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1

EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, 4: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 12, 2013 EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

2

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

3

EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notice of Intent: Scoping Period Ends 04/05/13The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities.

4

PDF Document (387k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

) ) " ) " ) " ) " ) ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Houston Webb Duval Frio Kerr Edwards Uvalde Bee Bexar Zavala Kinney Dimmit La Salle Kimble Medina Matagorda Travis Lee Sutton Nueces Real Maverick DeWitt Kleberg Lavaca Calhoun Hays Goliad Atascosa Wharton

5

Lavaca County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lavaca County, Texas: Energy Resources Lavaca County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.3359054°, -96.8350999° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.3359054,"lon":-96.8350999,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Calhoun Place Georgia Utility Id 2812 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Industrial Rate Industrial Large Power Service Commercial Large Power Service- Industrial Industrial Medium Power Service- Commercial Commercial Medium Power Service- Industrial Industrial Residential Service Residential Security Light 400 W MH Flood Type Lighting

7

Calhoun County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Elec Coop Assn County Elec Coop Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Calhoun County Elec Coop Assn Place Iowa Utility Id 4040 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1160/kWh Commercial: $0.0955/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Calhoun_County_Elec_Coop_Assn&oldid=409151" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

8

Notice of Intent (NOI) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas January 9, 2013 EIS-0310: Notice of Intent...

9

Hay Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hay Canyon Wind Farm Hay Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hay Canyon Wind Farm Facility Hay Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Snohomish Public Utility District Location Near Moro OR Coordinates 45.479548°, -120.741491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.479548,"lon":-120.741491,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Hay harvesting services respond to market trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services respond to market trends by Steven Blank, Karenyears, there has been a trend in California from harvesting1,300 pounds or more. This trend is influencing how hay-

Blank, Steven; Klonsky, Karen; Fuller, Kate

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Farmers and ranchers in Calhoun County, TX: their land ethic and their interest in nature tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is based on research that investigates (1) the land relationships of farmers and ranchers in Calhoun County, Texas, and (2) their opinions about, and interest in, nature tourism and/or starting a nature tourism enterprise. The methodology of this study consists of in-depth, semi-structured, open-ended interviews following an interpretive research approach (drawing from hermeneutic phenomenology), in order to get at the experiences of the farmers/ranchers and the meanings related to these experiences. The results of this descriptive and interpretive research indicate that the relationship of these agricultural producers with the land are far more complex than expressed in the environmental literature, and extends beyond the simplistic categories of anthropocentric (human centered) and non-anthropocentric (wilderness has value independent of humans) attitudes toward nature and the natural environment. Included in the framework of the producer's agricultural land ethic, which is built from the land relationship, are concepts such as the producers? sincere desire to take care of the land, their respect for the land, and specific views on their practices with the land. The agricultural land ethic provides insight into what guides the farmer in their daily operation of the farm and/or ranch as well as what influences them in their consideration of nature tourism. Finally, implications and recommendations are presented for the conservation and preservation of rural agricultural practices and ecological spaces through a revisited land ethic, and for the potential and pitfalls of diversifying into nature tourism in order to offset declining farm/ranching incomes.

Williams, Kimberly Lyn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NPP Grassland: Hays, U.S.A. [Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the central Great Plains, near the city of Hays, Kansas, about 400 km west of Kansas City. The Fort Hays branch station was established in 1906. Contact Information...

13

Recombinant Proteins in Milk A Bioreactor That Eats Hay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recombinant Proteins in Milk A Bioreactor That Eats Hay. Purpose: The mammary gland has exceptional capacity for secretion. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hays, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hays, Kansas: Energy Resources Hays, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8791783°, -99.3267702° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8791783,"lon":-99.3267702,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Robin Hayes | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Robin Hayes Robin Hayes Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (51KB) BES Budget BES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Organizational History Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » About Robin Hayes Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Hayes Robin Hayes Dr. Robin Hayes has worked with the DOE Energy Frontier Research Centers since September 2009, first as a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow,

16

Fort Calhoun Instrumentation & Control Systems Assessment: Volume 1: Baseline Evaluation of I&C Systems; Volume 2: Upgrade Evaluatio n for Electro Hydraulic Control and Turbine Supervisor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), as a member utility, initiated the long term strategic planning process for the Calhoun instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. The first step was to perform a baseline evaluation of selected I&C systems, generating system status summaries to highlight both problems and opportunities for improvement. Then a more detailed upgrade evaluation was performed to investigate the potential benefits of upgrading the electro hydraulic control and turbine supervisory ...

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dry matter losses during hay production and storage of sweet sorghum used for methane production  

SciTech Connect

Losses from production and storage of large round hay bales from sweet sorghum were measured. Dry matter losses from hay production were 55.3%. Storage losses were 18.1% and 10.1% for outdoor and indoor storage, respectively. It was concluded hay storage of sweet sorghum used for anaerobic digestion is not a viable option.

Coble, C.G.; Egg, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hays County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hays County, Texas: Energy Resources Hays County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.0537607°, -98.0028892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.0537607,"lon":-98.0028892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hayes Center Public Schools Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Public Schools Wind Project Center Public Schools Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Hayes Center Public Schools Wind Project Facility Hayes Center Public Schools Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location NE Coordinates 40.510666°, -101.015503° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.510666,"lon":-101.015503,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. On June 11, 1996 R. W. Hays Co. (Hays) of Medford, Oregon filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its Application, Hays requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied. vee0026.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0036 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. VEE-0067 - In the Matter of M.L. Halle Oil Service, Inc.

23

Effect of Heat Treating Alfalfa Hay on Chemical Composition and Ruminal In Vitro Protein Degradation1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional (unshredded) and shredded alfalfa hays were heated in either a forced-air oven or a steam pressure cooker at different times and temperatures to determine the effect of heat treatment on chemical composition and ruminal protein degradability. Rates of protein degradation and extents of protein escape were estimated using a ruminal inhibitor in vitro system. Both rates and extents were corrected for the proportion of total N in ADIN. Estimated net protein escape (total escape minus ADIN-bound CP) of unshredded and shredded hays was increased by oven or steam heating. Optimal oven treatments, as indicated by the greatest increase in net protein escape, were 120 min at 150C and 60 min at 160'C. Net protein escapes of shredded hay were greater than unshredded hay when neither was heated and when hays were heated to the same extent. Equivalent protein protection was obtained by oven heating for 120 min at 140'C, 60 rnin at 150"C, and 30 rnin at lWC, which gave net protein escapes of 55, 54, and 54% for shredded hay and 44, 45, and 43% for unshredded hay, respectively. Similar protein protection was obtained at lower

J. H. Yang; A. Broderick; R. G. Koegel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Honesty is the best policy---part 1: an interview with Rick Hayes-Roth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Untrustworthy information is an increasing threat to decision making in information environments. Rick Hayes-Roth has been studying how to detect and filter away untrustworthy information and base decisions on well-grounded claims that can improve outcomes. ...

Peter Denning

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 23600 of 31,917 results. 91 - 23600 of 31,917 results. Page EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas Notice of Intent: Scoping Period Ends 04/05/13 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities. http://energy.gov/nepa/eis-0494-excelerate-liquefaction-solutions-lavaca-bay-lng-project-calhoun-and-jackson-counties Page EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West

26

Bert Hayes, bhayes@infosec.utexas.edu How to Create a Custom Live CD for Secure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CD for secure remote incident handling on Windows and Linux systems. The process will include how for Remote Incident Handling 2 Bert Hayes, bhayes@infosec.utexas.edu Table of Contents?..................................................................................................................39 #12;How to Create a Custom Live CD for Remote Incident Handling 3

Texas at Austin, University of

27

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Ohio Sites 1 (Mixed Hay) and 2 (Corn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work conducted during 20082010 were to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) in eastern Ohio and to assess the potential for environmental effects of the use of FGDG. Two field experiments were conducted at the eastern Ohio research site, one involving a mixed-grass hay field and the other a corn (Zea mays L.) field. FGDG and mined gypsum product were applied one time at rates of 0.2, 2.0, and 20 megagrams ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Application of Fibrolytic Enzymes and Bacterial Inoculants to Sorghum Silage and Small-Grain Hay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fibrolytic enzymes and microbial inoculants have potential to improve the value of feedstuff and feedstock. An experiment was conducted to determine the nutritive value, ensiling characteristics, and in situ disappearance kinetics of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) silages pretreated with fibrolytic enzyme (xylanase plus cellulase: XC) or microbial [Promote ASB (Lactobacillus buchneri and L. plantarum); PRO] inoculants. The greatest yield was for cultivar PS 747 and the least for MMR 381/73 (MMR). Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentration was least for XC treated silage, and acid detergent fiber (ADF) concentration was least for XC and PRO treated silage. In vitro true digestibility (IVTD) was greatest for PRO treated Dairy Master BMR (DBMR), whereas, acid detergent lignin was least for PRO treated DBMR. Aerobic stability was not improved by PRO, however, aerobic stability of XC treated MMR was 63 h greater than the control. Generally, the in situ disappearance kinetics were improved with the application of XC and PRO, and XC had the greatest effect on silage with greater NDF and ADF concentrations. A second experiment was conducted to determine if the same application rates of either inoculant would reduce the fiber fraction of two cultivars each of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or oat (Avena sativa L.) hays. Forage was harvested twice during the tillering stage (H1) and (H2) and a third after grain harvest (H3). The IVTD was greater for oat than wheat due to a lesser fiber fraction. Forage from H2 had lesser NDF and ADF and greater CP and IVTD concentrations. In situ DM, NDF, ADF, and ERD were greater for wheat and oat at tillering than stover and NDF and ERD were greater for Harrison than Fannin at tillering. Treatment of oat or wheat hays with XC or PRO enhanced in situ disappearance kinetics. Both XC and PRO may be used to reduce the fiber fractions of sorghum silage and small-grain hay. Additionally, it appears the inoculant PRO can be used to improve fermentation characteristics of sorghum silage.

Thomas, Martha 1980-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A comparison of the carbon dioxide fluxes of two annual cropping systems and a perennial hay field in southern Manitoba over 30 months.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The eddy-covariance method was used to measure net ecosystem productivity over three adjacent fields from 2009 to 2011: two annual cropping systems (oat-canola-oat and hay-oat-fallow) (more)

Taylor, Amanda M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

"1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130 "2. Indian River Operations","Coal","Indian River Operations Inc",795 "3. Edge Moor","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",723 "5. McKee Run","Gas","NAES Corporation",136 "6. NRG Energy Center Dover","Coal","NRG Energy Center Dover LLC",100 "7. Warren F Sam Beasley Generation Station","Gas","Delaware Municipal Electric Corp",48 "8. Christiana","Petroleum","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",45 "9. Van Sant Station","Gas","NAES Corporation",39

31

Calhoun County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6°, -90.658333° 6°, -90.658333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1733216,"lon":-90.658333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Calhoun Falls, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina: Energy Resources South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0923375°, -82.5956875° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0923375,"lon":-82.5956875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Calhoun County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Georgia: Energy Resources County, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.5621777°, -84.6479124° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.5621777,"lon":-84.6479124,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Calhoun County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.3226954° 9.3226954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.8839218,"lon":-89.3226954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Calhoun County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

81.1196075° 81.1196075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.857973,"lon":-81.1196075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Calhoun County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

169365°, -96.663812° 169365°, -96.663812° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.4169365,"lon":-96.663812,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Calhoun County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.80766° 5.80766° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7701576,"lon":-85.80766,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Updated 7-12 Todd Calhoun, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. He also oversaw the Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations

39

Calhoun County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.539603° 2.539603° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.5020885,"lon":-92.539603,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Calhoun County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

85.1894045° 85.1894045° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3475302,"lon":-85.1894045,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Calhoun County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

94.645035° 94.645035° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3785903,"lon":-94.645035,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Calhoun County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -85.023346° °, -85.023346° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2073905,"lon":-85.023346,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Calhoun County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0.7657804° 0.7657804° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6738638,"lon":-80.7657804,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact 4: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities. EIS-0494-FERC-NOI-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0491: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

45

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 2020 of 26,777 results. 11 - 2020 of 26,777 results. Download EIS-0230: Final Environmental Statement Hermiston Power Project, Hermiston, Oregon http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0230-final-environmental-statement Download EIS-0460: Final Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0460-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EA-1782: Avian and Bat Assessment Annual Report University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1782-avian-and-bat-assessment-annual-report Download EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0494-notice-intent-prepare-environmental-impact-statement

46

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 22, 2013 March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS March 15, 2013 EIS-0472: DOE Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado March 15, 2013 EIS-0472: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado March 12, 2013 EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas March 11, 2013 EIS-0451: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Hooper Springs Project, Caribou County, Idaho

47

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 3090 of 28,905 results. 81 - 3090 of 28,905 results. Page Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks (text version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Renewable Energy Parks," originally presented on March 19, 2013. http://energy.gov/eere/community-renewable-energy-success-stories-webinar-renewable-energy-parks-text-version Download Technical Standards Newsletter- September 2001 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - September 2001 http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/technical-standards-newsletter-september-2001 Download EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0494-notice-intent-prepare-environmental-impact-statement

48

Donna Calhoun Laboratoire d'Etudes des Transferts et de Mechanique des Fluides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · "Simulating potential hydrogen explosions in nuclear reactor containment buildings", SIAM Com- putational Peak Over-pressures in explosions in nuclear reactor con- tainment facilities", SIAM Numerical Saclay, France. Division of Nuclear Energy. Research engineer in computational fluids and mechanics group

Calhoun, Donna

49

Hays, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas: Energy Resources Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.1227118°, -97.8722281° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.1227118,"lon":-97.8722281,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 18, 2010 CX-004521: Categorical Exclusion Determination County of Travis, Texas 700 Lavaca Street Building Retrofit Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11182010...

51

Hayes County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

070797°, -101.0711758° 070797°, -101.0711758° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5070797,"lon":-101.0711758,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

November 14, 2012 Jack Hayes Materials and Structural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5. Reinforced Masonry shear wall modeling and ... identified the reinforced masonry provisions as ... when dealing with partially grouted walls. ...

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hay Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.6013703°, -92.372539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6013703,"lon":-92.372539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Hugh Rudnick Van De Wyngard Seminario Hay crisis energtica?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Licuado #12;Otras Alternativas de Expansión: ERNC · Mini hidraúlicas · Eólico · Geotérmicas · Biogas

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

55

2004 AQUAINT Challenge Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ben Barnett, Trina Pitcher, John Calhoun, Eileen Boiling (Admin); Antonio Sanfilippo (Project Manager). Roadmap. Feb 23. ...

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ecosystem health at the texas coastal bend: a spatial analysis of exposure and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigated locational risks to ecosystem health associated with proximity to industrial complexes. The study was performed at the behest of ranchers and citizens living and working down-prevailing wind from the Formosa Plastics, Inc. and ALCOA facilities located in Calhoun County, Texas. Concerns expressed were for potential genotoxicity resulting from exposure to complex chemical mixtures released by the facilities. Exposure assessment of the marine environment was performed with sediments and oysters from Lavaca Bay being analyzed. Numerous chemicals were found to be present at concentrations considered likely to result in adverse responses in exposed populations. Bayesian geostatistical analysis was performed to determine if the concentrations were affected by a spatial process. Mercury and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the most notable of the chemicals found to be present at elevated concentrations and affected by a spatial process. Evaluation of maps generated from spatial modeling revealed that proximity to ALCOA resulted in elevated risks for exposure to harmful concentrations of pollutants. Genotoxicity was measured in two sentinel species. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were utilized for evaluation of the marine environment and cattle (Bos taurus and Bos taurus crossbred cattle) were chosen for evaluation of the terrestrial environment. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed on oyster hematocytes. Analysis of the results failed to demonstrate the presence of an important generalized spatial process but some specific locations close to the ALCOA plant had elevations in this measure of genotoxicity. Stress as measured by the lysosomal destabilization assay was also performed on oyster hematocytes. These results were found to be affected by a significant spatial process with the highest degree of destabilization occurring in close proximity to ALCOA. Genotoxicity in cattle was evaluated with the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and chromosomal aberration analysis. Bayesian geostatistical analyis revealed the presence of important spatial processes. DNA-protein cross-linkage was the most notable with a strong indication of increased damage down-prevailing wind from the industrial complexes. Results indicated that proximity to industrial facilities increased the risk for harmful exposures, genotoxicity, and lysosomal destabilization.

Bissett, Wesley Thurlow, Jr.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ecosystem health at the Texas coastal bend: a spatial analysis of exposure and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigated locational risks to ecosystem health associated with proximity to industrial complexes. The study was performed at the behest of ranchers and citizens living and working down-prevailing wind from the Formosa Plastics, Inc. and ALCOA facilities located in Calhoun County, Texas. Concerns expressed were for potential genotoxicity resulting from exposure to complex chemical mixtures released by the facilities. Exposure assessment of the marine environment was performed with sediments and oysters from Lavaca Bay being analyzed. Numerous chemicals were found to be present at concentrations considered likely to result in adverse responses in exposed populations. Bayesian geostatistical analysis was performed to determine if the concentrations were affected by a spatial process. Mercury and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the most notable of the chemicals found to be present at elevated concentrations and affected by a spatial process. Evaluation of maps generated from spatial modeling revealed that proximity to ALCOA resulted in elevated risks for exposure to harmful concentrations of pollutants. Genotoxicity was measured in two sentinel species. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were utilized for evaluation of the marine environment and cattle (Bos taurus and Bos taurus crossbred cattle) were chosen for evaluation of the terrestrial environment. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed on oyster hematocytes. Analysis of the results failed to demonstrate the presence of an important generalized spatial process but some specific locations close to the ALCOA plant had elevations in this measure of genotoxicity. Stress as measured by the lysosomal destabilization assay was also performed on oyster hematocytes. These results were found to be affected by a significant spatial process with the highest degree of destabilization occurring in close proximity to ALCOA. Genotoxicity in cattle was evaluated with the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and chromosomal aberration analysis. Bayesian geostatistical analyis revealed the presence of important spatial processes. DNA-protein cross-linkage was the most notable with a strong indication of increased damage down-prevailing wind from the industrial complexes. Results indicated that proximity to industrial facilities increased the risk for harmful exposures, genotoxicity, and lysosomal destabilization.

Bissett, Wesley Thurlow, Jr.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

F. Newton Hays, 1969 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

& Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S....

59

DOE Physicists at Work - Rob La Haye | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and measurement of field errors Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities Optimization of negative central shear discharges in shaped cross sections Practical beta...

60

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Pamela Hayes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Application from Northern Pass to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds, Hay, and Winegrapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Agriculture. State Organic Crop and Acreage Report. Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,

Brodt, Sonja; Klonsky, Karen; Thrupp, Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SMALL MAMMAL POPULATIONS IN SWITCHGRASS STANDS MANAGED FOR BIOMASS PRODUCTION COMPARED TO HAY AND CORN FIELDS IN KENTUCKY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), a native warm-season grass, has been investigated as a renewable energy crop that may provide viable wildlife habitat. This study investigated small (more)

Schwer, Laura Mary Jane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CX-004521: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21: Categorical Exclusion Determination 21: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004521: Categorical Exclusion Determination County of Travis, Texas 700 Lavaca Street Building Retrofit Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): County of Travis, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). Travis County, Texas proposes to use $2 ,207,900 of EECBG funds for the following activity which is bounded by the signed statement of work and are therefore categorically excluded: 700 Lavaca Street Building Retrofit Project. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004521.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002982: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002033: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001538

64

Index Revision, House Price Risk, and the Market for House Price Derivatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bias in repeat-sales home price indices. Freddie Mac workingpaper #0503. Index Revision, House Price Risk, and theMarket for House Price Derivatives Calhoun, C. A. (1996).

Deng, Yongheng; Quigley, John M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Revisiting the Past and Settling the Score: Index Revision for House Price Derivatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method for Real Estate Price Index Construction. Journal ofRevision Bias in Repeat Sale Home Price Indices. UnpublishedCalhoun, C.A. 1996. OFHEO House Price Indexes: HPI Technical

Clapham, Eric; Englund, Peter; Quigley, John M.; Redfearn, Christian L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1444 US Highway 41, North Calhoun, GA E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation Provide a retail-public accessible E85 fueling station by installing one 8,000 gallon...

