inversion methods we compute a one-dimensional potential whose lowest N eigenvalues obey random matrix statistics. Our numerical results indicate that in the asymptotic limit N{yields}{infinity} the solution is nowhere differentiable and most probably nowhere continuous. Thus such a counterexample does not exist.

  8. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    vertical test cathode, the geometry of these grooves was altered, presenting the possibility that multipacting may, in fact, be occurring in this area and contributing to the low gradients that have been observed in the fine-grain cavity. Therefore, the Survey and Alignment group in C-AD engaged in measurements of the cavity joint, shown in Figure 2 and the cathode weldment, shown in Figure 3 for the purpose of characterizing the grooves in both the cavity and the vertical test cathode and comparing the dimensions of the cathode with those of the prints supplied by Advanced Energy Systems (AES), the original designer and manufacturer of both the test cathode and the electron gun cavity, in preparation to have a new one manufactured. The goal was to ensure that the articles as built matched the design prints in preparation for manufacturing a new vertical test cathode. This report describes the data collected by the Survey group in these efforts. The endeavor was challenging for the group given the millimeter-scale dimensions of the grooves and the requirement for high precision.

  9. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars and Light Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vehicle footprint is the area defined by the four points where the tires touch the ground. It is calculated as the product of the wheelbase and the average track width of the vehicle. The...

  10. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It is calculated as the product of the wheelbase and the average track width of the vehicle. The upcoming Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards have fuel economy targets ...

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, Selected Years, 1949-2010 Year Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1 Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2 Heavy-Duty Trucks 3 All Motor Vehicles 4 Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per vehicle

  12. MOA-2008-BLG-379Lb: A massive planet from a high magnification event with a faint source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, D.; Sumi, T.; Fukagawa, M.; Shibai, H.; Udalski, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Rattenbury, N.; Fukui, A.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; and others

    2014-01-10

    We report on the analysis of the high microlensing event MOA-2008-BLG-379, which has a strong microlensing anomaly at its peak due to a massive planet with a mass ratio of q = 6.9 × 10{sup –3}. Because the faint source star crosses the large resonant caustic, the planetary signal dominates the light curve. This is unusual for planetary microlensing events, and as a result, the planetary nature of this light curve was not immediately noticed. The planetary nature of the event was found when the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) Collaboration conducted a systematic study of binary microlensing events previously identified by the MOA alert system. We have conducted a Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model to estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. This yields a host star mass of M{sub L}=3.3{sub −1.2}{sup +1.7} M{sub ⊙} orbited by a planet of mass m{sub P}=0.56{sub −0.27}{sup +0.24} M{sub Jup} at an orbital separation of a=3.3{sub −1.2}{sup +1.3} AU at a distance of D{sub L}=4.1{sub −1.9}{sup +1.7} kpc. The faint source magnitude of I {sub S} = 21.30 and relatively high lens-source relative proper motion of μ{sub rel} = 7.6 ± 1.6 mas yr{sup –1} imply that high angular resolution adaptive optics or Hubble Space Telescope observations are likely to be able to detect the source star, which would determine the masses and distance of the planet and its host star.

  13. Super-massive planets around late-type starsthe case of OGLE-2012-BLG-0406Lb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poleski, Rados?aw; Gould, Andrew; Udalski, Andrzej; Szyma?ski, Micha? K.; Soszy?ski, Igor; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzy?ski, Grzegorz; Koz?owski, Szymon; Pietrukowicz, Pawe?; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Jan; Wyrzykowski, ?ukasz; Dong, Subo

    2014-02-10

    Super-Jupiter-mass planets should form only beyond the snow line of host stars. However, the core accretion theory of planetary formation does not predict super-Jupiters forming around low-mass hosts. We present a discovery of a 3.9 1.2 M {sub Jup} mass planet orbiting the 0.59 0.17 M {sub ?} star using the gravitational microlensing method. During the event, the projected separation of the planet and the star is 3.9 1.0 AU, i.e., the planet is significantly further from the host star than the snow line. This is the fourth such planet discovered using the microlensing technique and challenges the core accretion theory.

  14. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level.more » For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.« less

  15. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level. For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.

  16. Expanding the Security Dimension of Surety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SENGLAUB, MICHAEL E.

    1999-10-01

    A small effort was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to explore the use of a number of modern analytic technologies in the assessment of terrorist actions and to predict trends. This work focuses on Bayesian networks as a means of capturing correlations between groups, tactics, and targets. The data that was used as a test of the methodology was obtained by using a special parsing algorithm written in JAVA to create records in a database from information articles captured electronically. As a vulnerability assessment technique the approach proved very useful. The technology also proved to be a valuable development medium because of the ability to integrate blocks of information into a deployed network rather than waiting to fully deploy only after all relevant information has been assembled.

  17. Polygon Subtraction in 2 or 3 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-10-01

    When searching for computer code to perform the ubiquitous task of subtracting one polygon from another, it is difficult to find real examples and detailed explanations. This paper outlines the step-by-step process necessary to accomplish this basic task.

  18. Apparatus for checking dimensions of workpieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Possati, Mario; Golinelli, Guido

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for checking features of workpieces with rotational symmetry defining a geometrical axis, which includes a base, rest devices fixed to the base for supporting the workpiece with the geometrical axis horizontally arranged, and a support structure coupled to the base for rotation about a horizontal axis. A counterweight and sensor are coupled to the support structure and movable with the support structure from a rest position, allowing loading of the workpiece to be checked onto the rest devices to a working position where the sensor is brought into cooperation with the workpiece. The axis of rotation of the support structure is arranged below the axis of the workpiece, in correspondence to a vertical geometrical plane passing through the workpiece geometric axis when the workpiece is positioned on the rest devices.

  19. Generalized Cartan Calculus in general dimension

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yi -Nan

    2015-07-22

    We develop the generalized Cartan Calculus for the groups G = SL(2,R) × R+, SL(5,R) and SO(5,5). They are the underlying algebraic structures of d=9,7,6 exceptional field theory, respectively. These algebraic identities are needed for the "tensor hierarchy" structure in exceptional field theory. The validity of Poincar\\'e lemmas in this new differential geometry is also discussed. Lastly, we explore some possible extension of the generalized Cartan calculus beyond the exceptional series.

  20. Generalized Cartan Calculus in general dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi -Nan

    2015-07-22

    We develop the generalized Cartan Calculus for the groups G = SL(2,R) × R+, SL(5,R) and SO(5,5). They are the underlying algebraic structures of d=9,7,6 exceptional field theory, respectively. These algebraic identities are needed for the "tensor hierarchy" structure in exceptional field theory. The validity of Poincar\\'e lemmas in this new differential geometry is also discussed. Lastly, we explore some possible extension of the generalized Cartan calculus beyond the exceptional series.

  1. Stochastic Dimension Reduction of Multiphysics Systems through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    held February 25 - March 1, 2013 in Boston, MA. Research Org: Sandia ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  2. Flavor structure of warped extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We recently showed that warped extra-dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) masses lead to striking signals at B factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B physics. We also briefly study other new physics signatures that arise in rare K decays (K{yields}{pi}{nu}{nu}), in rare top decays [t{yields}c{gamma}(Z,gluon)], and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates such as K{sub S}{pi}{sup 0} and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, {approx}3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a 'CP problem' since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  3. Flavor Structure of Warped Extra Dimension Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-08-10

    We recently showed, in hep-ph/0406101, that warped extra dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV KK masses lead to striking signals at B-factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B-physics. We also briefly study other NP signatures that arise in rare K decays (K {yields} {pi}{nu}{nu}), in rare top decays [t {yields} c{gamma}(Z, gluon)] and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates such as K{sub s}{pi}{sup 0} and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, {approx} 3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a ''CP problem'' since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  4. Dirac neutrino in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-12-01

    We implement Dirac neutrinos in the minimal custodial Randall-Sundrum setting via the Krauss-Wilczek mechanism. We demonstrate by giving explicit lepton mass matrices that with neutrinos in the normal hierarchy, lepton mass and mixing patterns can be naturally reproduced at the scale set by the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, and at the same time without violating bounds set by lepton flavor violations. Our scenario generically predicts a nonzero neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, as well as the existence of sub-TeV right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos, which partner the right-handed standard model charged leptons. These relatively light KK neutrinos may be searched for at the LHC.

  5. Apparatus for electroplating particles of small dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.; Illige, J.D.

    1980-09-19

    The thickness, uniformity, and surface smoothness requirements for surface coatings of glass microspheres for use as targets for laser fusion research are critical. Because of thier minute size, the microspheres are difficult to manipulate and control in electroplating systems. The electroplating apparatus of the present invention addresses these problems by providing a cathode cell having a cell chamber, a cathode and an anode electrically isolated from each other and connected to an electrical power source. During the plating process, the cathode is controllably vibrated along with solution pulse to maintain the particles in random free motion so as to attain the desired properties.

  6. Apparatus for electroplating particles of small dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M.; Illige, John D.

    1982-01-01

    The thickness, uniformity, and surface smoothness requirements for surface coatings of glass microspheres for use as targets for laser fusion research are critical. Because of their minute size, the microspheres are difficult to manipulate and control in electroplating systems. The electroplating apparatus (10) of the present invention addresses these problems by providing a cathode cell (20) having a cell chamber (22), a cathode (23) and an anode (26) electrically isolated from each other and connected to an electrical power source (24). During the plating process, the cathode (23) is controllably vibrated along with solution pulse to maintain the particles in random free motion so as to attain the desired properties.

  7. Implementing sustainability: the behavioral-institutional dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.; Diamond, Rick C.; Wolfe, Amy K.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Payne, Christopher T.; Dion, Jerry

    2013-05-10

    Organizations, both public and private sector, are increasingly pursuing strategies to reduce their energy use and increase sustainability. Whether these efforts are based on economic rationale, community spirit, environmental ethics, federal mandates, or other reasons, they predominantly feature strategies that rely on new technologies. If there is any focus on behavior change, it is typically addressed to changing individual behavior. While we recognize the importance—and limitations—of the role of individual behavior in promoting sustainability goals, we are more interested in the role of institutional behavior. We have reviewed the small but growing literature on institutional behavior change, and have identified eight “evidence-based” principles as a guide for federal agencies to take action. This article presents the principles and illustrates them with examples to suggest ways that they can serve as models for others.