67

Make Hay While the Sun Shines or be More Loyal Than the King? The Impact of External Labor Markets on the Technological Search Process within Firms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Past research on technological search has extensively studied the consequences of searching in different loci and in different manners. Less attention in given to the (more)

Tandon, Vivek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Patricia Hayes Andrews Young scholars hoping to shape a career with a far-reaching and long-lasting legacy would do well to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for forecasting weather and predicting climate. You don't need any hi-tech equipment; just download a free sur into life on campus. There are now more than 75,000 files available to down- load on iTunes U from over 800 of the Department of Electrical and Elec- tronic Engineering, wants to make data-gathering sensors smaller

Indiana University

69

September/October 2006 Clovertales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daughter, Chelsea Anne Hayes, and my son, David Lee Hayes, for hugs, kisses, smiles and lots of patience

Goodman, Robert M.

70

NUCLEARANDRADIOLOGICALENGINEERINGANDMEDICALPHYSICSPROGRAMSNUCLEARANDRADIOLOGICALENGINEERINGANDMEDICALPHYSICSPROGRAMS The Annual Report of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation issues are critical to the Native American community. For the urban Native American community line serving that population stopped roughly one mile from the only Native American medical clinic. Russell Lake, an impoundment of the Savannah River, through Calhoun Falls to GA 28, west of the town

Das, Suman

71

Nuclear Energy's Renaissance Andrew C. Kadak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23% 22% 3% 8% 3% 41% Electricity Production Source: EIA Gas 15% Hydro 8% Coal 51% Oil 3% Other 2) Ft. Calhoun (1) Cooper (1) Wolf Creek (1) Duane Arnold (1) Callaway (1) ANO (2) Comanche Peak (2) Duane Arnold (1) Callaway (1) ANO (2) Comanche Peak (2) South Texas (2) River Bend (1) Waterford (1

72

Ciccotelli et al. --Vernal Pool Plants of Acadia A preliminary study of the vegetation of vernal pools of Acadia National Park, Maine, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Maine's wetlands, including those of Acadia National Park (ANP) on Mt. Desert Island (MDI; Calhoun et al vegetation of ANP. Recent floristic treatments for ANP make no reference to vernal pool vegetation (Greene et al. 2005; Mittelhau- ser et al. 2010). Nearly 12% (133 taxa) of vascular plants in ANP have been

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

73

BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Maine's wetlands, including those of Acadia National Park (ANP) on Mt. Desert Island (MDI; Calhoun et al vegetation for ANP. Recent floristic treatments for ANP make no reference to vernal pool vegetation (Greene et al. 2005; Mittlehauser et al. 2010). Nearly 12% (133 taxa) of vascular plants in ANP have been

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

74

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON SYSTEM Board of Regents Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:45 p.m. PLACE: Hilton University of Houston Hotel Waldorf Astoria Ballroom E, Second Floor 4800 Calhoun Houston, Texas 77204 Chair: Carroll Robertson Ray Vice Chair: Nelda Luce Blair Secretary: Mica Mosbacher I -- University of Houston Action: Approval E. Approval of Naming of Building No. 9A at the Energy Research FCMP

Azevedo, Ricardo

75

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON SYSTEM Board of Regents Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m. PLACE: Hilton University of Houston Hotel Waldorf Astoria Ballroom E, Second Floor 4800 Calhoun Houston. Approval of scope for Energy Research Park Building One FCMP-6 Renovation at the University of HoustonUNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON SYSTEM Board of Regents Meeting 12:45 p.m. -- 4:00 p.m. May 18, 2011 #12

Azevedo, Ricardo

76

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-004521: Categorical Exclusion Determination County of Travis, Texas 700 Lavaca Street Building Retrofit Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): County of Travis, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 18, 2010 CX-004517: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio Energy Gateway Fund CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 18, 2010 CX-004495: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Algal Biofuels Consortium CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 18, 2010 CX-004485: Categorical Exclusion Determination

77

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

." ,.~, ." ,.~, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:TRAVIS COUNTY TEXAS PROJECT TITLE: County of Travis, Texas 700 Lavaca Street Retrofit Project ARRA-EECBG (5) Page 1 of2 ~ '&. J "'*'1. P STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pr~urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number 81 .128 DE-EE0000895 GF0-000089S-Q02 0 Based on my review orthe Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve finanda! and technical

78

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Cai, Long (Long Cai) - Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Cairo, Christopher W. (Christopher W. Cairo) - Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta Calhoun, David H. (David H. Calhoun) - Department of Chemistry, City College, City University of New York Callis, Patrik R. (Patrik R. Callis) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University Cammers, Arthur (Arthur Cammers) - Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky Campbell, Charles T. (Charles T. Campbell) - Department of Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Campbell, Robert E. (Robert E. Campbell) - Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta Cantor, Robert S. (Robert S. Cantor) - Department of Chemistry,

79

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Physics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Caers, Jef (Jef Caers) - Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University Cahay, Marc (Marc Cahay) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cincinnati Cai, Lin (Lin Cai) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria Cai, Steve C. S. (Steve C. S. Cai) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University Cai, Xiaodong (Xiaodong Cai) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Miami Cairns, Darran (Darran Cairns) - Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University Calhoun, Benton H. (Benton H. Calhoun) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia

80

Microsoft Word - F36A057D.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEXAS - COMMENTS AND RESPONSES TEXAS - COMMENTS AND RESPONSES NOVEMBER 2007 13-517 Texas - Both Sites Table of Comments TX1. Trainor, Eileen..................................................................................................................13-519 TX2. Calhoun County Resource Watch (Wilson, Diane) .........................................................13-521 TX3. Sembritzky, David............................................................................................................13-523 TX4. Texas Department of Transportation (Barta Jr., James P.) ..............................................13-525 TX5. FutureGen Texas Team (Walden, Steven - Walden Consulting) (The complete comment document submitted to DOE is shown in G10.)................................................13-527

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mike Hayes FE TBD NETL Albany Site 2010 Mike Hayes 2011 Albany, OR Building 4 Electrical Upgrade This project involves the installation of 15 kV switchgear and power distribution...

82

Interpretation as Method, Explanation, and Critique: A Reply (with R.A.W. Rhodes)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We disagree with Alexander Wendt, then, in a way that Haydoes not mention. Wendt and Hay believe that constitutive

Bevir, Mark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Interpretive Approaches to British Government and Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations, London: Sage. Wendt, A. (1999) Social TheoryHay, 2002, Smith, 2000, Wendt, 1999. On sociology see for

Bevir, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

UndergradUate Ceremony Platform Officials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

action guidelines. From 1979 to 1982, he was counsel to the firm of Kaye Scholer Fierman Hays and Handler

Beresnev, Igor

85

"Yo me percibo como una escritora de la Modernidad": Una entrevista con Cristina Peri Rossi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a otra alienacin, la pornografa. Pero, por qu? Porque laalienada la que haba pornografa brutal que hay. El hombre,

Mester, [No author

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (731.05). Dr. John (Jack) R. Hayes, Jr. ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

"1. Gerald Gentleman","Coal","Nebraska Public Power District",1365  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "1. Gerald Gentleman","Coal","Nebraska Public Power District",1365 "2. Nebraska City","Coal","Omaha Public Power District",1330 "3. Cooper","Nuclear","Nebraska Public Power District",767 "4. North Omaha","Coal","Omaha Public Power District",646 "5. Fort Calhoun","Nuclear","Omaha Public Power District",478 "6. Cass County","Gas","Omaha Public Power District",322 "7. Sarpy County","Gas","Omaha Public Power District",312 "8. Rokeby","Gas","Lincoln Electric System",237 "9. Beatrice","Gas","Nebraska Public Power District",237

88

Copyright 1998 Donald Wayne Taylor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

guidelines. From 1979 to 1982 he was counsel to the firm of Kaye Scholer Fierman Hays and Handler in New York

Washington at Seattle, University of

89

Deans Club Lifetime Abbott Laboratories Fund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northeast Correctional Complex Jerry Hayes, Health Administrator 5249 Highway 67 West Mountain City, TN Critical access hospital Wellmont - Hawkins County Memorial Hospital Fred Pelle, CEO 851 Locust St

Peterson, Blake R.

90

The Natural History of Bugs: Using Formal Methods to Analyse Software Related Failures in Space Missions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnson,C.W. Formal Methods 2005, F. Fitzgerald, I.J. Hayes and A. Tarlecki (eds), Springer Verlag, LNCS 3582 pp 9-25 Springer Verlag

Johnson, C.W.

91

Fast Algorithms for Phase Retrieval and Deconvolution - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optics Communications, 30(3):321?326, 1979. [2] M. J. Bastiaans. Application of the ... Institute of Technology, 1981. [16] M. H. Hayes and A. V. Oppenheim.

92

ATOXIC/ASSET Project Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies, FGD water did not inhibit bacterial activity in the constructed wetlands. Compost and hay were both a good source of carbon for denitrification. Compost supplies a...

93

Microsoft Word - 5DB30B37.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would include standard stormwater controls such as interceptor swales, erosion control compost, waddles, sod, diversion dikes, rock berms, silt fences, hay bales, or other erosion...

94

Microsoft Word - 36BBA23C.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would include standard stormwater controls such as interceptor swales, erosion control compost, waddles, sod, diversion dikes, rock berms, silt fences, hay bales, or other erosion...

95

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate Change Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate...

96

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Conservation tillage data from CTIC * Regional price data for crops (wheat, corn, soy, hay) and inputs (fertilizer, labor, fuel) * USG Ecozone dummy variables * Net...

97

The role of individual or neighborhood factors: HIV acquisition risk among high-risk populations in San Francisco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution of study participants Residence Zip (n)Neighborhood ZIP BMT White MSM Teach General Delivery HayesUse ZipHP residential zip code HIV prevalence, increasing

Raymond, Henry Fisher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating, Cooling, Lighting, Comfort Cluster Housing Swimming Fire Pit Usage of Local Woods (heating to create warmer floors, (2) the usage of natural building materials like hay, wood,

Shelby, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

LifeWings Attendees Last First Status Department Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ariel Samuel Hawks, Dustin M. Hayes, Anna K. Hayes, Rory Jude He, Harvey Hechler, Samantha Paige Kimani Herberger, Samantha Rae Herman, Stephen Edward Hermanovitch, Emily Noel Hernandez, Christine Marie Hernandez, Gilbert Joseph Hertica, Charles P. Hetherington, Stephanie E. Heuberger, Kristen Marie Hewit

Wood, James B.

100

2008-2009 Annual Report Department of Kinesiology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ariel Samuel Hawks, Dustin M. Hayes, Anna K. Hayes, Rory Jude He, Harvey Hechler, Samantha Paige Kimani Herberger, Samantha Rae Herman, Stephen Edward Hermanovitch, Emily Noel Hernandez, Christine Marie Hernandez, Gilbert Joseph Hertica, Charles P. Hetherington, Stephanie E. Heuberger, Kristen Marie Hewit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

http://www.oha.doe.gov/cases/eia/vee0026.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R.W. Hays Co. R.W. Hays Co. Date of Filing: June 11, 1996 Case Number: VEE-0026 On June 11, 1996 R. W. Hays Co. (Hays) of Medford, Oregon filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its Application, Hays requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied. A. Background Form EIA-782B is a mandatory reporting requirement which grew out of the shortages of crude oil and petroleum products during the 1970s. In 1979, Congress found that the lack of reliable information concerning the supply, demand, and prices of petroleum

102

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Florida based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Florida and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Florida, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 2 Alachua Franklin Lake Pinellas Baker Gadsden Lee Polk Bay Gilchrist Leon Putnam Bradford Glades Levy Santa Rosa Brevard Gulf Liberty Sarasota Calhoun Hamilton Madison Seminole Charlotte Hardee Manatee St. Johns

103

Secretary Chu and Congressman Clyburn in South Carolina this August |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu and Congressman Clyburn in South Carolina this August Secretary Chu and Congressman Clyburn in South Carolina this August Secretary Chu and Congressman Clyburn in South Carolina this August August 8, 2011 - 4:15pm Addthis Brenda DeGraffenreid How can I participate? Join us in South Carolina August 23! Small businesses are invited to join us on Tuesday, August 23, 2011, for a U.S. Department of Energy small business outreach session at Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Congressman James E. Clyburn, Assistant Democratic Leader, U.S. House of Representatives, and staff from the Department of Defense and other agencies will be meeting to discuss small business opportunities and programs. To register to attend, email your name, company name, address, and phone

104

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 1500 of 28,905 results. 91 - 1500 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003810: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40 Percent Energy Savings CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 09/08/2010 Location(s): Princeton, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003810-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003773: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate CX(s) Applied: B4.11, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Calhoun, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003773-categorical-exclusion-determination

105

Data:9d2620e4-e215-4918-90d2-ea85eb426a57 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e4-e215-4918-90d2-ea85eb426a57 e4-e215-4918-90d2-ea85eb426a57 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security lights 100/150 W HPS-175 MV Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

106

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 26, 2011 April 26, 2011 CX-005888: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Pressure Fire Loop Tank and Pump Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 04/26/2011 Location(s): Pantex Plant, Texas Office(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Pantex Site Office April 21, 2011 CX-005731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seadrift Wind Turbine CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2011 Location(s): Calhoun County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 21, 2011 CX-005730: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program Sinton Independent School District Wind Energy Project- Phase II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2011 Location(s): San Patricio County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 13, 2011 CX-005622: Categorical Exclusion Determination

107

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-003781: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Spark Ignited Engine Development for Combined Heat and Power Application CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.2, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Columbus, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2010 CX-003773: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate CX(s) Applied: B4.11, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Calhoun, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2010 CX-003772: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Parsippany-Troy Hills, Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Parsippany, New Jersey

108

Data:Eba222af-34f3-4be9-b56c-0232f6ac19fd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af-34f3-4be9-b56c-0232f6ac19fd af-34f3-4be9-b56c-0232f6ac19fd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Medium Power Service- Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: This rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage . Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

109

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 25, 2011 August 25, 2011 Have You Seen Energy Efficiency Improvements in Your Neighborhood? After discovering a renewable energy project in our blogger's own community, we're curious: What energy-saving, innovative projects have you come across in your neighborhood? August 24, 2011 Congressman James Clyburn speaks to South Carolina small business owners | Courtesy of Damien LaVera Secretary Chu Meets with South Carolina Small Businesses South Carolina's Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College is helping to leverage local ingenuity and entrepreneurship to create jobs and build a strong clean energy economy. Yesterday, Secretary Chu joined with Congressman James Clyburn at OCtech to meet with small business owners from across the state. As the Secretary noted, "Small businesses are the engine of the American economy, powering

110

Topic Group Meeting Participants were: Ira Baldwin, NCSTS Daren Gilbert, State Rail Sfty. Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 1998 3:30-6:00 p.m. Milwaukee Hilton Hotel, Milwaukee, WI July 13, 1998 3:30-6:00 p.m. Milwaukee Hilton Hotel, Milwaukee, WI Topic Group Meeting Participants were: Ira Baldwin, NCSTS Daren Gilbert, State Rail Sfty. Program Jim Baranski, NY SEMO Steve Hamp, DOE-NTP Kevin Blackwell, FRA Rick Hand, IL Commerce Commission Mike Butler, UETC Swenam Lee, DOE-FETC Mike Calhoun, FRA Norm Lindgren, UDOT Sandra Covi, UPRR Bruce Mibeck, FRA J.C. De La Garza, DOE-YMSCO William Naughton, ComEd Ray English, DOE-NR Markus Popa, DOE-OCRWM Allan Fisher, Conrail Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Bob Fronczak, AAR Carlisle Smith, Pub. Utilities Comm. of OH Phil Gehner, TRW-YMP Thor Strong, Michigan DEQ/MOCSG Michael Giblin, DOE-NV Jim Williams, Planning Information Corp. The meeting convened at approximately 3:35 p.m. CDT. Mike Butler (UETC) welcomed

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 8710 of 26,764 results. 01 - 8710 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0229-amended-record-decision Download CX-005731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seadrift Wind Turbine CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2011 Location(s): Calhoun County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005731-categorical-exclusion-determination Page Guidance Cybersecurity http://energy.gov/cio/office-chief-information-officer/services/guidance Page Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. http://energy.gov/management/office-management/operational-management/freedom-information-act/documents/annual-reports

112

Feb01_tribenotes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Tribal Issues Topic Group Meeting TEC Tribal Issues Topic Group Meeting February 6, 2001 Portland, Oregon Participants: Richard Arnold (Las Vegas Indian Center), Helen Belencan (DOE/EM- 22), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Wynona Boyer (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Mike Calhoun (DOT/FRA), Michael Chavarria/Joseph Mark Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kevin Clarke (DOE/RL), Sandra Covi (UPR), Martha Crosland (DOE/EM- 11), Jim Daust (CVSA), Ed Gonzales (ELG Engineering), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Veronica Herkshan (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Robert Holden (NCAI), Judith Holm (DOE/NTPA), Henry Jacobs (DOT/FRA), Daniel King (Oneida Nation), Edward Liebow (EH&SP), Linda Minton (ENA), Stanley Paytiamo (Pueblo of Acoma EPA), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Max Powell (DOE/YMSCO), Mike Rowswell (Assoc. of State Rail Safety Managers), Greg Sahd (DOE/CAO/WIPP), Patrick Sobotta (Nez Perce

113

Markus Popa, DOE (OCRWM) Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Robert Holden, NCAI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minutes Monday, November 3rd 2:00-3:00 p.m. (EST) Minutes Monday, November 3rd 2:00-3:00 p.m. (EST) Participants included: Markus Popa, DOE (OCRWM) Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Robert Holden, NCAI Mike Butler, UETC Bob Fronczak, AAR Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler (UETC) greeted participants and informed the group of previous notification by Robert Light (Mescalero Apache Tribe), Robert Centracco (FRA), and Mike Calhoun (FRA) that they would be unable to join the call. Mr. Butler began the call with a brief update on the status of Matrix 1, now entitled "Summary of Rail and Highway Regulations and their Applicability to States, Tribes, Shippers, and Carriers." He informed the group that he had completed an initial draft of the matrix, but that he was making substantial revisions to it and therefore he had not distributed it to the entire group for

114

Data:856ea508-a466-4379-baa5-358286e8a744 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

08-a466-4379-baa5-358286e8a744 08-a466-4379-baa5-358286e8a744 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Power Service- Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: This Rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

115

Data:5c242482-07f9-436d-aa6e-ac041f6b5f01 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82-07f9-436d-aa6e-ac041f6b5f01 82-07f9-436d-aa6e-ac041f6b5f01 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small General Service Non-Demand Sector: Commercial Description: The rate is applicable to all non-residential customers delivered or compensated to one standard voltage and where monthly energy consumption must average less than 5,000 kilowatt hours. tiered rate = Transmission charge + generation charge + energy charge Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments

116

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 12680 of 28,560 results. 71 - 12680 of 28,560 results. Download CX-002806: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/22/2010 Location(s): North Calhoun, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002806-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002807: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/22/2010 Location(s): Port St. Lucie, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002807-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002809: Categorical Exclusion Determination

117

Secretary Chu Meets with South Carolina Small Businesses | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Meets with South Carolina Small Businesses Chu Meets with South Carolina Small Businesses Secretary Chu Meets with South Carolina Small Businesses August 24, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Congressman James Clyburn speaks to South Carolina small business owners | Courtesy of Damien LaVera Congressman James Clyburn speaks to South Carolina small business owners | Courtesy of Damien LaVera Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs South Carolina's Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College is helping to leverage local ingenuity and entrepreneurship to create jobs and build a strong clean energy economy. Yesterday, Secretary Chu joined with Congressman James Clyburn at OCtech to meet with small business owners from across the state. As the Secretary noted, "Small businesses are the engine of the American economy, powering

118

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa based Iowa based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Iowa and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Iowa, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 6 Allamakee Clay Hancock Palo Alto Black Hawk Clayton Hardin Plymouth Bremer Delaware Howard Pocahontas Buchanan Dickinson Humboldt Sac Buena Vista Emmet Ida Sioux Butler Fayette Kossuth Webster Calhoun Floyd Lyon Winnebago Cerro Gordo Franklin