  8. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  9. MOA-2011-BLG-262Lb: A sub-Earth-mass moon orbiting a gas giant primary or a high velocity planetary system in the galactic Bulge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Bennett, C. S.; Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Donatowicz, J.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M {sub host} ∼ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M{sub L} π{sub rel} where M{sub L} is the lens system mass and π{sub rel} is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large π{sub rel}), then M{sub L} is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, μ{sub rel} = 19.6 ± 1.6 mas yr{sup –1}, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, there is an alternate solution that has a lower proper motion and fits the data almost as well. This solution is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M{sub host}=0.12{sub −0.06}{sup +0.19} M{sub ⊙} and m{sub comp}=18{sub −10}{sup +28} M{sub ⊕}, at a projected separation of a{sub ⊥}=0.84{sub −0.14}{sup +0.25} AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.

  10. THE SECOND MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEM DISCOVERED BY MICROLENSING: OGLE-2012-BLG-0026Lb, c-A PAIR OF JOVIAN PLANETS BEYOND THE SNOW LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Batista, V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Christie, G. [Auckland Observatory, Auckland (New Zealand); Tan, T.-G. [Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth (Australia); Almeida, L. A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Depoy, D. L. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-10

    We report the discovery of a planetary system from observation of the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. The lensing light curve exhibits a complex central perturbation with multiple features. We find that the perturbation was produced by two planets located near the Einstein ring of the planet host star. We identify four possible solutions resulting from the well-known close/wide degeneracy. By measuring both the lens parallax and the Einstein radius, we estimate the physical parameters of the planetary system. According to the best-fit model, the two planet masses are {approx}0.11 M{sub J} and 0.68 M{sub J} and they are orbiting a G-type main-sequence star with a mass {approx}0.82 M{sub Sun }. The projected separations of the individual planets are beyond the snow line in all four solutions, being {approx}3.8 AU and 4.6 AU in the best-fit solution. The deprojected separations are both individually larger and possibly reversed in order. This is the second multi-planet system with both planets beyond the snow line discovered by microlensing. This is the only such system (other than the solar system) with measured planet masses without sin i degeneracy. The planetary system is located at a distance 4.1 kpc from the Earth toward the Galactic center. It is very likely that extra light from stars other than the lensed star comes from the lens itself. If this is correct, it will be possible to obtain detailed information about the planet host star from follow-up observation.

  11. Test plan for the M-100 container model M-101/7A/12/90 Docket 96-43-7A, type A container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.

    1997-05-30

    This document describes the test plan for the M-100 Container, Model M-101/7A/12/90. This packaging system is designed to ship Type A solid, radioactive materials, normal form, Form Nos. 1, 2, and 3. The nominal overall dimensions, including risers, of the M-100 Container are 79 x 54 x 42 inches. The capacity of the container is approximately 89.9 ft. The estimated gross weight of the packaging and contents is 9,000 lb.

  12. A nodal domain theorem for integrable billiards in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samajdar, Rhine; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2014-12-15

    Eigenfunctions of integrable planar billiards are studied — in particular, the number of nodal domains, ν of the eigenfunctions with Dirichlet boundary conditions are considered. The billiards for which the time-independent Schrödinger equation (Helmholtz equation) is separable admit trivial expressions for the number of domains. Here, we discover that for all separable and non-separable integrable billiards, ν satisfies certain difference equations. This has been possible because the eigenfunctions can be classified in families labelled by the same value of mmodkn, given a particular k, for a set of quantum numbers, m,n. Further, we observe that the patterns in a family are similar and the algebraic representation of the geometrical nodal patterns is found. Instances of this representation are explained in detail to understand the beauty of the patterns. This paper therefore presents a mathematical connection between integrable systems and difference equations. - Highlights: • We find that the number of nodal domains of eigenfunctions of integrable, planar billiards satisfy a class of difference equations. • The eigenfunctions labelled by quantum numbers (m,n) can be classified in terms of mmodkn. • A theorem is presented, realising algebraic representations of geometrical patterns exhibited by the domains. • This work presents a connection between integrable systems and difference equations.

  13. Method for making radioactive metal articles having small dimensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohriner, Evan K.

    2000-01-01

    A method for making a radioactive article such as wire, includes the steps of providing a metal article having a first shape, such a cylinder, that is either radioactive itself or can be converted to a second, radioactive isotope by irradiation; melting the metal article one or more times; optionally adding an alloying metal to the molten metal in order to enhance ductility or other properties; placing the metal article having the first shape (e.g., cylindrical) into a cavity in the interior of an extrusion body (e.g., a cylinder having a cylindrical cavity therein); extruding the extrusion body and the article having the first shape located in the cavity therein, resulting in an elongated extrusion body and an article having a second shape; removing the elongated extrusion body, for example by chemical means, leaving the elongated inner article substantially intact; optionally repeating the extrusion procedure one or more times; and then drawing the elongated article to still further elongate it, into wire, foil, or another desired shape. If the starting metal is enriched in a radioactive isotope or a precursor thereof, the end product can provide a more intense radiation source than conventionally manufactured radioactive wire, foil, or the like.

  14. Levinson theorem for the Dirac equation in one dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Zhongqi; Dong Shihai; Wang Luya

    2006-07-15

    The Levinson theorem for the (1+1)-dimensional Dirac equation with a symmetric potential is proved with the Sturm-Liouville theorem. The half-bound states at the energies E={+-}M, whose wave function is finite but does not decay at infinity fast enough to be square integrable, are discussed. The number n{sub {+-}} of bound states is equal to the sum of the phase shifts at the energies E={+-}M:{delta}{sub {+-}}(M)+{delta}{sub {+-}}(-M)=(n{sub {+-}}+a){pi}, where the subscript {+-} denotes the parity and the constant a is equal to -1/2 when no half-bound state occurs, to 0 when one half-bound state occurs at E=M or at E=-M, and to 1/2 when two half-bound states occur at both E={+-}M.

  15. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS...

  16. Quantum Dimension of Photosynthesis Revealed by Angular Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new methods are required for an improved feedback to molecular simulation. We will look at a novel laser method, Angle-Resolved Coherent (ARC) imaging, that separates ...

  17. Extending vanLeer's Algorithm to Multiple Dimensions. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: MultiMat 2012 held September 2-6, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the MultiMat 2012 held September 2-6, ...

  18. Discovery of Hidden Dimensions in Information Space and Ultra...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sandia Postdoc Symposium held December 12, 2013 in Albuquerque, NM.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the Sandia Postdoc Symposium held December 12, 2013 in ...

  19. Levinson theorem for Dirac particles in n dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Yu

    2005-02-01

    We study the Levinson theorem for a Dirac particle in an n-dimensional central field by use of the Green function approach, based on an analysis of the n-dimensional radial Dirac equation obtained through a simple algebraic derivation. We show that the zero-momentum phase shifts are related to the number of bound states with |E|

  20. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1102128 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; ...

  1. Dimension-5 C P -odd operators: QCD mixing and renormalization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-12-23 OSTI Identifier: 1233945 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; ...

  2. Ice Particle Projected Area- and Mass-dimension Expressions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m-D and A-D expressions in BMPs is described in this paper. Figure 1. The m-D expression (black curve) for synoptic ice clouds between -20C and -40C based on SCPP m-D...

  3. Applied Studies and Technology: The Third Dimension-Variation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In other words, depth matters ... 1 Pure water, H2O, without any dissolved chemicals, is a very poor conductor of electricity. Water's ability to conduct electricity is ...

  4. Nonvolatile semiconductor memory having three dimension charge confinement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, L. Ralph; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Peercy, Paul S.; Weaver, Harry T.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A layered semiconductor device with a nonvolatile three dimensional memory comprises a storage channel which stores charge carriers. Charge carriers flow laterally through the storage channel from a source to a drain. Isolation material, either a Schottky barrier or a heterojunction, located in a trench of an upper layer controllably retains the charge within the a storage portion determined by the confining means. The charge is retained for a time determined by the isolation materials' nonvolatile characteristics or until a change of voltage on the isolation material and the source and drain permit a read operation. Flow of charge through an underlying sense channel is affected by the presence of charge within the storage channel, thus the presences of charge in the memory can be easily detected.

  5. Gravitationally collapsing shells in (2+1) dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, Robert B.; Oh, John J.

    2006-12-15

    We study gravitationally collapsing models of pressureless dust, fluids with pressure, and the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) shell in (2+1)-dimensional spacetimes. Various collapse scenarios are investigated under a variety of the background configurations such as anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole, de Sitter (dS) space, flat and AdS space with a conical deficit. As with the case of a disk of dust, we find that the collapse of a dust shell coincides with the Oppenheimer-Snyder type collapse to a black hole provided the initial density is sufficiently large. We also find - for all types of shell - that collapse to a naked singularity is possible under a broad variety of initial conditions. For shells with pressure this singularity can occur for a finite radius of the shell. We also find that GCG shells exhibit diverse collapse scenarios, which can be easily demonstrated by an effective potential analysis.

  6. Hoop conjecture in five dimensions: Violation of cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Nakao, Ken-ichi; Ida, Daisuke

    2005-05-15

    We study the condition of black hole formation in five-dimensional space-time. We analytically solve the constraint equations of five-dimensional Einstein equations for momentarily static and conformally flat initial data of a spheroidal mass. We numerically search for an apparent horizon in various initial hypersurfaces and find both necessary and sufficient conditions for the horizon formation in terms of inequalities relating a geometric quantity and a mass defined in an appropriate manner. In the case of infinitely thin spheroid, our results suggest a possibility of naked singularity formation by the spindle gravitational collapse in five-dimensional space-time.

  7. Expanding the Security Dimension of Surety (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This work focuses on Bayesian networks as a means of capturing correlations between groups, tactics, and targets. The data that was used as a test of the methodology was obtained ...

  8. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, Matthew ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; ...

  9. Support assembly having three dimension position adjustment capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; House, F. Allen

    1987-01-01

    An assembly for supporting an apparatus such as a microscope or laser to and against a planar surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes three specific arrangements for adjusting the positions of three segments of the apparatus so as to adjust the position of the overall apparatus with respect to the planar surface in the x-, y-and z-directions, where the x-direction and the y-direction are both parallel with the planar surface and perpendicular to one another and where the z-direction is perpendicular to the planar surface and the x-and y-directions. Each of two of the three arrangements includes its own means for providing x-, y- and z-adjustments (which includes rotation in the x, y plane) while it is only necessary for the third arrangement to provide adjustments in the z-direction.