119

DESCRIPTION OF THE RESEARCH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shallow Viscous Oil Reserves in North Slope Shallow Viscous Oil Reserves in North Slope ID Number: DE-FC26-01BC15186 Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: 9-25-2001 Reporting Period End Date: 9-24-2004 Submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy Kishore K. Mohanty Department of Chemical Engineering University of Houston 4800 Calhoun Road Houston, Texas 77204-4004 December, 2004 1 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

120

Data:147594b2-aef2-415a-9332-bd687066ed63 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aef2-415a-9332-bd687066ed63 aef2-415a-9332-bd687066ed63 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Service- Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: This rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Data:F24dc910-1593-4412-8751-db7f343d83a3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10-1593-4412-8751-db7f343d83a3 10-1593-4412-8751-db7f343d83a3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 250 W Utility Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

122

Data:C31a2f37-c090-4d4c-acef-3d205838968e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-c090-4d4c-acef-3d205838968e 7-c090-4d4c-acef-3d205838968e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Light 400 W MH Flood Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

123

Data:9eb896f6-4993-42f1-bbc3-ff7e904de2f0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6f6-4993-42f1-bbc3-ff7e904de2f0 6f6-4993-42f1-bbc3-ff7e904de2f0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Medium Power Service- Commercial Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage . Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

124

Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall December 2, 2009 - 5:49pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? The Community Action Agency of Talladega, Clay, Calhoun, Randolph and Cleburne Counties received about $1.8 million in Recovery Act money to weatherize homes and is assessing 60 to 70 homes each month. Mary's energy bill is about $300 cheaper now, and she no longer has to take extreme measures to keep her and her three children and grandchild warm. In the winter months, Mary Taylor felt a chilly draft billowing through her Talladega, Ala., home. The energy bills were mounting up higher and higher. In the summer, the sweltering southern heat was too much for her air conditioner to handle, as the cool air leaked out of house as quickly as

125

Office of Fossil Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Semi-annual Progress Report Reporting Period: November, 2008-April, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston May, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Oil & Natural Gas Technology

126

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

244 244 Waukesha Electric System, Inc OE U of Houston activities Energy Delivery Technologies Div 2010 David Szucs approx. July 2010 - January 2015 4800 Calhoun Rd, Houston , TX "Recovery Act-Fault Current Limiting Superconducting Transformer" The University of Houston will perform electrical, magnetic, mechanical and thermal testing of superconducting wire made by SuperPower, Inc and development of low ac loss superconductor wire. 07 02 2010 David Szucs Digitally signed by David Szucs DN: cn=David Szucs, o=NETL, ou=EDTD, email=szucs@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.07.02 13:05:17 -04'00' 07 13 2010 Fred E. Pozzuto Digitally signed by Fred E. Pozzuto DN: cn=Fred E. Pozzuto, o=USDOE, ou=NETL-Office of Project Facilitation and Compliance, email=fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov, c=US

127

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Mississippi and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Mississippi, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 3 Adams Greene Lowndes Smith Alcorn Grenada Madison Sunflower Amite Hinds Marion Tallahatchie Attala Holmes Marshall Tate Benton Humphreys Monroe Tippah Bolivar Issaquena Montgomery Tishomingo Calhoun Itawamba Neshoba Tunica

128

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston June, 2008 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

129

Data:4052d46d-681f-479e-a5fa-265a8ae334a5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6d-681f-479e-a5fa-265a8ae334a5 6d-681f-479e-a5fa-265a8ae334a5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Power Service Sector: Commercial Description: This Rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

130

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Illinois and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Illinois, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 5 Adams De Witt Jo Daviess McDonough Sangamon Boone Douglas Kane McHenry Schuyler Brown DuPage Kankakee McLean Scott Bureau Edgar Kendall Menard Stark Calhoun Ford Knox Mercer Stephenson Carroll Fulton La Salle Morgan Tazewell

131

Data:1aa46b9a-917d-4e95-84a5-0b65dedb0279 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-917d-4e95-84a5-0b65dedb0279 a-917d-4e95-84a5-0b65dedb0279 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Light 400 W Flood Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

132

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Alabama based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Alabama and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Alabama, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 3 Autauga Coosa Jackson Pickens Barbour Covington Jefferson Pike Bibb Crenshaw Lamar Randolph Blount Cullman Lauderdale Russell Bullock Dale Lawrence Shelby Butler Dallas Lee St. Clair Calhoun De Kalb Limestone Sumter

133

CX-008412: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

412: Categorical Exclusion Determination 412: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008412: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alabama-County-Calhoun CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1) Replace dishwasher (Jail), 2) replace washing machine and dryer with high efficiency appliances (Jail), 3) retrofit with high efficiency lighting and controls (Jail), 4) retrofit with high efficiency lighting and controls (Administration Building), 5) install walk-in cooler and walk-in freezer (Jail), 6) install new gas water heaters (Jail), and 7) technical consultant services for administration and implementation of grant-energy efficiency and conservation strategy. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

134

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Data:C25687dc-a87b-48ae-8e27-13c2dade108e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dc-a87b-48ae-8e27-13c2dade108e dc-a87b-48ae-8e27-13c2dade108e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Service Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is applicable to all commercial or industrial electric service which is delivered or compensated to one standard voltage. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

137

TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 15, 2004 November 15, 2004 Participants: Nancy Bennett (UNM/ATRI), Vicki Best (YMPO), Kevin Blackwell (FRA), Tony Bouve (FRA), Mike Calhoun (FRA), Greg Fasano (SAIC), Ed Gonzales (ELG), Elizabeth Helvey (BSC), Dennis Hurtt (DOE/CBFO), Jay Jones (DOE/RW), Dan King (Oneida Nation), Bob Lupton (DOE/OCRWM), Julie Offner (BAH), Ellen Ott (DOE/GC), Jennifer Patric (BAH),Wilda Portner (SAIC), Lisa Sattler (CSG/MW), Linda Sikkema (NCSL), Steve White (NAEMT) Jay Jones (DOE/RW) chaired the call, which focused on Tribal outreach associated with future shipments to Yucca Mountain. Action Items: Responsible Party Action to be Taken All Tribal Group Members Open discussions on 180(c) funding allocation methodologies; does a needs assessment and the formula

138

Evapoclimatonomy III: The Reconciliation of Monthly Runoff and Evaporation in the Climatic Balance of Evaporable Water on Land Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study is the third in a sequel by Lettau and Baradas. The Evapoclimatonomy I model has been discussed and applied by various authors including Hare, Hay, Kutzbach, Pinker, and Corio. In the present study the semiempirical method of ...

Heinz H. Lettau; Edward J. Hopkins

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

UHTCs and Composites for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012... Petry1; Michael Cinibulk1; Randall Hay1; 1Air Force Research Laboratory ... Surface flaw sealing and compressive thermal stress in the SiO2...

140

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

URS FE DE-FE0005654 Existing Plants Division 11 Bruce Lani 10012010-09302013 Buda, Hays County, Texas Evaluation of Concentrated Piperazine for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Flue...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

StructureActivity Analysis of the Potentiation by Aminothiols of the Chromosome-Damaging Effect of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, squamous cell car- cinomas, testicular cancer, and some lymphomas [Hay et al., 1991; Stubbe et al., 1996 to DNA by hydro- phobic and ionic interactions mediated by its bithiazole moiety and C-terminus [Kane et

142

The Institution of Infrastructure and the Development of Port-Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Field Crops, NEC 12 Wheat Flour and Semolina 13 AnimalField Crops, NEC 2041 Wheat Flour and Semolina 2042 Animal6781 Hay & Fodder 6746 Wheat Flour 6782 Animal Feed, Prep.

Hall, Peter Voss

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Determining the specification of a control system: an illustrative example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creating the specification of a system by focusing primarily on the detailed properties of the digital controller can lead to complex descriptions that are nearly incoherent. An argument given by Hayes, Jackson, and Jones provides reasons to focus first ...

Joey W. Coleman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DETONATION IN A SPHERICAL BOMB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute, Palo Alto, CA. NUREG-0560 (Hay 1979), StaffCommission, Washington, O.C. NUREG-75/014 [WASH-1400] (Octfted water (NSAC-1, 1979; NUREG-0560, 1979). Unlike previous

Kurylo, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report to Barnett and Appalachian Shale Water Management and Reuse Technologies Report No. 08122-05.FINAL.1 Contract 08122-05 March 30, 2012 Principal Investigator Tom Hayes, Ph.D....

146

9/03/1998 08: 31 4234814757 SAIC _ FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tanawanda, New York," May 1978 (DOEEV-W06). 2. *Radiological Survey of the Ashland Oil Co. (Fonntr HaSst Property), Tonawanda, h'ew York," Hay 1978 (DOEEV-00054). 3....

147

Amy Courtney: Freewheelin' Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trailer. Courtney: No, for compost and bales of hay and thatit. Inputs Rabkin: Do you compost or have other inputs thatinstead of bringing in a compost per se. But we have bought

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One West Speaker: Jonathan Hays, Imperial College London Title: Recent Results in SUSY Higgs Searches at DZero 8 p.m. Fermilab Lecture Series - Auditorium Tickets: 7 Speaker: Dr....

149

Dr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both successful and not so successful. 10:45-11:00 am Break 11:00-11:50 am Federal Appropriations Process (Grant, Brenda Hays, Barbara Williamson) A general overview of the Federal...

150

Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA Fan Mei, 1,7 Patrick L. Hayes, 2,3 Amber Ortega, 2,3 Jonathan W. Taylor, 4 James D. Allan,...

151

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

152

EditEd by Tony Hey, STewarT TanSley, and KriSTin Tolle F o u r t h  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diane Harpold & Bill Rodgers Catharine & Richard Harris Benjamin Harrison Karen & Stephen Henderson Treisman Drew Westen Moderator: Patricia Hayes 12:30-1:50 ATLAS Black Box 2465 Rust Belt City Renewal

Fähndrich, Manuel A.

153

Undergraduate Alumni LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Founder's Associate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diane Harpold & Bill Rodgers Catharine & Richard Harris Benjamin Harrison Karen & Stephen Henderson Treisman Drew Westen Moderator: Patricia Hayes 12:30-1:50 ATLAS Black Box 2465 Rust Belt City Renewal

Napier, Terrence

154

Faculty Page 401Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Carlos C. Ayala (2002)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diane Harpold & Bill Rodgers Catharine & Richard Harris Benjamin Harrison Karen & Stephen Henderson Treisman Drew Westen Moderator: Patricia Hayes 12:30-1:50 ATLAS Black Box 2465 Rust Belt City Renewal

Ravikumar, B.

155

ANNUAL REPORT University of Cambridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diane Harpold & Bill Rodgers Catharine & Richard Harris Benjamin Harrison Karen & Stephen Henderson Treisman Drew Westen Moderator: Patricia Hayes 12:30-1:50 ATLAS Black Box 2465 Rust Belt City Renewal

Kraft, Markus

156

FindingsV O L U M E 1 7 , N U M B E R 1 s F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 0 1 U N I V E R S I T Y O F M I C H I G A N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diane Harpold & Bill Rodgers Catharine & Richard Harris Benjamin Harrison Karen & Stephen Henderson Treisman Drew Westen Moderator: Patricia Hayes 12:30-1:50 ATLAS Black Box 2465 Rust Belt City Renewal

Shyy, Wei

157

CX-003688: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Mid-Atlantic Regional Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/02/2010Location(s): Hayes, VirginiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

158

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Not Yet Assigned TBD FE TBD OIOSite Operations Division FY 2014 Mike Hayes Albany, OR Buildings 7-11 Sidewalk Replacement Replace the existing sidewalk with a code compliantADA...

159

Risk Reduction and Soil Ecosystem Restoration in an Active Oil Producing Area in an Ecologically Sensitive Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The empowerment of small independent oil and gas producers to solve their own remediation problems will result in greater environmental compliance and more effective protection of the environment as well as making small producers more self-reliant. In Chapter 1 we report on the effectiveness of a low-cost method of remediation of a combined spill of crude oil and brine in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Osage County, OK. Specifically, we have used hay and fertilizer as amendments for remediation of both the oil and the brine. No gypsum was used. Three spills of crude oil plus produced water brine were treated with combinations of ripping, fertilizers and hay, and a downslope interception trench in an effort to demonstrate an inexpensive, easily implemented, and effective remediation plan. There was no statistically significant effect of treatment on the biodegradation of crude oil. However, TPH reduction clearly proceeded in the presence of brine contamination. The average TPH half-life considering all impacted sites was 267 days. The combination of hay addition, ripping, and a downslope interception trench was superior to hay addition with ripping, or ripping plus an interception trench in terms of rates of sodium and chloride leaching from the impacted sites. Reductions in salt inventories (36 months) were 73% in the site with hay addition, ripping and an interception trench, 40% in the site with hay addition and ripping only, and < 3% in the site with ripping and an interception trench.

Kerry L. Sublette; Greg Thoma; Kathleen Duncan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Performing statistical analyses on quantitative data in Taverna workflows: an example using R and maxdBrowse to identify differentially-expressed genes from microarray data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hypothesis-driven science in the post-genomic era. Bioessays 2004, 26:99-105. 4. Hayes A, Castrillo JI, Oliver SG, Brass A, Zeef LAH: Transcript Analysis: A Microarray Approach. In Methods in Microbiology. Yeast Gene Analysis Volume 36. Edited by... , Senger M, Wilkinson MD: BioMoby extensions to the Taverna workflow management and enactment software. BMC Bioinformatics 2006, 7:523. 17. Hancock D, Wilson M, Velarde G, Morrison N, Hayes A, Hulme H, Wood AJ, Nashar K, Kell DB, Brass A: maxdLoad2 and maxd...

Li, Peter; Castrillo, Juan I; Velarde, Giles; Wassink, Ingo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Owen, Stuart; Withers, David; Oinn, Tom; Pocock, Matthew R; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 2790 of 28,905 results. 81 - 2790 of 28,905 results. Download CX-008200: Categorical Exclusion Determination Virginia City-Lynchburg CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/28/2012 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008200-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008412: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alabama-County-Calhoun CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008412-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008419: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indiana-City-Gary CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/16/2012 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

162

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 CX-008412: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alabama-County-Calhoun CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 3, 2012 CX-008576: Categorical Exclusion Determination Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.25 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 3, 2012 CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 3, 2012 CX-008430: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas-City-Grapevine CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B2.5, B3.6, B5.1, B5.16, B5.17

163

Data:02e2c05d-f04b-42e2-b5e6-49c6cbcff51b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c05d-f04b-42e2-b5e6-49c6cbcff51b c05d-f04b-42e2-b5e6-49c6cbcff51b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Service Sector: Residential Description: Flat Rate Buy= Transmission charge+ Generation Charge+Energy charge Subject to power cost recovery and Revenue adjustment. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

164

Data:9030dc9b-29a9-461b-b8c0-cf2d599b7c1c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b-29a9-461b-b8c0-cf2d599b7c1c b-29a9-461b-b8c0-cf2d599b7c1c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 400 W Utility Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

165

Data:Ec9d1804-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

04-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 04-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 150 W Utility Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

166

Data:08de039d-126a-4e62-aa51-6d4a62e0fc79 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

39d-126a-4e62-aa51-6d4a62e0fc79 39d-126a-4e62-aa51-6d4a62e0fc79 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 1000 W MH Flood Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

167

Data:99cc81c6-6a1c-4a83-8e38-bfe8c2270bcc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c6-6a1c-4a83-8e38-bfe8c2270bcc c6-6a1c-4a83-8e38-bfe8c2270bcc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate Sector: Industrial Description: At the city's sole discretion, this rate schedule may apply to any new or existing industrial customer added to the city's electrical system and having a metered demand of at least 5,000kW. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

168

EXAMINING THE DEPTH AND BREADTH OF MENTALLY ILL ADOLESCENTS INCARCERATED IN THE STATE OF IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anyone knows that to undergo a project of this magnitude, a good deal of consideration and gratitude has to be given to those who helped shape its outcome. Much appreciation must be given to my County Commissioners and Court for their assistance with the financial and professional support during tight fiscal years, as well as the National Center for State Courts for the tuition assistance that always came at the right time. A very special thanks must go to Judge Stephen Calhoun for his determination to make the juvenile justice system responsive to the needs of our youth. A special thanks to my project advisor, Phil Knox, who spent many tireless evenings trying to juggle his own job and the endless emails that I sent to him for input. Youve been a true consummate of determination and professionalism, and pushed me for the best project. Thank you very much for your time and efforts! Within the State of Idaho, I would like to thank my dedicated peers in the Idaho Association of Juvenile Justice Administrators (IACJJA). Each one of you is a true champion for the rights and welfare of the kids in Idaho, and without your efforts, the lives of these children would be more horrific than what they already are in some instances. There are many contributors from the Idaho

John E. Triplett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Data:Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 1500 W MH Sport Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

170

RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN 2012 www.PosterPresentations.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants, and nuclear energy plants. And any other resource producing establishments. And of course roads a lot more. Lastly, if you remember how I said there will be nuclear energy plants between some growing population. Works citied 1. Hays, Jeffrey. "EARTHQUAKES, SAFETY, LIFE AND EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT

Farritor, Shane

171

University of Newcastle upon Tyne Deriving specifications for systems that are connected to the physical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are connected to the physical world C. B. Jones, I. J. Hayes, M. A. Jackson. TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. CS" and "radical" design. This report is a preprint of a paper that will appear in an LNCS volume -- please cite-TR-1045 August, 2007 NEWCASTLE UN IVERSITY OF #12;TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. CS-TR-1045 August, 2007

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

172

Am. Midl. Nat. 145:344357 Effects of Plains Pocket Gopher (Geomys bursarius)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and juveniles in pile mounds and, therefore, Ricinus does not benefit from directed dispersal by ants germinate and benefit from higher nutrient availability in the pile mounds (O'Dowd and Hay 1980; Davidson of where the plant is established. Ants also did not bring any benefits to seedlings growing in pile mounds

173

A Selected Bibliography of Publications by, and about, Werner Heisenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.21 Title word cross-reference (k1 ? kn) [Tem91]. + [BKBS93]. 1/2 [BHX96, Man91]. $12.00 [Kra07, Lan08]. 2 [Hen93]. $27.50 [Cas93a]. $29.95 [Hay90].

Nelson H. F. Beebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang Selangor, Malaysia 2 Malaysian Palm Oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

175

ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Evans, Jason

176

METR 4713/5713 Private Sector Meteorology Spring 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

177

Modeling Animal Landscapes* * This article was prepared as an overview of a symposium at "Molecules to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Williams, Jos. B.

178

Environmental, Energetic, and Economic Potential of Biochar CCSF Topical Lunch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental, Energetic, and Economic Potential of Biochar CCSF Topical Lunch November 19, 2008 discussed such as Hatch fund ­ multi-state (specifically with Anthony Hay and ecotoxicity and biochar for remediation research) Agricultural Companies, fertilizer companies ­ biochar could be seen as a co- product

Angenent, Lars T.

179

oday the spotlight in the United States is on the increasing world demand for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fuel for transportation, industrial chemicals or power plants to supply electrical power for public consumption. Efforts and partially digested dietary nutrients is a resource that benefits plant growth and adds organic matter Biomass Root Crops Agricultural Residues Silage/Hay Animal Manure Cities Municipal Solid Wastes Power

Mukhtar, Saqib

180

Seasonal Variation in Sampling Data for Walleye and Sauger Collected with Gill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gear bias is ofconstant concern (Carlander 1953, Forney 1961, Yeh 1977, Laarman and Ryckman 1982, Hayes and environmental variables such as weather, season, water temperature, water level, and other limnological days. Sampling occurred on day 20-25 of each month and water temperature was recorded. Stock

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

the YD triggered an equatorward reorganiza-tion of zonal circulation over North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Quat. Res., in press) recognize an oxygen isotope excursion that initiated 700 years before the YD isotope data show strong revegetation at about 13,000 radio- carbon years ago with no signal of a YD. E. Hays, P. D. Jones, Holocene 2, 97 (1992). 15. P. Blanchon and J. Shaw, Geology 23, 4 (1995). 16

Miyashita, Yasushi

182

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia #12;#12;Effects of Including Surface Depressions in the Application of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia By Roland J. Viger, Lauren E. Hay-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations

183

Introduction Study Area U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to climate change for the Flint River Basin at Montezuma in Georgia (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow) and a journal article (Hay and others, 2011). Study Area The upper portion of the Flint River flows unimpeded. River shoal habitat in the upper Flint River supports a variety of native fishes, mussels, and aquatic

184

Abundance,Biomass, and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance,Biomass, and Production Daniel B.Hayes,James R.Bence,Thomas J.Kwak, and Bradley E, the proportion of fish present that are #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 329 detected (i.e., sightability; available at http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance/). #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 331 Box 8

Kwak, Thomas J.