  10. Support assembly having three dimension position adjustment capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.; House, F.A.

    1985-11-08

    An assembly for supporting an apparatus such as a microscope or laser to and against a planer surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes three specific arrangements for adjusting the positions of three segments of the apparatus so as to adjust the position of the overall apparatus with respect to the planer surface in the x-, y- and z-directions, where the x-direction and the y-direction are both parallel with the planer surface and perpendicular to one another and where the z-direction is perpendicular to the planer surface and the x- and y-directions. Each of two of the three arrangements includes its own means for providing x-, y- and z-adjustments (which includes rotation in the x, y plane) while it is only necessary for the third arrangement to provide adjustments in the z-direction.

  11. Beijing Full Three Dimension Power Engineering Co Ltd FTD | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Engineering Co Ltd (FTD) Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100080 Product: A steam turbine design and refurbishment service provider. Focus on technical...

  12. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  13. Mechanical properties of materials with nanometer scale dimensions and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, William D.

    2015-08-05

    The three-year grant for which this final report is required extends from 2011 to 2015, including a one-year, no-cost extension. But this is just the latest in a long series of grants from the Division of Materials Sciences of DOE and its predecessor offices and agencies. These include contracts or grants from: the Metallurgy Branch of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (from the late 1960s to the mid-1970s), the Materials Science Program of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (from the mid- to late- 1970s), and the Division of Materials Science of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy (from the early 1980s to the present time). Taken all together, these offices have provided nearly continuous support for our research for nearly 50 years. As we have said on many occasions, this research support has been the best we have ever had, by far. As we look back on the nearly five decades of support from the Division of Materials Sciences and the predecessor offices, we find that the continuity of support that we have enjoyed has allowed us to be most productive and terms of papers published, doctoral students graduated and influence on the field of materials science. This report will, of course, cover the three-year period of the present grant, in summary form, but will also make reference to the output that resulted from support of previous grants from the Division of Materials Sciences and its predecessor offices.

  14. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of ... research and sharing Knowledge DOENSF Thermoelectric ...

  15. Going Deep...Putting the Undergound Dimension to Use

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Laughton, Chris

    2009-09-01

    Underground construction can offer durable and environmentally-sound solutions to many of societies more pressing needs. The talk will identify some common uses for underground space and discuss current construction techniques used to mine in soils and rock. Examples of successful underground construction projects will demonstrate the advantages that the underground site can offer. In addition, insight will be provided into the nature of the risks run when working with a construction material (the ground) that cannot be made to order, nor precisely defined by the investigative processes currently at our disposal.

  16. Bus Rollover Testing and Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bus Rollover Testing And Simulation Computational Structural Mechanics Collaborator Research Highlights - Florida State University & Florida Department of Transportation Current research conducted at FAMU-FSU College of Engineering pertains to comprehensive crashworthiness and safety assessment of a paratransit bus on a Chevrolet 138" wheelbase. The design process of passenger compartment structure in paratransit buses is not regulated by any of crashworthiness standards. FAMU-FSU

  17. Fact #624: May 24, 2010 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Years 2012-2016 | Department of Energy 4: May 24, 2010 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, Model Years 2012-2016 Fact #624: May 24, 2010 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, Model Years 2012-2016 The final rule for the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards was published in March 2010. Under this rule, each light vehicle model produced for sale in the United States will have a fuel economy target based on its footprint. A vehicle's footprint is defined as the wheelbase

  18. New dimensions in our understanding of the human health effects of environmental pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.O.

    1996-12-31

    The term {open_quotes}hazardous{close_quotes} waste is used primarily in reference to potential hazards to human health and, to a lesser decree, hazards to wildlife and the ecosystem. Many of the chemicals associated with hazardous waste sites are also widely distributed throughout the environment; therefore, the health hazards associated with hazardous waste sites are not different from those associated with general environmental contamination. Until recently, it was generally assumed that cancer was the human disease of greatest concern associated with toxic chemicals. In fact, most governmental regulations related to exposure are designed on the basis of presumed cancer risks. Since the evidence that hazardous chemicals can cause cancer is strong, it is appropriate to be concerned about cancer risk. Recent evidence, however, has triggered a reevaluation of the assumption that only cancer is of concern. New evidence suggests that noncancer endpoints may occur more frequently than cancer, may affect a greater number of individuals, and may occur at lower concentrations. Of particular concern is evidence of irreversible effects on the embryo and very young children, which influence intelligence, attention span, sexual development, and immune function. Although these effects are often subtle and difficult to quantify, the combined evidence is sufficiently compelling to necessitate a reevaluation of those outcomes of primary concern to human health. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three-dimensions)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite-element code for analyzing the large-deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains fifteen material models and nine equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

  20. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1984-04-01

    This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains fifteen material models and nine equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

  1. DYNA3D (Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures in Three Dimensions) user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1988-04-01

    This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains twenty-eight material models and eleven equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior. 56 refs., 46 figs.

  2. User's manuals for DYNA3D and DYNAP: nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. Post-processors for DYNA3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories. A user's manual for DYNAP is also provided in this report.

  3. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains twenty-five material models and eleven equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

  4. DYNA3D user's manual: (Nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions): Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.; Whirley, R.G.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. Using a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. The 1989 version of DYNA3D contains thirty material models and ten equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

  5. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions). Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallquist, J.O.; Benson, D.J.

    1986-03-01

    The user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures is updated. A contact-impact algorithm permit gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains sixteen material models and nine equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior. 40 refs., 43 figs.

  6. The 14th Pipeline and Gas Journal 500 report. [Statistical dimensions of leading US pipeline companies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congram, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    This article presents compiled data on oil and gas pipeline systems in the US and includes specific information on mileage, volume of transported fluids, and cost information. It lists the rankings based on miles of pipeline, units of gas sold, number of customers, units of petroleum sold, and utility by production sales. Information is also presented in alphabetical format.

  7. Structural Dimensions, Fabrication, Materials, and Operational History for Types I and II Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    2000-08-16

    Radioactive waste is confined in 48 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste will eventually be processed and transferred to other site facilities for stabilization. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks, including those with flaws and/or defects, will be required to be in service for another 15 to 20 years. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a leak-tight barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis event which include loading from both normal service and abnormal conditions.

  8. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds March 24, 2015 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley Cornell Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement  BETO MYPP Goals (3) Demonstrate 1. Performance against clear cost goals and technical targets (Q4 2013) 2. Productivity of 1,500 gal/acre/yr algal oil (Q4 2014)

  9. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux as a probe of large extra-dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykken, Joseph; Mena, Olga; Razzaque, Soebur; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Penn State U.

    2007-05-01

    A suppression in the spectrum of ultrahigh-energy (UHE, {ge} 10{sup 18} eV) neutrinos will be present in extra-dimensional scenarios, due to enhanced neutrino-antineutrino annihilation processes with the supernova relic neutrinos. In this scenario, neutrinos can not be responsible for the highest energy events observed in the UHE cosmic ray spectrum. A direct implication of these extra-dimensional interactions would be the absence of UHE neutrinos in ongoing and future neutrino telescopes.

  10. Entanglement Area Law in Disordered Free Fermion Anderson Model in One, Two, and Three Dimensions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pouranvari, Mohammad; Zhang, Yuhui; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We calculate numerically the entanglement entropy of free fermion ground states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional Anderson models and find that it obeys the area law as long as the linear size of the subsystem is sufficiently larger than the mean free path. This result holds in the metallic phase of the three-dimensional Anderson model, where the mean free path is finite although the localization length is infinite. Relation between the present results and earlier ones on area law violation in special one-dimensional models that support metallic phases is discussed.

  11. Radiation Heat Transfer in 3 Dimensions for Semi-Transparent Materials....

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-02

    The RAD3D software solves the critical heat transfer mechanisms that occur in production glass furnaces. The code includes state-of-the-art solution algorithms for efficient radiant interaction of the heating elements, furnace walls and internal furnace components. The code specifically solves the coupled radiative and conductive heating of semi-transparent materials such as glass to calculate the temperature distribution in the glass during processing.

  12. Magnetic phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate in two dimensions with dipole interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjaell, Jonas A.; Essin, Andrew M.; Moore, Joel E.

    2009-12-01

    Several new features arise in the ground-state phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate trapped in an optical trap when the magnetic-dipole interaction between the atoms is taken into account along with confinement and spin precession. The boundaries between the regions of ferromagnetic and polar phases move as the dipole strength is varied and the ferromagnetic phases can be modulated. The magnetization of the ferromagnetic phase perpendicular to the field becomes modulated as a helix winding around the magnetic field direction with a wavelength inversely proportional to the dipole strength. This modulation should be observable for current experimental parameters in {sup 87}Rb. Hence the much-sought supersolid state with broken continuous translation invariance in one direction and broken global U(1) invariance, occurs generically as a metastable state in this system as a result of dipole interaction. The ferromagnetic state parallel to the applied magnetic field becomes striped in a finite system at strong dipolar coupling.

  13. Extra Dimensions at the LHC (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  14. Separation of Highly Complex Mixtures by Two-Dimension Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georges Guiochon

    2009-12-11

    This report summarizes the progress made on the title project during the grant period. We developed a new classification of two-dimensional separations based on the observation that separations can be made in time or in space. Thus, two-dimensional separations can be made in time×time, space×space, space×time, or time×space. The two successive separations must use two different modes of chromatography that afford uncorrelated or weakly correlated patterns of retention factors for the components of the samples analyzed. Our attention was mainly focused on the separation of protein digests, particularly, on those of the digests of myoglobin and bovine serum albumin as model systems and extremely efficient temporal separations were developed. We also designed and constructed new instruments to carry out space×space separations (True Bidimensional Chromatography, HPLC2 or spacial separations) and time×space separations (a new hybrid combination of a temporal and a spacial separation that we designed).

  15. Changes of O/M, dimension and microstructure of MOX pellet during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, M.; Kato, M.; Sunaoshi, T.