185

Metabolic regulation of cattle adiposity in different breed types using two disparate diets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifteen steers were used to evaluate the difference of diets (corn-based for 8 mo or hay-based for 12 mo) and breeds (Angus; n = 7 or Wagyu; n = 8) in a completely randomized design with 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to test the hypothesis that there are differences in fatty acid metabolism and cellularity in subcutaneous (s.c.) and intramuscular (i.m.) adipose tissue between these breeds types. Fat thickness, carcass weight, overall maturity, and yield grade of Angus steers were higher than those of Wagyu steers fed either corn (34%, 22%, 3%, and 8% higher, respectively) or hay diets (20%, 8%, 10%, and 8% higher, respectively) (P 0.05). Adipocyte cellularity data demonstrated that both breeds have more cells per gram adipose tissue and smaller cell volumes in i.m. adipose tissue than in s.c. adipose tissue. In s.c. adipose tissue, saturated fatty acids tended to be lower in corn-fed Angus and Wagyu steers than in hay-fed steers (P < 0.06). Similarly, monounsaturated fatty acids were higher in corn-fed Wagyu and Angus steers than in hay-fed Wagyu and Angus steers (P < 0.01). Slip point was positively correlated with percentage stearic acid in corn-fed and hay-fed steers, and there was a negative correlation between slip point and the SCD index. These data demonstrated that corn-based diets provide not only increased contents of monounsaturated fatty acid in Angus and Wagyu adipose tissue but also increased lipogenic activity.

Chung, Ki Yong

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of alfalfa leaf meal for dairy cows. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of laboratory tests and two feeding experiments were conducted to determine the quality and evaluate the feeding value of alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) for dairy cows. An experiment was also conducted to enhance the protein value of ALM for ruminants. The fiber content of 6 different samples obtained from the processing plant from November 1996 to August 1997 were variable, ranging from 28.8 to 44.5% of DM for NDF, and from 16.0 to 28.6% of DM for ADF. Ash content ranged from 10.1 to 13.8% of the DM. The protein content of ALM was fairly constant and ranged from 21.8 to 23.6% of DM. Amino acids comprise at least 70% of the total CP in ALM, but essential amino acids comprise only about 35% of the total CP. The amino acid profile of ALM is similar to that of alfalfa hay, but markedly different from that of soybean meal. Overall, ALM produced to date is similar in nutrient content to prime alfalfa hay. In one of the feeding trials, ALM pellets were used to replace part of the hay in diets for early lactation cows. The results indicate that ALM pellets can make up as much as 16% of the diet DM in replacement of an equivalent amount of high quality chopped alfalfa hay without adverse effects on production or rumen health. In an other study, ALM replaced soybean meal to supply up to 3 3 % of the total CP in the diet without any detrimental effect on production. However, in each study, dry matter intake was reduced when ALM was included in the diet at or above 15 to 16% of the DM. Although this reduction in feed intake did not influence milk production over the short duration of these studies, it is not known what would happen if ALM was fed over long periods of time. Also, these results should not be interpreted to suggest either that ALM may used to replace all the hay in the diets or that ALM in meal form may be used to replace hay in the diets. Moreover, feed consumption by cows used in these experiments was rather high and somewhat atypical of most cows.

Akayezu, J.M.; Jorgensen, M.A.; Linn, J.G.; Jung, H.J.G. [USDA, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pam Hayes [hayespamj@yahoo.com] Pam Hayes [hayespamj@yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, September 16, 2013 10:29 AM To: Lawrence, Christopher Cc: maryanne.sullivan@hoganlovells.com; Bartoab@nu.com Subject: Request For Intervenor Status - NORTHERN PASS Dear Mr. Lawrence, I am writing to request intervenor status in your agency's consideration of the so-called Northern Pass (NP). My comments are as follows. I am adamantly opposed to the NP as currently proposed. As currently proposed, the NP route will cut through Deerfield, New Hampshire, where I live. Deerfield is a rural New England community with many beautiful vistas, farms, historic homes, and buildings. The impact of NP's construction of a corridor of massive steel towers through the town-including within a half-mile of Deerfield's historic

188

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SHARE Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate Change Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate change. Image credit: Santonu Goswami Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate change. Image credit: Santonu Goswami (hi-res image) This feature describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory research presented at the 98th annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. The theme of the meeting, held Aug. 4-9 in Minnesota, is "Sustainable Pathways: Learning From the Past and Shaping the Future." Fire, logging, insects and extreme weather can wreak havoc on forests. With support from the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation,

189

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tuo weeks. tuo weeks. For a personal retention copy, call Tech. Info. Division, Ext. 5545 -- - TJNIVERSITY O F CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory C ont rae t No, W-74.05-eng-48 THE PATH OF CARBON I N PHOTOSYNTHESIS, X U , KINETIC REIATIORSEIPS OF THE I N T m ~ ~ I A T E S IN sTum STATE PHOTOSYT\JTHESIS A , A. Benson, S . Icawaguchi, F, Hayes and M, Calvfr, Berkeley, Gallfomlh KlMETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF THE INTEiQBDIATLS 3 3 STEADH STATE E'HOTOSY NTHES IS A, A, Benson, So hawaguchf, Po Hayes and M, Calvin Ibadiation Laboratory and liegwtment 0% Chemistry University of California, Berkeley 1 A kinetic study of the accumulation of cL4 in the intermediates of steady. state photosynthesis in cUO2 provides information regarding the sequence of reactfona involvedo The work described applied the rpdfo-

190

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SFIBulletin How Complex Societies Evolve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bees in May Is worth a load of hay; A swarm of bees in June Is worth a silver spoon; A swarm of bees #12;2 S A N T A F E I N S T I T U T E B U L L E T I N · S U M M E R 2 0 0 1 profile SIR ROBERT MAYby

193

Charles M. Offenhauer '39G John H. Weitz '40G ++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hale '64G Stanley S. Le Roy '64G ++ Edward Mc Cafferty '64G '68G ++ Mary T. Pongracz '64G Diane S ++ George J. Tamaro '61G '86P '90P M. Herbert Wachs '61G '65G 1962 Mary E. Banzhof '62G John W. Caldwell '62 Jane B. Gerrish '65G Carol E. Hafner '65G Wilbur F. Hayes '61G '65G ++ Richard W. Hertzberg '65G 'F

Napier, Terrence

194

Hoja 7 Calculo I Primero de Ingenieria Informatica Curso 20122013 Calculo de primitivas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a nivel del mar? Responde a la misma pregunta para el hidr´ogeno, para el que C = 0.006. c) Teniendo en cuenta que a nivel del mar hay unas 400 000 mol´eculas de ox´igeno por cada una de hidr´ogeno, ¿a qu´e altura habr´a m´as hidr´ogeno que ox´igeno? 3 #12;

Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

195

Hoja 8 Calculo I Primero de Ingenieria Informatica Curso 20112012 Calculo de areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hidr´ogeno, para el que C = 0.006. c) Teniendo en cuenta que a nivel del mar hay unas 400 000 mol´eculas de ox´igeno por cada una de hidr´ogeno, ¿a qu´e altura habr´a m´as hidr´ogeno que ox´igeno? 18

Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

196

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick- stemmed species. Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering- economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or truck.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Butler, J. [Butler (James), Tifton, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Digestion of fat in the equine small and large intestine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six pony geldings were fitted with ideal cannulas and used in a 6 x 6 Latin square experiment. Diets consisting of 65% concentrate and 35% bermudagrass hay were fed at 12 h intervals. The concentrate contained 0, 5,10,15, 20 or 25% rendered animal fat. The ponies were fed at a constant intake throughout the experiment. The ponies were fed each diet for 1 0 d of adjustment followed by 4 d of collection during each period. Feces and ileal fluid were collected over the 4-d collection period. The collections from the ileum were taken 3X daily to represent each 2 h interval following feeding. The ileal fluids were composited on an equal volume basis into one sample per horse per treatment. Fifteen percent of the total feces within each collection period were saved for analyses. Feed and hay samples were also collected. The feed, hay and fecal samples were analyzed for dry matter, energy, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber and ether extract. The ileal samples were analyzed for dry matter and ether extract content. Upper and lower intestinal digestibilities were calculated from the change in ratio of nutrient to indigestible indicator. The fat added to the diet had no effect on the apparent digestibility of energy or crude protein. Apparent digestibilities of neutral detergent fiber

Swinney, Dara Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CERTS 2012 Program Review - Baselining Studes and Analysis - Brett Amidan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis (DOE-CERTS Internal Review) Brett Amidan, M.S. Thomas A. Ferryman, Ph.D. (retired) Trenton Pulsipher, M.S. Spencer Hays, Ph.D. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory brett.amidan@pnnl.gov June 2012 Project Objectives and Relevance Project Objectives Investigate power grid data (PMU and State Estimator Data), including, but not limited to, phase angle differences between site pairs, and mode meter and oscillation derived variables. Identify atypical events and characterize typical patterns. Recommend upper and lower limits for "normal" operation. Relevance Increase understanding of the significance of phase angle differences and other variables as a metric of grid health.

199

Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Nenad M. Markovic (Primary Contact) and Vojislav R. Stamenkovic Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Argonne, IL 60439 Phone: (630) 252-5181 Email: nmmarkovic@anl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Karren More, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN * Charles Hays, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA * Shuoheng Sun, Brown University, Providence, RI * Guofeng Wang, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA * Radoslav Atanasoski, 3M Company, Saint Paul, MN

200

The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte reservoirs for increased long-term baseline stability, and larger integral batteries allowing operation for in excess of 3 months without intervention. In this case sensors were sealed with rubber O-rings on the bottom of the enclosure behind a... The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks. M. I. Mead1*, O.A.M. Popoola1, G. B. Stewart1, P. Landshoff3, M. Calleja2, M. Hayes2, J. J. Baldovi1, T. F. Hodgson1, M. W. McLeod1, J. Dicks4...

Mead, M I; Popoola, O A M; Stewart, G B; Landshoff, P; Calleja, M; Hayes, M; Baldovi, J J; Hodgson, T F; McLeod, M W; Dicks, J; Lewis, A; Cohen, J; Baron, R; Saffell, J R; Jones, R L

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Effect of questionnaire length, personalisation and reminder type on response rate to a complex postal survey: a randomised controlled trial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey response behavior. Public Opin Q 1991, 55:613-639. 7. Mond JM, Rodgers B, Hay PJ, Owen C, Beumont PJV: Mode of delivery, but not questionnaire length, affected response in an epidemiological study of eating-disordered behavior. J Clin Epidemiol... 2004, 57:1167-1171. 8. Nakash R, Hutton J, Jrstad-Stein E, Gates S, Lamb S: Maximising response to postal questionnaires - A systematic review of randomised trials in health research. BMC Med Res Methodol 2006, 6:5. 9. Nicolaas G: Putting voters...

Sahlqvist, Shannon; Song, Yena; Bull, Fiona; Adams, Emma; Preston, John; Ogilvie, David

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Conceptos basicos sobre el propano (Propane Basics), Programa de Technologias de Vehiculos (Vehicle Technologies Program - VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Marzo 2010 Marzo 2010 o gasolina. Se pueden convertir vehícu- los para que funcionen con propano o comprarlos directamente de su fabricante como vehículos dedicados. Hay técnicos que pueden instalar sistemas de conver- sión a propano certificados por la Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) de EE. UU. y/o la Junta de Recursos del Aire de California en una variedad de vehículos. Podrá encontrar

203

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 1: Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FC Solicitation Workshop 1 March 2010 FC Solicitation Workshop 1 March 2010 BREAKOUT GROUP 1: CATALYSTS PARTICIPANTS NAME ORGANIZATION Radoslav Atanasoski 3M Plamen Atanassov University of New Mexico Stephen Campbell Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation David Cooke Lamar University Sally Davies Sudchemie Inc. Huyen Dinh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark Edmundson W. L. Gore & Associates Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dave Ghosh National Research Council Institute For Fuel Cell Innovation Mallika Gummalla University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Charles Hays Jet Propulsion Laboratory Kelly Jezierski Next Energy Shyam Kocha National Renewable Energy Laboratory Di-Jia Liu Argonne National Laboratory Karren More Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sanjeev Mukerjee Northeastern University

204

Los linajes de transmision de Nyag bla Padma bdud'dul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tradicin a los que hetenido acceso. Entre los lamas ms reconocidos de la transmisin de Padma bdud dul(tanto en el papel de maestros como de discpulos) hay que destacar mDomkhyen brtse Ye shes rdo rje, Mi gyur nam mkhai rdo rje, rDza dPal sprulRin po... importantes, tanto por la singularidad de estos personajes posesores de un gran carisma en la orden rNying ma pa como por lasenseanzas y consejos que dieron al joven yogui. Mi gyur nam mkha rdo rje (1793-?), cuarta encarnacin de rDzogs chenPadma rig...

Aguillar, Oriol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DEVELOPMENT OF A MUD-PULSE HIGH-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT-WHILE-DRILLING (MWD) SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The overall program objective is to develop a mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool for oil and gas drilling operations that can be used where downhole temperatures are as high as 195 C (383 F). The work was planned to be completed in two phases: Phase I and an optional Phase II. The objectives of Phase I were first to identify critical components of existing MWD systems that can or cannot operate at 195 C. For components not able to meet the higher standard, one of several strategies was pursued: (1) locate high-temperature replacement components, (2) develop new designs that eliminate the unavailable components, or (3) use cooling to keep components at acceptable operating temperatures (under 195 C). New designs and components were then tested under high temperatures in the laboratory. The final goal of Phase I was to assemble two high-temperature MWD prototype tools and test each in at least one low-temperature well to verify total system performance. Phase II was also envisioned as part of this development. Its objective would be to test the two new high-temperature MWD prototype tools in wells being drilled in the United States where the bottom-hole temperatures were 195 C (or the highest temperatures attainable). The high-temperature MWD tool is designed to send directional and formation data to the surface via mud pulses, to aid in the drilling of guided wellbores. The modules that comprise the tool are housed in sealed barrels that protect the electronics from exposure to down-hole fluids and pressures. These pressure barrels are hung inside a non-magnetic collar located above the drilling assembly. A number of significant accomplishments were achieved during the course of the Phase I project, including: (1) Tested two MWD strings for function in an oven at 195 C; (2) Conducted field test of prototype 195 C MWD tool (at well temperatures up to 140-180 C); (3) Tested ELCON hybrid chip with processor, clock, and memory in a custom package for 700 hours at 200 C; (4) Contracted with APS Technology to conduct study of thermoelectric cooling of downhole electronics; (5) Conducted successful Peltier cooling test with APS Technology; (6) Tested and improved the electronics of Sperry Sun's Geiger Muller-based gamma detector for operation at 195 C; (7) Developed two high-temperature magnetometers (one in-house, one with Tensor); and (8) Encouraged outside source to develop lithium/magnesium high-temperature batteries (operating temperature of 125 to 215 C). One of this project's greatest achievements was improvement in Sperry Sun's current tool with changes made as a direct result of work performed under this project. These improvements have resulted in longer life and a more robust MWD tool at the previous temperature rating of 175 C, as well as at higher temperatures. A field test of two prototype 195 C MWD tools was conducted in Lavaca County, Texas. The purpose of this operation was to provide directional services on a sidetrack of a straight hole. The sidetrack was to intersect the formation up-dip above the water/gas interface. In addition, the gamma tool provided formation data including seam tops and thickness. Results from these field tests indicate progress in the development of a 195 C tool. Although the pulsers failed downhole in both tools, failure of the pulsers was determined to be from mechanical rather than electrical causes. Analysis of the economics of the 195 C tool highlights the greatest obstacle to future commercialization. Costs to screen individual components, then subassemblies, and finally completed tools for high-temperature operations are very high. Tests to date also show a relatively short life for high-temperature tools--on the order of 300 hours. These factors mean that the daily cost of the tool will be higher (3 to 5 times more) than a conventional tool.

John H. Cohen; Greg Deskins; William Motion; Jay Martin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pollen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollen Pollen Nature Bulletin No. 80 August 24, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation POLLEN From mid-August until early frost, people are "pollen-conscious" -- particularly those who suffer with hay fever. Millions of flowers are in bloom, including the ragweeds which are heavy producers of pollen. Hay fever is an "allergy" or protein sensitivity to this pollen, carried scores or even hundreds of miles by the wind, which sticks to the thin moist membranes of the eyes, nose, throat and lungs. Most plants, including trees, have flowers. The stamens of a flower are covered with fine yellow grains called pollen. If there is to be fertilization, these grains must be transferred to the pistil in which the seeds are formed. Some plants, such as peas and beans, are self- fertilized but most kinds are cross-fertilized: the pollen being carried from one plant to another by wind or on the bodies of insects attracted to them by the nectar in the flowers. Under a microscope the pollen grains of one species are distinctively different from those of another in size, shape, markings and color.

207

SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

Diaz-Sanchez, David

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Metabolic and genetic regulation in adipose tissue of Angus and Wagyu steers raised to U.S. and Japanese endpoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesized that carcass and fatty acid composition of Angus and Japanese Black (Wagyu) steers would not differ if the steers were fed to a typical U.S. final weight, but that Wagyu steers fed to a typical Japanese endpoint body weight would have greater quality grades and softer fat than Angus steers. Sixteen Angus and 16 Wagyu 8-month-old, weaned steers were assigned to a corn-based diet for 8 or 16 months (n = 4 per breed type and time) or hay-based diet for 12 or 20 months (n = 4 per breed type and time) in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. USDA yield grade was greater at the Japanese endpoint than at the U.S. endpoint in Angus steers (breed x endpoint, P = 0.03). Intramuscular (i.m.) lipid continued to increase to over 20% in the Wagyu steers (P = 0.05), but attained a plateau (14.7%) by 16 months on feed in the Angus steers. These results confirm that Wagyu cattle must be raised to greater physiological maturity before they differ from Angus cattle in M. longissimus thoracis i.m. lipid concentration. Subcutaneous adipose tissue concentrations of oleic (18:1n-9) was greater in Wagyu steers than in Angus steers (P = 0.05). All monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) increased between the U.S. and Japanese endpoint, whereas slip points of lipids in s.c. adipose tissue were 10°C lower in Japanese endpoint steers than in U.S. endpoint steers (P = 0.01). Angus adipose tissue exhibited peak SCD enzyme activity at 16 months (corn-based diet) but activity in Wagyu adipose tissue was greatest at 20 months (hay-based diet) (breed x diet x endpoint, P = 0.08). However, SCD gene expression in Angus adipose tissue was maximal at 12 months (hay diet), whereas Wagyu adipose tissue had peak expression at 16 months (corn diet) (P < 0.03). Trans-10, cis-12 CLA has been reported as a potent inhibitor of adipocyte differentiation. CLA (40 µM) strongly decreased SCD and PPAR? expression in bovine adipocytes, even in the presence of 5 mM arginine. It can be concluded that arginine up-regulates bovine preadipocyte differentiation, and CLA antagonizes this effect.

Chung, Ki Yong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, agribusinesses and policy makers, but an economic model making these projections for Texas did not previously exist. The objective of this study was to develop a model to project annual NFI for producers of major crops in Texas. The Texas crop model was developed to achieve this objective, estimating state prices, yields and production costs as a function of their national counterparts. Five hundred iterations of national price and yield projections from the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), along with FAPRIâ??s average production cost projections, were used as input to the Texas crop model. The stochastic FAPRI Baseline and residuals for Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) equations relating Texas variables to national variables were used to incorporate the risk left unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably and prices rising moderately in the January 2006 Baseline, deterministic projections of 2006-2014 Texas NFI decreased by an average of 26 percent for corn, 3 percent for cotton, 15 percent for peanuts, and 12 percent for rice, and were negative for sorghum and wheat. Probability distributions of projected NFI fell for all program crops, especially sorghum and wheat. Higher hay price projections caused deterministic projections of NFI for hay to rise roughly 13 percent, and increased the probability distributions of projected hay NFI. Deterministic and probabilistic projections of total NFI decreased for each year, especially for 2006-2008 when fuel price projections were the highest. The Texas crop model can be used to simulate NFI for Texas crop producers under alternative FAPRI baselines. The model shows the impact of baseline changes on probability distributions of NFI for each crop and for Texas as a whole. It can also be useful as a policy analysis tool to compare impacts of alternative farm and macroeconomic policies on NFI.

Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

VEE-0084 - In the Matter of Gas'n Shop, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84 - In the Matter of Gas'n Shop, Inc. 84 - In the Matter of Gas'n Shop, Inc. VEE-0084 - In the Matter of Gas'n Shop, Inc. On March 26, 2002, Gas'n Shop, Inc. (Gas'n Shop) of Lincoln, Nebraska filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its application, Gas'n Shop requests that it be excused from filing the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/ Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). For the reasons detailed below, we deny Gas'n Shop's request for exception relief. vee0084.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0082 - In the Matter of Fleischli Oil Company VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co.

211

Microsoft Word - STIP 11732.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

31 31 Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security Robert B. Hayes, PhD, CHP, PE Senior Scientist Remote Sensing Laboratory Las Vegas, NV 89193 hayesrb@nv.doe.gov Keywords: Monte Carlo, Benchmark, Detector, Homeland Security, Testing Executive Summary It is shown in this work that basic measurements made from well defined source detector configurations can be readily converted in to benchmark quality results by which Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks can be validated. Specifically, a recent measurement made in support of national security at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is described with sufficient detail to be submitted to the American Nuclear Society's (ANS) Joint Benchmark Committee (JBC) for consideration as a radiation measurement

212

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

213

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-02_ King_Alternative Chemical Cleaning.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

725 725 EM-31 Alternative and Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Program Bill King, Mike Hay, Bruce Wiersma, Frank Pennebaker SRNL Environmental and Chemical Process Technology November 16, 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Meeting Print Close 2 SRNL-STI-2010-00725 Introduction Numerous SRS tanks scheduled for closure (contract commitments) Cannot remove all sludge by mechanical means due to obstructions Chemical removal technology needed (likely oxalic acid) Post-dissolution neutralization required prior to transfer to compliant tanks Sodium oxalate salts precipitate on neutralization and have negative downstream impacts Currently three SRS chemical cleaning programs Baseline: 8 wt. % OA batch contact (Tanks 5 and 6) ECC: 1-3 wt. % OA with oxalate destruction

214

Ragweeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ragweeds Ragweeds Nature Bulletin No. 160 September 13, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RAGWEEDS Late summer and early autumn is "hay fever time." This is the season dreaded by thousands of people who are allergic to the wind-borne pollen of the ragweeds which is shed then. The ragweeds are more abundant and cover more acres in this region than any other weeds. Of the three kinds in the Chicago area, the two most widespread are the plants growing only from seeds and dying each winter. They thrive abundantly wherever the soil has been disturbed recently. Their seeds can survive for many years in the ground -- waiting only for the soil to be stirred for them to germinate and grow. Most of our troublesome weeds came from the Old World but the ragweeds are native Americans.

215

Midwest Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Address 1330 Canterbury Road Place Hays, Kansas Zip 67601 Product Electricity Natural Gas Number of employees 201-500 Phone number 785-625-3437 Website www.mwenergy.com/elecrate Utility Id 12524 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project was awarded $712,257 Recovery Act

216

Federal Energy Management Program Contacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About the Program » Federal Energy Management Program Contacts About the Program » Federal Energy Management Program Contacts Federal Energy Management Program Contacts October 8, 2013 - 1:32pm Addthis Contact information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is available for: Leadership Staff Information is also available for: FEMP Field Contacts Federal Financing Specialists National Laboratory Liaisons DOE Sustainability Performance Office. Leadership The FEMP leadership team is composed of the following contacts. Dr. Timothy Unruh Director 202-586-5772 Jerry Dion Strategic Program Development 202-586-9470 Daniel Gore Supervisor, Technology Services 202-586-6477 Brad Gustafson Supervisor, Customer Services 202-586-5865 Hayes Jones Supervisor, Operations 202-586-8873 Schuyler (Skye) Schell

217

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l .tU!} u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Geostellar, Inc. PROJECT TITLE: SunShot InItiative" Rooftop Solar Challenge to Induce Markel Transformation Page 1 of2 STATE: WI! Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrtH:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DEFOA0000549 DE-EE0005691 GF()..OOO5691-(I01 81 Based on my review or lhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order45J.lA), I haye made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to internationa l, national, state, and local organizallons. A9 Infannatlon gathering, analysis, and dissemination

218

Gas Natural - CNG y GNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Natural Dispensador de Gas Natural Gas Natural Dispensador de Gas Natural El gas natural, un combustible fósil compuesto básicamente de metano, es uno de los combustibles alternativos menos contaminantes. Puede ser usado como gas natural comprimido (GNC) o como gas natural licuado (GNL) para autos y camiones. Existen vehículos diseñados para funcionar exclusivamente con gas natural. Por otra parte hay vehículos de doble combustible o bi-combustibles que también puede funcionar con gasolina o diesel. Los vehículos de doble combustible permiten que el usuario aproveche la gran disponibilidad de gasolina o diesel, pero use la alternativa menos contaminante y más económica cuando el gas natural esté disponible. Ya que el gas natural es almacenado en depósitos de combustible de alta

219

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

220

BNL | Plant Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sciences Plant Sciences The Plant Sciences group's goal is to understand the principles underlying carbon capture, conversion, and storage in living systems; and develop the capability to model, predict and optimize these processes in plants and microorganisms. Staff Members John Shanklin Jason Candreva Jilian Fan Hui Liu Qin Liu Edward Whittle Xiaohong Yu Dax Fu Jin Chai Chang-Jun Liu Yuanheng Cai Mingyue Gou Guoyin Kai Zhaoyang Wei Huijun Yang Kewei Zhang Xuebin Zhang Jörg Schwender Jordan Hay Inga Hebbelmann Hai Shi Zhijie Sun Changcheng Xu Chengshi Yan Zhiyang Zhai Plant Sciences Contact John Shanklin, (631)344-3414 In the News No stories available Funding Agencies DOE Basic Energy Sciences Bayer CropScience The Biosciences Department is part of the Environment and Life Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

FI L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

112, 112, m k 2 f=oW€=4- FI L 6 5 PREDICTIONS OF SEISMIC MOTION A N D CLOSE-IN EFFECTS RULISON EVENT N T A L R . E S E A R C H C O AUGUST, 1969 R P O R A T I O N DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. NVO 1163-180 PREDICTIONS OF SEISMIC MOTION AND CLOSE-IN EFFECTS' RULISON EVENT B. G. Weetman R. H. Berry R . A. Mueller L. L. Davis J. R . Murphy P. P. decaprariis D. L. Orphal W. W. Hays C. T. Spiker Environmental Research Corporation 813 North Royal Street Alexandria, Virginia Prepared under Contract No. AT(29-2)-1163 for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page . I ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . .

222

Why Sequence Switchgrass?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Switchgrass? Switchgrass? A long-standing mission of the DOE has been to develop alternative sources of energy from biomass, and with good reason President George W. Bush specifically mentioned switchgrass as a promising energy crop in his 2006 State of the Union Address. This native grass has many traits that make it well suited for use as an energy feedstock. Yields of switchgrass are high, averaging 7 tons per acre in unirrigated field trials with some lines yielding up to 10 tons per acre. Production costs are low because of the plant's low nutrient use, minimal pesticide requirements, propagation by seed, and perennial growth habit. Switchgrass can be harvested with conventional haying equipment, and its wide adaptability allows it to be grown productively across a large geographic area, including marginal

223

,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O' P.ear. I have determiaed Volume If, Design sad ProcurePent Ehtoq of Nanford Enginaar works and ClAnton Semi-Works, may be declaseified. Aomrdingly, by my authority, Volume II is declassified effeotive Hay 4, 1964. Volume II h& bean deterdaed to contdn~ Section148 infonzation~ however, olswe lthasnotbeenreviewed

224

1960's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

's 's The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov Award Laureates 1960's Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 1969 Geoffrey F. Chew Don T. Cromer Ely M. Gelbard F. Newton Hays John H. Nuckolls 1968 James R. Arnold E. Richard Cohen Val L. Fitch Richard Latter John B. Storer 1967 Mortimer M. Elkind John M. Googin Allen F. Henry John O. Rasmussen Robert N. Thorn 1966 Harold M. Agnew Ernest C. Anderson Murray Gell-Mann John R. Huizenga

225

2002 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Review of Particle Physics 2 Review of Particle Physics K. Hagiwara et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D66, 010001 (2002) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. PARTICLE DATA GROUP AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2002) K. Hagiwara, 1 K. Hikasa, 4 K. Nakamura, 1 M. Tanabashi, 4 M. Aguilar-Benitez, 5,¶ C. Amsler, 6 R.M. Barnett, 2 P.R. Burchat, 7 C.D. Carone, 8 C. Caso, 9 G. Conforto, 11 O. Dahl, 2 M. Doser, 3 S. Eidelman, 12 J.L. Feng, 13 L. Gibbons, 14 M. Goodman, 15 C. Grab, 16 D.E. Groom, 2 A. Gurtu, 3 K.G. Hayes, 18 J.J. Hernandez-Rey, 19,¶ K. Honscheid, 20 C. Kolda, 21 M.L. Mangano, 3 D.M. Manley, 22 A.V. Manohar, 23

226

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- C I Haynes Inc - RI 02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C I Haynes Inc - RI 02 C I Haynes Inc - RI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: C. I. Haynes, Inc. (RI.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: C.I. Hayes, Incorporated RI.02-1 Location: Cranston , Rhode Island RI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 RI.02-2 RI.02-3 Site Operations: Performed limited scale tests on heat treating uranium in a vacuum cold-wall furnace in 1964 RI.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantities of material handled RI.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium RI.02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to C. I. Haynes, Inc.

227

Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation Title Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Arthur W. H., Gabriel Isaacman, Kevin R. Wilson, David R. Worton, Christopher R. Ruehl, Theodora Nah, Drew R. Gentner, Timothy R. Dallmann, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Robert A. Harley, Jessica B. Gilman, William C. Kuster, Joost A. de Gouw, John H. Offenberg, Tadeusz E. Kleindienst, Ying H. Lin, Caitlin L. Rubitschun, Jason D. Surratt, Patrick L. Hayes, Jose L. Jimenez, and Allen H. Goldstein

228

The Standard Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Los físicos han desarrollado una teoría llamada el Modelo Standard, que intenta describir toda la materia y todas las fuerzas existentes en el universo (excepto la gravedad). Su elegancia radica en la capacidad de justificar la existencia de cientos de partículas e interacciones complejas, sobre la base de sólo unas pocas partículas e interacciones fundamentales. Partículas portadoras de fuerza: Cada tipo de fuerza fundamental es "transportada" por una partícula portadora de fuerza (el fotón es un ejemplo). Partículas materiales: El Modelo Standard establece que la mayoría de las partículas de las cuales tenemos conocimiento están compuestas en realidad de partículas más fundamentales llamadas quarks. Hay otra clase

229

Clean Cities: Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) Coalition Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) Coalition The Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition Contact Information Stacy Neef 512-773-8794 stacy.neef@lonestarcfa.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Stacy Neef Photo of Stacy Neef Stacy Neef has served as the coordinator for Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) (LSCFA) promoting and advancing the use of alternative fuel and vehicles for fleets in central Texas since 2000. The central Texas region includes Bastrop, Caldwell, Hays, Travis, Williamson Counties; Fort Hood and City of Temple, Texas. LSCFA works closely with other Texas Clean

230

¿Qué es el Centro de Datos de Combustibles Alternativos y Vehículos Avanzados? (What Is the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - AFDC?), Programa de Technologias de Vehiculos (Vehicle Technologies Program - VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

May 2010 May 2010 combustible ahorrado por otros usuarios de AFDC. Ubicado en www.afdc.energy.gov, el sitio web recibe millones de visitas por año. Usted tiene preguntas, nosotros tenemos respuestas Admitámoslo. El cambio puede ser difícil, sobre todo cuando se trata de pasar de una tecnología de transporte convencional a otra alternativa. Pero no hay que preocuparse; el AFDC le brinda toda la información que necesita para navegar esta ruta. Cuenta con información para todos. A los recién llega- dos, el AFDC les brinda una introducción a los combustibles alternativos principales y tecnologías de vehículos avanzados. ¿Qué es el biodiesel? ¿Cómo se produce y distri- buye el gas natural? ¿Cuánto combustible se puede ahorrar reduciendo la marcha en

231

VEE-0036 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

36 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. 36 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. VEE-0036 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. On November 26, 1996, Kalamazoo Oil Co. (Kalamazoo), of Kalamazoo, Michigan, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Kalamazoo requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied. vee0036.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. VEE-0085 - In the Matter of Smith Brothers Gas Company

232

Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public Not Available (1988) Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A. Moe; et al. (2002) Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection Daniela Rodica Radu (2005) Tolerance doses for treatment planning Lyman, J.T. (1985) Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security Robert Hayes (2008) Function and dynamics of aptamers: A case study on the malachite green aptamer Wang, Tianjiao (2008) Extremophiles 2004 Frank Robb (2004) Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

233

Protoplast isolation and transient gene expression in switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biotechnology Biotechnology Journal DOI 10.1002/biot.200700189 Biotechnol. J. 2008, 3, 354-359 354 © 2008 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 Introduction Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-sea- son perennial grass that is a major component of the prairies of North America. It is grown in mono- culture for hay, grazing, and erosion control [1]. Also, switchgrass has a high biomass production potential as a feedstock for biofuel production [2, 3]. Genetic manipulation of the growth and devel- opment of switchgrass is needed for better cellu- losic ethanol production, especially to improve cel- lulose-to-lignin ratios. The latest genomic and biotechnology tools can be used for the production of designer plants for this purpose, which is immi- nently feasible. Several genes can make significant

234

Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Vendor's Name Contact/Rep Address Work Phone 615 Music Productions, Inc. Steve Hayes or Laura Palmer 1030 16th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 616-244-6515 Adams, James F. James Adams 1217 Brookshire Dr., Bedford, TX 76021 214-674-6868 Adobe Systems Inc. N/A 2750 Barrett Lakes Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144 800-833-6687 Atlantech Resellers Inc, DBA CablesAndKits.com Craig Haynie 4555 Atwater Ct Ste ! Buford, GA 21075 877-633-2629 Albuquerque Printing Co Albert Padilla 3838 Bogan Ave.NE, Albq. 87109 505-872-2200 AlphaTRAC, Inc. John Ciolek 8670 Wolff Ct Ste 120 Westminster, CO 80031 303-428-5670 Amazon.com CSR

235

UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT By application dated ;!ay 11, 1959, as a~zen:ii:d Hay 25, 1959, the a--T+- I-r-- cant requests that its license SW-33 be amend,ed to authorizt? proced- ures for t>e CCLl-ect conversion of LT6 to '3$ and by applicaticn datzci June 29, 1959, a.3 n:odifizd July 15, 1059, the shipment of uranium rdioxide pellets. Based on our rexiew of the information finished by the applicant, it is hereby determined that the applicant is qualified, by training and experience, to use special nuclear material for the pwpose requested and that the ap@icant's procedures, facilities and equip- ment are adequate to protect health and minimize danger to life and property. It is, therefore, determined that ~NM-33 may be amended to

236

Notice of Availability of the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0355D) (12/3/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

256 256 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 232 / Friday, December 3, 2004 / Notices 877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The changes to the agenda for the December 2004 meeting of the National Advisory Committee, to be held at the Ritz Carlton Hotel at Pentagon City, 1250 South Hayes Street, Arlington, VA, are as follows: (1) On Monday, December 13, and Tuesday, December 14, 2004, the National Advisory Committee is now scheduled to meet from 8 a.m. to approximately 6 p.m. The National Advisory Committee will not meet on Wednesday, December 15, 2004. (2) On Wednesday, December 15, the Accreditation and State Liaison Staff will provide an informational briefing on the new Web-based process for electronic submission of petitions for

237

taubranch-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September September 2013 by K.G. Hayes (Hillsdale College). There are now 42 measurements and 23 upper limits from Belle and BaBar on branching fractions of conventional τ -decay modes, up from 1 measurement and 3 upper limits in the 2006 edition of this Review. Eighteen of these measurements are used in the constrained fit to τ branching fractions, and 22 are for τ -decay modes for which older non-B-factory mea- surements exist. For those 22 measurements, the new B-factory measurements have on average about sixty times the number of events as the most precise earlier measurements, and the statistical uncertainties on the B-factory measurements are on average about eight times smaller. However, the systematic un- certainties now greatly exceed the statistical uncertainties of all B-factory branching fraction measurements of major τ -decay modes. For example, the average ratio of systematic

238

2004 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4) Reviews (2004) Particle Listings 4) Reviews (2004) Particle Listings Authors for the 2004 Review of Particle Physics S. Eidelman et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Lett. B592, 1 (2004) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. PARTICLE DATA GROUP AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2004) S. Eidelman, 1 K.G. Hayes, 2 K.A. Olive, 3 M. Aguilar-Benitez, 4 C. Amsler, 5 D. Asner, 6 K.S. Babu, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 P.R. Burchat, 9 C.D. Carone, 10 C. Caso, 11 G. Conforto, 12,13 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 14 M. Doser, 15 J.L. Feng, 16 T. Gherghetta, 3 L. Gibbons, 17 M. Goodman, 18 C. Grab, 19 D.E. Groom, 8 A. Gurtu, 20,15 K. Hagiwara, 21

239

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 24470 of 28,905 results. 61 - 24470 of 28,905 results. Download 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Livermore Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/2012-annual-workforce-analysis-and-staffing-plan-report-livermore-field-office Article Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween This Halloween, think of turning seasonal waste -- including pumpkins, hay and leaves -- to energy as a very important "trick" that can have a positive environmental impact. http://energy.gov/eere/articles/reducing-waste-and-harvesting-energy-halloween

240

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-12-27155 Revision 0 Evaluation of Computer- Based Procedure System Prototype Johanna Oxstrand Katya Le Blanc Seth Hays September 2012 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween October 30, 2013 - 9:57am Addthis This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department Paul Grabowski Demonstration and Deployment, Bioenergy Technologies Office This Halloween, think of turning seasonal municipal solid waste (MSW) to energy as a very important "trick" that can have a positive environmental impact. Usually, these seasonal items including hay, pumpkins, candy, and leaves, are thrown away and sent to landfills. From there, the MSW decomposes and eventually turns into methane-a harmful

242

Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology October 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis (Arcadia, Florida) - Today, President Obama spoke at the DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center in Arcadia, Florida where he delivered the below remarks: THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, guys. Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you so much. Well, first of all, let me thank Lew Hay and his visionary leadership at Florida Power & Light. It's an example of a company that is doing well by doing good. And I think it's a model for what we could duplicate all across the country. To Greg Bove, who just gave me the tour and was a construction manager for this facility, congratulations. We've got a couple of special guests here:

243

Hot Springs Soaking Pools Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soaking Pools Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Soaking Pools Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs Soaking Pools Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Springs Soaking Pools Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hay-Yo-Kay, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

244

.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION t'age I or L RECIPIENT:Govornor's Energy Office STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: COLORADO SEP ARRA - Commercial Buildings - Denver Housing Authority Funding Opportunity Announc:ement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000082 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOOO82-011 cm Number o Ba~d on my review of the information c:onc:erning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Complianc:e Officer (authorized under OOE Order 4St.IA), t haYe made the (allowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85. 1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

245

2002 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) Reviews (2002) Particle Listings 2) Reviews (2002) Particle Listings Authors for the 2002 Review of Particle Physics K. Hagiwara et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D66, 010001 (2002) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. PARTICLE DATA GROUP AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2002) K. Hagiwara, 1 K. Hikasa, 4 K. Nakamura, 1 M. Tanabashi, 4 M. Aguilar-Benitez, 5,¶ C. Amsler, 6 R.M. Barnett, 2 P.R. Burchat, 7 C.D. Carone, 8 C. Caso, 9 G. Conforto, 11 O. Dahl, 2 M. Doser, 3 S. Eidelman, 12 J.L. Feng, 13 L. Gibbons, 14 M. Goodman, 15 C. Grab, 16 D.E. Groom, 2 A. Gurtu, 3 K.G. Hayes, 18 J.J. Hernandez-Rey, 19,¶ K. Honscheid, 20 C. Kolda, 21 M.L. Mangano, 3

246

PMe'TF::& U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PMe'TF::& PMe'TF::& U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETFRMlNATION RECIPIENT:University of Tennessee Page I of2 STAn:: TN PROJECf TITLE: Demonstration of On-Fann Production of a Dedicated Energy Crop incorporating Multiple Varieties of Switchgrass Seed Funding Opportunity Announcement Number USDA-CSREES-9008-00274 P~uremeDt Instrument Number OE·EEOOO2993 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-10-384 0 Based on my review urthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I haye made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUM BER: Description: 85.1 Actions to con serve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not

247

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 The CommandinS Officer '  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

*>I ' *>I ' { q;' ' y,,",' T 3 ,> 0 ,I- \! - . :. p EPA L ,v " _ ' . \ / UNITED STATES , . .- . t ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 . The CommandinS Officer ' Ltaricn Zngineer Depot Marion, Ohio Dear Sir: Subject: REPORT CF F2GIATICN ' SUEiVZY radiation Transmitted herewith, in duplicate, is a report of the su,rveg made at your Znstallation April 17, 1947 by Messrs. Russell Hayes and Ellery Storm of the Rochester Project, United States Atomic Energy Commission. ~~~ j/p z, i,' 3 P. 0. Box 288, Station .L3 Rochester 7,'NewYork ' . Y ' May 22, 1947 ' i 4$ 4I#74f/ w/ \' - . ' . _ I In line 6th paragraph 2'of recommendations, yo& instal- lattion may continue to request film badges and for%ard'themto this office for monitoring.