    2013-07-01

    The oxidation and reduction behaviors of sintered (Pu{sub 0.3}U{sub 0.7})O{sub 2-x} pellets have been studied at 1873 K under a controlled oxygen partial pressure. From the results of oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio changes, dimensional and structural changes, it was concluded that the crack nucleation-propagation and the local density change of pores were caused by the tensile and compressive stresses due to the O/M ratio distribution in the direction of the pellet radius. (authors)

  16. On the frames of spaces of finite-dimensional Lie algebras of dimension at most6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2014-05-31

    In this paper, the frames of spaces of complex n-dimensional Lie algebras (that is, the intersections of all irreducible components of these spaces) are studied. A complete description of the frames and their projectivizations for n ? 6 is given. It is also proved that for n ? 6 the projectivizations of these spaces are simply connected. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  17. Fibroblasts maintained in 3 dimensions show a better differentiation state and higher sensitivity to estrogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montani, Claudia; Steimberg, Nathalie; Boniotti, Jennifer; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Zanella, Isabella; Diafera, Giuseppe; Biunno, Ida; Caimi, Luigi; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Cell differentiation and response to hormonal signals were studied in a 3D environment on an in-house generated mouse fibroblast cell line expressing a reporter gene under the control of estrogen responsive sequences (EREs). 3D cell culture conditions were obtained in a Rotary Cell Culture System; (RCCS™), a microgravity based bioreactor that promotes the aggregation of cells into multicellular spheroids (MCS). In this bioreactor the cells maintained a better differentiated phenotype and more closely resembled in vivo tissue. The RCCS™ cultured fibroblasts showed higher expression of genes regulating cell assembly, differentiation and hormonal functions. Microarray analysis showed that genes related to cell cycle, proliferation, cytoskeleton, migration, adhesion and motility were all down-regulated in 3D as compared to 2D conditions, as well as oncogene expression and inflammatory cytokines. Controlled remodeling of ECM, which is an essential aspect of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue was affected by the culture method as assessed by immunolocalization of β-tubulin. Markers of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue repair, metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and its physiological inhibitor (TIMP4) changed expression in association with the relative formation of cell aggregates. The fibroblasts cultured in the RCCS™ maintain a better responsiveness to estrogens, measured as expression of ERα and regulation of an ERE-dependent reporter and of the endogenous target genes CBP, Rarb, MMP1 and Dbp. Our data highlight the interest of this 3D culture model for its potential application in the field of cell response to hormonal signals and the pharmaco-toxicological analyses of chemicals and natural molecules endowed of estrogenic potential. - Highlights: • We here characterized the first cell line derived from an estrogen reporter mouse. • In the RCCS cells express an immortalized behavior but not a transformed phenotype. • The RCCS provides a system for maintaining cells in more physiological conditions. • RCCS-cultured fibroblasts showed higher hormonal sensitivity to estradiol. • This bioreactor is a novel 3D model to be applied to pharmacotoxicological studies.

  18. Threshold singularities in a Fermi gas with attractive potential in one dimension

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schlottmann, P.; Zvyagin, A. A.

    2015-01-15

    We consider the one-dimensional gas of fermions with spin S interacting via an attractive ?-function potential using the Bethe Ansatz solution. In zero magnetic field the atoms form bound states of N=2S + 1 fermions, i.e. generalized Cooper states with each atom having a different spin component. For low energy excitations the system is a Luttinger liquid and is properly described by a conformal field theory with conformal charge c=1. The linear dispersion of a Luttinger liquid is asymptotically exact in the low-energy limit where the band curvature terms in the dispersion are irrelevant. For higher energy excitations, however, themorespectral function displays deviations in the neighborhood of the single-particle (hole) energy, which can be described by an effective X-ray edge type model. Using the Bethe Ansatz solution we obtain expressions for the critical exponents for the single-particle (hole) Greens function. This model can be relevant in the context of ultracold atoms with effective total spin S confined to an elongated optical trap.less

  19. Extra Dimensions at the LHC (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: CERN-PH-TH-2010-014, Jan 2010. 33pp. arXiv:1001.4801; Conference: Particle Dark ...

  20. Dynamic reduction of dimensions of a document vector in a document search and retrieval system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiao, Yu; Potok, Thomas E.

    2011-05-03

    The method and system of the invention involves processing each new document (20) coming into the system into a document vector (16), and creating a document vector with reduced dimensionality (17) for comparison with the data model (15) without recomputing the data model (15). These operations are carried out by a first computer (11) while a second computer (12) updates the data model (18), which can be comprised of an initial large group of documents (19) and is premised on the computing an initial data model (13, 14, 15) to provide a reference point for determining document vectors from documents processed from the data stream (20).

  1. Rajesh Maingi adds a new strategic dimension to fusion and plasma physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Raising the Bar within the Weatherization and Home Performance Industry Raising the Bar within the Weatherization and Home Performance Industry Addthis Description The Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) was created in 1976 to assist low-income families who lacked resources to invest in energy efficiency. This video not only shines a light of the existing success of the WAP, but it also takes a look at its recent evolution through the Guidelines for Home Energy

  2. Radius stabilization and dark matter with a bulk Higgs in warped extra dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, A.; Grzadkowski, B.; Gunion, J. F.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we employ an SU(2) bulk Higgs doublet as the stabilization field in the Randall–Sundrum model with appropriate bulk and brane-localized potentials. The gauge hierarchy problem can be solved for an exponentially IR-localized Higgs background field with mild values of fundamental parameters of the 5D theory. We consider an IR–UV–IR background geometry with the 5D SM fields in the bulk such that all the fields have even and odd towers of KK-modes. The zero-mode 4D effective theory contains all the SM fields plus a stable scalar, which serves as a dark matter candidate.