248

It's Time to ACT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

It's Time to ACT It's Time to ACT It's Time to ACT May 25, 2011 - 10:32am Addthis John Lippert In my November 29, 2010 and my February 15, 2011 blog postings, I described some tools and strategies based on behavioral psychology that some companies and organizations are using to encourage people to use less energy and purchase clean energy. Here's another one. I was reading an article the other day in which University of Nevada, Reno, psychologist Steven Hayes gave his explanation of why we Americans are so reluctant to adjust our thermostats. He believes our culture has conditioned us to avoid all discomfort. In other words, we believe that we should feel good all the time. The funny thing is that I heard multiple times essentially the same message at religious services I attended. The common thread in these messages and

249

It's Time to ACT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

It's Time to ACT It's Time to ACT It's Time to ACT May 25, 2011 - 10:32am Addthis John Lippert In my November 29, 2010 and my February 15, 2011 blog postings, I described some tools and strategies based on behavioral psychology that some companies and organizations are using to encourage people to use less energy and purchase clean energy. Here's another one. I was reading an article the other day in which University of Nevada, Reno, psychologist Steven Hayes gave his explanation of why we Americans are so reluctant to adjust our thermostats. He believes our culture has conditioned us to avoid all discomfort. In other words, we believe that we should feel good all the time. The funny thing is that I heard multiple times essentially the same message at religious services I attended. The common thread in these messages and

250

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-003688: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mid-Atlantic Regional Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/02/2010 Location(s): Hayes, Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2, 2010 CX-003661: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas - City - Allen CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/02/2010 Location(s): Allen, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 2, 2010 CX-003657: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Carolina - City - Charleston CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/02/2010 Location(s): Charleston, South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 2, 2010 CX-003902: Categorical Exclusion Determination

251

Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomonospora viridis (Schuurmans et al. 1956) Nonomurea and Ohara 1971 is the type species of the genus Saccharomonospora which belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae. S. viridis is of interest because it is a Gram-negative organism classified amongst the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Members of the species are frequently found in hot compost and hay, and its spores can cause farmer?s lung disease, bagassosis, and humidifier fever. Strains of the species S. viridis have been found to metabolize the xenobiotic pentachlorophenol (PCP). The strain described in this study has been isolated from peat-bog in Ireland. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, and the 4,308,349 bp long single replicon genome with its 3906 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides1, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Simplified clear sky model for direct and diffuse insolation on horizontal surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed comparison was made between five simple broadband models for clear sky global insolation. Compared models were those of Atwater and Ball, Davies and Hay, Watt, Hoyt, and Lacis and Hansen. A sixth simple model, called the Bird model, has been formulated by using parts of these five models and by comparison with the results from three rigorous radiative transfer codes. All of the simple models provide results that agree within < 10% with the three rigorous codes when the sun is in the zenith position. The Bird and Hoyt models agree within 3% with each other and with the results of the rigorous codes. However, the Bird model is easier to implement and has broader application than the Hoyt model.

Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

GLOVEBOX WINDOWS, FIRE PROTECTION AND VOICES FROM THE PAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Study the past--what is past is prologue'. These words appear as the motto on a pair of statues at the National Archives Building in Washington DC. They are also the opening sentence in the preface of a document written in August of 1956 entitled 'A Summary of Accidents and Incidents Involving Radiation in Atomic Energy Activities--June 1945 thru December 1955'. This document, one of several written by D.F. Hayes of the Safety and Fire Protection Branch, Division of Organization and Personnel, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in Washington DC, and many others are often forgotten even though they contain valuable glovebox fire protection lessons for us today.

Till, W

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ensiling wet distillers grains with other feeds. SDSU Extension Extra 4029  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last century, livestock producers have relied heavily on highly valued crops to feed their cattle. Corn grain and silage, alfalfa hay and silage as well as other highly productive crops have been used extensively. Changes in oil prices have sparked interest into renewable energy alternatives. Ethanol production from corn has gained popularity in the Midwest resulting in increased availability of corn distillers grains. Corn distillers grains are an excellent feed for ruminants. They can usually be purchased as wet (40-70 % moisture) or dry. They supply approximately 10 % more energy than corn grain, and approximately 30 % protein, 10 % fat and 1 % phosphorus. These are highly priced nutrients and thus desirable in a feed, although they might pose a challenge when formulating diets. When distillers grains

A. D. Garcia; K. F. Kalscheur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

257

VEE-0030 - In the Matter of Lee Oil Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 - In the Matter of Lee Oil Company 30 - In the Matter of Lee Oil Company VEE-0030 - In the Matter of Lee Oil Company On July 19, 1996, Lee Oil Company (Lee), located in Greensboro, North Carolina, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Lee requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be granted. vee0030.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. VEE-0017 - In the Matter of Visa Petroleum, Inc. VEE-0021 - In the Matter of Jacobs Oil Company

258

Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Energy Inc. Midwest Energy Inc. Country United States Headquarters Location Hays, Kansas Recovery Act Funding $712,257.00 Total Project Value $1,424,514.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 38.8791783°, -99.3267702° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

259

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Charlotte North Carolina Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project New Orleans Louisiana ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project Holyoke Massachusetts Connecticut Maine New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Hays Kansas Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Carmel Indiana Iowa Illinois Michigan Minnesota Missouri Montana North Dakota Ohio Pennsylvania South Dakota Wisconsin New York Independent System Operator Inc Smart Grid Project New York

260

Sensors and Measurements Discussion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements for Assessment of Measurements for Assessment of Hydrate Related Geohazards" Report Type: Topical No: 41330R07 Starting March 2002 Ending September 2004 Edited by: R.L. Kleinberg and Emrys Jones September 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-01NT41330 Submitting Organization: ChevronTexaco Energy Technology Company 2811 Hayes Road Houston, TX 77082 ii DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

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261

VEE-0056 - In the Matter of Stacey Oil Co. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 - In the Matter of Stacey Oil Co. 56 - In the Matter of Stacey Oil Co. VEE-0056 - In the Matter of Stacey Oil Co. On April 2, 1999, Stacey Oil Co. (Stacey), of Whitefish, Montana, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Stacey requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA- 782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be granted for a temporary period. vee0056.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0026 - In the Matter of R.W. Hays Co. VEE-0036 - In the Matter of Kalamazoo Oil Co. VEE-0059 - In the Matter of XXXX

262

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

Adhikari, Bijaya K. [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada); Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)], E-mail: suzelle.barrington@mcgill.ca; Martinez, Jose [Cemagref, Rennes Regional Centre, 7 avenue du Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); King, Susan [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Effects of Maternal Nutrition Manipulation on Mares and Their Foals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research documented the fetus is sensitive to nutrition of the dam, but this has not been thoroughly investigated in horses. Objectives of the current studies were to determine effect of manipulation of maternal nutrition during the last third of pregnancy on mare performance, intake, hormones, foaling parameters, colostrum, and foal passive transfer of immunity and growth, and effects of supplemental arginine. Plane of nutrition influenced mare performance, and DMI was influenced by time with the first trial finding all mares consumed less in the 10th month of pregnancy compared to the 11th month, and the second trial finding all mares consumed less during the 11th month. Additionally, the second study determined arginine supplementation has no detrimental effects on DMI. Both studies indicated the dual marker system was sufficient at estimating DMI. Neither trial found an influence of treatment on foaling parameters or physical measurements obtained following parturition, and the second study determined arginine supplementation also did not affect foaling or measurements. The first study determined maternal nutrition did not affect foal growth or ADG. When colostrum quality was evaluated, the first study determined mares consuming only hay had increased specific gravity and Brix% indicating higher quality. This was confirmed by IgG analysis finding a tendency for increased IgG concentration. However, colostrum volume was not affected by nutrition, nor was total g IgG. The second study found contrasting results with greater specific gravity in mares on a high plane of nutrition, and a tendency for moderate plane of nutrition mares to have greater volume. Additionally, the second study determined that arginine supplementation does not influence colostrum volume or quality (measured by specific gravity or Brix %). In the first trial, maternal diets affected glucose and insulin AUC in mares, which altered insulin dynamics in the resulting foals. Foal insulin AUC and peak insulin concentration were greater in foals from mares supplemented with concentrate compared to foals from mares fed hay alone. These studies have provided a wealth of information to help elucidate the impact of maternal nutrition in late gestation on mares and their foals.

Winsco, Kelly N

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Four Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cuatro Interacciones Cuatro Interacciones Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO! El universo que conocemos y amamos existe debido a que las partículas fundamentales interactúan, ya sea porque decaen o se aniquilan, o bien porque responden a una fuerza debida a la presencia de otra partícula (por ejemplo, durante una colisión). Hay cuatro interacciones entre partículas: Fuerte, débil, gravitatoria, electromagnética Para aclarar las cosas, damos a continuación dos definiciones: Fuerza: El efecto que aparece sobre una partícula debido a la presencia de otra partícula. Interacción: Las fuerzas y los decaimientos que afectan a una partícula dada. Una Interacción no es lo mismo que una fuerza dado que a la palabra "interacción" se le asigna un significado más amplio. A pesar que los dos

266

2004 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Review of Particle Physics 4 Review of Particle Physics S. Eidelman et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Lett. B592, 1 (2004) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. PARTICLE DATA GROUP AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2004) S. Eidelman, 1 K.G. Hayes, 2 K.A. Olive, 3 M. Aguilar-Benitez, 4 C. Amsler, 5 D. Asner, 6 K.S. Babu, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 P.R. Burchat, 9 C.D. Carone, 10 C. Caso, 11 G. Conforto, 12,13 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 14 M. Doser, 15 J.L. Feng, 16 T. Gherghetta, 3 L. Gibbons, 17 M. Goodman, 18 C. Grab, 19 D.E. Groom, 8 A. Gurtu, 20,15 K. Hagiwara, 21 J.J. Hernandez-Rey, 22,¶ K. Hikasa, 23 K. Honscheid, 24 H. Jawahery, 25 C. Kolda, 26

267

Passive sampling and analyses of common dissolved fixed gases in groundwater  

SciTech Connect

An in situ passive sampler and gas chromatographic protocol for analysis of the major and several minor fixed gases in groundwater was developed. A gas-tight syringe, mated to a short length of silicone tubing, was equilibrated with dissolved gases in groundwater by immersing in monitoring wells and was used to transport and to inject a 0.5 mL gas sample into a gas chromatograph. Using Ar carrier gas, a HaySep DB porous polymer phase, and sequential thermal conductivity and reductive gas detectors allowed good sensitivity for He, Ne, H2, N2, O2, CO, CH4, CO2, and N2O. Within 4 days of immersion in groundwater, samplers initially filled with either He or air attained the same and constant gas composition at an Oak Ridge, Tennessee, site heavily impacted by uranium, acidity, and nitrate. Between June 2006 and July 2007, 12 permanent groundwater wells were used to test the passive samplers in groundwater contaminated by a group of four closed radioactive wastewater seepage ponds; over a thousand passive gas samples from these wells averaged 56% CO2, 32.4% N2, 2.5% O2, 2.5% N2O, 0.20% CH4, 0.096% H2, and 0.023% CO with an average recovery of 95 14% of the injected gas volume.

Spalding, Brian Patrick [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ethanol Production and Gasoline Prices: A Spurious Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethanol made from corn comprises 10 % of US gasoline, up from 3 % in 2003. This dramatic increase was spurred by recent policy initiatives such as the Renewable Fuel Standard and state-level blend mandates, and supported by direct subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit. Some proponents of ethanol have argued that ethanol production greatly lowers gasoline prices, with one industry group claiming it reduced gasoline prices by 89 cents in 2010 and $1.09 in 2011. The estimates have been cited in numerous speeches by Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack. These estimates are based on a series of papers by Xiaodong Du and Dermot Hayes. We show that these results are driven by implausible economic assumptions and spurious statistical correlations. To support this last point, we use the same statistical models and find that ethanol production decreases natural gas prices, but increases unemployment in both the US and Europe. We even show that ethanol production increases the ages of our children.

Christopher R. Knittel; Aaron Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Spurious Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethanol made from corn comprises 10 % of US gasoline, up from 3 % in 2003. This dramatic increase was spurred by recent policy initiatives such as the Renewable Fuel Standard and state-level blend mandates, and supported by direct subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit. Some proponents of ethanol have argued that ethanol production greatly lowers gasoline prices, with one industry group claiming it reduced gasoline prices by 89 cents in 2010 and $1.09 in 2011. The estimates have been cited in numerous speeches by Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack. These estimates are based on a series of papers by Xiaodong Du and Dermot Hayes. We show that these results are driven by implausible economic assumptions and spurious statistical correlations. To support this last point, we use the same statistical models and find that ethanol production decreases natural gas prices, but increases unemployment in both the US and Europe. We even show that ethanol production increases the ages of our children.

Christopher R. Knittel; Aaron Smith; Christopher R. Knittel; Aaron Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Tecnologías de Eficiencia Energética  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Eficiencia Energética de Eficiencia Energética ¡Hay nuevas tecnologías de eficiencia energética disponibles ahora! Muchos de los vehículos actualmente en exhibición en los concesionarios presumen de tecnologías para mejorar el rendimiento, y para el ahorro de combustible, que puede ahorrarle dinero. Tecnologías del Motor Tecnologías de la Transmisión Todos Tecnologías del Motor Incremento Promedio de Eficiencia El Tiempo de apertura y Levantamiento de Válvulas Variable (VVT&L) mejora la eficiencia de motor optimizando el flujo de combustible y aire en el motor para varias velocidades. 5% La Desactivación de los Cilindros ahorra combustible mediante la desactivación de estos cuando no estáán en uso. 7.5% Los turbocargadores y los supercargadores aumentan el poder de motor, permitiendo a fabricantes reducir el tamaño de motores sin sacrificar el funcionamiento del auto; o aumentar su funcionamiento sin bajar la economía de combustible. 7.5%

271

Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Fire Nature Bulletin No. 51 Febraury 1, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE Most people firmly believe the ancient notion that the prairies and vacant lots should be burnt off "to make better grass." Many are doing so now. Boys who have seen their parents and neighbors kindling fires on vacant property frequently do likewise on the prairies. Recently there have been four fires in the forest preserves which spread from adjoining land. Burning does more harm than good. True, it gets rid of the old weed stalks and dried grass of last year, so that new grass shows green more quickly. But repeated burnings kill the good, nutritious grasses such as bluegrass, timothy and clover. The wildflowers disappear. All food and nesting cover for birds, rabbits and other wildlife is destroyed, just when they need it most. Thistles thrive. Only tough grasses of little value for pasture or hay, such as crabgrass and quackgrass, and the weeds survive.

272

taubranch_s035215-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April April 2012 by K.G. Hayes (Hillsdale College). Since the previous edition of this Review, there have been 7 published papers that have contributed to the τ Listings: 4 by the BaBar collaboration and 3 by the Belle collaboration. Four of these papers have provided new upper limits on the branching fractions for neutrinoless τ -decay modes. Of the 59 neutrinoless τ -decay modes in the τ Listings, 17 have had improved limits set. The upper limits have been reduced by factors that range between 1.3 and 43 with the median reduction being a factor of 1.5. There are now 30 measurements and 13 upper limits from Belle and BaBar on branching fractions of conventional τ -decay modes, up from 1 measurement and 3 upper limits in the 2006 edition of this Review. Sixteen of these measurements are used in the constrained fit to τ branching fractions, and 20 are for τ -decay modes for which older non-B-factory

273

Reseña de gas natural, Programa de Tecnologías de Vehículos, Marzo 2010 (Natural Gas Basics, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), March 2010) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Marzo 2010 Marzo 2010 El gas natural comprimido se almacena dentro del vehículo en tanques seguros y resistentes a la punción. ¿Qué es el gas natural? El gas natural es una mezcla gaseosa inodo- ra y no tóxica de hidrocarburos, compuesta predominantemente por metano (CH 4 ). Como es un gas, hay que almacenarlo en el vehículo ya sea como gas comprimido o en estado líquido. El gas natural comprimido (GNC) se almacena en general en un tanque a una presión de 3,000 a 3,600 libras por pulgada cuadrada. El gas natural líquido (GNL) está superenfriado y se almacena en fase líquida a -260° F en tanques con aisla- miento especial. El gas natural se vende en galones equivalentes de gasolina o diesel de acuerdo al contenido energético de un galón

274

Beyond the Standard Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allá del Modelo Standard allá del Modelo Standard Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! El modelo standard explica muchas de las preguntas acerca de la estructura y la estabilidad de la materia, con sus seis tipos de quarks, sus seis tipos de leptones, y sus cuatro fuerzas fundamentales. Sin embargo, el modelo standard es una teoría incompleta porque todavía no puede explicar la naturaleza del mundo en forma completa. ¿Por qué hay tres generaciones de quarks y leptones? ¿Los quarks y leptones son realmente fundamentales, o están constituidos a su vez por partículas aún más fundamentales? ¿Por qué no puede el modelo standard predecir la masa de una partícula? De acuerdo con nuestros experimentos, las cantidades de materia y antimateria en el universo deberían ser iguales; pero, ¿por qué hemos

275

2006 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Review of Particle Physics 6 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006) W.-M. Yao, 1 C. Amsler, 2 D. Asner, 3 R.M. Barnett, 1 J. Beringer, 1 P.R. Burchat, 4 C.D. Carone, 5 C. Caso, 6 O. Dahl, 1 G. D'Ambrosio, 7 A. DeGouvea, 8 M. Doser, 9 S. Eidelman, 10 J.L. Feng, 11 T. Gherghetta, 12 M. Goodman, 13 C. Grab, 14 D.E. Groom, 1 A. Gurtu, 15,9 K. Hagiwara, 16 K.G. Hayes, 17 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 18,¶ K. Hikasa, 19 H. Jawahery, 20 C. Kolda, 21 Y. Kwon, 22 M.L. Mangano, 9 A.V. Manohar, 23

276

JOHN DAVIS: Acura steers their crossover fortunes onto a new road with the coupe-like ZDX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas - Metro Buses Natural Gas - Metro Buses 1 JOHN DAVIS: Tratándose de reducir emisiones de vehículos y no depender del petróleo extranjero, el gas natural comprimido sirve como fuente de energía doméstica y limpia, pero el GNC tuvo que luchar para ganar espacio en el mercado privado de autos de pasajeros. JOHN DAVIS: Por otra parte, el combustible limpio ha ganado terreno en flotillas municipales. Ciudades grandes y pequeñas están cambiando a GNC, y están probando que para muchas flotillas, el gas natural es la solución natural. JOHN DAVIS: Comparado con las casi 190 mil gasolineras en EE.UU., hay menos de mil estaciones de GNC y no todas están abiertas al público. Así que a excepción de recargar en casa, el GNC aún no es una opción para la mayoría de conductores en

277

Eta-c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

encanto / antiencanto encanto / antiencanto Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! El quark charm (encanto) y el antiquark charm, de un mesón (eta-c), se aniquilan entre sí, produciendo un pión ( ) y dos kaones. Cuadro 1: Un quark charm y un antiquark charm se dirigen uno hacia el otro.... Cuadro 2: ...aniquilación... Cuadro 3: ...en gluones virtuales. Cuadro 4: Un quark extraño (strange) y un antiquark extraño emergen de la nube de gluones. Cuadro 5: A medida que los quarks se alejan uno del otro, se desarrolla entre ellos un campo de fuerza de color. Cuadro 6: La energía del campo aumenta a medida que los quarks se separan más y más, hasta que hay la suficiente energía en el campo de fuerza para generar un quark up y un antiquark up. Cuadro 7: Los quarks up y antiextraño comienzan a separarse.