  3. CASL-U-2015-0182-000 Initial One-Dimension

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Joint International Conference on Mathematics and Computation (M&C), Supercomputing ... International Conference on Mathematics, Computational Methods & Reactor ...

  4. Public views on multiple dimensions of security : nuclear waepons, terrorism, energy, and the environment : 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, Kerry Gale; Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze and compare findings from identical national surveys of the US general public on nuclear security and terrorism administered by telephone and Internet in mid-2007. Key areas of investigation include assessments of threats to US security; valuations of US nuclear weapons and nuclear deterrence; perspectives on nuclear proliferation, including the specific cases of North Korea and Iran; and support for investments in nuclear weapons capabilities. Our analysis of public views on terrorism include assessments of the current threat, progress in the struggle against terrorism, preferences for responding to terrorist attacks at different levels of assumed casualties, and support for domestic policies intended to reduce the threat of terrorism. Also we report findings from an Internet survey conducted in mid 2007 that investigates public views of US energy security, to include: energy supplies and reliability; energy vulnerabilities and threats, and relationships among security, costs, energy dependence, alternative sources, and research and investment priorities. We analyze public assessments of nuclear energy risks and benefits, nuclear materials management issues, and preferences for the future of nuclear energy in the US. Additionally, we investigate environmental issues as they relate to energy security, to include expected implications of global climate change, and relationships among environmental issues and potential policy options.

  5. Radius stabilization and dark matter with a bulk Higgs in warped extra dimension

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, A.; Grzadkowski, B.; Gunion, J. F.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we employ an SU(2) bulk Higgs doublet as the stabilization field in the RandallSundrum model with appropriate bulk and brane-localized potentials. The gauge hierarchy problem can be solved for an exponentially IR-localized Higgs background field with mild values of fundamental parameters of the 5D theory. We consider an IRUVIR background geometry with the 5D SM fields in the bulk such that all the fields have even and odd towers of KK-modes. The zero-mode 4D effective theory contains all the SM fields plus a stable scalar, which serves as a dark matter candidate.

  6. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  7. 2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... distances required by the NFPA. Liquid trucks can deliver 4,110 kg to a refueling site. ... lb f in 2 lb m ft 3 segment, lb m 0 999 0.347 26.8 2,195,167 0.013 5,023 12.1 987 ...

  8. Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... distances required by the NFPA. Liquid trucks can deliver 4,110 kg to a refueling site. ... lb f in 2 lb m ft 3 segment, lb m 0 999 0.347 26.8 2,195,167 0.013 5,023 12.1 987 ...

  9. Topics in N = 1 supergravity in four dimensions and superstring effective field theories beyond tree-level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saririan, K.

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis, the author presents some works in the direction of studying quantum effects in locally supersymmetric effective field theories that appear in the low energy limit of superstring theory. After reviewing the Kaehler covariant formulation of supergravity, he shows the calculation of the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity, including the Yang-Mills sector and the helicity-odd operators that arise from integration over fermion fields. The only restriction is on the Yang-Mills kinetic energy normalization function, which is taken diagonal in gauge indices, as in models obtained from superstrings. He then presents the full result for the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity coupled to chiral and Yang-Mills supermultiplets. He also considers the specific case of dilaton couplings in effective supergravity Lagrangians from superstrings, for which the one-loop result is considerably simplified. He studies gaugino condensation in the presence of an intermediate mass scale in the hidden sector. S-duality is imposed as an approximate symmetry of the effective supergravity theory. Furthermore, the author includes in the Kaehler potential the renormalization of the gauge coupling and the one-loop threshold corrections at the intermediate scale. It is shown that confinement is indeed achieved. Furthermore, a new running behavior of the dilaton arises which he attributes to S-duality. He also discusses the effects of the intermediate scale, and possible phenomenological implications of this model.

  10. The Interface of Art and Science in the Museum: Disclosing a 4th Dimension of Art Preservation and Connoisseurship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casadio, Franceska

    2004-11-03

    Drawing from her most recent experience at the Art Institute and past experiences in Italy, Dr. Casadio will discuss examples of applications of scientific analysis to the field of Cultural Heritage, including: 1) The use of instrumental analysis to address fundamental questions regarding artists' techniques, and as an aid to unraveling paint technology, as with the fascinating pre-Columbia pigment Maya Blue; 2) The investigation into deterioration of artifacts, the design of innovative conservation materials and the testing of their durability, expemplified with the case study of the conservation of the facade of the gothic Cathedral of Milan; 3) Development of fine-tuned conservation strategies for the cleaning of Michelangelo's David; 4) The study of the effect of environmental parameters on objects in exhibitions and storage to help design compatible display cases; 5) The role of scientific analysis in matters of authentication and dating. Future trends that increasingly see science as a tool for virtual restoration will be discussed.