278

Hidrógeno  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hidrógeno Vehículo de Célula de Combustible con la capote abierta Hidrógeno Vehículo de Célula de Combustible con la capote abierta El hidrógeno (H2) se está explorando agresivamente como un combustible para vehículos de pasajeros. Se puede usar en células de combustible para hacer funcionar vehículos eléctricos, o puede ser quemado por motores de combustión interna (ICEs). Es un combustible ecológico que tiene el potencial de reducir dramáticamente nuestra dependencia en el petróleo extranjero, pero hay grandes obstáculos que sobrepasar antes de poder ser usado extensivamente. Beneficios Se produce en el país. El hidrógeno se puede producir en el país de varias fuentes, reduciendo así nuestra dependencia en el petróleo extranjero. Es más ecológico. El hidrógeno no produce contaminantes de aire o gases

279

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TX Eng Exp.Sta./Xtreme Power sub TX Eng Exp.Sta./Xtreme Power sub OE DE-OE0000038 EDTD 2010-2011 Darshan L. Goswami 11/01/2009 - 10/31/2011 City of Kyle, Hays County, Texas Colonias for Microgrids (TX) OE 14.09 Purpose of this project is to fully develop prototype renewable based micro-grid power systems for communities (colonias) in the US/Mexico border region to supply electric service to dwellings. 09 07 2010 Darshan L. Goswami Digitally signed by Darshan L. Goswami DN: cn=Darshan L. Goswami, o=NETL, Dept. of Energy, ou=PMC, email=darshan.goswami@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I am the author of this document Date: 2010.09.07 11:15:33 -04'00' 10 18 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.10.18 11:16:54 -04'00'

280

Edenspace Systems Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edenspace Systems Corporation Edenspace Systems Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Edenspace Systems Corporation Name Edenspace Systems Corporation Address 1500 Hayes Drive, Suite 1500 Place Manhattan, Kansas Zip 66502 Sector Biofuels Product Feedstock technology Year founded 1998 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 785 587 8200 Website http://www.edenspace.com/ Coordinates 39.1938429°, -96.5551891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1938429,"lon":-96.5551891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lavaca calhoun hays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sod Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Houses Houses Nature Bulletin No. 620 December 3, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SOD HOUSES In the 1860's and 70's, when pioneer settlers came to homestead free land on the vast lonely prairies of Kansas and Nebraska, they found a country that, except for fringes of cottonwoods and willows along the streams, was treeless. There was no rock and mighty little timber for building houses and barns. Lumber was very expensive and scarce. So was money. However, the prairies were thickly covered with short, drought- enduring buffalo and blue grama grasses. Some of the Indian tribes which not only hunted buffalo but also grew corn -- notably the Pawnee, Osage and Hidatsa -- had large earthlodges. They used sod in the walls and the conical or dome-like roofs had pole rafters covered with willow brush, slough hay, sod, and finally clay. So the homesteaders were inspired to build their homes with slabs of the remarkably thick and tough prairie sod: "Nebraska marble".

282

AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U N D E R G R O U N  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U N D E R G R O U N D NUCLEAR .DETONATIONS -9.\c January through December 1996 by the Monitoring Applications Laboratory National Enviscnmental Research Center LT . S . EFTtPlgRO%RIENFA& PROTECTIQN AGENCY LPS Vegas, Nevada -"& -% ~d*.".::. Published Hay 1975 This work p e r f o w e d under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539) for the U. S. ENERGY RESEARCH B D E V E L O P M E X T ABMINISTRATIQN d ~ P v . a - r . . . - . -.. . . . . * . "+ . - : I - : : - ... 1-11.; ~ ~ ~ % ~ ! ~ $ ' ; : L : ; ~ : ~ ~ ~ ~ . . T h i s r e p o r t was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by t h e United S t a t e s Government. N e i t h e r t h e United S t a t e s nor t h e United S t a t e s Energy Research and Development A d m i n i s t r a t i o n , n o r any of t h e i r employees, nor any of t h e i r c o n

283

Yield and quality of forages grown on mine spoil  

SciTech Connect

Pasture or hayland is a potential use for much of the reclaimed mined land in Kentucky. To determine the usefulness of several species for forage production, two study areas were established, one in the eastern coal fields, the second in the western coal fields. Eight species were seeded in eight different mixtures at each location. Each plot was harvested twice each year to determine yield, and samples were analyzed to determine percent protein, DMD, and sugar. Analysis of variance of the data show that there are significant differences in yield, stand, percent protein and percent DMD among the different species. There is also a significant difference in the yield of the same species between the two study areas. In eastern Kentucky, two mixtures, switchgrass-Interstate sericea lespedeza and Caucasian bluestem-Appalow sericea lespedeza yielded more hay than tall fescue-Interstate sericea, the standard of comparison. In western Kentucky, all seeding mixtures yielded more than the tall fescue Interstate mixture. There is no difference in stand among the species in eastern Kentucky. In western Kentucky, Caucasian bluestem, tall fescue, and switchgrass have better stands than other species.

Kuenstler, W.F.; Henry, D.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Organic Geochemical and tectonic evolution of the Midcontinent Rift system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The older assemblages stand in contrast with the ca. 1000 Ma old Hunting Formation, Arctic Canada, which contains what may be the oldest evidence for modem algae - red algal fossils that compare closely with members of the extant family Bangiophyceae (Butterfield et al., 1990). Taken together the Nonesuch, Shaler, Hunting and other assemblages support the hypothesis of a major episode of eukaryotic diversification ca. 1000 Ma ago. Prior to this time, eukaryotic primary producers must have been physiologically primitive (and now extinct) algae whose abundance in ecosystems is poorly constrained by analogies with the present oceans. Cyanobacteria were major primary producers in a wide range of marine environments. After 1000 Ma, diversifying red green and chromophyte algae contributed significantly to primary production in all save microbial mat communities in restricted environments. It bears mention that such mat communities remained significant potential sources of buried organic matter until the end of the Proterozoic, necessitating exploration strategies that differ from those commonly employed for younger rocks (Knoll, in press). As in Phanerozoic basins, petroleum exploration in Proterozoic rocks requires tools for stratigraphic correlation. In Neoproterozoic (<1000 Ma) rocks, biostratigraphy is possible, and it is aided significantly by C and Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy. New data from the Shaler Group contribute to the construction of C and Sr isotopic curves for Neoproterozoic time, making possible much improved chronostratigraphy for this time interval. (Asmerom et al., 1991; Hayes et al., ms. in preparation).

Hayes, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Knoll, A.H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Organic Geochemical and tectonic evolution of the Midcontinent Rift system  

SciTech Connect

The older assemblages stand in contrast with the ca. 1000 Ma old Hunting Formation, Arctic Canada, which contains what may be the oldest evidence for modem algae - red algal fossils that compare closely with members of the extant family Bangiophyceae (Butterfield et al., 1990). Taken together the Nonesuch, Shaler, Hunting and other assemblages support the hypothesis of a major episode of eukaryotic diversification ca. 1000 Ma ago. Prior to this time, eukaryotic primary producers must have been physiologically primitive (and now extinct) algae whose abundance in ecosystems is poorly constrained by analogies with the present oceans. Cyanobacteria were major primary producers in a wide range of marine environments. After 1000 Ma, diversifying red green and chromophyte algae contributed significantly to primary production in all save microbial mat communities in restricted environments. It bears mention that such mat communities remained significant potential sources of buried organic matter until the end of the Proterozoic, necessitating exploration strategies that differ from those commonly employed for younger rocks (Knoll, in press). As in Phanerozoic basins, petroleum exploration in Proterozoic rocks requires tools for stratigraphic correlation. In Neoproterozoic (<1000 Ma) rocks, biostratigraphy is possible, and it is aided significantly by C and Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy. New data from the Shaler Group contribute to the construction of C and Sr isotopic curves for Neoproterozoic time, making possible much improved chronostratigraphy for this time interval. (Asmerom et al., 1991; Hayes et al., ms. in preparation).

Hayes, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Knoll, A.H. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 km recorded over 250 mm. The convection began in a weakly forced environment well ahead of a cold front that was forecast to trigger the storms. The Penn State University/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) was used to diagnose the extent and magnitude of upward motion, the convective potential of the environment, and the causes of the upward motion that contributed to the convective initiation. A rainfall analysis constructed from all available observations and radar estimates was used for a quantitative comparision with the MM5-simulated rainfall. The MM5's success in simulating many aspects of the rainfall suggested that the atmospheric processes that brought about this heavy rain event were also present in the model simulation. Using a 48-km model grid, upward motion was found to be more than sufficient to cause deep convection in the conditionally unstable atmosphere of south Texas. The cause of the upward motion was attributed to differential warm advection focused by a low-level jet centered over the region where convection began.

Scott, Richard Kevin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Benchmark studies of the Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) reactive scattering code: Implications for accurate quantum calculations  

SciTech Connect

The Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM), developed by Hayes and Walker, is a simple approximation to the true multidimensional scattering problem for reaction of the type: A + BC {yields} AB + C. While the BCRLM method is simpler than methods designed to obtain accurate three dimensional quantum scattering results, this turns out to be a major advantage in terms of our benchmarking studies. The computer code used to obtain BCRLM scattering results is written for the most part in standard FORTRAN and has been reported to several scalar, vector, and parallel architecture computers including the IBM 3090-600J, the Cray XMP and YMP, the Ardent Titan, IBM RISC System/6000, Convex C-1 and the MIPS 2000. Benchmark results will be reported for each of these machines with an emphasis on comparing the scalar, vector, and parallel performance for the standard code with minimum modifications. Detailed analysis of the mapping of the BCRLM approach onto both shared and distributed memory parallel architecture machines indicates the importance of introducing several key changes in the basic strategy and algorithums used to calculate scattering results. This analysis of the BCRLM approach provides some insights into optimal strategies for mapping three dimensional quantum scattering methods, such as the Parker-Pack method, onto shared or distributed memory parallel computers.

Hayes, E.F.; Darakjian, Z. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Walker, R.B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Uc-400 Uc-721  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

submitted for the 21st Annual Actinide Separations Conference, Charleston, SC, June 23-26,1997. Rao, L., Y. Xia, B.M. Rapko, and P.L. Martin. "Synergistic Extraction of Eu(III) and Am(III) by TTA and the Neutral Donor Extractants CMPO and NOPOPO." Abstract submitted for the 21st Annual Actinide Separations Conference, Charleston, SC, June 23-26, 1997. Zanonato, P.L., and L. Rao. "Complexation of Eu(III) by N, N,N',N'-tetraalkyldiamides." Abstract submitted for the 214th ACS National Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, September 7-11, 1997. Clement, O., G. Sandrone, D.A. Dixon, and B.P. Hay. "A MM3(96) Force Field for MetalAmide Complexes." Abstract submitted for the 214th ACS National Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, September 7-11, 1997. Rapko, B.M., G.J. Lumetta, B.K. McNamara, L. Rao, and P.L. Zanonato. "Determination of Actinide and Lanthanide Binding Constants with Amides and Diamides." Abstract submitted for the Tenth Symposium on Separation Science and Technology for Energy Applications, October 20...

June Prepared For

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biological conversion of biomass to methane. Final report, June 1, 1976-January 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental methane fermentation system was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the processng requirements and conversion efficiencies associated with production of methane from various organic feed stocks. The fermentation reactors had an operating volume 0.775 m/sup 3/. This permitted operation with an approximate continuous feed of milled organics including beef feedlot manure, corn stover, wheat straw and alfalfa hay. A thermochemical pretreatment was applied to the corn stover and wheat straw in order to increase the biodegradability of these substrates. Working with these large units provided sufficient volumes of fermented slurry for evaluation of the dewatering properties of these slurries. Kinetic data were obtained by operating four reactors at different retention times. These data were used to calculate a first order rate constant and the percent of substrate volatile solids that were biodegradable. These data were obtained on beef feed lot manure at 40/sup 0/C and 60/sup 0/C nominal fermentation temperatures. Data from the fermentation of corn stover showed that the biodegradability of the stover volatile solids was only 36 percent at the thermophilic fermentation temperature. The first order rate constant was found to be 0.25 day/sup -1/. Thermochemical pretreatment increased the biodegradability of stover volatile solids to 71 percent. The final substrate tested was a green crop that was field dried - alfalfa. Significant foaming problems were encountered with this material. The volatile solids were found to be 74 percent biodegradable at a fermentation temperature of 60/sup 0/C. (MHR)

Pfeffer, J T

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields  

SciTech Connect

Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wide Web) Fusion Education Project Home Page: http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datos complementarios, información reciente y material educativo en Internet (World Datos complementarios, información reciente y material educativo en Internet (World Wide Web) Fusion Education Project Home Page: http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html CPEP Home Page: http://pdg.lbl.gov/cpep.html CPEP Product Information: http://pdg.lbl.gov/cpep/cpep_how_to_order.html CIEMAT Homepage: http://www-fusion.ciemat.es/ TEC-Homepages FZJ/IPP Juelich: http://www.fz-juelich.de/ipp/ ERM-KMS Brussels: http://fusion.rma.ac.be/ FOM Rijnhuizen: http://www.rijnh.nl/ Estas páginas enlazan con diferentes instituciones y organismos activos en el campo de la fusión controlada. Las reacciones de fusión son las que liberan la energía que alimenta el Sol y las estrellas. Para producir esta energía hay que confinar plasmas de muy alta tem- peratura durante un tiempo lo suficientemente largo.

293

1471-2105-10-S11-S3 1..15  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BMC BMC Bioinformatics Proceedings Comparative genome analysis of lignin biosynthesis gene families across the plant kingdom Zhanyou Xu †1,2 , Dandan Zhang †3 , Jun Hu †1,2,3 , Xin Zhou 2 , Xia Ye 3 , Kristen L Reichel 4 , Nathan R Stewart 3 , Ryan D Syrenne 1 , Xiaohan Yang 5 , Peng Gao 1,2 , Weibing Shi 1,2 , Crissa Doeppke 4 , Robert W Sykes 4 , Jason N Burris 3 , Joseph J Bozell 6 , (Max) Zong-Ming Cheng 3 , Douglas G Hayes 6 , Nicole Labbe 6 , Mark Davis 4 , C Neal Stewart Jr 3 and Joshua S Yuan* 1,2 Address: 1 Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA, 2 Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA, 3 Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, 4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, USA, 5 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA and 6 Department

294

Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native grass species to much of the US. It has shown great potential for use in production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass (Lynd et al., 1991). Work in Alabama demonstrated very high dry matter yields can be achieved with switchgrass (Maposse et al. 1995) in the southeastern US. Therefore, this region is thought to be an excellent choice for development of a switchgrass cropping system where farmers can produce the grass for either biomass or forage. Another report has shown success with selection and breeding to develop high yielding germplasm from adapted cultivars and ecotypes of switchgrass (Moser and Vogel 1995). In the mid 1990s, however, there was little plant breeding effort for switchgrass with a potential for developing a cultivar for the southeast region. The main goal of the project was to develop adaptive, high-yielding switchgrass cultivars for use in cropping systems for bioenergy production in the southeastern US. A secondary objective was to assess the potential of alternate herbaceous species such as bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge.), and napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) that may compete with switchgrass for herbaceous bioenergy production in the southeast. During the conduct of the project, another goal of developing molecular markers useful for genetic mapping was added. The ''lowland'' cultivars, Alamo and Kanlow, were found to be the highest yielding switchgrass cultivars. Although most summers during the project period were hot and dry, their annual dry matter yield continue to outperform the best ''upland'' cultivars such as Cave-in-Rock, Shawnee, NE Late, and Trailblazer. The use of a breeding procedure based on the ''honeycomb design'' and multi-location progeny testing, coupled with the solid heritability and genetic gain estimates for dry matter yield in lowland type switchgrass germplasm, indicated excellent potential to isolate parental genotypes for producing higher yielding synthetic cultivars. The four experimental synthetics produced thus far, and now in performance tests, could provide this cultivar. Initial performance results of these experimentals have been very promising demonstrating a 30% yield enhancement over Alamo and Kanlow. Future testing, including testing in other states, will be critical before a determination can be made to release one or more of these into the commercial seed trade. In the genetic mapping project, 42 genotypes of switchgrass were surveyed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes from different grass species. The different genotypes included 24 from Alamo, 15 from Kanlow, and 3 from ''Summer.'' A majority of the probes (87%) hybridized to the switchgrass DNA and 81% were polymorphic. Most of the polymorphism observed was between the cultivars. A mapping population consisting of 100 progeny from a cross between the most dissimilar Kanlow and Summer genotypes was produced during 2001. The parents and progeny population are now maintained at the University of Georgia and will be used to construct a map based on the polymorphic RFLP probes. When compared to ''Tifton 85'' bermudagrass, ''Tifton 9'' bahiagrass, and ''Merkron'' napier-grass, Alamo switchgrass was found to show poorer yields than Merkron and Tifton 85, but better yields than Tifton 9 in the coastal plain region. The exceptional performance of Tifton 85 bermudagrass is extremely noteworthy because this hybrid bermudagrass is also a variety of choice for many commercial hay producers in the lower south and would give any producers a very good option to produce either biomass for a biofuels initiative or sell as hay on the open market. Merkron has consistently showed the highest dry matter yields. However, there continues to be some winter damage each year on this species at the Athens location indicating its real potential lies mainly in the Gulf Coast region of the southeastern United States. The excellent characteristic of Tifton 85 and Merkron should therefore be enough to initi

Bouton, J.H.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

297

Digestion of protein in the equine small and large intestines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four mature pony geldings weighing an average of 134 kg and fitted with ileal cannulas were used in two 4X4 Latin square experiments to determine the digestibility of forage and soybean meal protein in different segments of the equine digestive tract. Chromic oxide was fed in both trials to measure ileal flow and fecal excretion. Digestion and absorption of nitrogen was determined from changes in nitrogen:chromium ratios, and true digestion of nitrogen was computed by regression analyses. In trial 1, four diets containing varying ratios of chopped bermudagrass and alfalfa hays were fed. True total tract nitrogen digestibility was 89.6%. True digestibility of forage nitrogen in the small intestine was 40.5% in this trial, while true postileal digestibility was 78.1%. These data indicate that almost 90% of forage protein was digested over the total digestive tract. Approximately 45% of the digestible forage nitrogen was digested prececally with the remaining nitrogen being digested postileally. Thus, when ponies were fed all forage diets the lower tract was a major site for protein digestion. In trial 2, a basal, corn-based diet and three diets with soybean meal as the primary source of protein were formulated to contain approximately 5%, 9.5%, 14% and 16.5% crude protein as fed. True total tract digestion of nitrogen was 95.3%. True digestibility of feed (SBM) nitrogen in the small intestine over the range of linearity was 72.2%, while true digestibility of nitrogen reaching the large intestine was 89.8%. These data indicate that the protein in soybean meal was almost completely digested in the equine digestive tract. Further, while results from this trial indicate there may be an upper limit to the quantity of SBM nitrogen digested in the small intestine from a meal, approximately 75% of the digestible SBM protein was digested prececally when nitrogen intake was less than approximately 125 mg/kg body weight/feeding.

Farley, Eleanor Baker

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Recolonization of surface-mined lands by pocket gophers (Geomys breviceps) in East Texas Post Oak Savannah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface mining involves the use of heavy equipment that would theoretically create underground vibrations sensed by pocket gophers. To determine if vibrations cause pocket gopher movement away from areas being mined, gopher movements were monitored in a hay field adjacent to an active mine pit on Big Brown Mine in Freestone County, Texas. Gophers were live-trapped in summer 2000 prior to mining activity, injected subcutaneously with a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag, and released. Coordinates of each capture location were recorded. After mining began and spoil piles were established adjacent to the field, re-trapping was conducted. Upon capture each pocket gopher was scanned for a PIT tag and newly caught animals were tagged. Location coordinates were recorded to determine movement between capture sites. Of the 58 gophers captured and tagged, 9 individuals were recaptured. Pocket gophers did not appear to move away from mining activity, so they might have been adversely affected. However, the number of individuals in the population remained constant during the study, indicating there was no population effect. During January and February 2001, all remaining non-mined and reclaimed lands within the mine were surveyed for pocket gopher activity (mounds). Activity was found on non-mined land adjacent to reclaimed land but no activity was found on reclaimed land. Pocket gopher populations did not reestablish on reclaimed lands because of the removal of sandy soils and subsequent replacement with hard, loamy soils. If pocket gophers are desired on reclaimed lands, then it would be important to retain areas of topsoil containing at least 80% sand.

Gutierrez, Paula B

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets, contaminated equipment, decontamination materials, etc.).

Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geothermal source potential and utilization for methane generation and alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating a geothermally heated anaerobic digester with a fuel alcohol plant and cattle feedlot. Thin stillage produced from the alcohol production process and manure collected from the cattle feedlot would be digested in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, and residue. The energy requirements to maintain proper digester temperatures would be provided by geothermal water. The biogas produced in the digesters would be burned in a boiler to produce low-pressure steam which would be used in the alcohol production process. The alcohol plant would be sized so that the distiller's grains byproduct resulting from the alcohol production would be adequate to supply the daily cattle feed requirements. A portion of the digester residue would substitute for alfalfa hay in the cattle feedlot ration. The major design criterion for the integrated facilty was the production of adequate distiller's grain to supply the daily requirements of 1700 head of cattle. It was determined that, for a ration of 7 pounds of distiller's grain per head per day, a 1 million gpy alcohol facility would be required. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared for the proposed project, operating costs were calculated for a facility based on a corn feedstock, the economic feasibility of the proposed project was examined by calculating its simple payback, and an analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity of the project's economic viability to variations in feedstock costs and alcohol and distiller's grain prices.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this investigation was to initiate the restoration process of a facsimile prairie. Specific objectives were to evaluate the effects of time, topography/soil, seeding rate, mulch treatments and soil compaction on-the establishment phase of the restoration in a split-split-split plot experimental design. Three 24mx3Om replicate plots were established on summit, backslope and footslope positions. Each plot was subdivided into four treatment subplots which were planted with locally collected seed at rates of .3, .6, and .9 kg/ha pure live seed (PLS) (based on Sorghastrum avenaceum PLS). The fourth subplot was a control. One-half of each subplot was mulched with mechanically shredded seed hay. Subplots were further split into areas of soil compaction created by the wheel traffic of planting equipment. Across time, native perennial grass densities decreased and cover increased, while native annual forb density increased as canopy dominance decreased. Native perennial grass establishment was best within the summit and poorest within the footslope positions. Higher levels of soil compaction were deleterious to establishment of native perennial species, especially within the first growing season. Sorghastrum avneaceum plants successfully established under mulch-only applications, while other native perennial grasses had greater cover on mulched than on unmulched plots. Annual forb densities were less on mulched plots. Further, interactions with topographic positions and soil compaction often modified or nullified other treatment effects. For example, S. avenaceum densities for mulch treatments on compacted soils were not different than unmulched plots, regardless of compaction.

Eidson, James Arthur

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Barriers to water marketing: opinions of major pumpers on water marketing issues in the Edwards Aquifer region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater use is a contentious issue in the Edwards Aquifer region of Texas. Many environmentalists are advocating groundwater law reform, much to the chagrin of property rights advocates. Establishment of tighter controls in the Edwards Aquifer region, which is imminent at this time, will have significant impacts on agriculture as well as municipalities and downstream users in the region.,.,This study provides us with a rare opportunity to study a changing resource management regime at an early phase. The spectrum of stakeholders in this issue is quite broad. Stakeholders may fit into any of the following categories: agricultural, municipal, recreational, and environmental interests. Despite the benefits of quantifying water rights and promoting water transfers to reallocate water more efficiently, there are certain externalities caused by this. Water transfers may cause "third-party impacts," or impacts on other individuals or interests not directly involved in the transaction. The purpose of the study was to identify the value placed on water in the Edwards Aquifer region, assess the extent of concern for third-party impacts in the region, and investigate whether or not these concerns might be a barrier to water marketing. These research questions were answered through the use of a telephone survey of major irrigators, municipal pumpers and industrial pumpers in Bexar, Comal and Hays counties. Results showed that there were not significantly different opinions on water marketing in general. Irrigators are more willing to sell water rights than municipalities or industries, and they are willing to supply relatively large amounts of water. Irrigators indicated a preference for transfers to other agricultural users. However, more than one-quarter of irrigators are against water marketing in general, and would not sell to anyone. Respondents indicated that markets should be free with regard to pricing, but some oversight should be instituted to protect third-party interests. Top water use priorities were sin-similar to those in the Texas Water Code.

Phillips, Laura Maureen

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alfalfa leaf meal in wintering beef cow diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hundred dry pregnant cows (1389 lb) and twenty-four pregnant heifers (1034 lb) were assigned by calving date and body condition to one of four dietary treatments for a wintering period during their late gestation. Dietary treatments consisted of supplementing crude protein (CP) at 100 % or 120 % of the recommended intake using either soybean meal or alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) as the supplemental protein source. Cows were group fed (two replicate pens/treatment) while heifers were individually fed for the duration of the study. The study lasted 70 (early) or 85 (late) days for cows and ended when the first cow in each replicate calved. For heifers, the study lasted for 100 days and ended accordingly when each heifer calved. Heifers fed ALM had consumed less (P < .05) hay and corn dry matter (DM). Overall diet DM intakes were unaffected (P > .05) by protein source. Feeding 120 % of recommended protein (2.38 vs 2.07 lb/day) to heifers increased (P < .05) their rate of gain by almost .5 lb/head/day. Cows fed ALM had faster (P < .05) rates of gain when gain was measured 22 days before calving. Once cows calved, weight change was similar (P > .05) for each protein source. However, cows fed alfalfa leaf meal consumed more (P = .054) total dry matter (DM). Calving traits were not affected by protein source or intake. Wintering heifers or cows on ALM-based supplements had no detrimental effect on performance of heifers or cows or their calves at birth. Additional protein may be required by heifers to ensure that they continue gaining weight during late gestation.

Zehnder, C.M.; Hall, J.M.; Brown, D.B.; DiCostanzo, A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Plasma concentration of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in horses following an oral dose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to study absorption of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and to measure any changes in blood concentration of these compounds following feeding them to horses in different amounts. Six mature mares were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square designed experiment. The experiment consisted of three 15-day periods, which included 10 days of diet adaptation followed by a 5-day sampling period. Blood was drawn on one day during each sampling period. Horses were fed a control diet (40% hay, 60% concentrate) balanced to meet NRC (1989) requirements for maintenance of mature horses. In one experimental diet, 2.0 g chondroitin sulfate and 5.5 g glucosamine were added to the basal ration at each feeding. In the other experimental diet, 3.5 g chondroitin sulfate and 8.5 g glucosamine were added to the basal ration at each feeding. Following total collections, blood was centrifuged and plasma was harvested and data analyzed for the presence of each compound. Analyses for plasma glucosamine were performed in the Protein and Chemistry Lab at Texas A&M University using HPLC. Chondroitin sulfate in the plasma was analyzed using a color reagent, dimethylmethylene blue, followed by UV spectrophotometry. There were no significant differences (Pplasma when comparing the three different diets. This leads to a conclusion that these compounds were not absorbed through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream in the same form as they were fed. This poses a question as to whether or not oral forms of these compounds are absorbed and are able to migrate to joints through the blood to improve joint function. With the significant economic impact that products containing chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine are making in the animal nutrition industry, more research is needed to further elucidate actual efficacy of these compounds in diet supplements for horses.

Welch, Courtney Ann

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energys tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

WJ Apley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The use of Texel, Dorper, Suffolk, and Rambouillet rams in terminal crossbreeding programs on fine wool type sheep to improve growth rate and carcass composition of offspring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crossbreeding study to compare the use of Texel, Dorper, Suffolk and Rambouillet rams as terminal sires on fine wool type sheep was conducted at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Two-hundred fifty-five multiparous Rambouillet ewes were randomly divided into four breeding groups and mated to rams representing the test breeds. Ewes were maintained on native grass pastures and supplemented with concentrate or dry hay, when forage sources were deemed insufficient to meet ewes' dietary requirements according to NRC (1985) for gestating and lactating ewes. Ewes lambed and were maintained on pasture through weaning. Data collected and analyzed included birth weights, lamb vigor scores and death loss prior to weaning. Lambs were weaned at average age of 90d, weaning weights were taken and adjusted for age, sex, and type of birth/rearing. Seventy-eight lambs, 20 from each of the Rambouillet, Suffolk, Texel and 18 from the Dorper subgroups, were placed in the feedlot portion of this study. Lambs were fed ad libitum for 78d. Refusals were weighed back weekly and feed conversions calculated. After a 12hr shrink, final weights were obtained, post weaning average daily gain calculated, and lambs were slaughtered. Hot carcass weights were obtained and dressing percentages calculated. Cold carcass weights, loin eye area (LEA), 12[] rib fat thickness, leg circumferences and carcass lengths were measured. Leg conformation scores were assigned to each carcass after a 48h chill. Texel-sired lambs had a higher mean (P.10). Texel- and Suffolk-sired lambs had higher mean final weights (P.10) among breeds. Dorper-sired lambs had the lowest final weights, lightest hot carcass weights and shortest carcass lengths (P<.01).

Taylor, Todd Allen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Microbial properties of mine spoil materials in the initial stages of soil development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early years of soil genesis during mine spoil reclamation are critical for vegetative establishment and may help predict reclamation success. Mine spoils in the Halle-Leipzig region of Germany were analyzed for microbial changes following a hay mulch-seeding treatment without topsoil or fertilizer application. Microbial biomass carbon (C{sub mic}) and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of spoils were measured each year in the first 3 yr after treatment. In the third year, bacterial community DNA fingerprints were compared with those from a reference soil. Microbial indicators were measured at three depths in the upper 10 cm of spoils at three sites with contrasting parent materials: glacial till (sandy loam), limnic tertiary sediments (high-lignite sandy clay loam), and quaternary sand and gravel (loamy sand). Before reclamation, C{sub mic} means and standard deviations of surface spoils (0-1 cm) were 9{+-}6, 39{+-}11, and 38{+-}16 mg kg{sup -1} for the loamy sand, high-lignite sandy clay loam, and sandy loam spoils, respectively. Within one year, mean C{sub mic} at the surface increased to 148{+-}70, 229{+-}64, and 497{+-}167 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively, and was significantly higher at 0 to 1 cm than at lower depths. Highest DHA and DNA yields were obtained in the 0- to 1-cm depth of the sandy loam spoils. Microbial biomass C values exhibited significant correlations with DHA, DNA yield, and extractable C for all three mine spoils. Soil microbial indices were more responsive than plant measurements to differences in parent materials.

Machulla, G.; Bruns, M.A.; Scow, K.M. [University of Halle Wittenberg, Halle Saale (Germany). Inst. for Soil Science

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of composted dairy manure on soil chemical properties and forage yield and nutritive value of coastal Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research was conducted to compare the effects of composted dairy manure and raw dairy manure alone, or in combination with supplemental inorganic fertilizer, on soil chemical properties and Coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] yield and nutritive value. Composted dairy manure was surface applied at rates of 14 (125 kg N ha-1), 29 (250 kg N ha-1) and 57 (500 kg N ha-1) Mg dry matter (DM) ha-1, and raw dairy manure was surface applied at a rate of 54 (420 kg N ha-1) Mg DM ha-1 to established bermudagrass. Selected compost and manure plots received supplemental inorganic N at rates of 56, 84 and 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 or 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 of supplemental N with supplemental inorganic phosphorus or potassium at rates of 112 kg P2O5 ha-1 yr-1 and 112 kg K2O ha-1 cutting-1, respectively. Composted dairy manure (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or raw manure alone increased cumulative forage yields compared to the untreated check in both years of the study, but were less than those obtained using only inorganic fertilizer. Application of 56 kg N ha-1 cutting-1 or more of supplemental N to compost (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or iv manure produced forage yields that were equal to or greater than those obtained using inorganic fertilizer alone. However, increasing compost rate did not increase tissue N concentrations regardless of supplemental inorganic N rate. Yield and tissue K concentrations were increased in the second growing season when supplemental inorganic K was applied to 29 Mg ha-1 of compost or 54 Mg ha-1 of raw dairy manure. No yield response was observed when supplemental inorganic P was applied to compost or manure. Soil pH and concentrations of NH4, NO3, K, Ca, Mg and Mn were increased by application of compost or manure. Soil P concentrations in the 0 to 5-cm zone exceeded 200 mg kg-1 when compost was applied at the high rate. Dairy manure compost was an effective nutrient source for bermudagrass hay production, but will require the use of supplemental N and, in some cases, K to achieve yields comparable to inorganic fertilizer.

Helton, Thomas J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Multispecies Diffusion Capability For The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code (LANL Milestone M31MS060301 Final Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses only diffusion. The contact solver in AMP was not sufficiently developed this year to attempt treatment of species contact. A cylindrical tensor diffusion coefficient model was added to the AMP code, with the KHHS model [1] implemented into the AMP material library as a specific example. A cylindrical tensor diffusion operator manufactured solution verification example was coded. Before meeting the full text of the milestone task, it remains to: (1) code and run a cylindrical tensor diffusion solver manufactured solution (2) code and run the validation example of [1] (3) document results. These are dependent on developing new capabilities for the AMP code requiring close collaboration with the AMP team at ORNL. The model implemented provides a good intermediate first step toward a general multi-species solver. The multi-species capability of the AMP nuclear fuel code [2] is intended to allow the modeling of radiation-driven redistribution of various elements through solid metal nuclear reactor fuels. The initial model AMP provides for U-Pu-Zr fuels is based on the analysis of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel development program experiment X419 post-irradiation data described in [1], referred to here as the KHHS model. This model may be specific to that experiment, but it was thought to provide a good start for the AMP code, because it (1) is formulated at the engineering scale, (2) decouples the species from each other, (3) predetermines the phase boundaries so that reference to a phase diagram is not needed, and (4) one of the authors (Hayes) was the NEAMS Fuels IPSC manager for FY11. The KHHS model is formulated for radial fluxes as little axial redistribution is seen experimentally. As U-Pu-Zr fuel is irradiated, the constituents migrate to form three annular regions. The center region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted, the middle region is Zr-depleted and U-enriched, and the outer region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted. The Pu concentration stays roughly constant throughout with slight enrichment in the center and depletion near the surface. Pu acts as a solvent for the mixture. The experiment was only run to 1.9% burnup, so the model is not at this time applicable to the high-burnup scenarios that the AMP code is intended to eventually model.

Dilts, Gary A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluation of auxinic herbicides for broadleaf weed control, tolerance of forage bermudagrass hybrids [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], and absorption and translocation in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These studies were conducted on several central Texas agricultural producers?? properties, the Stiles Farm Foundation, the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Texas A&M University campus. First, an experimental herbicide from Dow AgroSciences, GF-884, was evaluated for effectiveness in controlling three annual and three perennial weed species in production pasture lands and hay meadows. Several rates of GF-884 were examined and evaluated against three registered pasture products and one non-selective herbicide. Next, GF-884 was assessed for tolerance on two common bermudagrass hybrids (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) at three progressive rates with and without adjuvant. Finally, the herbicides, picloram and fluroxypyr, were applied to common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) to characterize their individual absorption and translocation and assess any influence one might have on the other. GF-884 applied at rates of 0.91 and 1.14 kg a.e./ha provided >85% and >75% control of the annual and perennial weed species evaluated, respectively. These same rates of GF-884 consistently provided control that was equivalent or better than thatachieved with the registered products. No differences were observed among treatments when shoots from the perennial species were evaluated 12 months following treatment application. The tolerance experiments utilized GF-884 at rates twice that used to evaluate weed control efficacy. These elevated rates did not result in discernable influences on yield or forage quality for either hybrid forage grass when compared to untreated areas. The efficacy and tolerance observations suggest that GF-884 applied at the highest recommended weed control rate can effectively control several annual and perennial weed species without imparting detrimental effects to the hybrid bermudagrass being produced. Finally, in the presence of fluroxypyr, 14C picloram absorption was maintained throughout all sampling intervals. Picloram applied alone, maximized 14C absorption at 6 HAT then declined significantly. At the final sampling, 14C from picloram applied alone was in greater concentration in the treated leaf and the root. Picloram significantly decreased absorption of 14C fluroxypyr. Fluroxypyr alone maintained 14C absorption throughout all samplings, whereas the combination maximized at 12 HAT. Initially, picloram limited 14C translocation, however at 6, 12, and 24 HAT this was not evident.

Moore, Frederick Thomas

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ASSESSING THE UNCERTAINTY IN TANK 18-F WALL SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tank 18-F in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has had measurements taken from its inner vertical sides in order to determine the level of radionuclide and other analyte concentrations attached to the tank walls. In all, three samples have been obtained by drilling shallow holes into the carbon steel walls and consolidating the material. An Upper Wall Sample (Sample ID: Tk 18-1) was formed by combining two drill samples taken at a height of 17 ft above the tank floor, and a Lower Wall Sample (Sample ID: SPD4) was formed by combining two drill samples taken between 10 and 12 ft above the tank floor. A Scale Sample (Sample ID: Tk 18-2) was formed by combining 5 drill samples obtained between 6 and 7 ft above the tank floor. Photographs of the sampled material and a more detailed description of the samples and the concentration results are presented by Hay and others [2009]. The objective of this report is to determine a method and use it to place an upper confidence bound on the concentrations in the wall samples using only the currently available sample information. None of the three wall locations (tank heights) has been measured more than once. For radionuclides, only the variation among the concentrations per unit mass (g) of the wall samples, ignoring locations, or the variation among the concentrations of the floor samples are possibilities for establishing an upper confidence bound. The wall samples and floor samples were examined for comparability by (a) observing whether the wall sample concentrations fell inside the footprints created by prediction intervals for floor sample radionuclide concentrations and (b) whether the variation among the wall samples was approximately the same as the variation among floor samples. Most of the radionuclide concentrations satisfied (a) but the variation among radionuclide concentrations (b) was smaller for the floor samples. Consequently, upper 95% confidence bounds were established separately for radionuclide concentrations at each of the sampled tank heights using the conservatively estimated variation among the wall samples. A final step to convert concentrations by unit mass (g) to concentrations by sq ft was performed for the Upper Wall Sample and the Lower Wall Sample regions of the tank wall. The Upper Wall Sample and the Lower Wall Sample were not measured for elemental constituents. Consequently, the only possibility for establishing an upper bound for nonradionuclide concentrations for the Scale Sample was using the concentrations from floor samples. However, most non-radionuclide wall concentrations failed to fall within the footprint generated prediction intervals based on the non-radionuclide concentrations for the floor samples. The report concludes that there is no way to establish upper confidence bounds for elemental constituents attached to the inner liner of Tank 18-F based on currently available data.

Shine, G.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Particle Data Group - 2009 Authors  

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08 Edition and 2009 Web Update 08 Edition and 2009 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) New authors of 2009 Web Update D. de Florian, 109 G. Dissertori, 31 D. Edwards, 27 S. Golwala, 108 M. Heffner, 45 B. Heltsley, 62 J. Holder, 34 A. Karle, 7 J. Lys, 8 G. Salam, 112 K. Scholberg, 111 M. Syphers, 15 A. Vogt, 110 W. Walkowiak, 113 C. Walter, 111 E. Weinberg, 90 L. Wiencke, 114 Authors of the 2008 Review of Particle Physics C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) (Also see: PDF format) AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

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Particle Data Group - Authors  

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8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8